Oregon Public Charter School Proposal

V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Academy of the Arts and Sciences

Submitted to: Medford School District 549c Original: September 4, 2012 Revised: December 5, 2012 Revised: January 10, 2013

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. XXI. Identification of the Applicant ……………………………………………… Declaration of Intent ……………………………………………………….. Name of proposed Public Charter School …………………………………. Executive Summary ………………………………………………………... Description of the Philosophy and Mission of the Public Charter School…. Similarities and Differences with Medford School District ……………….. The Legal Address, Facilities and Physical Location of Public Charter School Target Population ………………………………………………………….. Projected Enrollment Including the Ages or Grades to be Served ………... Date the Charter School Would Begin Operating …………………………. Statutes and Rules that Shall Apply to the Public Charter School ………… Distinctive Learning and Teaching Techniques …………………………… Description of the Curriculum of the Public Charter School ………………. Curriculum Expectations …………………………………………………… Staff Development Plan ……………………………………………………. Descriptions of Proposed Student Learning Assessment Tools to be Used .. Grading Practices – Documentation of Student Performance ……………... Reporting Student Progress to Parents (Report Cards) ……………………. Admission Policy ………………………………………………………….. Enrollment Documents ……………………………………………………. The Proposed School Calendar …………………………………………… 5 6 7 7 8 13 17 18 18 19 19 21 24 32 33 43 46 47 47 48 49

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XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV. XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII. XXIX. XXX. XXXI. XXXII. XXXIII. XXXIV. XXXV. XXXVI. XXXVII. XXXVIII. XXXIX. XL. XLI. XLII. XLIII. XLIV.

Description of the Typical School Day …………………………………… Proposed School Staff and Qualifications ………………………………… Governance Structure ……………………………………………………… Relationship Between V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School and its Employees Student Handbook – Code of Conduct ……………………………………. Response to Intervention (RTI) …………………………………………… Special Education …………………………………………………………. Section 504 ……………………………………………………………….. Talented and Gifted ………………………………………………………. English Language Learners ………………………………………………. Counseling ……………………………………………………………….. Community Involvement ………………………………………………… Proposed Budget …………………………………………………………. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Financial Policies and Procedures ……. Annual Program Review ………………………………………………… Student Nutrition Program ………………………………………………. Transportation of Students ………………………………………………. Information Technology and Support …………………………………… Description of Average Student Daily Membership Calculation ………... Required School Reports to the Medford School District ………………. The Term of the Charter ………………………………………………… Performance Bonding, Buildings and Liabilities ……………………….. Plan in Case of Charter Termination or Non-Renewal ………………….

51 51 57 64 64 65 68 70 70 70 71 72 73 80 84 84 85 85 87 87 88 88 89

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XLV. XLVI. XLVII.

Proposal, Approval and Review of Charter Application ……………….. Bibliography ……………………………………………………………. Appendix ………………………………………………………………..

90 91 98

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IDENTIFICATION OF APPLICANT

Founding Kids Unlimited Board of Directors Members
Chuck Martinez, Board Chair Commercial Land Development Vancouver, Washington 541-944-4550 Stephanie Johnson, Board Secretary Retired School Administrator Ashland, Oregon 541-482-1398 Dave Carroll Federal Law Enforcement/S.O. Region Medford, Oregon 541-210-1033 Andy Batzer Engineer, Batzer Construction Medford, Oregon 541-773-7553 Jeri Olson Retired Nurse Medford, Oregon 541-601-1750 Pat Huycke, Board Vice Chair Lawyer Medford, Oregon 541-261-1472 Rick Hutchins, Board Past Chair Fund Development/Financial Advisor Medford, Oregon 541-608-4366 Greg Jones Real Estate Advisor Medford, Oregon 541-944-6291

Jessica Gomez Rogue Valley Micro Devices Medford, Oregon 541-774-1900 Pedro Cabrera Higher Education Instructor, RCC Medford, Oregon 541-773-4523

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II. Signed Declaration
August 29, 2012 If given Conditional or Unconditional Approval, we promise to provide to the Medford School District Liaison, at least 60 days before the intended date to begin operation of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, proof that it will be able to secure, at least thirty days before the intended date to begin operation of the public charter school, a suitable facility, occupancy and safety permits and insurance policies with minimum coverage required by the Medford School District in Medford School Board Policy and Administrative Regulation LBE that sets forth the requirements and process for the Medford School Board in reviewing, evaluating and approving a public charter school. If V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School fails to provide proof of an ability to secure a facility and all necessary occupancy and safety permits and insurance that are required by the Medford School District as a condition of approval by the due date, we will withdraw our application to begin operation of a public charter school for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. By signing this document, I affirm that I am authorized to make the promises stated above on behalf of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. I understand that failure to fulfill the conditions listed in Medford School Board Policy LBE will result in an approval becoming void, and will automatically revoke any type of approval that the Medford School Board previously granted to the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School applicant.

Printed Name (Signed on Original Proposal Submission) _____________________________________ Chuck Martinez, Board Chair Kids Unlimited of Oregon (Dated on Original Proposal Submission) ___________________________ Date

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III. Name of Proposed Public Charter School V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School: Academy of the Arts and Sciences
(V.I.B.E.S.: Vitality in Being Educated Socially)

IV. Executive Summary
The V.I.B.E.S. (Vitality in Becoming Educated Socially) Public Charter School: Academy of the Arts and Sciences will be a kindergarten through eighth grade program that fully implements the Success For All school reform model which has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Best Practice. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be relentless in ensuring that all students are reading at grade level and use research-based practices that integrate the applied arts, science and technology for a comprehensive learning experience. The mission of VIBES Public Charter School is to provide a high quality education in a positive learning environment that embraces diversity, builds on the strengths of its students and works to accelerate the learning of students who have traditionally come to school two to three years behind in vocabulary and literacy skills. The school will engage students in learning activities that are grounded in the Common Core State Standards and aligned with research supported best practices in teaching and learning. Through authentic community partnerships and individualized student “Personal Success Plans”, all students will become successful learners through mastering a rigorous, standards-based curriculum that will prepare them for success in high school. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will seek out student enrollment from all ethnicities, income levels and areas of residence to create a “melting pot” of diversity within the classroom. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School seeks to create a global perspective on learning through the development of internet-based relationships with students attending international schools around the world. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will have the technology for students to engage in comprehensive, project-based learning activities that require the internet (cloud computing) for research, inquiry, simulations, project file maintenance and reporting productions. The goal is that students reciprocate the learning, thereby strengthening their own learning skills, by interacting with youth who are not within physical reach but are easily accessible by technology. Contact Person for the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is: Tom Cole 821 North Riverside Medford, Oregon 97501 Phone Numbers: 541-774-3900 (office)

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V. Description of the Philosophy and Mission of the Public Charter School
The need is great for school reform. It has been documented that there is a growing skills gap within the Jackson County community. The skills businesses are seeking in today’s workplace are outpacing the skills of Oregon’s workforce. Even with an overall labor surplus, many employers report that they are unable to find the skilled workers they need. Labor shortages and skill gaps in some industries and occupations threaten Oregon’s economic recovery. ( Oregon Workforce Investment Board Oregon At Work: Oregon’s Workforce Development Strategic Plan 2012 – 2022 http://www.worksourceoregon.org/strategic-plan-2012-2022). Oregon's educational goal for year 2025: 100-percent of Oregonians will earn a high school diploma or its equivalent; 40-percent will earn a post-secondary credential; and 40-percent will obtain a bachelor's degree or higher.

The goal is track a series of shared indicators
Readiness Healthy and ready for Kindergarten Achievement Supported and successful in school Graduate from high school -college and career-ready Attainment Earn a college degree or career credential and career ready

Examples of possible reporting measures: • % children meeting kindergarten readiness standards • % children accessing comprehensive medical and dental care • % eligible children enrolled in evidencebased early learning programs • % students proficient in 3rd • % students • % students who grade reading graduating high earn a postschool meeting secondary • % students proficient in 4th proposed Oregon credential by age 26 grade math State graduation th • % students who • % 9 graders who pass requirements enroll in end of course algebra • % students postsecondary exam graduating with education • % students motivated and Dual Credit /9 • % students who engaged to succeed in hours college persist year to year school credit • % parents who believe a college degree is important • Reduced % high school graduates and actively support their who take child’s education developmental education courses in college • Healthy Family indicators Workforce Readiness Indicators (TBD)
Adapted from Road Map for Education Results www.ccedresults.org

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YOUTH SUCCESS NETWORK’S REGIONAL INITIATIVE Kids Unlimited of Oregon leadership is part of the Jackson and Josephine Counties “Youth Success Network” and its Regional Initiative is to successfully address and implement Oregon's Educational goal which not only states that 100-percent of Oregonians will earn a high school diploma or its equivalent; 40-percent will earn a post-secondary credential, but that 40-percent will obtain a bachelor's degree or higher. The visual below, although created by the “Youth Success Network”, also represents the foundation for Kids Unlimited’s work in building a Charter School design that is innovative, grounded in research and best practices in the use of time and resources – including extensive collaborative interactions within the community, region, nation and world.

Collective Impact for Healthy & Successful Youth Ages 0-24
12

Aim ed at gettingdram atic im provem ents in student achievem ent – cradle throughcollege/career in Jackson & JosephineCounties

Horizontal Image Area

Healthy and ready for Kindergarten

Supported and successful in school

Graduate from high school college & career ready

Earn a college degree or career credential & career ready

Thriving Families  Thriving Communities  Thriving Businesses & Economy
Adapted from Road Map for Education Results www.ccedresults.org

National Center on Time and Learning
Every child in America deserves an education that prepares each for success in college, careers and a rich, fulfilling life. Unfortunately, the antiquated school calendar and scheduling system is too limiting to provide students with the breadth and depth of educational experiences needed to thrive. However schools that have broken from the bounds of the conventional calendar and
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schedule offer promising alternatives to the status quo. The National Center on Time and Learning has documented the practices of high-performing, high-poverty schools that have expanded time in order to: Raise achievement • Feature longer classes that allow teachers to cover more material and examine topics in greater depth; build-in more project-based and hands-on learning; individualize and differentiate instruction; and answer students’ questions. • Set aside whole periods each day to focus on small-group instruction to address and overcome student learning deficits. Enrich education • • • Maintain and/or extend class time in science, social studies, music, art and phys education in order to give more time to the subjects that are tested (reading and math). Offer students a wide range of enrichment courses from robotics and astronomy to drama and creative writing. Bring partners in to the school to supplement and enhance the educational program. Partners include community-based organizations, local businesses, higher education, and arts and cultural institutions.

Empower teachers • Schedule dedicated time for teachers to collaborate, the component most responsible for supporting the formation of Professional Learning Communities. • Incorporate individual staff coaching and group discussion, that allows teachers to hone their instructional practices under the guidance of experts and peers.

Agency Capacity
With 15 years of history in the highest poverty neighborhoods of Medford, Kids Unlimited of Oregon, a community-based youth development agency, has earned recognition for providing the most comprehensive academic and enrichment after school and summer programs in Southern Oregon. Many of the Mexican youth served by Kids Unlimited are the first generation in their families to participate in a purposeful and defined educational process that leads to graduation from high school. It is important to note that Kids Unlimited has a proven track record of staying the course with high risk youth, getting them back on track when needed, and providing the opportunities that level the playing field in academics, sports and leadership activities. To facilitate this success, case management protocols have been developed and implemented and now institutionalized across all levels of Kids Unlimited’s youth programs. Working with the families of program youth has always been of the highest priority for Kids Unlimited, seeing change as a systems piece that must involve the whole to improve the parts. The creation of a charter school continues the mission of Kids Unlimited to develop programs that effectively meet the needs of the highest risk youth populations, level the playing field(s) for

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success and have them on track for graduation from high school with the goal of continuing on to post-secondary education.

THE VISION OF V.I.B.E.S. PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL “ACADEMY OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES” V.I.B.E.S. public charter school’s vision is to be a “Beacon of Hope” that creates future leaders. Our school will be known for academic excellence and ethical conduct; that it is a place where personal responsibility, accountability and good judgment (common sense) are taught, modeled and expected for all. Our school will be known as a place where respect and safety are the norm. THE MISSION OF V.I.B.E.S. PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL “ACADEMY OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES” We, the parents and staff of V.I.B.E.S. public charter school, see ourselves as a family committed to successfully guiding our students through their early learning, elementary and middle school years for a successful transition to high school. We will endeavor to balance intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth in a positive, safe, nurturing environment that promotes self-discipline, self-esteem and integrity.
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School: Academy of the Arts and Sciences is accountable for improved student learning and will work to provide solutions to current and future school challenges through practices that help: • Ease the shortage of school facilities and seat space • Narrow the achievement gap among students of racial and ethnic backgrounds • Increase responsible parent and student involvement in learning • Improve teacher quality and performance evaluation systems • Provide data to help identify and evaluate issues that affect quality educational programs and student learning and achievement
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• •

Serve as laboratories to test, demonstrate and disseminate ideas that can promote better educational practices Provide an additional educational option for parents

The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School: Academy of the Arts and Sciences will be identified as a Kindergarten – Eighth Grade Academy that focuses on solid literacy skills and integrates the applied arts, science and technology. V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School is projected to open with grades Kindergarten – Five and add a subsequent grade level each following year so that students are well grounded in the school’s curriculum, learning strategies and culture of success. V.I.B.E.S. will be using the Success For All school reform model that is immersed in the literacy development of all students to brings students to grade level standards in reading by the end of third grade as well as providing aligned literacy development through eighth grade. Secondly, the school will be using Singapore Math curriculum which has produced “world class” results as reported in TIMMS reports. The school seeks to empower students of diverse backgrounds to succeed academically, socially and emotionally, in the present and the future as adults who are successfully contributing to the community. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Kindergarten – 8th grade Charter School will provide a high quality education in a positive learning environment that embraces diversity, builds on the strengths of its students and will work to accelerate the learning of those students who have traditionally come to school 2 to 3 years behind in vocabulary and literacy skills. Thirdly, the school will engage students in learning activities that are grounded in the Common Core State Standards and aligned with researchsupported best practices in teaching and learning. Students will have extended opportunities to apply their academic skills through collaborative, project-based activities that integrate art, science and technology following systematic instruction in reading and language arts. And lastly, through authentic community partnerships, individualized student Personal Success Plans (PSP), structured case management and school-based mentoring, all students will become successful learners by the mastering the attitudes, skills and knowledge founded in a rigorous, standards-based curriculum that will prepare them for success in high school. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school’s core beliefs are: 1) Diversity is an asset, not a barrier; 2) Meaningful student engagement is a precursor to student learning; 3) Every student, regardless of home environments, language barriers or economic status can succeed, provided the right opportunities and supports; 4) A student’s greatest area of growth is in his/her areas of strengths; therefore it is important to also address strengths not just limitations; 5) Academics and socialemotional aspects of education are of equal importance in student success; 6) Meaningful relationships create success, therefore all students need a trustworthy support system 24 hours a day/7 days a week; 7) Problem solving, team work and effective social skills are crucial in today’s complex society; 8) Community involvement is a mutual venture, therefore, students should strive to improve their community through civic engagement and service learning activities; 9) Collaborative parent and family partnerships are important to student success, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will sustain a culture that is inviting, flexible and resourceful in helping to strengthen and involve families. Legal relationship between V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School and any other Public Charter School: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School does not have, or intend to enter into, any legal relationship with any other Public Charter School.

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VI. Similarities and Differences With the Medford School District Similarities:
• • • • • • • • • • • • Proficiency Based Learning Use of Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Learning (DIBELS) assessment 90 minute reading block Accelerated Math from Renaissance Learning Professional Learning Communities Student Learning Data Analysis Student Report to Parents Online Data Collection System for: Attendance, Student Achievement, Grades Use of Medford School District’s Special Education Board, Section 504 and Talented and Gifted School Board Policies Oregon State Assessments Access to middle school sports at McLoughlin or Hedrick Middle Schools Safe Schools Procedures and Bullying Prevention Training

Differences:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • “Academy of the Arts and Sciences” STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics school focus that is integrated across subjects Kindergarten – 8th Grade school design Extended School Year due to modified calendar alignment Extended School Day for targeted student tutoring and enrichment activities Structured weekly staff development required for all staff Lesson Study format for grade level teachers for improvement of instruction Relentless pursuit of student academic success All students have “Personal Success Plans” that outline learning goals based on proficiency levels assessed throughout the school year Structured Case Management services for youth at risk of dropping out of school Structured Mentoring program utilizing Kids Unlimited’s established mentoring program Full day Kindergarten Success for All – 4th Edition School Reform Model that includes Reading and Writing Curriculum implemented with fluid ability grouping; 90 minute Deployed Reading Block: held at the same time every day to facilitate cross class/cross grade level grouping Singapore Math Curriculum which brings in Singapore’s cutting edge methodology for teaching mathematics from problem solving to the concrete use of numbers. Singapore has led the world in high mathematics achievement amongst its students

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument- 2011 Edition as the adopted staff evaluation tool which lays out highly defined criteria in rubric format for teacher instructional performance and professional responsibilities Opportunity for all students to learn a second language (English or Spanish) Use of Woodcock Johnson and Peabody Picture Assessments as required by Success for All School Reform Model Intensive quarterly student learning progress monitoring within the Success for All curriculum to determine re-grouping for student advancement Success for All prescribed 20 minute tutoring sessions for students needed additional academic skill(s) reinforcement Grammar and Writing curriculum for sixth-eight grade students Place-based learning for Social Studies and Science Fully integrated hands-on science learning with Project Learning Tree, Project Wet, and Project WILD across all grade levels Use of Be A Fit Kid and FUEL: Foods You Eat For Life written by Jennifer Slawta, PhD. Fully integrated, interactive technology within the classroom Cloud-based computing Global education that is relationship-based and linked with International Schools around the world via internet applications and mobile technology Internet-based student portfolios beginning in first grade Integrated Units of Study in grades 6th – 8th that coordinate: reading, writing, science, social studies and mathematics.

V.I.B.E.S. Charter School is unique in that it blends structure, discipline, and order within an environment fostering and encouraging individual (and group) achievement, creativity, and compassion. The over-riding belief of the school is that every child is capable of achieving the high goals set forth in the curriculum. The school will accomplish its focused pursuit for excellence by: providing a firm foundation in reading, writing mathematical and science skills; addressing student educational needs through the use of individual plans; comprehensive teacher support and development; use of data and assessments to drive achievement and interventions; partnering with parents to encourage students to reach their maximum potential; providing mentoring and tutoring opportunities for students needing extra help; utilizing technology to maximize learning; including science, social studies, computers, art and physical education for all students; providing a wealth of extracurricular activities designed to enrich students’ academic experience creating an environment of mutual respect within the entire school community. To frame and support these goals, Kids Unlimited has developed an extensive network of partnerships within the community, region, state and nation. These relationships will be used to draw upon expertise in best practices for working with youth at risk of dropping out of school.

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V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Over-Arching Goals The accountability plan will be made public on the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s website and will be monitored by the school’s Board of Directors. SCHOOL GOALS
1. Open School

EVALUATION

METRIC FOR ACCOUNTABILILTY
School opens its doors and begins serving students a high quality education in August 2013

2. Increase Parent Involvement

Quarterly

• • • • •

Attendance at parent committees Communications between school and home quantified by teacher, grade, and school as a whole Participation in parent-teacher student conferences, Sign in sheets at monthly parent education sessions Number of shared family activities at school

3. Increase Attendance

Quarterly

• • •

School to Home outreach activities quantified by student, grade level, school level Case management reports The school will see a quarterly increase in attendance until the school has reached a minimum threshold of 95%

4. School Assessment

Annually

• •

Turn Around Schools assessment tools for school implementation of proven best practices RTI school-wide implementation assessment tool

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• • • • •

Evaluation for school annual report School strategic planning process

5. Parent Student Survey

Annually

90% satisfaction rating

6. Provide Professional Development for All Staff

Annually

100% participation in professional development plan and workshops Documented dates of all professional development activities categorized by topic area (e.g. Math, Reading, PBS, RTI, ELL, Special Education, etc.)

7. Ensure Fiscal Responsibility

Quarterly Annually

• • •

Accounting report monthly to school’s Board of Directors Accounting report to District Annual Fiscal Audit

Academic Goals
1. Increase Student Reading Skill

Reporting Frequency
Every 6 weeks for progress monitoring with: • DIBELS • curriculum based assessments • Annual Summative Report • • • • • • • • •
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Accountability Metric
5% increase in students reading at grade level as measured by state standards and cut scores DIBELS progress monitoring data Success for All 6 week data Focused tutoring data by student Response to Intervention (RTI) supplemental plans quantified by student, grade level, school wide Behavior management plan success quantified by student, grade level, school wide OAKS score in English/Language Arts 5% higher than student’s previous year SMART Assessment transition

2. Increase Student

Annually

5% increase in students performing

V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Proposal

Math skills

• • • • • • • • • • •

math at grade level Singapore Math proficiency assessments (pre and post) data Lesson Study sessions documented by grade levels and school wide Focused tutoring in basic skills quantified by student, grade level and school wide OAKS score in Mathematics 5% higher than student’s previous year SMART Assessment transition

3. Increase Student Attendance

Quarterly

Improved attendance case management plans by student, grade level, school wide Student Study Team notes Wrap around supports documented by student Modified curriculum, behavior support plans, incentives quantified by student, grade level, school wide Growth model by individual student 5% improvement in student attendance

Non-Academic Goals
1. Activity Participation

Reporting Frequency
Quarterly • •

Accountability Metric
Before, During and After School “club” and boys/girls group participation 5% increase in participation each year from previous year

2. Student Leadership

Annually

• • • •

Existence of Youth Student Council/Advisory Board Structure Created for Youth Board Activities planned and delivered yearly Student feedback survey

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VII. Legal Address, Facilities and Physical Location of Public Charter School
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School 821 North Riverside Medford, Oregon 97501 The location of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is within the Kids Unlimited youth facility which was completely renovated from its former use as the Medford Bowling Lanes. The youth center now includes: licensed, commercial-grade kitchen, gymnasium, hardwood floor dance studio, inter-active computer lab, arts studio, classroom spaces, administrative offices and large meeting/presentation space(s). Kids Unlimited is also developing the facility adjacent to the Kids Unlimited youth into a Family – Neighborhood Center. This Center will house a Family Nurturing Center (Relief Nursery) satellite program for infants through age 5 and for parents who have been identified as being at risk of and/or involved in domestic violence.

VIII. Target Population
The longer youth are engaged in productive relationships with school staff, the greater the opportunity to keep those youths on course. Consistently focusing on helping students become successfully involved in school, is a core foundation for creating a Kindergarten thru Eighth Grade school. All too often high-poverty youth come to kindergarten two to three years behind in vocabulary and readiness skills for learning. VIBES has the organization, support and vision necessary to implement an innovative and successful, early childhood through middle school model. The VIBES school will seek out student enrollment from all ethnicities, income levels and areas of residence to create a “melting pot” of diversity within the classroom. The target student population for the VIBES Public Charter School includes the full definition of high need youth: children and students at risk of educational failure, due to living in poverty, representing English Language Learners, far below grade level or students who are not on track to becoming college-or career-ready by graduation, who are at risk of not graduating with a diploma on time, students who are homeless, in foster care, pregnant teenagers, those youth who have been incarcerated, are new immigrants, are migrants, or those children with disabilities. Because the target population of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is anticipated to present with more risk factors than traditional schools, school-wide procedures and practices will be in place to proactively teach positive behavior and appropriate social skills in all settings applicable to students attending the school. Differentiated teaching strategies will be a strength of the school, as well as rigorous data collection and analysis to determine academic progress using the core curriculum(s). Strategic interventions will be used when students are not progressing at a steady rate that is predictive of achieving at grade level (as determined by Oregon State Benchmarks and the Common Core Standards). In addition, a comprehensive Response to Intervention Manual for the school will be developed, using examples from across the nation as models.

IX. Projected Enrollment Including the Ages or Grades to be Served
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will ultimately provide a comprehensive Kindergarten through Eighth Grade program. V.I.B.E.S. will open with a comprehensive Kindergarten through Fifth Grade program with two sections of 25 students at each grade, growing an additional grade
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cohort of 50 students each school year thereafter until the school reaches its full Kindergarten through Eighth grade structure in year 4. The two classrooms at each grade level will allow provide for common planning time, an organizational need within the development of Common Assessments/Rubrics and the “Lesson Study” which is a professional development structure unique within Singapore Math. 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 Kindergarten 50 50 50 50 st 1 Grade 50 50 50 50 2nd Grade 50 50 50 50 rd 3 Grade 50 50 50 50 th 4 Grade 50 50 50 50 5th Grade 50 50 50 50 th 6 Grade 0 50 50 50 7th Grade 0 0 50 50 th 8 Grade 0 0 0 50 Total Enrollment 300 350 400 450 Projected Number of Classes 12 14 16 18 V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will provide small learning environments for youth who are within a spectrum of risk factors that are predictive of not graduating from high school. The school will market within the community and surrounding area to build student enrollment to a maximum of two classes per grade level (50 students per grade level) by each subsequent school year. The school plans that students, upon enrolling in the school, will remain through grade eight and then successfully transition to high school.

X. Date the Charter School Would Begin Operating
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is scheduled to open to students in August of 2013. The school will be incorporated and begin pre-opening operations no later than July 1, 2013.

XI. Statutes and Rule that Shall Apply to the Public Charter School
The administrative relationship between the sponsor (Medford School District) and V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will be detailed in the chartering document negotiated and agreed upon by the charter school and the sponsoring agency (Medford School District) with terms for renewal of the charter set in terms of 2 to 3 years past the signing of the original chartering document. Funding to support the operation of the charter school (eg. wages, curriculum, supplies) will be a pass-through from the sponsoring school district or directly from the Oregon Department of Education if the state or higher education is the sponsoring agent. ORS 338.135 Employees; licensure and registration requirements; collective bargaining; prohibition on waiver of right to sponsor charter school: (1) Employee assignment to a public charter school shall be voluntary; (2)(a) A public charter school or the sponsor of the public charter school is considered the employer of any employees of the public charter school. If a
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school district board is not the sponsor of the public charter school, the school district board may not be the employer of the employees of the public charter school and the school district board may not collectively bargain with the employees of the public charter school. The public charter school governing body shall control the selection of employees at the pubic charter school. Medford School District Board Policy L.BE, along with L.BE-AR regarding public charter schools will be followed regarding the proposal, review, agreement and operation phases of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school’s governing board will plan in good faith with the Medford School District regarding all phases of the school’s sponsorship. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will follow all local, state and federal rules/regulations applicable to charter schools in Oregon. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will comply with the national Common Core Curriculum standards as formatted by the Oregon Department of Education. The Oregon Assessment of Knowledge testing for third – eighth grades and the 4th and 8th grade writing assessment will be used as standardized assessment materials in conjunction with the state required work samples. Because Oregon’s Charter School law is very detailed related to the administrative relationship between the charter school and the authorizing public chartering agency, the development team will use the actual language of the Oregon Revised Statutes in regards to charter schools, the administrative relationship between the charter school and the authorized public chartering agency and the flexibility afforded charter schools: ORS 338.015 Legislative intent; goals: It is the intent of this chapter that new types of schools, called public charter schools, be created as a legitimate avenue for parents, educators and community members to take responsible risks to create new, innovative and more flexible ways of educating children within the public school system. The Legislative Assembly seeks to create an atmosphere in Oregon’s public school system where research and development of new learning opportunities are actively pursued. The provisions of this chapter should be interpreted liberally to support the goals of this section and to advance a renewed commitment by this state to the mission, goals and diversity of public education. It is the intent that public charter schools may serve as models and catalysts for the improvement of other public schools and the public school system. The goals of pubic charter shall be to: increase student learning and achievement; increase choices of learning opportunities for students; better meet individual student academic needs and interests; build stronger working relationships among educators, parents and other community members; encourage the use of different and innovative learning methods; provide opportunities in small learning environments for flexibility and innovation, which may be applied, if proven effective, to other public schools; create new professional opportunities for teachers; establish additional forms of accountability for schools; and create innovative measurement tools (1999 c.200. 1) ORS 338.025 (2) Rules; waiver of provisions of chapter; exceptions: Upon application by a public charter school, the State Board of Education may grant a waiver of any provision of this chapter if the waiver promotes the development of programs by providers, enhances the equitable access by underserved families to the public education of their choice, extends the equitable access to public support by all students or permits high quality programs of unusual cost. The State Board of Education may not waive any appeal provision in this chapter or any provision under ORS 338.115 (1)(a) to (u), 338.120, 338.125 (4), 338.l35 (2)(b) or 339.122 (1999 c.200.13; 2001.c.810.3; 2005.c.367.5; 2007.c.575.4; 2007.c.660.4; 2008.50.13; 2010.c.53.4; 2010.c.72.3; 2011.c.94.4; 2011.c.649.3; 2011.c.718.26). Degree of autonomy the charter school will have over such matters as the charter school’s budget, expenditures, daily operation, and personnel in accordance with Oregon’s
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charter school law: ORS 338.115 Applicability of laws; restrictions; powers; student diplomas and alternative certificates. (1) statutes and rules that apply to school district boards, school district or other public schools do not apply to public charter schools. However the following laws do apply to public charter schools: federal law, tort claims, public records law, public meetings law, Municipal Audit Law, student records, criminal records checks, academic content standards and instruction, high school diploma, modified diploma, extended diploma and alternative certificate, the statewide assessment system developed by the Department of Education for mathematics, science and English under ORS 329.485 (2), textbooks, tuition and fees, prohibition on infliction of corporal punishment, notice concerning students subject to juvenile court petitions, reporting of child abuse and training on prevention and identification of child abuse, Employment Department law, discrimination, instructional time provided by school during each day/during the year, health and safety statutes and rules, any statute or rule that is listed in the charter, consideration for educational services. ORS 338.145 Responsibility for student transportation services; costs. (1) the public charter school shall be responsible for providing transportation to students who reside within the school district and who attend the pubic charter school. The public charter school may negotiate with a school district for the provision of transportation to students attending the public charter school. (2) Notwithstanding subsection 91) of this section, the school district within which the public charter school is located shall be responsible for the transportation of students attending the public charter school pursuant to ORS 327.043 in the same manner as students attending nonchartered public schools if the student is a resident of the school district. To ensure it is a “Standard School” by Oregon standards, V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will follow Oregon Administrative Rule 581.022.1620 which requires public schools to provide students, at a minimum, the following number of instructional program hours: Kindergarten (based on half-day) Grades One through Three Grades Four through Eight 405 hours 810 hours 900 hours

Because V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be utilizing a modified school calendar and extended school day, the number of instructional program is projected to be much higher than the minimum level set by Oregon Administrative Rule.

XII. Distinctive Learning and Teaching Techniques TEACHING STRATEGIES
Fully Embrace State Standards and Common Curriculum Standards LEARNING TECHNIQUES Knowledge of Learning Goals

Grade Level Teams Participate in 36 Week Scaffolded Learning That Builds Upon Each Curriculum Planning by Subject, fully Grade Level Throughout School for Consistency aligned with State Standards and Common of Learning
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Curriculum Standards

100% Fidelity to Success for All School School-wide, 90 minute Reading Block that is Reform Model Cross Grouped to Accommodate Learning Levels; Targeted Tutoring to Maximize Learning; Ongoing and Frequent Assessment; Fluid Grouping and Regrouping for Skills

100% Fidelity to Singapore Math Program

School-wide, 90 minute Mathematics Block for learning from Whole to Part; Every Lesson Begin with Concrete Problem Solving Followed with Number Application

“Lesson Study” Protocol at Grade Levels (Singapore Mathematics Program)

Improved Student Learning due to Improved Lesson Development and Instructional Practices

I.T.I.P.’s Seven Lesson Protocols (Madeline Hunter’s Literature) a) Learning Objective b) Anticipatory Set c) State Lesson Objective d) Instructional Input (by teacher) e) Check for Understanding f) Guided Practice g) Independent Practice

Improved Student Learning due to Improved Lesson Development and Instructional Practices

S.I.O.P Sheltered Instruction Lesson Plan a) Lesson Preparation b) Building Background c) Comprehensible Input d) Strategies e) Interaction f) Practice and Application g) Lesson Delivery h) Review and Assessment

Improved Student Learning due to Improved Lesson Development that is Built for English Language Learners Which Will Assist All Students, Especially Students With Limited English Skills and/or Literacy Skills

Theory of Multiple Intelligences (Howard Gardner’s Literature)
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Improved Student Learning Because Instruction is Planned and Delivered to Address Multiple
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a) b) c) d) e) f) g)

Linguistic Logical Mathematical Spatial Musical Bodily/Kinesthetic Interpersonal Intrapersonal

Learning Strength Areas and Modalities

Integrated Studies that are Project-Based

Improved Student Learning Because Skills Are Not Taught in Isolated Segments, but Rather in a Holistic Manner With Real Life Applications

High Level of Technology Integration

Improved Student Learning Due to Real Life Applications of Technology in the Classroom and Within Project Based Studies

Place-Based Lessons and Units

Improved Student Learning Due to Tying Learning to the Natural Surroundings of the Students to Anchor Learning to the Real World

Teaching Academic Vocabulary

Improved Student Learning Because Academic Vocabulary has been Identified as the Weakest Area for English Language Learners

Scientific Inquiry Model

Improved Student Learning Because Scientific Inquiry is Linked to Real World Work Skills and the Development of New Advancements in the World of Engineering/Technology/Economy

Cooperative Learning that Includes Team Project Development and Demonstration

Improved Student Learning Because Students Need to Learn to Work Together to Enhance Their Learning and the Learning of Others. Real Life Skills of the Work Place Require the Ability to Work with Others to Produce Work Tasks

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Integration of the Arts into all Learning

Improved Student Learning Because the Arts Activate a Part of the Brain that Enriches the Full Learning Experience

Schoolwide Instructional Processes: Instruction employs cooperative learning, which maintains student engagement and motivation, to teach meta-cognitive strategies. The cycle of instruction includes direct instruction, guided peer practice, assessments (formative and summative) and student feedback on progress. Features of the direct instruction include high time-on-task, brisk pacing and systematic routines. V.I.B.E.S. Charter School will promote a college ready student body beginning in kindergarten. Strategies will include: • • • • • • • Culturally Responsive Teaching which will bridge applications to the real world Provide college role models Career Day Virtual and actual Field Trips to area Colleges/Universities Classroom discussions Student college project which could include college pen pals, college reports Parent meetings regarding family participation in college preparation

Schoolwide Curriculum: V.I.B.E.S. will implement a school wide (K-8) Singapore Math curriculum that has been documented in the TIMMS reports for being cutting edge at the “world class” level for producing higher math scores, with students testing one to two years ahead of their peers who are using a different mathematics curriculum – at grades 3 and 5. Singapore Math uses a “Lesson Study” format/requirement in which teachers work together to develop, implement, discuss results and modify lessons for maximum student engagement and acquisition of skills. Information Regarding Singapore Math Curriculum: Singapore’s students skyrocketed from 16th of 26th in the Second International Science Study (SISS) rankings in 1984 to 1 st in 1995. On the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) undertaken in over 40 countries, Singapore has ranked 1st in three of the four administrations. The United States has ranked in the top 10 countries for math only once. Singapore Math, Inc. brought the curriculum to the United States in 1989. Singapore Math curriculum is concept-based, with a progression from visual to pictorial to abstract that ends with mastery. It is conceptual, not algorithmic; visual not rote. Because it is logical and conceptual, Singapore Math works with remedial students as well as with gifted students and is well supported with auxiliary workbooks, review books, software, online tutorials for teachers and parents. In 2008, STC School Harlem Academy implemented Singapore Math and was the first school in Manhattan to do so. Head of the School Vinny Dotoli stated that he “saw double-digit growth in students’ quantitative reasoning scores in a single year.” The curriculum aligns with United
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States curriculum standards, but there are significant differences in the delivery compared to standard American teaching methods. Singapore Math covers 10-14 concepts a year, stays with each 2 to 3 weeks, and expects mastery before introducing a new lesson. In traditional United States mathematics textbooks, about 30 math concepts a year briefly and without expectation of mastery because of a spiraling effect of revisiting concepts throughout the year and years. Vinny Dotoli, (STC School Harlem Academy) also reported that there is “more positive engagement among students. With Singapore Math, all students are more interested in math learning, not just the few that “get it” with minimal instruction.” However, teachers must be equipped with a “strong math core” relevant to their instruction, “because they can’t teach on auto-pilot”. Harlem Academy’s teachers attend a minimum week long summer institute in preparation for the year, because they must be engaged and engaging. In 1977, Australian educator Anne Newman discussed five steps that students need to work through in order to solve a word problem successfully: 1) Reading the problem 2) Comprehending what was read 3) Transforming the words into a mathematical strategy 4) Applying a mathematical procedure, and 5) Writing the answer Newman’s research showed that over 50% of errors that children make occur in the first three steps before they even begin the problem. Instead of relying on ambiguous key words, Singapore Math textbooks help students to visualize problem situations by turning abstract words into easy to understand pictorial models. By constructing a model students can understand the problem situation more clearly. It takes time to develop model drawing skills in students, but it is worth the effort. As children become increasingly proficient at constructing models, they gain confidence in their problem solving abilities. Proficiency in the use of model drawing helps students to solve increasingly complex problems as they progress through the elementary and middle school mathematics and eventually make the transition from arithmetic to algebra with greater ease (Bill Jackson, Math Helping Teacher; Scarsdale Public Schools). Singapore Math textbooks present and develop a few consistently used models in a clear and systematic way. The result is that students become adept at converting abstract word problems into concrete pictures that are easily translated into mathematical procedures. Studies of students in Singapore have reported that Singaporean students are exposed to higher level, multi step word problems than are United States students and proficiency in solving these complex problems is a key factor in why they have fared so well on international mathematics assessments. Singapore’s model drawing approach helps children get past the words by visualizing and illustrating word problems with simple diagrams. Singapore Math utilizes a Lesson Study format for teachers to work together in grade level units to develop their mathematical content knowledge by solving problems together, craft good mathematical lessons, observe each other teaching and then engage in peer discussion around the lesson delivery and how it could be improved. Teachers work to continually improve their teaching throughout their classroom career through this Lesson Study format. The U.S. Department of Education (AIR, NMAP) have gone on record with stating that “…the Singapore Mathematics system…should be considered as a model for U.S. Reform – the delivery system in mathematics education (in the U.S.) is … broken and must be fixed; ….the U.S. will have to consider making comprehensive reforms to its school mathematics system if we are to replicate
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the Singaporean successes.” The U.S. Department of Education goes further in stating that “The United States produces students who have learned only to mechanically apply mathematical procedures to solve routine problems and who are, therefore, not mathematically competitive with students in Singapore.” (U.S. Department of Education reports 2010, 2009, 2008, 2006, 2005, 2004) Singapore Math research and statistics show that students enrolled in the Singapore Math experienced a 32% increase in test scores. Singapore Math statistics show that the percentage of students scoring at the highest level increased by 20%. Students using Singapore Math showed 3 times the average improvement, compared to non-Singapore Math users. Singapore Math statistics show that students who utilized Singapore Math challenging problems increased their proportion at the 97% by 17%.

World’ Student Performance in Mathematics
STUDENTS 15 year old Eighth Graders Fourth Graders SINGAPORE #1 #2 #3 UNITED STATES #29 #11 #9

(U.S. Department of Education, Highlights From PISA 2009: “Performance of U.S. 15 Year-Old Students in Reading, Mathematics and Science in an International Context”, Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), 2010; U.S. Department of Education, 2009, Highlights From TIMMS 2007: “Mathematics and Science Achievement of U.S. Fourth and Eighth Grade Students in an International Context”) Information Regarding Success for All Reading Curriculum: The school will implement research-based reading, writing and language arts programs in all grades K-8 . The Success For All kindergarten is a full-day program where children learn language and literacy, math, science and social studies concepts through 16 two-week thematic units. The reading component in grades K-1 contains a systematic phonemic awareness and phonics program that includes mnemonic picture cards and embedded video segments that support phonics and vocabulary development. It uses phonetically regular shared stories that students read to one another in pairs. In grades 2-8, students use novels or basals but not workbooks. This program emphasizes cooperative learning, partner reading activities and comprehension strategies such as summarization and clarification. These strategies are built around narrative and expository texts, writing and direct instruction in reading comprehension skills. At all levels, students are required to read books of their own choice for twenty minutes at home each evening. Cooperative learning programs in writing/language arts are used in grade K-8. Tutors: In grades 1-3, specially trained certified teachers and paraprofessionals work one-to-one with any students who are failing to keep up with their classmates in reading. Tutorial instruction is closely coordinated with regular classroom instruction taking place 20 minutes daily during times other than reading periods. Quarterly Assessments and Regrouping: Students in grades 1-8 are assessed every quarter to determine whether they are making adequate progress in reading. This information is used to regroup students for instruction across grade lines, so that each reading class contains students of
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different ages who are all reading at the same level. Assessment information is also used to suggest alternative teaching strategies in the regular classroom, changes in reading group placement, provision of tutoring services, or other means of meeting students’ needs. Solutions Team: A Solutions Team works in each school to help support families in ensuring the success of their children, focusing on parent education, parent involvement, attendance, and student behavior. This team is composed of existing or additional staff such as parent liaisons, social workers, counselors and school administrators. Facilitator: A program facilitator works with teachers as an on-site coach to help them implement the reading program, manages the quarterly assessments, assists the Solutions Team, makes sure all staff are communicating with each other, and helps the staff as a whole make certain that every child is making adequate progress. Success For All provides ongoing support for implementation of the program, which includes 5 days of training during the summer prior to the initial implementation for the school’s leadership team (ie. Director and Facilitator) and 3 days of intensive training at the beginning of the first year for teaching staff. Follow-up services over the first year of implementation consist of 16 days of on-site support provided by Success For All program staff as well as quarterly monitoring of student progress data. After the first year, approximately 15 days of additional training are provided each year by Success For All program staff. Success For All is designed to help all children, regardless of their ethnicity or socioeconomic status, achieve success in reading. The average demographic for Success For All schools, nationwide, is 80% free lunch participation rate, with ethnicity at 40% African American, 35% Hispanic and 25% white. Because the VIBES Public Charter school will be a K-8 school, it will align with Success For All and its “The Reading Edge Middle School”, a comprehensive literacy program for all middle school students. This program addresses students from struggling to advanced. The program’s goal is to prepare students to be strategic, independent and motivated readers and learners. Reading Edge aligns with the Common Core State Standards and helps students build their fluency, increases comprehension and improves study skills. Built into Reading Edge are several key components designed to engage students in the learning process and motivate them to read and learn: goal setting, peer support and cooperative learning, use of meta-cognitive reading strategies, frequent assessment and feedback. Even the best curriculum cannot reach all of the learning standards required to be taught at each grade level and across grade levels. It will be critical that the school’s curriculum team identifies the holes in the core curriculum and then identifies supplemental curricula to address Response to Intervention needs and differentiated instructional strategies. During the planning stage of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school grant, the school development team will be engaged in Curriculum Mapping. Each grade’s curriculum will that show deep alignment with the Core Curriculum Standards and identify the Power Standards for each grade level. (Power Standards are the over-arching/high-priority standards that can be used for organizing the learning standards.) From the very beginning stages of its development, V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School will be implementing the Professional Learning Community model espoused by the DuFour’s with the full expectation that this model of professional collaboration and communication will continue during the implementation stage of the school’s operations. The school’s professional staff culture will be one that requires all staff to communicate and to collaborate around student learning, teaching practices, curriculum design, research on learning and related teaching
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strategies. “These conversations about teaching and learning will be frequent, continuous, concrete, and precise.” (Barth 1990) “The mark of effective professional learning communities is for educators to collaboratively work to: Develop curricula and lessons; Identify and commit to common learning and performance proficiency standards for students; Create and give common formative assessments; Analyze student data for gaps between expectations and outcomes; Review and score student work together; Identify strengths and weaknesses in student learning based on the work; Determine next steps to build on student strengths; Work together to improve classroom practices (DuFour, Eakers & DuFour, 2005; McLaughlin & Talbert, 2006; Schmoker, 2006). Aligned curriculum across all school grades with assessments that test the skills taught within the aligned curriculum has been cited as a key reason for improved student achievement, especially seen equalizing opportunities for students who enter school 2-3 years behind in skills. (Fenwick & Steffy, 2001). The VIBES planning team will “unpack” the Common Core Curriculum Standards to ensure that the staff understands the knowledge and skills that the students are required to learn. By doing so, the staff will determine where the holes are within the school’s core curriculum strands. Curriculum mapping will ensure that during the planning and implementation stages, that all of the CCCS are addressed across all grade levels of the V.I.B.E.S. Pubic Charter school. All teachers (certified, registered) will lead classroom instruction in reading, language arts and mathematics; prepare for daily instruction; develop lesson plans within a 90 day format for long-term planning, teach integrated units for social studies and science. Teachers administer assessments as directed within the Success for All program every 8 weeks as well as other curriculum-based assessments as directed within the school’s academic structure. Teachers will work collaboratively in planning instruction so that curriculum content is aligned by grade levels and the Common Core Curriculum standards. The school will function within a Professional Learning Community format that brings together teachers and support staff in cross-grade groupings as well as in subject-specific focus groups. Teachers will work cooperatively with parents, encouraging them to become active participants in the classroom and within the larger school environment. Parent and/or guardian communication will be actively developed and supported regarding their student’s classroom performance and by developing collaborative strategies for improving and maximizing each student’s performance. Additional Project-Based Learning Strands: Place-Based Learning will be utilized for social studies units that incorporate the history, geography, geology and sociology of the local area, state and region, providing hands-on experiences for students to see, hear, smell and interact with all aspects of the area in which they live. Project-Based Learning will be utilized for all of the above listed study areas as well as for science investigations that will utilize cooperative learning strategies. Technology Integration will cross all curriculum areas to allow for interactive and inquiry learning experiences, internet investigations, electronic student work portfolios, development of student work samples that collectively demonstrate project and/or place-based learning projects. Service Learning will be integrated beginning in kindergarten and building in learning complexity through eighth grade. Students will develop a project action plan to give back to the community, implement the plan, evaluate their success and describe what they would change for the next Service Learning project plan. School to Work Learning also begins in kindergarten and scaffolds in complexity through each of the grade levels. The school staff will collaborate with community and business groups to effectively incorporate opportunities for students to learn about the skills needed to succeed in the work environment of today and will
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also learn what skills will be needed for the entry level employment opportunities available to students upon graduation from high school. Extra-Curricular Activities Pursuant to OSAA and Medford School Board Policy : Then V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School grows to include the projected 7 th and 8th grade levels, students enrolled at these grade levels will be eligible and encouraged to participate in the extra-curricular activities available to students attending McLoughlin and/or Hedrick Middle Schools within the Medford School District. School-wide Teaching Strategies : The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will be using researchbased instructional strategies, practices and structures that can be applied across content areas and grade levels. Marzano, Pickering and Pollock (2001) identified the following strategies that have the potential to increase student learning based on their extensive research: Identifying similarities and differences; Summarizing and note-taking; Reinforcing effort and providing recognition; Homework and practice; Nonlinguistic representations; Cooperative learning; Setting objectives and providing feedback; Generating and testing hypotheses; Cues, questions and organizers. Darling-Hammond (2002) supports individualized instruction that provides for a greater range of opportunities for student success. His model is based on Robert Glasser’s work in “adaptive pedagogy which adjusts for the individual (their backgrounds, talents, interests, and the nature of past performance).” Examples of the “adaptive pedagogy” that will be implemented within the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school are: a) Multiple instructional strategies, ranging from traditional strategies to projects, experiments, internet research, construction of models and products, use of technology and arts, short-term and long-term projects; b) Group work with substantial scaffolding as needed with active teacher coaching and assistance (projectbased learning, collaborative learning); c) Explicit teaching of academic skills (direct instruction); d) Scaffolding – such as teaching students explicitly how to study; e) Culture of revision and redemption which encourages students to attempt challenging work and builds confidence in students to work to improve through their ‘successive efforts’; f) Extra support; g) Strong relationships that are enabled by smaller class sizes and fewer courses. Positive Behavior Intervention Strategies (PBIS): VIBES charter school will develop a comprehensive School wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports program that is evaluated every year using a PBIS specific assessment tool. PBIS is an evidence-based approach for establishing a positive whole-school social culture that involves systemic and individualized behavior support strategies for achieving social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behavior for all students (OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, 2005). The program is not a specific model or curriculum, rather it is a process of combining research-validated behavior intervention procedures with systems change strategies designed to improve the abilities of school personnel to help all students succeed socially and academically (Horner, Sugai, Todd & Lewis-Palmer, 2005). The six important principles of PBIS are: Develop a continuum of scientifically-based behavior and academic interventions and supports; Use data to make decisions and solve problems; Arrange the environment to prevent the development and occurrence of problem behavior; Teach and encourage pro-social skills and behaviors; Implement evidence-based behavioral practices with fidelity and accountability; Screen universally and monitor student performance and progress continuously. It has been documented that schools who have established systems with the capacity to implement PBIS
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with integrity and durability have teaching and learning environments that are: less reactive, aversive, dangerous and exclusionary; more engaging, responsive, preventive and productive; address classroom management and disciplinary issues (ie. attendance, tardies, anti-social behavior); improve supports for students whose behaviors require more specialized assistance (ie. Emotional and behavioral disorders, mental health) and maximize academic engagement and achievement for all students. The school wide Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports system has been extensively and rigorously evaluated for improved social and/or academic outcomes for students and has been documented as being an “evidence-based” practice/procedure. (www.PBIS.org) The Success for All Solutions Team (previously discussed on page 26 of this document) will use school data that is both aggregated and dis-aggregated by grade level, ethnicity, gender and individual students to evaluate on a monthly basis the school’s areas of success and areas of difficulties in regards to positive student behaviors in the classroom and throughout the school. Students are “red flagged” when data shows a pattern of school absences, behavior and/or academic trajectories that need additional support(s) to move the student back on track for success. The Success for All Solutions Team will work closely with the classroom teacher, the student and his/her parents to develop a Success Plan to intervene early with individualized goals and incremental benchmarks leading to success. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will ensure that all students feel safe and are free from bullying through a comprehensive effort to teach positive responses to confrontational interactions with peers as well as preparing all staff for the potential of a school threat from an outside entity. Safe Schools Procedures have been prepared and are attached to this proposal. All staff will be trained in Safe Schools Procedures and monthly drills will be held to practice and refine school wide procedures. Such practices will ensure the V.I.B.E.S. staff and students are ready to act in a safe and orderly manner in the event of a threat to the school and/or student body. Please refer to the attached Safe School Procedures packet for further detail.

XIII. Description of the Curriculum of the Public Charter School
Success For All, Inc – Research Based School Reform model (grades K-8); Singapore Math World Class curriculum resulting in TIMMS designation of the highest student math scores in the world for multiple years; Mathematics will be supplemented with Renaissance Learning Accelerated Math – Response to Intervention Model fully supported by scientifically-based research (K-8 already purchased); Reading and Mathematics will be supplemented with Essential Skills (Reading) computer-based Response to Intervention that incorporates systematic and comprehensive activities that provide learners with the opportunity for extensive, private practice (K-8 already purchased); Essential Skills (Mathematics) computer-based Response to Intervention that incorporates systematic and comprehensive activities that provide learners with the opportunity for extensive, private practice; Project Learning Tree and Wet/Wild for Environmental Education that is project-based and has been one of America’s most widely-used environmental education curriculums for over 35 years. The curriculum(s) are fully aligned with the Common Core Curriculum Standards and the National Science Standards. Evaluation studies have been conducted by the states of Maine, New Hampshire and California with excellent results for increased student knowledge and positive attitudinal growths among students exposed to Project Learning Tree. (K-8 Free curriculum and training through Oregon State University’s Forest Education Program); Rosetta Stone – English and Spanish which are
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aligned with Oregon Language Standards (K-adult already purchased); Open Source technology integration lessons through ThinkFinity, NEON-NASA Educators Online Network, Google Apps, Google+, Web 2.0 Tools, www.edweb.net, www.wikispaces.com, Success at the Core (professional development toolkit) and free online educational lessons/videos through the Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) which has the backing of Bill Gates and Google. Additional Open Source lesson planning and professional development websites that provide educational resources will be researched during the Charter School’s Planning and Implementation Stages. With the dynamic nature of technology, the V.I.B.E.S. staff will continuously seek ways to integrate cutting edge technology skills into the school’s lessons and project applications (eg. http://edu.glogster.com). When looking for a school model that specifically accelerates and helps to improve the high school graduation rate for students who: have a high level need, have disabilities and/or are English Language Learners, the VIBES charter school development team chose Success For All (www.successforall.org) because it is the most heavily researched school reform model which consistently demonstrates success when implemented with full fidelity to the model’s design. A meta-analysis of research of twenty-nine comprehensive reform models by Borman, Hewes, Overman & Brown (2003) categorized Success For All as one of only three programs with “Strongest Evidence of Effectiveness” based on research quality, quantity and impact. The others were Direct Instruction and the School Development Project. The American Institutes for Research (Herman 1999) carried out a review of research on twenty-four comprehensive school reform models. Success For All was one of only two elementary models (Direct Instruction was second) that received the maximum rating for “Evidence of Positive Effects on Student Achievement.” The research has documented positive effects of Success For All on reducing retentions and special education placements (Borman & Hewes, 2003), improving reading outcomes for English Language Learners (Cheung & Slavin, 2005), and many other outcomes (Slavin & Madden, 2001). The definitive evaluation of the reading outcomes of Success For All was a United States Department of Education-funded evaluation involving forty-one Title I schools throughout the United States. Schools were randomly assigned to use Success For All or continue with existing programs in grades K-2. At the end of the three-year study, children in the Success For All schools were achieving at significantly higher levels on all three reading measures used (Borman, Slavin, Cheung, Chamberlain, Madden & Chambers, 2005; Slavin, Madden, Cheung, Borman, Chamberlain & Chambers, 2006). This study was described by Grover Whitehurst, director of the Institute of Education Services at the United States Department of Education, as “a sophisticated study that uses everything the evaluation field has come to recognize as high-quality” (Viadero, 2005). Success For All is a school wide program for students in grades pre-K through sixth grade which organizes resources to attempt to ensure that virtually every student will acquire adequate basic skills and build on this basis throughout the elementary grades, that no student will be allowed to “fall between the cracks.” The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s curriculum alignment with Medford School District’s curriculum is articulated through the Common Core State Standards. We have attached within the Appendix, documentation of the curriculum Scope and Sequence and alignment with the Common Core State Standards for: • Success for All • Singapore Math • Accelerated Math
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• • • •

Essential Skills Grammar and Writing Project Learning Tree Fuel: Foods You Eat for Life

XIV. Curriculum Expectations
The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s expectations that all students will make Adequate Yearly Progress and in doing so will: a) Achieve at grade level in core academic subjects (reading and mathematics) as measured by curriculum-based and standardized assessments utilized throughout the school year b) Apply appropriate social skills to advocate for their own learning needs as measured on a standardized behavior scale to be adopted by July 1, 2013 c) Demonstrate regular school attendance at a minimum of 95% d) Practice refined scientific inquiry and problem solving skills, enabling them to be 21 st Century Learners e) Use refined skills in utilizing media-based, cloud-based and hand-held technology to further their abilities to demonstrate their advancing levels of learning f) Develop an enriched appreciation for a range of arts experiences. To accomplish these objectives the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school protocol will be structured so that each student attending the school has a Personal Success Plan (PSP) that is uniquely tailored to include academic, social and school attendance goals to build success for the student. Each student will meet with their teacher, at a minimum, eight times a year to review the PSP goals and the student’s progress. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school staff will work collaboratively with the student’s previous school to establish a starting point for the development of the student’s PSP. This will help the teachers to individualize the learning goals for their students. Collaborative and project-based learning with peers as well as inquiry-based teaching strategies that utilize an on-site computer technology (desk top and mobile) and ActivBoard systems, and off-site community-based learning opportunities will provide forums for students to incorporate their learning into real-life projects. (Individual attention will be given to students, such as the opportunities for field experiences supporting the use of small learning environments supporting the use of different learning styles.) The VIBES public charter school will be grounded in best practices and research-based leadership, teaching and curriculum to maximize the learning opportunities for all students. Utilizing information from What We Know About Successful School Leadership (2003, Administration of American Education Research) there are 9 core characteristics of successful schools: Clear and Shared Focus; High Standards and Expectations; Effective School Leadership; High Levels of Collaboration and Communication; Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Aligned with Standards; Frequent Monitoring of Teaching and Learning; Supportive Learning Environment; High Levels of Community and Parent Involvement. The VIBES Charter School will incorporate all nine of these core characteristics through thoughtful and strategic planning, implementation and evaluation for student success. The school’s instructional program
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will offer small learning environments for youth who have not previously experienced success in the traditional school setting by providing an innovative, technology-rich academic program supplemented with hands-on learning experiences that integrate with the core curriculum. In addition to using high quality instructional practices, as outlined within the Effective Schools literature, in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies, VIBES teachers will use ActivBoard technology, student response systems, mobile technology available through iPads and laptops. Such technology enhancement will enhance and extend learning in all subjects. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in project-based learning activities that utilize hands-on learning strategies and community partnerships to bring learning alive. V.I.B.E.S. staff will work collaboratively in grade level teams to assess their Reading and Writing instruction using the Common Core Instruction – Implementation Guide , developed by the Literacy Leadership State Team (LLST) in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education. The comprehensive tool is segmented by the following categories: Goals, Assessment, Instruction, Leadership, Professional Development and Commitment. This process provides recommendations for implementing progressive implementation to the Standards-Based Framework. The ultimate goal is to have all of V.I.B.E.S. students at or above the benchmark in all core subjects as measured on the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) and transition successfully into the new Oregon Smarter Balance Assessments in 2014-2015. In Oregon students are assessed with state assessments beginning in third grade (reading and math), with the writing assessment added in fourth grade, science and social studies added in fifth grade and continuing on through middle school. To close the achievement gap of the identified highrisk student population, it will take focused, strategic and intentional teaching practices that are assessed with progress monitoring every four - eight weeks. In this manner teaching can be adjusted to meet the learning needs of ALL students. Within the “key concepts from the new science of learning” (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking 2000) we know that the core principles that are likely to increase students’ learning are: Constructing knowledge - active participants in the learning process using their prior knowledge and experiences; Active Engagement – giving learners choices and time to reflect, express learning in different ways, doing something with what they have learned; Meaningful content – students make connections with the content because it is personally relevant; Collaboration and social interaction – students work together, teach one another, converse about their learning; Reflection/Self-Assessment and Meta-cognition – students are aware of their thinking processes and how to regulate those processes by monitoring and directing the process and making adjustments when something isn’t working; Inclusivity – students feel valued and welcomed in classrooms by teachers who believe in them and expect them to do well. (Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory – School Improvement Programs)

XV. Staff Development Plan
The goal for professional development at V.I.B.E.S. Charter School will be preparation to foster the development of a "community of leaders and learners" in which teaching and learning are reciprocal and each member receives from and provides support to others. To do so, each faculty member will participates in a variety of methods and programs for personal and professional growth, all of which will have the common focus on equity and long-term student achievement. Learning opportunities will be diverse and emphasize effective research and exemplary practice
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in advancing the achievement of all students. As such, V.I.B.E.S. Charter School’s professional development will embrace a process of inquiry where quantitative and qualitative data are analyzed in weekly team meetings, including work samples, standardized test results, stakeholder surveys, portfolios, self-evaluations, videotaped lessons, and administrator observations. Based on the needs of students and teachers that arise through data analysis, professional development will take place in a variety of contexts including seminars, institutes, grade level collaboration, cross grade level articulation, and formal and informal opportunities for peer coaching and researched pedagogy. All licensed staff are responsible for maintaining their Continuing Professional Development Units (CPDU) documentation throughout the year to use for licensure renewal. All licensed and registered staff are responsible for maintaining current licensure and/or registration with TSPC. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will adhere to the The National Staff Development Council (NSDC) Standards for Staff Development (2001), as outlined below: Context Standards Staff development that improves the learning of all students: • Organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and district. (Learning Communities) • Requires skillful school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement. (Leadership) • Requires resources to support adult learning and collaboration. (Resources) Process Standards Staff development that improves the learning of all students: • Uses disaggregated student data to determine adult learning priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. (Data-Driven) • Uses multiple sources of information to guide improvement and demonstrate its impact. (Evaluation) • Prepares educators to apply research to decision making. (Research-Based) • Uses learning strategies appropriate to the intended goal. (Design) • Applies knowledge about human learning and change. (Learning) • Provides educators with knowledge and skills to collaborate. (Collaboration) Content Standards Staff development that improves the learning of all students: • Prepares educators to understand and appreciate all students, create safe, orderly and supportive learning environments, and hold high expectations for their academic achievement. (Equity) • Deepens educators’ content knowledge, provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments appropriately. (Quality Teaching) • Provides educators with knowledge and skills to involve families and other stakeholders appropriately. (Family Involvement)
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During the planning, implementation phases of the charter school proposal and continuing on indefinitely, the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school staff will actively participate in successive staff development activities that scaffolds learning and provides staff with new learning research that they can successfully implement in their classes. The Success For All school reform model has significant staff development built into the program which is reflected in the staff development chart. The school staff will also need sequential training in: Singapore Math, Accelerated Math and Essential Skills software with the programs progressive skill development and data documentation. School staff will also need intensive training in School wide Positive Behavior Support, Response to Intervention and the DIBELS early literacy assessments. V.I.B.E.S. school staff will need to commit to the multi-year training in Project Learning Tree and Project Wet/Wild . This professional development will be facilitated by the Oregon State University’s Forestry Education program. These processes and strategies will be internalized through the development of school wide grade level and cross-grade level lesson planning and will sequentially builds on skill taught during the previous year. Project based and cooperative learning teaching strategies will be taught through local training resources provided by the Southern Oregon Education Service District staff, along with technology imbedded classroom strategies that utilize mobile technology. Initial and long-term follow-up trainings will be planned and implemented to ensure that all charter school staff are “all on the same page” with school wide programming, behavior systems and assessments. Professional Development Calendar: The V.I.B.E.S. Charter School daily schedule and calendar are specifically designed to provide opportunities for in-depth and ongoing professional development opportunities for the entire staff. First, the year starts with the three-week orientation described above, designed to develop a community of learners and leaders who will collaborate toward student success throughout the year. This intensive session will offer faculty with significantly more training each year than the standard two professional development days that are common in the surrounding schools. Further, teachers will participate in two-hour weekly professional development sessions on Wednesdays. During this time they will have an opportunity to learn from field experts, as well as share and reflect on their students’ learning and their own practices mid week, giving them time to revise their lesson plans and re-teach as necessary as well as to plan in advance for the following week based on student achievement data. In order to develop a quality instructional program in the subject areas, the V.I.B.E.S. Charter School faculty orientation will give new and returning teachers knowledge that builds a community of learners who: • • • • • • Engage in collective assessment of student work, identifying student' strengths and challenges Integrate technology into the learning process. Use Visual and Performing Arts to enhance instruction. Align standards with effective instructional practices. Share effective instructional practices with each other through dialogue, demonstrations, observations, professional readings and discussion, student samples and peer coaching. Identify and develop assessment tools that address meaningful evidence that students have met the standards.
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• •

Reflect continuously on how to deepen the instructional program and identify further resources and materials needed for teachers to ensure student progress. Utilize both classroom assessments and standardized tests results to guide instruction

AREA OF FOCUS
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Staff Orientation School Vision and Mission Curriculum Philosophy School Structural Format Curriculum Philosophy Standards Based Instruction Proficiency Based Learning School’s Teaching Strategies Proficiency/Standards Based Assessment 36 Week Instructional Mapping School Procedures School Day Structure and flow Safe Schools Procedures Staff Handbook Student Handbook School Discipline Philosophy Positive Behavior Support Response to Intervention Procedures Common Curriculum State Standards State Required Minimum Minutes Per Subject Staff Evaluation and Process Special Education Talented and Gifted English Language Learners V.I.B.E.S. School Board Policies Case Management Volunteers in School Mentoring Professional Development Plan Technology Plan

WHO and WHEN

All Staff - August

Curriculum Learning Assessments DIBELS Woodcock Johnson Peabody Picture
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Staff Directly Involved With Giving Assessments and Collecting Data All Staff Involved With Data

Success for All Singapore Math Essential Skills Accelerated Math Curriculum Embedded Assessments Common Assessments by Grade Level State Assessments State Rubrics by Subject Area Others as Identified

Analysis August and September

Effective Teaching Practices in the Classroom Charlotte Danielson’s Framework Madeline Hunter and ITIP Marzano Research Professional Learning Communities DuFour – Data Analysis Best Practice Research on Instruction Practices

All Staff August and September Ongoing

Reading and Writing Success for All Essential Skills Grammar and Writing Common Core Standards Writing Samples/Anchor Papers Writing Rubric Scoring

Success for All: 5 day training July for school leadership 2 day training in August for all teachers 1 day of training in September for Instructional Assistants Ongoing Consultation from SFA Point Coach During Year 2 day training in January for all school leadership All Staff; Online Tutorials

Mathematics Singapore Math (K-8) Accelerated Math (1-8) Essential Skills (1-8)
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All Staff Participate Publisher on-site training Online Tutorials

Common Core Curriculum Standards

Grade Level Mapping 36 Week Curriculum Plans “Lesson Study” Development of Common Assessments Rubric Scoring Tools

Science Project Learning Tree Project Wet Project Wild Inquiry-Based Common Core Curriculum Standards Project-Based Rubric Scoring

All Staff Participate 5 to 6 weekend trainings by OSU staff from Forestry in Education Department Identify Areas of CCSS That Need to be Developed Within Scaffolded School-Wide Units Grade Level Curriculum Mapping/36 Week Planning Development of Common Assessments

Writing Grammar and Writing Common Core Curriculum Standards

Grade Level Staff Participate Publisher on-site Training Online Tutorials Grade Level Mapping 36 week Planning of Lessons State Anchor Papers Rubric Scoring Team Practice in Scoring

Social Studies Common Core Standards

Grade Level Staff Participate in Teams to Develop 36 Week Curriculum Plans That Scaffold by Grade Level Use of Local Community and Region for Resources “Place-Based Learning” Develop Common Assessments

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Develop Rubric Scoring Tools

Physical Education Common Core Standards

All Staff Participate

Develop 36 Week Plan for Developmental Sports and Group Games That Scaffolds by Grade Level (K-8) Develop Common Assessments

Health and Fitness Be a Fit Kid Fuel: Foods You Eat For Life

All Staff Participate Author On-Site Training Grade Level Mapping for 36 Week Planning Common Assessments Develop Rubric Scoring Tools

Creative Arts Music (voice, instruments) Dance (ballet, modern, break-dance) Theater; Art (all mediums) Common Core Standards

Grade Level Staff Grade Level Mapping for 36 Week Planning Develop Common Assessments Develop Rubric Scoring Tools

Technology Integration Into Instruction School’s Technology Plan Common Core Curriculum Standards Engineering Standards National Technology Standards ISTE Technology Standards

All Staff Participate All Year Long Review and Revise School’s Technology Plan Identify and Prioritize Learning Curve for Staff/Students Specific Training for Staff in Student Data Collection Protocols (Academic, Attendance, Behavior)
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Specific Training as Required For Technology Tools and Software Implementation Electronic Student Data Tracking and Analysis ActivBoards Integration

Mobile Technology (iPads, Laptops, Netbooks, Student Response Systems) Curriculum Integration Open Source Curriculum Global Learning Partnering with International Schools for Projects Online Student Portfolios Student Web Pages Blogs, Podcasting Collaborative Learning Project-Based Teaching Place-Based Learning Robotics Workplace Applications

English Language Learner SIOP School’s ELL Plan Sheltered Instruction State Standards

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Review/Update School Plan SIOP Book Study SOESD Classes Sheltered Instruction Lessons

Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS)

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Develop School-wide PBS Manual Incorporate “Self Managers” Monthly Staff Meetings Weekly Class Celebrations Monthly School Celebrations Ongoing Data Collection and Analysis Assess Annually for Level of Implementation Fidelity

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Response to Intervention (RTI)

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Review School Response to Intervention Protocols Develop School-wide RTI Manual Identify Areas That Need Core Curriculum Interventions

Develop Plan for Purchasing Additional Curriculum Interventions Ongoing Data Collection and Analysis

Study Study Team (SST) Purpose Procedures Protocols

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Training on Using Templates Team Practice in Using SST Framework Paperwork With Peer Review

Section 504 Plans School Protocols Procedures Federal and State Law

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Training in Section 504 Law, Protocols, Procedures Team Practice in Developing And Reviewing Section 504 Plans Team Development of School/ Classroom Accommodations

Special Education (IDEA) Federal and State Law Medford School District Policies/Procedures Charter School Compliance

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Training in Special Ed. Law Training in Inclusion Model Training on Adaptations in Classroom and School Training(s) Related to Specific Disabilities That Impact the Entire School (ie. Autism, Fetal-Alcohol, Attachment Disorder, Chronic Stress)

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Talented and Gifted (TAG) Federal and State Law Medford School District TAG Manual Identification Procedures Development of TAG – PEP Plans

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Training in TAG Laws Training in Characteristics of Giftedness, Under Performing Gifted Students, Gifted Students With Disabilities Strategies for Implementing TAG-PEP Plans in the Classroom School-wide Development of Enriched and Accelerated Program to Engage Gifted Students

Service Learning

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Develop School Wide Plan

Grading Practices Competency Based Assessments State Subject Area Assessments Medford School District 549c Report to Parent

All Staff Participate/Ongoing Develop Rubric for Consistent Grading at all Grade Levels Research and Collaboratively Study Effective Grading Practices Nationwide Develop School Grading Handbook for Staff/Parents Develop Consistency in Report Comments to Parents Develop School wide Progress Reporting Format Hold Grade Level Orientations For parents on Grading All Staff Study Oregon Rubrics Work Samples, Anchor Papers for Common Usage

New Oregon Benchmark Assessments to Replace OAKS ---- SMART Assessments

All Staff/Ongoing School Leadership Participate In State Sponsored Trainings Use ODE Online Resources for Staff Training Develop Staff Understanding of Assessment Questions and
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How That Impacts Teaching And Learning Rates

Evaluation of Professional Development The effectiveness of professional development will be evaluated in multiple ways. Written evaluations will be done at the end of every professional development session and will be reviewed and analyzed by the school leadership council to guide professional development decisions. Professional development will also be evaluated through the regular observation of teachers in the process of teaching and by looking at student data. Observations will be formal and informal. Regular informal observations will assist the principal and staff in monitoring and providing additional support and resources. Questions like the following will guide the evaluation of professional development effectiveness: • • • • • • • • • • • • Are teachers well planned? Are students generally engaged, and responsive? Are the methods and procedures introduced in staff development used appropriately and consistently? To what extent is instruction standards-based? What are the variety of learning activities and strategies used in the classroom? To what extent are teachers implementing ELD instruction daily? How and to what extent are accommodations and modifications implemented? How are students performing academically and socially as measured by various assessments? To what degree have teachers created positive classroom environments? What are the incidences of referrals for discipline? How do teachers feel about the tone and culture of the school? How do students feel about the tone and culture of the school?

The professional culture of the proposed school will be based within an understanding of the faculty as a community of learners and leaders, each working toward the common goal of increasing student achievement and ensuring student success in mastering the Core Content Standards through the implementation of quality classroom instructional practices. Faculty and staff will be centrally involved in school-level decisions and in developing new initiatives through open communication lines with the V.I.B.E.S. Charter School principal. The main process for ensuring that teachers have opportunities to directly impact school-level decisions will be participation in grade level team meetings. Said teams will discuss and document relevant issues and ideas that will be brought directly to the administrative team by lead teachers. Further, teachers will be required to attend faculty meetings and will be encouraged to attend school advisory meetings where their input can be heard and considered by all members of the V.I.B.E.S. community. Also, as described above, teachers will have direct input into instructional materials selection and the professional development program. Finally, as described throughout this application, teachers will have multiple opportunities to collaborate with each other, administrators, and community members, the primary focus of which will be around gathering and analyzing data from multiple sources to support increased student achievement.
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XVI. Descriptions of Proposed Student Learning Assessment Tools to be Used
To reach the goal of Adequate Yearly Progress for all students, it is important to have multiple sources of student learning so that data can be triangulated for a more holistic view of each student’s learning profile. Required documentation of performance shall be based on multiple assessments of

student learning and shall include a variety of work samples taken from the following: • Class Assignments • Anecdotal Records • Performance Assessments/Projects • Journals/Logs • Discussion/Problem Solving/Participation • Homework • Writing Folders • Student Self-Assessments • Group Work • Lab Work • Curriculum-based Quizzes/Tests • Independent Projects When one of the above examples is used as a formative assessment, the student’s work is reviewed to determine the next step in an instructional process. In addition to the above documentations of student performance, research-based assessments will also be used to determine student learning growth. As a requirement within the Success For All program schools must use the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT III) as a kindergarten pre-test and then individually post-test on the Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised (WMTR). The Dynamic Indicators Basic Early Literacy (DIBELS), developed at the University of Oregon, will also be used to measure learning progress in: phonological awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency with connected text, vocabulary and comprehension. Curriculum-based pre- and post-assessments will be used to measure growth in student learning to make adjustments in teaching and student support within the Singapore Math curriculum as well as the supplemental curriculums used for RTI purposes in Reading and Math. Science, Social Studies, Health, Physical Education and the Arts will incorporate project-based learning strategies and will be assessed using a pre-determined Rubric system. School staff will be trained on the Oregon Work Samples for all core subject areas using the Rubrics posted on the Oregon Department of Education’s webpage and incorporate team-level discourse regarding effective teaching strategies to prepare students for the required Work Samples. OAR 581-022-0615 also requires school districts and public charter schools to provide students in Grades 3 through 8 and once in high school with annual opportunities to demonstrate their progress in the skills areas of Writing, Speaking, Mathematical Problem-Solving, and Scientific Inquiry. These opportunities must consist of annual local performance assessments.
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School districts and public charter schools are free to develop their own local performance assessments, however, they may choose to meet this requirement by administering work samples scored using the official state scoring guide. (Test Administration Manual 2012-2013, Appendix M – Work Samples and State Scoring Guides).

Skill Area

Grade

Achievement Standard

Notes About Work Samples Grade 3 students are not held to a standard in Sentence Fluency. Voice and Word Choice may be scored but are not required traits. Exemplars reflect expectations at each grade level. Grade 3 students are not held to a standard in the trait of Language. Exemplars reflect expectations at each grade level. Exemplars reflect expectations at each grade level. A separate official scoring guide exists for each of the grade bands (3, 4-5 and 68)

Grade 3 Writing

• • • •

Meets = Score of 3 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 4, 5, or 6 Meets = Score of 4 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 5 or 6

Grades 4-8

Grade 3 Speaking

• • • •

Meets = Score of 3 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 4, 5, or 6 Meets = Score of 4 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 5 or 6 Meets = Score of 4 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 5 or 6 Meets = Score of 4 in each required trait Exceeds = Score of 5 or 6

Grades 4-8

Mathematic s Problem Solving Scientific Inquiry

Grades 3-8

• • • •

Grades 3-8

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(http://www.ode.state.or.us/go/worksamples)
The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is also required to use the Oregon State Assessments for grades 3-8 (OAKS). To facilitate V.I.B.E.S. students who are required to take the Oregon State Assessments, up to the maximum allowable 3 opportunities, the school will request access to the one or more large computer labs within the Medford School District schools (“use of facilities”). Knowing that the State of Oregon is moving to a new standardized assessment tool for students, called Smarter Balanced Assessments, the V.I.B.E.S. leadership and staff will stay current with updates and trainings provided by the Oregon Department of Education to best be prepared to implement the new Smarter Balanced assessment tools for standardized measurement of student knowledge for 2014-2015 Please refer to the attached document entitled: Coming Together to Raise Achievement: New Assessments for the Common Core State Standards (December 2010) prepared by The Center for K-12 Assessment and Performance Management at ETS. To manage the comprehensive data collection required within the school reform model, Success For All has developed a data-management tools that link day-to-day classroom performance in reports that are easy to use for real discussion and decision-making throughout the year. The reports address phonics skills, vocabulary use and are available to all staff members in the classroom and at the school level. In addition, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School intends to utilize the Medford School District’s student information system to track attendance, DIBELS data, scores on any statewide assessments (including work samples in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics problem solving and scientific inquiry), data on any and all sub-group (Special Education, English Language Learners, Low Income, Race/Ethnicity, etc) populations, graduation rates (if it were to become applicable), student behavior citations and any other information that will be necessary in determining AYP status or meeting other current or future district, state or federal regulations and requirements related to Charter School student data reporting.

XVII. Grading Practices – Documentation of Student Performance
Local schools historically rarely have agreements on grading practices. In a 2008 article, Reeves
supports Marzano’s and O’Connor’s contentions that the most effective grading practices provide accurate, specific, timely feedback designed to improve student performance (2007). He also asserts that in the best classrooms, grades are only one of many types of feedback provided to students and that in some courses, portfolios are used to showcase students’ work and provide opportunities for lessons learned to lead to success. Furthermore, Reeves contests using the average of all scores throughout the semester (Marzano, 2000; O’Connor, 2007) and the use of the “semester killer”—a single project, test, lab, paper, or other assignment—that will make or break students, as this practice puts weeks of work at risk based on one project.

V.I.B.E.S. Public School staff will be uniquely positioned to develop and implement Proficiency Based Assessments through the development of grade level common assessments, including detailed Rubrics that differentiate learning performance levels. Rubrics also benefit students. When students know the criteria in advance of their performance, they have clear goals for their work. Because well-defined criteria provide a clear description of quality performance, students don't need to guess what is most important or how teachers will judge their work. V.I.B.E.S. staff will use the Oregon State Content Rubric Scoring structure for assessing student work samples. Please refer to the attached Oregon Department of Education Scoring Guides for:
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Mathematics Problem Solving, Reading, Speaking, Writing, Scientific Inquiry, Engineering Design, and Science Analysis provided by grade level. Proficiency-based practice is real standards-based practice. It is the intent and goal that V.I.B.E.S. staff will all be actively engaged in proficiency-based instruction use the Common Core Standards, in both skills and subject matter content, to 1) set performance objectives that students see, understand, and strive to achieve, 2) gauge student progress through formative assessment, 3) individualize the learning experience (in particular through projects and collections of evidence) for each student based on those objectives and ongoing assessments, and 4) determine that students are proficient in the standards through summative assessment. The staff of V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will work collaboratively within the Professional Learning Community structure to develop a consistent and well documented process for assigning grades to student work that is aligned by grade and scaffolded from Kindergarten through Eighth grade. Teaching staff will be required to maintain student learning documentation sufficient to justify student grades, which is at a minimum three assessment scores per week. Walker (2006) suggests in his research that school faculties discuss and agree on the following
when establishing a grading policy:

• • • • • • • • • • •

Learning goals of the school; Purposes of grades; Factors that should be included when grading; Role of zero and how lack of achievement will be assessed and recorded; Weighting of grades; Ways in which to document student progress; How feedback will inform the instructional program; Programs that will assist students and help them become responsible for their own learning; Communication with students and parents about the school’s grading policy and expectations; Definition and development of meaningful assessments; and Periodic re-examination, assessment, and modification of the grading system.

XVIII. Reporting Student Progress to Parents (Report Cards)
At the present time it is expected that the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will use the Medford School District’s Report to Parents report cards and Skills for Success documents to provide consistency between the school progress documentation provided by V.I.B.E.S. public charter school and the Medford School District. However, with the movement to Proficiency Based Assessment and grading practices that are aligned throughout the school, it is expected that V.I.B.E.S. instructional staff will create its own Student Progress to Parents Report that is in sync with school grading standards and the Medford School District’s revised Report to Parents which is currently “in committee” so as to align with Oregon’s updated standards. These grading standards will be fully outlined in a printed document for staff, parents and the community to ensure full disclosure.

XIX. Admission Policy
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board School Admission Policy SAE.1

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V.I.B.E.S. Charter School is a public, tuition-free, Oregon public school of choice. Enrollment at a charter school is completely voluntary. Like all Oregon schools, V.I.B.E.S. is non-sectarian and is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of gender, ethnicity, religion, national origin, ability or disability. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school has been established to serve students from kindergarten through eighth grade. For kindergarten, 4-year olds who turn five on or before September 5th of the current school year will be admitted. For first grade, students who will turn six on or before September 5th of the current school year will be admitted. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will publicly advertise the Open Enrollment period via newspaper, radio, television, Kids Unlimited’s reader board and community banners. Any child residing in the Medford School District is eligible to attend V.I.B.E.S. public charter school. All school enrollment applications from within the Medford School District attendance area received after May 1st will be placed on the wait list in the order received. If the number of applications from students who reside within the Medford School District exceeds the number of spaces available, V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will conduct a Lottery to enroll students in an equitable process on the first working day of June. If there are more names of students within the Medford School District than available school spaces, even after the Lottery, these names will be placed on a waiting list by order of lottery drawing. Students living within the Medford School District, whose names are on the waiting list after the lottery will be on a call-back basis and parents of these students will be notified by phone and official letter when an opening exists. Parents will have 10 calendar days to accept the opening before it is offered to another student living within the Medford School District and who is on the waiting list created from the lottery drawing. If there is space available, V.I.B.E.S. public charter school is allowed by law to admit out-of-district students after all Medford School District students who have applied during the Open Enrollment period and through the Lottery have been placed. Out-ofDistrict students’ enrollment applications will be date stamped upon receipt. If space is available for Out-of District students, following the Lottery, an Enrollment Letter will be sent to the student’s parents following the order of enrollment applications submission date. Parents have 10 calendar days to accept the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school enrollment opportunity before it is offered to another Out-of-District student that has submitted an application. After the school has been open for a year, preference may be given to returning students and siblings of students already enrolled in the school. Current students will be sent an “Intent to Return to V.I.B.E.S. public charter school” form in March of the current school year. Parents of current students have 15 calendar days to sign and return the “Intent to Return to V.I.B.E.S. public charter school” form to retain their student’s place for the upcoming school year. This will allow the school to determine how many openings are available for new students.

XX. Enrollment Documents
Attached is the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school student enrollment form (in English and Spanish) along with required student health forms. In addition, we will include a list of the required immunizations by grade level in both English and Spanish for parents. Students who return to a Medford School District School after attending V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will transition smoothly due to the consistent focus on teaching to the Common
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Core Curriculum Standards and from utilizing the Oregon Department of Education’s online resources.

XXI. The Proposed School Calendar
Increased quality-based instructional time leads to better outcomes for students. Adding additional learning time can have a measurable impact on student learning and overall educational experience. The National Center for Time and Learning (Boston, MA.) has produced research supporting that expanded learning time, when used well and efficiently, positively impacts student learning in three core and overlapping areas: • Increased time in academic areas allows for broader and deeper coverage of curriculum that results in improved student achievement. • Additional enrichment opportunities that enhance students’ educational and life experiences, and • Dedicated time for teacher collaboration and embedded professional development that enable educators to strengthen instruction and improve student outcomes Harvard Economist, Roland Fryer studied the charter schools in New York City and determined that “instructional time – measured as the time students are actually engaged in learning – and a high dosage of tutoring were much stronger predictors of higher achievement.” “In an analysis of the Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time Initiative, participating schools who redesigned their school days to add 300 more hours per year for all students have demonstrated improvement trends in all tested subjects. In 2010, all participating schools gained proficiency at double the rate of the state in ELA and math, and gained at nearly five times the rate of the state in science across all grades.” (Massachusetts 2020, More Time for Learning: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned (Boston: Massachusetts 2020, 2010) Because V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is dedicated to working with students of greater need, who will likely come to the school performing well below grade level, increased instructional time will be crucial to closing the achievement gap that exists between them and their peers. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will provide an extended school day and extended school year so that students spend more time in school. The school will maximize student learning and outcomes by providing a minimum of 29% more instructional time, than Medford School District schools, serving students at the same grade level. The increased day will allow V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School to provide ninety minutes of Reading English Language Arts instruction each day as well as ninety minutes of math instruction. As students from the Medford School District have had increasingly poor performance on state math exams, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School understands the importance of providing an extended block of math instruction on a daily basis. It is also important to note that the extended day and year will ensure that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School students continue to see instructional time comparable to the Medford School District in other subjects and will not sacrifice time in other subjects as a result of the increase in math instruction. Although they are not included here for the purposes of calculating instructional minutes, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will also be providing half hour tutoring sessions, starting at 7:30 AM each morning, 45 minutes of Developmental Athletics Programming every day, and Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner on-site to ensure students experience
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a well-rounded school day promoting physical activity and proper nutrition in addition to an excellent education. The following calculation of instructional time is not intended to be indicative of exactly how many more minutes of instructional time a V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School student has in comparison with a Medford School District students at every level of education. Middle School students will have a different instructional schedule from 4 th and 5th graders, just as Kindergarten students won’t have the same schedule as 1 st graders. However, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is committed to providing more than 29% more instructional time for students at each grade level. This increased instructional time will be a critical element in ensuring students who arrive at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School several years behind, return to the Medford School District performing at or above grade level. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will open to students one week earlier, have a one week shorter Spring Break, and continue one week later into the summer. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will also observe the day before Thanksgiving as a holiday. These changes in the school calendar lead to an additional 14 days of school each year. In addition, based on the current school calendar the Medford School District will observe 35 early release days during the 2012-2013 school year. The school intends to only 8 early release school days per school year, for professional development or parent teacher conferences. Combined with the great amount of instructional time on a given school day, 35 minutes per day, the result will be that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School students will be in-school for an additional 260 hours each year, a 29% increase in instructional time when compared with the Medford School District’s 5 th grade students’ schedule. Below is a sample comparison of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Schedule and School Calendar of 5th Grade. For this comparison the Oak Grove Elementary (one of the Medford School District’s Elementary Schools) school calendar and daily schedule for 5 th Grade students to the proposed schedule and calendar for 5th grade students at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School (E.R represents Early Release Days). A copy of the draft V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School calendar for 2013-2014 is attached to this proposal.

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VIBES Public Charter School -5th Grade Total E.R. Month Days Days August & September 25 0 October 23 0 November 17 2 December 15 0 January 19 2 February 19 0 March 21 2 April 16 0 May 21 2 June 10 0 Total 186 8 VIBES Public Charter School Instructional Time - 5th Grade Instructional Minutes Per Day Total Instructional Minutes Per Year Total Instructional Hours Per Year Grand Total Instructional Hours Per Year Full Day 385 68,530 1,142 E.R. Days 210 1,680 28

Medford District School - 5th Grade Total Month Days September 20 October 21 November 18 December 15 January 18 February 19 March 21 April 12 May 21 June 5 Total 170 Medford District School Instructional Time - 5th Grade Instructional Minutes Per Day Total Instructional Minutes Per Year Total Instructional Hours Per Year Grand Total Instructional Hours Per Year Full Day 350 47,250 788 910

E.R. Days 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 2 4 1 35

E.R. Days 210 7,350 123

1,170 (+ of 29%)

XXII. Description of the Typical School Day
A typical day at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School with Extended Learning Time: 7:30 – 8:00 a.m. 8:00 – 8:30 a.m. 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. 10:00 – 10:15 a.m. 10:15 – 11:45 a.m. 11:45 – 12:40 p.m. 12:40 – 3:00 p.m. 3:00 – 3:10 p.m. Tutoring Sessions Provided Breakfast prepared in the on-site commercial grade kitchen 90 minute undisturbed Success For All Reading & ELA Block Break/Recess 90 minute undisturbed Singapore Math Block Staggered Recess/Lunch periods by grade level Science/Social Studies Projected-Based Learning Break/Recess
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V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Proposal

3:10 – 4:15 pm 4:15 – 5:00 pm 5:00 – 5:30 pm

Small Group Instruction and Skill Support, & Service Learning Developmental Athletics Program (basketball, soccer, volleyball, tennis) Dinner on-site

V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s documentation of student tardies, excused and unexcused absences will follow the Medford School District’s protocols as outlined in the district’s Elementary Parent Handbook, page 10a.

XXIII. Proposed School Staff and Qualifications
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will ensure that all teachers of core classes will meet the requirements for “highly qualified” status as defined in No Child Left Behind and outlined on the Oregon Department of Education’s webpage for licensure, content endorsements and competencies. The federal law defines a Highly Qualified teacher who: Is fully licensed by the state (Oregon) Has at least a bachelor’s degree Has demonstrated competence in basic elementary curriculum (K-6) or demonstrated competence in each subject taught (7-12) Under Oregon Administrative Rule 584-100-0101, the following licenses are considered “full state” licenses: • Standard • Basic • Initial (Initial, Initial I, Initial II) • Five Year (Elementary and Secondary) • Continuing • NCLB Alternative Route Teaching License Section 9101(23)(A)(ii) of the ESEA does not permit teachers who are hired through a provisional or temporary waiver of State licensure requirements to be considered “Highly Qualified” teachers. The definition of a highly qualified teacher in section 9101(23) of the ESEA is very specific about the ways in which a teacher may demonstrate subject knowledge competence and teaching skills. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will comply fully with the requirements for highly qualified for the best interests of the school’s students. “Highly Qualified” Para-Professionals providing instructional support with Title I, Part A funds also must meet federal highly qualified standards. ESEA also states that a district receiving Title I A funds must ensure and document that all para-professionals providing instructional support meet highly qualified standards. All Title I para-professionals must have a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent. Additionally, para-professionals have the following three options to meet the designation of highly qualified: • Complete two years of study at an institution of higher education; or • Obtain an associate’s (or higher) degree; or
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• • •

Meet a rigorous standard of quality and be able to demonstrate, through a formal state or local academic assessment, knowledge of and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing, and mathematics (or, as appropriate, reading readiness, writing readiness and mathematics readiness). V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will request to use the Medford School District’s “Rigorous Local Assessment” for para-professionals to ensure the highest quality of instructional support for the students. All staff will be trained using the Oregon Administrative Rules, Chapter 584, Division 020 (“The Ethical Educator and Professional Practices”) which is applicable to school staff in the performance of their duties. Any violations will be promptly reported as required to Oregon’s Teacher Standards and Practices (Oregon Administrative Rules). Teachers will be responsible for maintaining current licensure which requires documented professional development units and/or college course credits within a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) plan. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school is committed to adhering to the highest standards of academic and financial accountability. Ongoing evaluation systems will take place to drive quality program development, instructional practices and school management. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school planning team has developed job descriptions and applications for employment that are compliant with all state and federal laws. In additional, a staff handbook has been developed that includes all of the “Annual Required Notices” per ORS law along with emergency procedures and other school information. To become an employee of the VIBES charter school staff must share a personal and professional passion for education and a dedication to working with children and youth with the full range of abilities and cultural background experiences that are representative of Medford and the greater area of Jackson County. Although the predominant culture in Medford is middle-class Anglo-American, the community’s diversity incorporates a growing population of Hispanic/Latino families that within ten years will comprise 40% of the students eligible for school in the Medford School District. It will be critical that all VIBES staff share a well-developed understanding of and commitment to the school’s academic philosophy and approach to education. VIBES will have a full time Director whose role it will be to provide instructional and management leadership, striving for academic excellence in teaching practices and maintaining high expectations for excellent student achievement results. The School’s Director, as an Effective School Leader, will have the following responsibilities (AERA 2003): 1) Facilitate the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the VIBES charter school community 2) Advocate, nurture and sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth 3) Ensure management of the school’s organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment 4) Collaborate with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources 5) Facilitate development and implementation of the school improvement plan with aligned professional development that supports vision and operational philosophy It will be the Director’s responsibility to ensure that the comprehensive Success For All school reform model is implemented with 100% fidelity to the curriculum and support systems. The Director oversees staff, the operations for the full academic program structure, including curriculum, teaching practices, student disciplinary systems, school safety and community
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relations (outreach and marketing). The VIBES public charter school Director needs to present the unique qualities that research demonstrates that are critical for improved student learning. Marzano, Waters and McNulty (2005) “identified 21 leadership attributes that have positive effects on student learning, seven of which were specifically linked to promoting ‘second-order change’. Second-Order change requires changes in attitudes, beliefs and values that are more likely to affect student learning, in contrast to ‘first-order change’ that is related to structural or organizational changes that may not affect student learning. These seven leadership attributes are: Knowledge of curriculum, instruction and assessment; Intellectual stimulation by ensuring that school faculty are aware of most current theories and practices and make discussion of these a regular aspect of the school’s culture; Monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the school practices and their impact on student learning; Communicates from strong ideals and beliefs about schooling; Willing to challenge the status-quo (change agent); Flexible through the ability to adapt his/her leadership behavior to the needs of the current situation and is comfortable with dissent; Inspires and leads new and challenging innovations (optimizer)”. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school principal will need to be able to consistently exemplify these leadership attributes. A detailed Staffing Chart is included with this proposal. The descriptions below are meant to be only brief profiles for each position listed.

POSITION TITLE
School Principal

FTE
1.0

POSITION DUTIES
Instructional and operational leadership, school district liaison, personnel management

Operations Director

1.0

Responsible for all matters of school administration that do not directly relate to instruction or student behavior. Provides multi-level assistance to the school principal and Operations Director for a full range of tasks relevant to the school needs Case management, coordination of wrap-around services, gang intervention, oversees mentor program strand by facilitating mentor-mentee matches

Operations Assistant

1.0

Intervention Specialist

1.0

Facilitator/Reading Specialist

1.0

Provide full oversight of Success for All comprehensive Language Arts school reform model, including 6-week assessments and data processing

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Licensed Teachers*

12

Provide high-quality developmentally appropriate instruction that supports the Common Core Standards, liaison with families, provide ongoing assessment of student learning for adjustment of instruction

Registered Instructors*

2

Provide instruction for project-based learning

Special Education Instructor*

1.0

Provide specialized instruction for special education students; develop, monitor and revise IEP’s

ELL Specialist *

1.0 6.0

Provide support instruction; monitor and assess ELL

Registered Instructional Assistants (part time)

Provide small group tutoring before, during and after school within Success For All format

Fitness Instructor (if funding allows)

1.0

Provide whole class instruction in age appropriate physical fitness, games, dances, etc. activities

Custodian

1.0

Provide facility cleaning, upkeep, maintenance

*Staffing level to be determined by enrollment Employment Practices to Create a Diverse Work Force : It will be vital to the success of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school that staff are representative of the cultural and language variances within the school’s student body. This will require the aggressive recruitment of teaching and support staff that has the following characteristics: Hispanic/Latino and African American ethnicity, fluent in Spanish and/or a native speaker of Spanish, and provides a balance between male and female employees. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will maintain equal opportunity hiring practices as currently used by Kids Unlimited: “We are an equal opportunity employer and do not unlawfully discriminate in employment. No question on this application is used for the purpose of limiting or excluding any applicant from consideration for employment on a basis prohibited by local, state, or federal law. Equal access to employment, services, and programs is available to all persons. Those applicants requiring reasonable accommodation to the application and/or interview process should notify a representative of the organization. It is the policy of this organization not to refuse to hire or otherwise discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability because of that person’s need for a reasonable accommodation as required by the ADA.” Substitute Teachers and Support Staff will be secured through the Southern Oregon Service District’s new Substitute Calling Procedures for local school districts in Rogue Valley.
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Staff Evaluation for Improvement of Instruction. The Oregon Department of Education and the Educator Effectiveness Workgroup, established through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver process was charged with developing state guidelines for local evaluation and support systems in Oregon. The Oregon Framework for Teacher and Administrator Evaluation and Support Systems was developed with input from the Educator Effectiveness Workgroup and other stakeholders. The Oregon Framework for Teacher and Administrator Evaluation and Support Systems requires that performance rubrics be aligned to the state adopted Model Core Teaching Standards (InTASC) and the Oregon Educational Leadership/Administrator Standards (based on ISLLC and ELCA Standards) and designed with four performance levels as described in the Oregon Framework. The Oregon Department of Education and stakeholder workgroup conducted a review and crosswalk of rubrics aligned to the standards. The 2011 Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument was the first teacher evaluation rubric tool listed in the Oregon Department of Education document dated November 14, 2012 with an aligned crosswalk to the InTASC Standards. A copy of that crosswalk is included in the appendix of this proposal. It is the understanding of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School planning team that the Medford School District is seriously evaluating an adaptation of the Bend-LaPine Framework for Teacher Evaluation. Once the Medford School District has adopted their Framework for Teacher Evaluation, as required by the Oregon Department of Education, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s board of directors will determine whether to adjust and/or change from the Charlotte Danielson’s model to the newly adopted Medford School District model for Teacher Evaluation. Student learning reflects the strength and skills of the teacher providing the instruction. Therefore, the V.I.B.E.S. team intentionally selected a framework of effective teacher performance and evaluation that will be implemented from the very beginning of school development planning and will continue throughout the full operation. To that end, the VIBES public charter school will fully implement the 2011 Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument (www.danielsongroup.org) which was first published by ASCD in 1996. The Framework built on the research compiled by ETS in its development of Praxis III: Classroom Performance Assessments, an observation-based evaluation of first-year teachers that is used for the purpose of licensing. The Framework divides the elements of effective teaching into 22 components clustered within 4 domains: Planning and Preparation; the Classroom Environment; Instruction; Professional Responsibilities. The Framework uses detailed rubric structures to delineate the different levels of teaching proficiencies: Unsatisfactory, Basic, Proficient, And Exemplary. The Framework extended the work from 1996-2006 (examining current research) to capture the skills of teaching required not only by novice teachers but by experienced practitioners as well. The 2007 edition of the Framework, also published by ASCD as Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching incorporated this research. In 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarked on a large research project “Measures of Effective Teaching” (MET) which entailed the video capture of over 23,000 lessons, analyzed according to five observation protocols with the results of those analyses (together with other measures) correlated to value-added measures of student learning. The aim of the study was to determine which aspects of a teacher’s practice were most highly correlated with high levels of student progress. Charlotte Danielson’s Framework of Teaching was one of the models selected for this study. This 2011 edition of this Framework requires the Framework to be updated with

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tighter Rubric language, the inclusion of “Critical Attributes” for each level of performance for each component and possible examples for each level of performance for each component. The chart on the following page highlights the core areas within each of the four Framework domains: Planning and Preparation Knowledge of content and pedagogy Demonstrating knowledge of students Setting instructional outcomes Demonstrating knowledge of resources Designing coherent instruction Classroom Environment Creating an environment of respect and rapport Establishing a culture for learning Managing classroom procedures Managing student behavior Instruction Communicating with students Questioning and discussion techniques Engaging students in learning Using assessment in instruction Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on teaching Maintaining accurate records

Communicating with families Participating in a professional community Organizing physical Demonstrating Growing and space flexibility and developing responsiveness professionally Designing student --------Showing assessments professionalism (The Framework For Teacher Evaluation Instrument, 2011 Edition by Charlotte Danielson)

XXIV. Governance Structure
Kids Unlimited of Oregon, the “host agency,” is an incorporated Oregon non-profit corporation that has an established tax exempt status as a 501c(3) organization, which will be maintained throughout the term of the charter agreement (including renewals). Community support for excellence in education, a strong leadership team and a highly qualified staff has enabled the host agency to establish an excellent reputation in the Southern Oregon Community, the state and nationally. Strong Board Governance is demonstrated by the established 9-member Board of Directors for Kids Unlimited of Oregon, consisting of distinguished civic leaders, business executives, philanthropists and educational professionals, who are responsible for setting policy, governing the non-profit corporation’s activities, and holding its leadership accountable for all aspects of fiscal health, organizational operation and program performance. The Kids Unlimited Board of Directors plans to establish a separate 501(c)3 member corporation for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. Kids Unlimited of Oregon shall be the sole member of this 501(c)3 corporation and will look to provide services for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School to increase the organizational efficiency of the organization. These services may include, but will not be limited to, fundraising and development, business management and
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operational support, human resources management, facilities and facility management, leadership support and development, instructional support from registered tutors and aides, and board development and support. To provide local support and representation to the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, a school Board of Directors will be established consisting of the school director, civic leaders, senior teachers, founding members and community members at large. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School may include members of the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors, but at no point will more than 25% of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board of Directors also be members of the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board will play an instrumental role in: supporting teachers and the school’s director, ensuring that the school has adequate resources, ensuring the financial and operational stability of the school, providing a fully furnished and equipped facility with adequate space for all school activities, and ensuring that all students, no matter what their income level, have access to high-quality technology and a full spectrum of extracurricular activities. To achieve these goals the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board shall seek out state and national professional development and research pertaining to: school policy development, student, parent and staff relations, all new and updated state and federal laws pertaining to the operation of a public school. A Parent Involvement Group will be established to play a mission-critical role in the well-being of the school by: ensuring that all parents meet the expectations defined in their covenant with the school, reinforcing school culture and character values among students at all times, maintaining a healthy, safe and well-equipped facility. The V.I.B.E.S. charter school and the governing Board of Directors will be subject to the provisions of the Oregon Public Meeting Law, ORS 192.710 to 192.790. The operation of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board of Directors as a public body under Oregon law is presented within this section. While not a specific requirement of Oregon charter law, a charter school must be governed by a Board of Directors under Oregon nonprofit Law. Until such a time as V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has established its own articles of incorporation and bylaws, the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School shall be governed pursuant to its host, Kids Unlimited of Oregon’s articles of incorporation and bylaws. Separate articles of incorporation and bylaws for the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School shall be established not later than July 1, 2012. The Charter Board shall be a “public body” and subject to public meeting and public records laws. Board members shall be subject to government ethics requirements. Record Retention Schedules • • • • Board member and meeting records: School Administrative Records; OAR 166-400-0010 Legal advice records: School Administrative Records; OAR 166-400-0010 Public records requests: Information and Records Management Records; OAR 166-4000030 Public notice records; School Administrative Records; OAR 166-400-0010 GENERAL REPORTING STRUCTURE and COMPOSITION

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V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School is hosted by a nonprofit corporation (Kids Unlimited of Oregon, or for future reference, “KU”), but shall be managed by its own board of directors, ultimately accountable to Kids Unlimited’s Board of Directors as well as the sponsoring entity. The governance structure will be composed of the V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School Board of Directors, The School Site Leadership team (School Principal, Director of Operations, selected faculty, and Parent Representatives) that consults and acts as liaison with the Board of Directors and School Principal (Figure 1 collapsed, Figure 2 expanded):

Figure 1:

Representatives to the Leadership and Advisory Team are nominated and elected yearly to allow for equal opportunity and participation.

Figure 2:

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The School Site Leadership Team (SSLT) will be responsible for crafting the means to achieve outcomes delineated and/or approved by the Board. This leadership team comprised of faculty, parents and the School Director and Director of Operations will represent the views and priorities of the faculty, families, students, board of directors and the advisory board. The SSLT roles and responsibilities include: • Developing and presenting strategic plan priorities to the Board; • Assisting the Board in maintaining focus and momentum for the charter school • Identifying and authoring new policy proposals • Designing and participating in the personnel interviewing and selection process Both faculty and parent representatives will be elected. The School Principal and Director of Operations will be seated without election, as the central leaders of the school. The parent representatives will be responsible for organizing family forums, attending SSLT meetings as representatives of parental interests and viewpoints. Overall governance in the oversight of finance, student performance, personnel and facilities will be provided by the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board of Directors. Board Powers and Duties: A majority of the Directors who are currently in office immediately preceding a meeting will constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at any Board meeting. An act by a majority of the Directors present at a meeting at which a quorum of Directors is present will be considered the act of the Board. Board Member Selection and Terms: The Board consists of no fewer than five (5) and no more than fifteen (15) Directors elected by a majority vote of the Board at its annual meeting. Board member terms are one to four years and members may be reelected without limit. The Board shall fill a vacancy by an election of the Board. A person elected to fill a vacancy on the Board will hold office until the next annual election meeting, held each June, at which time regular elections of the Board occur. While the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors will accept nominations from the V.I.B.E.S. Board of Directors, School Director, and school’s sponsoring entity, the final decision on all V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School board appointments and offices shall be at the sole discretion of the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors. Board Officers: The Board of Directors shall have a Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary and Treasurer. Officers shall be nominated and elected during the annual election meeting in June, for a term of one to two years. Board Committees: The Board of Directors shall have a Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee to oversee the development of the annual budget, as well as overseeing the organization’s annual audit. This committee will receive financial reports monthly, and shall meet not less than quarterly for an in-depth review of the organization’s financial position. Further guidelines on the organization’s Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee’s oversight role, please see refer to the Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual in the attachments to this proposal. In addition to the Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee the organization may develop separate committees including a Development/Fundraising Committee, a Curriculum Committee, and a
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Parent Support Committee. Establishment of these committees shall depend on membership capacity, organizational priorities, and the final decision of the Board of Directors. Board Meetings: One regular Board meeting will normally be held each month. The meeting schedule will be established at the organizational. The School Director and Board Chair will jointly prepare an agenda for all meetings of the Board and list the major items of business planned at the meeting. Meeting notice, including topics to be discussed, will be given to the local news media and any other interested person who has requested notice of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School meetings at least 48 hours in advance. The Board may hold executive sessions during a regular or special meeting to discuss only one or more of the specific topics authorized by ORS 192.660(2) as topics allowed to be discussed in executive sessions. Notice of the meeting will be given at least 24 hours in advance, except as provided for emergency circumstances under the Oregon Public Meetings Law; in such circumstances, the Board may hold executive sessions during a regular or special meeting for any reason permitted by ORS 192.660. The Chair will announce the executive session by identifying the authorization under ORS 192.660 for holding such session, and by noting the general subject of the executive session. Members of the press may attend executive sessions except as provided by the Public Meetings Law. Content discussed and any documents reviewed in executive sessions are confidential and are not to be disclosed to those not participating in the executive session. Pursuant to public meeting laws, the Board will not take final action or make final decisions during executive sessions, rather the Board will vote publicly and take action in public sessions (exceptions are student expulsion and confidential student medical records). Board Minutes: The Secretary shall record and/or supervise the recording of the minutes of all meetings of the Board and present the transcribed minutes at or before the next proceeding Board meeting. Minutes shall comply with Public Meeting laws of ORS section 192.650. Public Officials (Including Board Members) Ethics: With respect to Oregon’s Government Ethics Law as set out in ORS 244, a charter school is a “public body” and charter school employees, as well as appointed Board members, are “public officials” pursuant to ORS 174.109 and 174.117. As public officials, charter school employees and Board members are subject to the provisions of Oregon Ethics Law as set out in ORS 244. Public officials, including charter school employees and Board members, may not use or attempt to use their positions to gain a financial benefit or avoid a financial cost for themselves, a relative, or their businesses, if the opportunity is available only because of their position as an employee or Board member of the charter school. Such financial benefits may include, but are not limited to: business opportunities; gifts; services; and /or payment of expenses by someone other than the charter school. Conflicts of Interest: A Board member may have a conflict of interest if the Board member can participate in an official action that could result in a financial benefit or detriment to the Board member, a relative of the Board member, or a business with which either the Board member or a relative of the Board member are associated. An actual conflict of interest occurs if the action taken by the Charter Board of Directors would affect a financial interest. A potential conflict of interest occurs if the action taken by the Charter Board of Directors could affect a financial
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interest. A Board member with an actual or a potential conflict of interest must publicly announce the conflict and the nature of the conflict in a meeting where the issue will be discussed, before the issue is discussed. The minutes of the meeting will accurately reflect the Board member’s statement. If the conflict is an actual conflict of interest, the Board member may be asked to leave the meeting and may not participate in a discussion of the issue not participate in any official action taken on the issue. If the conflict is a potential conflict of interest, the Board member, following the public announcement of the conflict, may participate in a discussion of the issue and in any official action taken on the issue. Annually Board members will provide a statement of all of their business involvement, if any, with the non-profit organization. Such Board member statements will become part of the public minutes of the organization. Board Member Rights and Responsibilities: Charter schools in Oregon must be established as an Oregon non-profit corporation and be recognized as a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Members of the charter school Board of Directors have responsibilities as Board members pursuant to Oregon’s non-profit corporation law as set out in ORS Chapter 65 and corporation law generally. Board Responsibilities: Board members have three basic fiduciary responsibilities or duties, according to ORS Chapter 65: care, loyalty and obedience. • Duty of Care: Board members have the duty to actively participate in charter school Board activities and to make reasonable inquiries into issues that come before the charter school Board. ORS 65.357 establishes a standard of care for Board members: what would a reasonably prudent person do in a similar situation with access to similar information. Duty of Loyalty: Board members have the duty to avoid conflicts of interest. Where conflicts, either actual or potential, exist, Board members have the duty to disclose the conflict to the Board. Conflicts are discussed further in a separate policy. Duty of Obedience: Board members have the duty to follow the non-profit organization’s governing documents (Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws and *Charter-not yet established), to carry out the mission of the charter school, to ensure that funds are used for lawful purposes and to comply with state and federal laws.

• •

Other duties include but are not limited to: • Meet at such times and places as required by these Bylaws; • Register their addresses with the Secretary of the corporation, and notices of meetings mailed or communicated to them at such addresses shall be valid notices thereof; • Oversee the School's performance relative to the School's vision and goals, applicable statutes and rules and provisions of the Charter; • Adopt the School's general policies, governance policies, student policies, personnel policies and financial management policies; • Adopt the annual School budget and School calendar; • Approve major expenditures and all contracts; • Solicit financial and in-kind support from organizations and private individuals, both within and outside the local community.

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Board Rights: Board members have the right to: • Reasonably rely on information from the charter school staff and advisors; • Have access to charter school management; and • Have access to charter school information, including internal information (taking FERPA into consideration). Whistleblower Protection Policy: V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School requires its directors, officers and employees to observe high standards of business and personal ethics in the conduct of their duties and responsibilities. All employees and representatives of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, must practice integrity in fulfilling the responsibilities and comply with all applicable laws and regulations. Reporting Responsibility: This Whistleblower Policy is intended to encourage and enable employees and others to raise serious concerns internally so that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School can address and correct inappropriate conduct and actions. It is the responsibility of all Board members, officers, employees and volunteers to report concerns about violations of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s code of ethics or suspected violations of law or regulations that govern V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s operations. No Retaliation: It is contrary to the values of V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School for anyone to retaliate against any Board member, officer, and employee or volunteer who in good faith reports an ethics violation, or a suspected violation of law, such as a complaint of discrimination, or suspected fraud, or suspected violation of any regulation governing the operations of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. An employee who retaliates against someone who has reported a violation in good faith is subject to discipline up to and including termination of employment. Reporting Procedure: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has a policy and suggests that employees share their serious concerns within the scope of this Whistleblower Policy with their immediate supervisor. If an employee is not comfortable speaking with his//her supervisor or is not satisfied with his/her supervisor’s response, the employee is encouraged to speak with the School Director (unless the School Director is the individual suspected of ethical violations or other wrong-doing within the scope of this Whistleblower Policy). School administrators are required to report serious complaints or concerns about suspected ethical and legal violations in writing to the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Compliance Officer, who has the responsibility to investigate all reported complaints. Employees with concerns or complaints may also submit their concerns in writing directly to their supervisor or the School Director or the school’s Compliance Officer. Compliance Officer: The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Compliance Officer is responsible for ensuring that all complaints about unethical or illegal conduct are investigated and resolved. The Compliance Officer will notify the School Director of all complaints within the scope of this Whistleblower Policy (unless the School Director is the individual suspected of ethical violations or other wrong-doing within the scope of this Whistleblower Policy). The Compliance Officer will keep a written record of all complaints and their resolution and will report at least annually to the full Board on all complaints and investigative findings of suspected and substantiated egregious improprieties within the scope of this Whistleblower Policy. The Compliance Officer
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will be appointed by the Board of Directors and should be someone with a strong background in Human Resources Law, including FLMA, FLSA, and Oregon State Labor Law. Accounting and Auditing Matters: The V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School Compliance Officer shall immediately notify the Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee of any concerns or complaint regarding corporate accounting practices, internal controls or auditing and work with the committee until the matter is resolved. Acting in Good Faith: Anyone filing a written complaint concerning a violation or suspected violation must be acting in good faith and have reasonable grounds for believing the information disclosed indicates a violation. Any allegations that prove not to be substantiated and which prove to have been made maliciously or knowingly to be false will be viewed as a serious disciplinary offense. Confidentiality: Violations or suspected violations may be submitted on a confidential basis by the complainant. Reports of violations or suspected violations will be kept confidential to the extent possible, consistent with the need to conduct an adequate investigation. Handling of Reported Violations: The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school’s Compliance Officer will notify the person who submitted a complaint and acknowledge receipt of the reported violation or suspected violation. All reports will be promptly investigated and appropriate corrective action will be taken if warranted by the investigation. Compliance Officer: The Compliance Officer will investigate and respond to complaints. The School Director may function as the Compliance Officer for complaints related to employees. A designated Board member will function as the Compliance Officer for complaints related to the Administrator or Board member(s). Public Meetings: When a school district agrees to sponsor a charter school and the parties execute an enforceable charter contract, the charter school governing Board is considered to be a “governing Board” of a “public body” and is subject to Oregon public meeting law (ORS 192.610 to 192.690). All regular and special meetings of the Board will be open to the public except as provided by law. No meeting of the Board shall be held at any place where discrimination on the basis of race, disability, religion, color, sex, age, marital status or national origin is practiced. Reasonable notice, typically 48 hours, of the date, time, place and key agenda topics for all regular and special Board meetings will be provided to parties determined by the school to be interested, and by anyone who requests to receive the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School meeting notices and agendas. Executive sessions will be conducted according to public meeting laws and corporate bylaws. Public Records: The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will comply with the Oregon Public Records Law in responding to any request for release of or review of any V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School record. Employee personnel records are available for use and inspection only by the individual employee, others designated in writing by the employee, the auditor in connecting
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with carrying out his/her duties or as specifically authorized by the Board, a Board member when specifically authorized by the Board or in conjunction with an action item to come before the Board, the School Director or designee, attorney(s) for the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School or their designated representative on matters of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School business, or upon receipt of a legal subpoena or other court order. Student records are available for use and inspection only by the student’s parent(s), and any staff members with a “need to know” based on assignment to instruct and/or supervise the student or upon lawful subpoena if the parent or guardian is informed in advance of the receipt of the subpoena and given an opportunity to challenge the subpoena. Public records shall be retained according to the schedule established by the Oregon State Archivist. Legal Advice and Counsel: The School Director shall have access to qualified legal advice regarding school issues, and will seek legal advice before making major decisions, including terminations, that may have legal implications. The Board may have policy adoptions and revisions reviewed by legal counsel before adoption, and will seek legal advice before making major decisions, including terminations, that may have legal implications. Charter School Governance References: A Guide to Nonprofit Board Service; http://www.doj.state.or.us/charigroup/pdf/nonprofit.pdf Public Records and Meetings Manual; http://www.doj.state.or.us/public_records/manual.html Guide for Public Officials – Ethics; http://www.oregon.gov/OGEC/forms_publications.html Oregon Charter School Governance; http://www.chartercenter.org/resources

XXV. Relationship Between V.I.B.E.S. Charter School and its Employees
All Employment at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is a voluntary, at-will employment relationship for no definite period of time . V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School and the employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason or for no reason, with or without notice. Although, the employees of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school have the legal right to organize and become part of an employee union, it is the hope and desire of the school leadership that employed staff do not choose that option. For more detail on separation policies and the at-will nature of employment being proposed for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School please see Policy Statement of the Board of Directors of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School on Separation from Employment (PA.1.AR). Once the school has been chartered the school’s Board of Directors will meet to review, revised and approve this or a similar policy on at-will employment and separation.

XXVI. Student Handbook – Code of Conduct
An extensive V.I.B.E.S. public charter school Student Handbook and Code of Conduct has been developed that meets the requirements of Oregon law for informing students of discipline expectations and consequences. A copy of this handbook was included in the Appendix of the first four notebooks submitted to the Medford School District in early September 2012. In

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addition Board Policies were submitted outlining processes and procedures for student conduct, including Safe Schools protocols for weapons. In addition to the V.I.B.E.S. Student Handbook, the school will also include the Medford School District’s Parent Handbook on its school website and in student take home packets upon enrollment to the school for consistency of communication with parents across all of the district’s schools. Because V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School is currently structured for kindergarten through eighth grade and will not typically be serving students of the legal driving, an option for student parking will not be provided. However, if at some point V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School and its sponsoring entity re-negotiate the terms of the charter to include services provided to students in grades 9-12, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Board of Directors will adopt a policy to address student parking needs. Kids Unlimited currently owns multiple parking lots that it can make available for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School staff use as needed. A policy on the use of these spaces will be adopted by the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board of Directors and the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors by July 2013. If an additional space is rented by Kids Unlimited or V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School for school staff use, a parking policy will be adopted by the Board of Directors for that lot as well.

XXVII. Response to Interventions (RTI)
Positive Behavior Support Systems and Response to Interventions are both integral parts of the V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School’s framework for best practices in developing systems and support plans that best meet the needs of all students. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will follow the Medford School District’s process for meeting the needs of students who are not successful in the regular classroom program, which states: “Our schools and classrooms strive to foster a learning environment that encourages positive student behavior and responsibility. This is accomplished through the use of proactive and positive supports that teach, support and reinforce appropriate behavior. Classroom Supports - All students receive instruction focusing on empathy, impulse control, problem solving and anger management. Strategic Supports - A Student Success Plan may be developed for students needing additional support. This plan focuses on re-teaching behaviors and providing students with frequent feedback and positive reinforcement. Intensive Supports - Some students may require an individualized Behavior Intervention Plan that targets specific behavior and incorporates a higher level of positive reinforcement. A Functional Behavior Assessment is completed before this plan is developed. All students will be provided with high-quality instruction, frequent monitoring of progress and lesson activities that are designed to match student needs. Unique student needs will be addressed through the use of accommodations, modification and differentiated instruction.
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Accommodations – Academic or behavior supports that do not change the level or content of instruction. Examples of accommodations include: allowing a student more time to complete an activity, frequent teacher checks for understanding and seating a student away from distractions. Modifications – Changes and/or alterations to the level or content of instruction provided to a student and/or performance standards. Examples of modifications include: providing a student with different spelling words, allowing a student to listen to text on tape and reducing the amount of assigned work. Differentiated Instruction – Classroom instruction is designed to meet the unique needs of all students. Teachers develop instruction and activities that are based on students interests and strengths while allowing students to select from a range of activities to demonstrate their performance and understanding of the material. A. Benchmark Instruction – All students will receive 90 minutes of reading instruction at grade-level standards in the classroom. Teachers will provide accommodations and modifications as needed to differentiate the classroom instruction. B. Strategic Interventions – These interventions are provided for students who may need more small-group instruction and supplementary materials in the classroom to make adequate and expected progress toward grade-level standards. C. Intensive Interventions – These interventions are provided for students who need an additional dose of reading instruction in addition to the 90 minutes of classroom instruction. These direct-instruction interventions are provided in a small group. Universal Screenings – All students in grades K-6 will participate in a school-wide reading screening called DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) three times a year to assess their skill levels and allow school staff to assign students to appropriate instructional groups. These screenings occur in the fall, winter and spring or when students are enrolled in a school for the first time. Progress Monitoring - Students receiving strategic interventions will have their progress monitored at least one time per month. Students who are participating in intensive interventions will have their progress monitored twice a month.” (Medford School District 549c Student Services 2012-2013)

The Medford School District information below will be incorporated into a V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School brochure and posted on the school’s webpage. Multi-Tiered Instruction (MTI) and Response to Intervention (RTI) are often used interchangeably. MTI, as a school organizational model, is a system of organizing general education curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of all students. This system of support integrates core instruction and all supplemental and intervention programs in order to use resources more efficiently. School-wide
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All Medford School District, including V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, students receive high quality, research-based instruction by qualified staff in their general education classroom. Instruction is delivered using a multi-tier model of increasingly intense student interventions. Differentiated curriculum and instruction is in all classrooms. General education instructors and staff assume an active role in the assessment of the student’s progress in core and supplemental curriculum. Medford School District Schools, including V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, conduct universal screening of academics and behavior three times per year. All district schools have a common framework and participate in similar procedures and processes that are well defined and allow for some variation between schools. Grade and School Level Teams use a problem-solving model to develop and evaluate core instruction and intervention programs. For Students At-Risk The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School staff implements specific, research-based interventions to address the student’s difficulties. Continuous and regular progress monitoring of the student’s performance occurs and interventions may be delivered by someone other than the classroom teacher. Interventions are varied in duration, frequency and time. School staff will use progress monitoring data and decision rules to determine the effectiveness of the interventions and to make modifications, as needed. Systematic evaluation of the fidelity or integrity with which instruction and interventions are implemented will be implemented by the school leadership. Response to Intervention V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will keep you informed about your child and will tell you whether your child begins to make sufficient progress or if your child has or continues to have difficulty. If you and the school have tried several interventions, and progress is still limited, you may be asked to give your consent for an evaluation. The purpose of such an evaluation is to determine your child’s specific educational needs and to consider whether a disability may impact his or her learning.

XXVIII. Special Education
Response to Intervention is also intended to reduce the number of students referred for Special Education services. Please refer to the included addendum documents regarding the V.I.B.E.S. Positive Behavior Support Program, the school’s Response to Intervention plan which includes a well documented protocol for our Student Study Team. Also attached is the Procedural Safeguards Notice to be provided for all parents with students entering Special Education. V.I.B.E.S. will provide the documents in both English and Spanish. Special Education policies were included in the original four notebooks submitted to the Medford School District in early September 2012. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be following these policies in regards to Special Education. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will follow the Medford School District’s detailed Board Policies in regard to the correct implementation of Special Education Services within the charter school. Medford School District is in charge of ALL Special Education matters within the
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charter school. V.I.B.E.S. school staff will work collaboratively and professionally with Medford School District staff to ensure effective development and implementation of Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) for identified Special Education students. The V.I.B.E.S. team will work to meet the needs of individuals with special needs regardless of disability and will be served in accordance with applicable federal and state laws. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will collaborate with the Medford School District in the annual “Child Find” efforts to ensure that a free appropriate education is provided to all students with exceptional needs. The following statement will be posted on the school’s webpage and included in the school’s annually in the school’s parent newsletter: On an ongoing basis, school districts in Jackson County conduct Child Find activities to locate disabled children birth to age 21 who are not currently receiving special education services. Medford School District 549C wants to find and evaluate the skills of children within its boundaries who have serious physical, educational, emotional, mental, or learning problems so that appropriate educational programs may be provided. Such services must be provided for disabled students under federal and state law. The rights of parents and special education laws can be reviewed at the special education office of Medford School District 549C (541) 842-3628. V.I.B.E.S. will be a public charter school within the Medford School District. Because of this, the Medford School District has the responsibility to identify, locate, and evaluate to determine a student’s needs for special education and related services. The Medford School District is also required to provide those special education services, regardless of where the student resides. Special education services at V.I.B.E.S. are designed to meet the unique needs of students in special education enrolled at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. The IEP team—including the parents, the Educational Specialist, a Special Education Provider, and a District representative— may decide to deliver special education services in a variety of ways, depending on each student’s individual needs. The following statement will be included in a Special Education brochure for V.I.B.E.S. as well as being included on the school’s webpage: Any student may apply for admission to V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. For students who require special education services, an IEP meeting will be scheduled to review the student’s needs, IEP goals, and services to determine if the IEP can be implemented at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. In some cases, the parent and the Medford School District may agree through a written agreement that changes to the student’s IEP can be made without holding a formal IEP meeting. If a student’s IEP cannot be implemented at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School because the student requires specialized supports through a special day class, the IEP team may determine that V.I.B.E.S. is not the best educational placement for the student. If this is the case, the parent would need to contact the school district where the child lives for information regarding programs and services in the resident district. SERVICE DELIVERY

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Consultative Model For many students, special education services are best provided by the Educational Specialist. This allows a continuity of service, as the Educational Specialist works with the student and his family on both his general education course work and specially designed instruction. This would be in close consultation with a Special Education Provider. These services would take place at a location agreed upon by the Educational Specialist and the family. Direct Service Model For other students, direct service provided by a special education provider may be needed. If that is the case, the student would meet with both their Educational Specialist and the Special Education Provider directly. The services provided by Special Education Provider occur on-site at V.I.B.E.S., while meetings with the Educational Specialist would take place at a location agreed upon by the Educational Specialist and the student’s family. Speech and Language Students who require speech and language services will receive high quality services through an innovative service delivery model called tele-practice or online speech therapy. Students come on site to V.I.B.E.S. to have a live interaction with a qualified, licensed speech language pathologist using web-based video conferencing technology. To provide this high quality service to your student, the Medford School District has partnered with Presence Learning, the leader in online speech therapy. If you have specific questions about your child, contact your child’s teacher or your school principal. If you have questions regarding District policy contact Special Education & Student Services at 541-842-3628. Dr. Philip G. Long, Superintendent Tania Tong, Supervisor of Special Education & Student Services Special Education Services at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Special Education & Student Services 815 South Oakdale Medford, OR 97501 (541) 842-3628

XXIX. Section 504
In compliance with the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADA) the school shall ensure that no otherwise qualified individual with disabilities shall, solely by reason of his/her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity conducted by the agency or those provided by the agency through contractual or other arrangements. Programs and activities shall be accessible and usable by individuals with disabilities as prescribed by law. The agency director will ensure all Section 504-qualified students with disabilities are identified annually. Students will be evaluated by a team of individuals knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data and placement options.
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Services will be provided as required by law. V.I.B.E.S public charter school has adopted Board Policies for Section 504 students that are aligned with the Medford School District’s Policies. Please refer to the attached addendum regarding Section 504 identification and services at V.I.B.E.S. Public School which is aligned with Federal and Oregon guidelines.

XXX Talented and Gifted
V.I.B.E.S. public charter school board of directors recognizes the need to establish an educational program designed to provide maximum educational opportunities for all students including non-typical populations. The board recognizes that many children have talents and abilities which may need acceleration and/or enrichment opportunities beyond the regular curriculum. The school, while meeting the requirements of Oregon Statutes and Administrative Regulations pertaining to TAG, shall identify these students and provide the educational services to develop these innate talents and abilities as outlined in each TAG student’s PEP. V.I.B.E.S public charter school has adopted Board policies for TAG students that are aligned with the Medford School District’s board policies. The V.I.B.E.S. public school board policy for Talented and Gifted is found within the Instruction Section of Board Policies which is included within the Appendix. In addition, our school staff will follow the 2010 Gifted Programming Standards as outlined by the National Association for Gifted Children, which is also attached to this proposal. Please refer to the attached addendum regarding V.I.B.E.S. Public School’s Talented and Gifted protocols and program development and Medford School District TAG Manual.

XXXI. English Language Learners
V.I.B.E.S. public charter school is required, as all public schools are in Oregon, to provide 30 minutes of English Language instruction every day for every student identified as an English Language Learner (ELL). V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will follow the protocols established by the Medford School District for identifying and serving ELL students using the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) tool. All students of Hispanic origin will be assessed for language support needs upon entering V.I.B.E.S. public charter school. The pre and post assessment used will be Oregon’s English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) which is the same assessment used within the Medford School District. This online adaptive assessment measures student proficiency in the areas of speaking, writing, reading, and listening. When students complete their ELPA tests, they receive a score that identifies where they fall in five levels of English proficiency (beginning, early intermediate, intermediate, early advanced, and advanced). Specifically, all districts, including public charter schools, must comply with ORS 336.079, which requires schools to provide specific courses to teach speaking, reading, and writing of the English language. To accomplish this goal, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will: A) Employ a fully endorsed English Language Learner Instructor (full time) to provide 90 minutes of instruction for students grouped by grade level during the regular school day, with the assistance of a specially trained ELL educational assistant; Provide 90 minutes of Success for All school wide reading instruction at each student’s ability level;
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B)

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C)

Within the school wide RTI model, if an ELL student is not making adequate progress as measured by curriculum based assessments and DIBELS, the school will provide additional tutoring during, before or after school using the Success for All tutoring protocol and support English Language Acquisition skills through the use of Rosetta Stone software.

The V.I.B.E.S. public school will also use Rosetta Stone software for English Language Learners and will work closely with the Medford School District’s ELL program staff to provide effective instruction for these students. Please refer to the attached V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s English Language Learner Plan for a detailed explanation of our ELL program.

XXXII. Counseling
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will work collaboratively with Kids Unlimited for structured Case Management services for students within the school who have been determined to have an above average level of risk factors predictive of dropping out of school and/or anti-social behaviors. Kids Unlimited has fifteen years experience in providing case management services that have been validated by the Jackson County Health and Human Services Department for file documentation and records management. Students who are within a severe range of risk factors will be referred for outside counseling services provided by professionals within our area. Kids Unlimited has successfully been working with La Clinica Del Valle for the past three years for contracted counseling services for at risk youth within the agency’s after school programs in grades 4-8. Kids Unlimited leadership has found the counseling services provided through La Clinica to be effective and consistent in delivery for both English and Spanish speaking students. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will seek competitive grant funds (local, state, regional and federal) to secure quality counseling services through La Clinica Del Valle for at risk students.

XXXIII. Community Involvement
Over the course of the development of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School framework and proposal, leadership within Kids Unlimited (including the Board of Directors and staff leadership) have extensively researched best practices and research supported curriculum and teaching strategies that are effective in closing the Achievement Gap. During this process, the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s planning team has attended two National Charter School conferences, an “Invitation Only” Purpose Built Communities conference and facilitated two comprehensive community leader forums for public input on the school design and programming. In addition, the planning team has engaged a team of highly respected community leaders with extensive experience in education, leadership and community involvement to read this revised V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School proposal for completeness and again provide input regarding the school design and program delivery to increase student achievement. Over fifty one to one and small group meetings have been held over the past two years with social service leadership, Latino Advisory Committee leadership, local and regional funders as well as significant community leadership to gather advice and input for the school’s framework and
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proposal development. Throughout this process, the input has been highly positive and progressive with the recognition that a change is necessary to close the achievement gaps between high income students and low income students as well as between Anglo and Hispanic students here in the Rogue Valley. Both the V.I.B.E.S. team and many community leaders in the Rogue Valley, believe that closing these achievement gaps directly translates into an economic improvement for our community. Closing such gaps will increase graduation rates, send more students on to post-secondary education, and give more young people entering the work force the skills to compete and excel in the current global marketplace. Community involvement, especially Parent Involvement, is core to the success of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school. The school staff and leadership team will seek to establish close relationships with the parents of all of our students, making home visits and advocating for community resources to provide wrap around services when needed. Because the host agency for V.I.B.E.S. public charter school is Kids Unlimited, one of the strengths that the host agency brings is extensive community involvement with program youth. V.I.B.E.S. will continue to build on that involvement through community forums and speaking opportunities to share the purpose and work of V.I.B.E.S. public charter school. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will utilize the Medford School District’s VIMS (Volunteers in Medford Schools) document and protocols for volunteers within our school. Kids Unlimited staff have the equipment and expertise to handle fingerprinting onsite at the Kids Unlimited youth center. Please refer to the attached VIMS Handbook for protocols. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will actively seek a broad representation from parents with students in the school to participate on the school’s advisory council as well as a full range of special project committees. As part of our English Language Learner Plan (which is also attached to this proposal), family engagement is a vital part of our school’s programming. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will develop and implement a comprehensive Parent Involvement Program which could include the following: • • • • • • • • • An overview of the school’s structure including school hours, school holidays, school rules, school trajectory from pre-kindergarten through middle school, and the school's administrative hierarchy, A grade by grade overview of the school’s curriculum, Oregon State Standards, Benchmarks and Assessments, Explanation of ELL parent rights including the right to have an interpreter, to have school literature translated in their language of origin, free lunch program and any supplemental school programs that their child may be eligible for, Parent strategies to help their child at home with English Language Learning (oral storytelling, wordless books, learning English themselves), how to help with homework, Invite the parent(s) to tour the school, visit the classroom and volunteer, Provide English as a Second Language classes for parents using Rosetta Stone software onsite at the school, Introduce the family to the Public Library, Provide basic evening word processing and technology classes onsite at the school for parents, Other information identified by parents and staff as being important to share for skill and school relationship building,
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

V.I.B.E.S. Charter School Advisory Committees Parent Expectations to Support Student Achievement Parent Literacy Workshops Family Literacy Workshops Math Literacy Workshops Parent Assessment Workshops Health/Nutrition Classes Home/school communication through web-based media, newsletters, flyers, and letters Back to School Night Open House School wide performances Parent/Teacher conferences Parent Volunteer Programs School Beautification Program with parents, teachers, and community Big Sunday Community Event Parent Classroom Volunteers Parent Representative for each classroom/Classroom Adoption

XXXIV. Proposed Budget Budget Narrative & Assumptions:
The primary source of revenue for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be the General Purpose Grant based on Extended ADMw. In addition V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will apply for other state and federal grants for charter schools, private and foundation grants, private donations and fundraising activities.

ADMw: The ADMw components shall be computed to determine the operating budget of the
school. For the purpose of budget projection, the calculation used in the attached budget is based on the following Assumptions: • Despite the fact that V.I.B.E.S. kindergarten students will participate in full extended day programming, we understand that each Kindergarten student is weighted at 0.5 in accordance with current ADM calculations. Despite the fact that the State has passed a bill to fund full day Kindergarten starting in 2015, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School assumes all Kindergarten funding at 50%, because the state has not yet given explicit details regarding how full day Kindergarten will be funded. • Because the School’s sponsor is obligated to provide the school with no less than 80% of the amount of the Charter Schools Rate (ORS 338.155), this budget is conservatively based upon the receipt of 80% of the current Charter Schools Rate (as of the latest 20122013 State School Fund Estimates provided by ODE, appendix [insert here]) for Medford School District 549c, which is currently 5,986. $5,986 X 80% = $4,789

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Given that the target population for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will include the students of greatest need in the district, assuming that the Number of Students in ESL programs, Students in Poverty, Students in Foster Care and Neglected/Delinquent situations will all make up a larger percentage of our student population than they do the district’s population. The V.I.B.E.S. team very conservatively estimates that on a percentage basis the school will serve twice as many English Language Learners, twice three times as many students in poverty, and twice as many students in foster care settings as the Medford School District currently serves. • V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s five year budget also assumes the receipt of 80% of the additional weights for students in ESL Programs, IEP students, Students in Poverty, and Students in Foster Care who will be enrolled in V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. V.I.B.E.S. of course understands that the charter school will only receive funding for students who actually enroll in the school. Based on the current demographics of the Medford School District 549c, as well as the target population and mission and vision of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, below are the current estimates for the numbers of students V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School estimates will attend the charter school in year one. In subsequent years, the 5 year budget (addendum X) assumes that students fitting into these subgroups will continue to attend V.I.B.E.S. at the same percentages of total enrollment. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School feels comfortable in these being conservative estimates, but understands that it will need to make financial adjustments if the percentages of students in these subgroups varies significantly, one way or the other. The following chart is based on the addendum, immediately following the V.I.B.E.S Charter School narrative and budget, showing the current estimated ADMw for the Medford School District with the assumptions outlined above.

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2012-2013 ADMw Components for Medford School District 549c ADMr Students in ESL programs Students capped at 11% of ADMr Students on IEP Above 11% of ADMr Students in Pregnant/Parenting Programs Students in Poverty Students in Foster Care and Neglected/Delinquent Remote Elementary School Correction Total ADMw

Student s 12,245. 00 820.00 1,347.0 0 1.30 40.00 2,218.4 0 149.00 8.90

Weight 1.00 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 0.25 1.00

ADMw 12,245. 00 410.00 1,347.0 0 1.30 40.00 554.60 37.25 8.90 14,644

Current Percentage of District Student Population 100.0% 6.7% 11.0% 0.0% 0.3% 18.1% 1.2% 1.1%

Estimate d Percenta ge of V.I.B.E.S. PCS Student Pop. 100.0% 13.4% 11.0% 0.0% 0.0% 54.3% 2.4% 0.0%

Estimated 2013-2014 ADMw Components for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School ADMr Students in ESL programs Students capped at 11% of ADMr Students on IEP Above 11% of ADMr Students in Pregnant/Parenting Programs Students in Poverty Students in Foster Care and Neglected/Delinquent Remote Elementary School Correction Total ADMw

Student s 275* 36.9 30.3 0.0 0.0 149.3 6.6 0.0

Weight 1.00 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 0.25 1.00

ADMw 275.00 18.43 30.25 0.00 0.00 37.33 1.65 0.00 363

Estimated Percentage of V.I.B.E.S. PCS Student Pop. 100.0% 13.4% 11.0% 0.0% 0.0% 54.3% 2.4% 0.0%

*300 students, the 50 Kindergarten students are counted as a .5 for the purposes of funding, leading to the 275 ADMr calculation.

Other Revenue Assumptions:

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Start-Up Funding: Upon the sponsor’s approval of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, Kids Unlimited will begin to undertake a campaign to raise funds for the restricted purpose of collecting start-up funding for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. These funds will be raised to cover the costs of the initial purchase of the Singapore Math curriculum, the Success For All curricular materials, classroom furniture, and classroom technology. Kids Unlimited has an excellent track record of raising funds to support its programs and initiatives. Annual Contributions: In addition to the start-up funds, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School makes the assumption that it will be successful in raising a modest $50,000 per year. This may come in the form of foundation grants, individual or corporate gifts, or some combination of the three.

Expense Assumptions
Staffing: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will begin with a staff of twenty four full-time staff, including a School Director/Principal, Director of Operations, twelve full-time teachers (two per grade), two full-time Registered Instructional Assistants, one Special Education Teacher, one Success For All Facilitator/Reading Specialist, one Intervention Specialist, one ELL Specialist, an Operations Assistant (Secretary), and one full-time Custodian. In addition, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has budgeted to have six part-time Registered Instructors and four part-time Registered Instructional Assistants to provide less than 600 hours of tutoring and supplemental instruction per year. The school will also employ two part-time Operations Assistants and one part-time Building Maintenance Worker who will each provide less than 600 hours of operational support on an annual basis. Salaries will be competitive, but are not enclosed due to their confidential nature. Taxes: Payroll taxes are conservatively estimated at 12% of salary, which includes 7.65% for FICA (Social Security & Medicare) and State Unemployment Tax. PERS: Employer PERS contributions are estimated at 22%. Health Insurance: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School intends to contribute $300 per month towards the health insurance coverage of each full-time employee. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will offer multiple health insurance platforms, but the cost beyond the $300 per month will be the responsibility of the employee, if the employee should elect coverage under V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter Schools’ benefits plan. Contracted Services: The budget assumes the cost of $1,000 per year per special education student in contracted special education support costs. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School acknowledges that if there are students with greater needs that cannot be met by work with the Special Education Teacher and Intervention Specialist that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School must work with the sponsoring entity and/or contract with an outside provider to ensure that these educational needs are met at a very high standard.

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Curriculum: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School budgets $20,000 per grade level in curricular expenses for each new grade level. In subsequent years, the school budgets consumable replacement costs at $2,000 per section (excluding the $20,000 for new grade levels). Books: The school budgets a cost of $1,000 per grade classroom for classroom libraries. Other grants may be pursued for the purpose of increasing the size of the classroom libraries. Once the school reaches capacity the school will budget $2,000 each year in book replacement costs. Assessments: Assessment costs are based on the costs to purchase Peabody Test Kits, Peabody Record forms, DIBELS materials, and the WRMT-R/NU. The costs are rounded up to the nearest whole thousand to account for cost of living increases and potential additional assessment materials. Instructional Software: Estimates are based on the purchase of Essential Skills Software in year one, and thereafter a budget of $1,000 per student is estimated. Supplies: The school budgets $300 per student for classroom supplies Manipulatives: The school budgets $1,000 per classroom for manipulative. Once the school has reached capacity there were be replacement costs built in at $2,000 per year. Furniture: The school budgets $7,000 to furnish each new classroom with desks, tables, and chairs. Once the school has reached capacity, the school will budget $7,000 per year in replacement costs. The school acknowledges that as these items are above the capitalization limit for the organization, they will be capitalized on the balance sheet and have a lesser impact on the P&L, but as the organization will have a tighter cash flow in the early years of operation we chose to show capitalized expenses at full cash value in the five year budget to ensure fiscal stability. Student Trips: The school budgets $300 per student annually for educational field trips. Professional Memberships: The school budgets $2,500 per year for professional memberships, a number which will increase by 3% per year after the second year of operation. Regular & Overnight Mail: The school budgets $200 per month for regular and overnight mail for communication with parents and other stakeholders. To the degree possible the school will use email, telephone, and send home communication with students, but the organization recognizes that some items will need to be mailed home. Each year this amount will increase by the same factor that enrollment increases. Office Supplies: The school budgets $200 per month for basic office supplies. This factor will increase annually by the same factor that enrollment increases. Office Equipment: The school budgets $5,000 per year for office equipment, including computers, desks and chairs. In the initial years as the organization grows capacity to purchase

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more office equipment, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School may accept some donated equipment and office furniture and it also may share resources with Kids Unlimited. Photocopier Services (Lease & Printing): The school will lease photocopier services. The cost of this is estimated at $12,000 per year, with a 10% annual increase built into the budget. Professional Services: The school will engage an independent auditor on an annual basis for the required financial audit and to prepare the organization’s 990. The budget assumes the annual audit to cost 4% of total budget expenses. Insurance: The school has undergone a thorough examination of the insurance costs required to adequately insure and bond the organization against any and all claims to ensure the protection of the organization, but its partners and sponsor. The school has gone through a quotation process with Arthur J Gallagher’s CharterSafe division, which is a leader in the field of Charter School insurance to determine the annual costs based on student enrollment, payroll, property, and other considerations. Attached to this proposal is a signed letter that fully explains this work. In year one the cost of insuring the school in compliance with all regulatory requirements will cost the organization an estimated $18,793. These costs will increase annually as the school grows to capacity. Professional Development: The school has budget $2,000 per staff member for professional development in year one, and an additional $40,000 for the school each year after year one to ensure new staff members are adequately trained and returning staff members stay current on the school’s model and best practice methodology. The school intends to look to secure grants to assist with its vital professional development, but conservatively none of those funds are assumed here. Staff Travel: The school will annually provide funds for a few teachers and administrators to travel to national conferences. The school will put a plan in place for conference attendees to turnkey their findings to other members of the staff and faculty. Student Transportation: The school budgets for the cost of transporting 80% of the student body to and from school each day for 186 school days per year. The budget also assumes that students living within 1 mile of school will walk to school, and that this will account for 20% of the student population who will either walk to school or get to school by other means, such as parent transportation. Student Transportation provided to the Medford School District by First Student currently runs at a rate of $216.15 per bus route (to and from school) per day. First Student estimates that V.I.B.E.S. will require four bus routes in year one, five in year two, and six each year after. Telephone Services: The school budgets $200 per month to cover the cost of a telephone system. After year two an annual increase of 3% is factored in. The school will look to secure erate reimbursement for internet and phone services starting in year 2.

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Internet Services: The school budgets $200 per month to cover the cost of an internet connection. After year two an annual increase of 3% is factored in. The school will look to secure e-rate reimbursement for internet and phone services starting in year 2. Computer & Network Equipment: The school budgets $5,000 per classroom for computer equipment. After the school has reached capacity, it will budget $10,000 per year in replacement costs. The school intends to look to secure grants to assist with its technological focus, but conservatively none of those funds are assumed here. As with furniture, the school understands that these assets will be capitalized according to the school’s capitalization policy, but because cash flow is an important consideration there full cost is being assumed to ensure the organizations financial stability for the purposes of this projection. Although Kids Unlimited is providing V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School with network equipment and infrastructure as well as computer equipment to use for administrative and instructional purposes, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is budgeting an additional $5,000 for non-classroom computer and network equipment in year one, and $10,000 each year for computer and network equipment in each subsequent year in addition to budgeted replacement costs. These extra funds will be used for any unanticipated technology needs in the organization, such as the need for a more robust network infrastructure, more teacher or administrator technology, or additional funding for classroom technology. Student Database Systems: The school has modest costs assumed for student database systems as it intends to utilize the district’s student database for enrollment and attendance information and utilize the affordable modules from the Success For All program. However, since data management and analyze is an important aspect of top performing schools, the school has elected to set aside $10,000 each year, should the organization elect to utilize a more robust student information system at some point. IT Consultants: The school intends to contract with an IT support organization at an estimated cost of $1,000 per month. Each year this cost will increase by the same factor as enrollment. General Marketing: The budget assumes a cost of $2,000 per year for general marketing, such as online search engine optimization and/or newspaper advertisement. Staff Recruitment: The budget assumes a cost of $30 per staff member for staff recruitment. This will cover the cost of online or print teacher/staff recruitment methods. Student Recruitment: The school budgets $100 per student for recruitment methods annually. This will cover the cost of print, online, or radio advertisement. Shared Facility Cost (Kids Unlimited): The budget assumes a fair market value for Kids Unlimited to lease its facilities to V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. This cost will include all utilities. After the second year this cost is assumed to increase by 5% annually. Prior to opening this cost must be evaluated and agreed upon by the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors and the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board of Directors.

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Lease of Second Building: In the case that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School needs to secure a second building in order to educate its full enrollment, it will either look to lease a second facility or Kids Unlimited may purchase or seek the donation of an additional facility. If Kids Unlimited purchases or secures the donation of such a facility a fair market value arrangement will reached between Kids Unlimited and V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School for the use of the facility. This cost is estimated for the purposes of the budget. After the second year this cost is assumed to increase by 5% annually. Maintenance Supplies: The school assumes a cost of $300 per month for maintenance and janitorial supplies. Fund Balance: After the first year the organization shall look to increase its fund balance annually with a goal of reaching a fund balance equal to 10% of annual revenue by year 5, and 20% of annual revenue by year 10 of operation, until the organization has a fund balance large enough to cover three months of operating expenses.

XXXV. V.I.B.E.S. Charter School Financial Policies and Procedures
Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has drafted a fully comprehensive fiscal policies and procedures manual, which includes all aspects of budget development, fiscal management, and the necessary policies and procedures to ensure strong internal controls. Upon approval of the Charter, the Finance, Audit and Budgeting Committee of the Board of Directors will review this fiscal policies and procedures manual, determine and recommend any changes needed and approve it by the July 2013 Board of Directors meeting to ensure that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has best practice fiscal policies and internal controls. Please refer to the fully revised Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual that accompanies this proposal for further information . The Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual includes policies describing the internal controls for receiving revenue and paying bills, the organization’s operating standards for financial management, and processes for oversight and review. Financial Reporting Procedures: As soon as is practicable before each Board meeting, the following will be sent to the Finance, Audit and Budget Committee (“FABC”) for review: (1) the budget vs. actual report for the operating budget; (2) the balance sheet; (3) the check detail report from the previous month, showing any and all checks, debits, or withdrawals from the school’s checking account; (4) the deposit detail report, showing any and all donations, deposits, and credits to the school’s checking account; and (5) the enrollment budget vs. actual report per grade for General Education and Special Education students. The Treasurer of the Board will present these reports to the entire Board at each meeting. The Finance Committee may also request cash flow projections through the end of the fiscal year to identify the months that cash flow may run negative. Any of these reports will be made available to the school’s sponsoring entity upon request or agreement of the two parties. In addition, monthly budget vs. actual reports for the operating budget will be produced by the Director of Operations and/or Financial Consultant for the School Director by the 21 st of each month. Currently it is understood that at least one other Medford sponsored Public Charter School provides a balance sheet and a profit and loss statement on a monthly basis, as well as a
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year-to-date Budget vs. Actual report. If that is required of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, the Charter School will meet that requirement. At the end of the year, the following key financial statements are produced: A. Balance Sheet B. Income Statement (Profit & Loss) C. Statement of Activities D. Statement of Net Assets E. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance F. Reconciliation of Governmental Fund Balance Sheet to Statement of Net Assets G. Reconciliation of Statement of Fund Balance of the Governmental Fund to Statement of Activities H. Schedule of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance – Budget to Actual – General Fund I. Final Budget vs. Actual Report Accounting System: V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has established an accounting system comprised of the methods and records used to identify, assemble, classify, record and report accounting transactions. The methods are set up to (1) identify and record all of the organization’s transactions; (2) describe the transactions in enough detail to allow classification for financial reporting and (3) indicate the time period in which transactions occurred in order to record them in the proper accounting period. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will adopt a system that is fully compatible with the budget and accounting system of the sponsor of the school; and complies with the requirements of the uniform budget and accounting system adopted by the State Board of Education under OAR 581-023-0035. The fiscal year is from July 1st to June 30th. The school’s audited financial statements must be approved by the Board of Directors and provided to the sponsoring entity according to all applicable requirements. Furthermore, the school’s budgets for the following fiscal year must be drafted for Board review and approved prior to the end of the current fiscal year, or by an earlier date established by the school’s sponsoring entity. Kids Unlimited has already established a separate company file within its currently owned Quickbooks software to serve as V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s financial management system. Quickbooks has been selected based on both the familiarity of Kids Unlimited finance staff and its current use with Logos Public Charter School as well as use in some of the Medford School District’s school accounts at its primary settings. On behalf of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, Kids Unlimited has already established this company file, formatted this company file’s chart of accounts in alignment with the uniform budget and accounting system adopted by the State Board of Education under OAR 581-023-0035. This version of Quickbooks is hosted locally on the Kids Unlimited server. As outlined in the school’s record retention policy within the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual, the accounting system files are saved on the school’s server, which is backed up on-site on a daily basis and offsite on a weekly basis, to ensure the recoverability of financial information in case of hardware failure or disaster. Back-up data and program files shall always remain the confidential and proprietary property of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. In the event of a major system
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malfunction, the latest backup would be restored on the server and any transactions since that backup would be re-recorded based on the cash disbursement records and cash receipts records. Additionally, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School also understands that there may be value to both V.I.B.E.S. and the Medford School District in having V.I.B.E.S. on the same accounting system as Medford School District. If V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is able to attend trainings and receive the finance modules from this system form the Medford School District at no cost or a reduced cost, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School would be willing to consider the migration of its financial data to the Medford School District system in a manner, and under a timeline, beneficial to both parties. Financial Leadership and Management: The financial management team of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School consists of: 1. The V.I.B.E.S. Board of Directors 2. The Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee (“FABC”) of the V.I.B.E.S. Board of Directors 3. Treasurer of the Board of Directors (by default, also the Chairperson of the FABC) 4. School Director/Principal 5. Director of Operations 6. Operations Assistant 7. Financial Consultant/Bookkeeper provided by Kids Unlimited The day-to-day fiscal responsibilities of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School are assigned to its fiscal staff. However, ultimate fiduciary responsibility for the overall management of the organization lies with the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors will meet monthly during the course of the fiscal year to ensure that is fiduciary duty is maintained. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will establish a Finance, Audit, & Budget Committee (FABC) by the first full Board meeting. This committee will be responsible for selecting an audit firm on an annual basis, reviewing the financial policies and procedures manual on an annual basis, working with the school’s finance team to review the monthly financial statements, and working with the school’s financial team and programmatic leadership to develop and oversee an annual budget. The FABC of the Board of Directors shall be responsible for the primary Board-level oversight of school financial matters, as defined by the Board. The School Director and Director of Operations of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will have the primary responsibility of executing all financial matters. All members of the fiscal management team will work together to make certain that all financial matters of the organization are addressed with care, integrity and in the best interest of V.I.B.E.S. Pubic Charter School. The Director of Operations is responsible for administering the school’s adopted policies and ensuring compliance with procedures that have been approved by the Board of Directors. Exceptions to written policies may only be made with the prior approval of the FABC. Changes or amendments to these policies shall be conducted by the FABC and approved by the Board of Directors every year. Any violation of these policies and procedures is considered to be cause for termination or removal and, depending upon the nature of the infraction, civil and/or criminal prosecution.

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The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School planning team members from the Kids Unlimited Board of Directors have proven capacity for establishing competent financial capacity building as demonstrated by the completion of a $5.2 million dollar capital campaign (2005-2011) to purchase and renovate an old bowling alley facility into a first-class youth center with a commercial-grade kitchen, collegiate-sized gymnasium, computer lab, dance studio, classrooms, arts gallery, large multi-purpose gathering room along with collaborative staff office spaces. The agency’s average yearly operating budget is approximately $2.2 million for youth development programming that serves over 1,000 children and youth weekly, that occurs outside of the school day, along with mentoring and case management that fits within the regular school day hours and after school. Kids Unlimited had a clean financial review in 2008 and its first full financial audit in 2009 which was successful and followed by successful fiscal audits for 2010 and 2011. From, 2009-2012, Kids Unlimited has continued to revise and refine the agencies financial operating handbook, which includes detailed internal control procedures for Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable and Payroll. The planning team secured the skills of a licensed Certified Public Accountant to develop the V.I.B.E.S. Accounting Policies and Procedures Manual which is aligned with the Oregon Department of Education Program Budgeting and Accounting Manual . This manual has also been reviewed and amended by Kids Unlimited’s current Operations Director who has seven years of experience in Charter School and Non-Profit Operations, Business and Financial Management, including serving as the Director of Finance for a network of Charter Schools managing over $25 million in revenues and expenses on an annual basis and receiving unqualified opinions on multiple financial audits, including an A-133 Federal Single Audit. The V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s financial management will be in accordance with state law, GAAP standards and managed by a Certified Public Accountant on contract for the school. Administration of the funds will be under the direction of the governing Board of Directors of the school. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be subject to financial examinations and audits as determined by the state auditor, including the annual audit for legal and fiscal compliance. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school Board of Directors will form a Finance, Audit and Budget Committee (“FABC”) each fiscal year to oversee the school’s financial affairs. The audit will verify the accuracy of the school’s financial statements, attendance and enrollment accounting practices and the school’s internal controls. The audit will be conducted in accordance with GAAP standards that are applicable to the school and will follow all mandated state requirements. To the extent required under federal law, the audit scope will be expanded to include items and processes specified in any applicable Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars. The annual audit will be completed each year and a copy of the finding will be forwarded as required by the sponsoring agency (Medford School District), the State Board of Education and the Oregon Department of Education. The school’s audit committee will review any noted exceptions and deficiencies and report to the V.I.B.E.S. charter school’s Board of Directors with recommendations for resolution. The school’s Board of Directors will report to the sponsoring agency, the State Board of Education and the Oregon Department of Education regarding the resolution of any audit exceptions and deficiencies.

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After the first year of operation, it will be the school’s goal to build towards a reserve of three months of operating expenses. For school budgeting purposes, income will be based upon state and local allotments, plus grants. The school’s principal will be responsible for ensuring that expenses do not fall outside of budgetary allotments. All contracts, management, equipment and services, including consulting services, leases and insurance requirements related to the management of the V.I.B.E.S Public Charter School will be in compliance with all federal and state mandates.

XXXVI. Annual Program Review
VIBES public charter school’s continuous improvement planning is an ongoing process of working towards the goal that all students achieve at or above the state standards in math and reading. Our school will utilize school wide assessment models annually such as the “Nine Characteristics of High Performing Schools: A Research-Based Resource for Schools and Districts to Assist With Improving Student Learning”, prepared by Sue Shannon, Ed.D. for the Washington State Department of Education (2007). Additional school-wide assessments are attached to this proposal which will be adopted for the needs of the school for continuous improvement planning. We will utilize a sustainable school improvement model (Oregon Department of Education 2009) that includes the following phases: 1) build readiness, 2) collect and analyze data, 3) set goals based on data, 4) investigate research-based practices, 5) make action plan, 6) implement and monitor, 7) evaluate effectiveness and sustain efforts. During the implementation phase of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school, the school leadership and advisory group will collaborate in the development of a Strategic Plan utilizing the Oregon Department of Education’s School Improvement Plan template originally developed for Title I school wide programs with headings aligned with the wording charted below: Grade Level Content Area Assessment Name and Description Frequency of Assessment How will Staff be Trained Financial Resources Needed

Each spring after the school opens with students, the goals of the Strategic Plan will be evaluated by the school’s staff and leadership, using curriculum-based and standardized assessments that had been systematically outlined in the previous year’s VIBES school improvement plan, for student progress towards meeting and/or exceeding the school’s goals. New goals will be written with adjusted strategies and resources to meet the identified learning needs based on the school’s current data.

XXXVII. Student Nutrition Program
V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will work with Sodexo Food Service, or the current Food Service contractor with the Medford School District to provide meals onsite at the charter school facility. Through conversations with the School District’s Sodexo staff, it is understood that the
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district runs the program for a current district charter school as a part of the services that the Medford School District makes available to all of its schools within the National School Lunch Program. Sodexo staff are familiar with Kids Unlimited’s commercial grade kitchen from their support of Kids Unlimited’s Alternative Education and Middle School after school programs in previous years. It is central to V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s mission in serving students of great need that VPCS provides the opportunity for kids to eat three healthy balanced meals a day, as well as an afternoon snack. Our extended day program, by providing nutritious meals, will help a student population that due to other risk factors is prone to greater rates of malnutrition demonstrated through obesity. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s dedication to serving students breakfast, lunch, and dinner as a part of the school’s Student Nutrition Program is something that will be of great benefit to children and families of need. Additionally, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will independently and, to the degree that they are able to assist, with Sodexo staff to provide students with valuable lessons on the importance of eating a healthy and balanced diet. It is the hope that in the future, as the school grows, that the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will be able to provide its own food program for its students, with food prepared from fresh materials onsite using the commercial-grade kitchen within the Kids Unlimited building.

XXXVIII. Transportation of Students
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School, by Oregon law, shall be responsible for providing transportation for its students and may negotiate with the school district for the provision of transportation services. Pursuant to ORS 327.043, the school district shall provide transportation for public charter school students under the same conditions as students attending private or parochial schools located along or near established school district bus routes. The school district shall not be required to add or extend existing bus routes. V.I.B.E.S. public charter school students who reside outside of the Medford School District may use existing bus routes and transportation services of the school district in which the public charter school is located. Any transportation costs incurred by the school district shall be considered approved transportation costs. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School intends to partner with the Medford School District for provision of transportation services. For the purposes of budgeting, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School contacted First Student to discuss the estimated costs of transportation of students to the charter school through the Medford School District, understanding that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School would be responsible for 30% of the approved transportation costs (subject to change by the State of Oregon). V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School – like other schools in the Medford School District – will have a walking radius of one mile within which First Student transportation will not be provided. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School estimates that 20% of its students will fall within this walking radius, and estimates transportation costs at 30% of the overall cost of transporting the remaining 80% of student enrollment. These costs are reflected in the attached five-year school budget. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will take responsibility to ensure that in their partnership with First Student, all state regulations are being followed, including, but not limited to: accident reporting, driver safety testing, as well as any and all other requirements determined by the
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Oregon Department of Education and Medford School District 549c. The Director of Operations for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be responsible for ensuring compliance with respect to all facets of student transportation.

XXXIX. Information Technology Support
V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s planning team has developed an extensive school technology plan that will serve as a dynamic “applied” document. This documented plan will be revised each year using input from the school staff and through the school’s annual pre- and post-assessment technology in education skills assessment. It is expected that the plan will evolve to include a listing of current school technology and a listing of projected school technology needs. As a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) focused school, a technology plan with supporting professional development is vital to the school’s goals for integrated technology throughout the curriculum and at all grade levels. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has developed a robust technology plan and intends to seek additional private and government grants to fund the school’s technology infrastructure. Due to the size of the school and the variety of technology equipment that will be utilized in the classroom, it is the intention of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School to contract with an IT support vendor for IT Management Services until such time when the school reaches a point in its scale where it makes sense for the school to hire a full-time IT Management professional. Kids Unlimited currently has a server and full network set-up, including wireless and wired connectivity in each of its classroom spaces. In addition, Kids Unlimited currently has seven PC’s available for full-time administrative use by charter school employees and has recently upgraded the computer lab containing twenty four PC’s, two Apple computers with software for music and video editing and a mobile laptop cart with twenty four laptops for classroom use. Four additional laptops are dedicated to robotics instruction and ten iPads are available for mobile/off-site project development and documentation. It is anticipated that an additional twenty iPads will be purchased by June 2013 for student use. Additionally, the computer lab contains one ActivBoard for whole group instruction, supported with a document camera and teacher slate. A portable microphone/lavaliere system is available for ease of voice projection and hearing in large student gatherings. A set of student response systems (twenty) is also available for classroom use with the ActivBoard. All of Kids Unlimited’s resources will be provided for administrative and as applicable student use within the learning environment. All internet material is filtered centrally through the network so that it is safe for student use and aligns with all federal and state guidelines for school use. Kids Unlimited already has a strong IT infrastructure that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be able to utilize to avoid additional costs of purchasing IT to support administrative tasks and services. Currently Kids Unlimited uses an outsourced payroll service, which provides a Human Resources Information System and web-based time clock system. The payroll, time clock and Human Resources Information are hosted on secure websites to ensure the confidentiality of data. All data will be secured and backed-up to meet the guidelines of the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Records Retention Policy (which can be found in the organization’s Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual). Until the time when it makes sense from a budgetary standpoint for V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School to purchase its own server for storage and hosting of instructional program modules, Outlook server for hosted email and phone system, Kids Unlimited shall provide these
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resources for the use of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School employees and students. This provision shall include any costs necessary to ensure that these systems and devices are compliant with any and all state, federal and district regulations relevant to Charter School use of technology for staff and students. Additionally, Kids Unlimited will host the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Information System and data modules related to the school’s assessments and curriculum in a manner that ensures the confidentiality of all student data and limits access only to the appropriate V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School employees, while still maintaining appropriate back-up and redundancy protocols to ensure compliance with the V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Records Retention Policy (which can be found in the organization’s Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual). V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will request the use of one or more of sponsoring agency’s computer labs to access the state required annual assessment of student knowledge. This request will be presented during negotiation of the school charter with the sponsoring agency. The school will also request access to the library resources of the sponsoring agency’s schools to provide equal access for all students. This request will be presented during negotiation of the school charter with the sponsoring agency. Please refer to the attached V.I.B.E.S. Technology Plan for further information.

XL. Description of Average Student Daily Membership Calculation
ORS 338.155(2) states: A school district shall contractually establish, with any public charter school that is sponsored by the board of the school district, payment for provision of educational services to the public charter school’s students. The payment shall equal an amount per weighted average daily membership (ADMw) of the public charter school that is at least equal to (a) Eighty percent of the amount of the school district’s General Purpose Grant per ADMw as calculated under ORS 327.013 for students who are enrolled in kindergarten through grade eight. (3) A school district shall contractually establish, with any public charter school that is sponsored by the State Board of Education or an institution of higher education and that is within the boundaries of the school district, payment for provision of educational services to the public charter school’s students. The payment shall equal an amount per weighted average daily membership (ADMw) of the public charter school that is at least equal to (a) Ninety percent of the amount of the school district’s General Purpose Grant per ADMw as calculated under ORS 327.013 for students who are enrolled in kindergarten through grade eight. As V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has applied to the Medford School District to be its sponsoring entity, the school understands that it is entitled to no less than 80% of the ADMw. That is the calculation the school has used in the formulation of its budget. Further discussion of the school’s methodology in budget development can be found in the budget narrative section and in the organization’s Fiscal Policies and Procedures Manual attached to this proposal. During the charter negotiations, V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will request permission from the Medford School District to link into the district’s student attendance data system to maintain up to date student information. The Success for All school reform model also includes a data software program for student performance tracking and student data collection. V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School has also set aside additional budgetary funds for the purposes of procuring a more robust student information system to ensure that it is complying with any and all regulatory

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requirements as well as providing teachers with the best data for the utilization of driving instruction.

XLI. Required School Reports to the Medford School District
During the development of the Chartering Process, the Medford School District will provide to the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school administration/leadership a detailed list of documents required to be submitted by the charter to the school district with applicable deadlines.

XLII. The Term of the Charter
The founding group of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school is requesting a 3-year charter term.

XLIII. Performance Bonding, Buildings and Liabilities
Oregon Public Charter Law and the Medford School District require the following from a sponsored public charter school: • Commercial General Liability Insurance in an amount of not less than $1,000,000 combined single limit per occurrence/$3,000,000 annual aggregate covering the public charter school, the governing board, employees and volunteers against liability for damages because of personal injury, bodily injury, death or damage to property including the loss of use thereof. Coverage to include, but not limited to, contractual liability, advertisers’ liability, employee benefits liability, professional liability and teachers’ liability. • Liability Insurance for Directors and Officers in an amount not less than $1,000,000 each loss/$3,000,000 annual aggregate covering the public charter school, the governing board, employees and volunteers against liability arising out of wrongful acts and employment practices. Continuous “claims made” coverage will be acceptable, provided the retroactive date is on the effective date of the charter. Automobile Liability Insurance in an amount not less than $1,000,000 combined single limit covering the public charter school, the governing board, employees and volunteers against liability for damages because of bodily injury, death or damage to property, including the loss of use thereof arising out of the ownership, operation, maintenance or use of any automobile. The policy will include underinsured and uninsured motorist vehicle coverage at the limits equal to bodily injury limits. Workers’ Compensation Insurance shall also be maintained pursuant to Oregon Laws (ORS Chapter 656). Employers’ liability insurance with limits of $100,000 each accident, $100,000 disease each employee and $500,000 each policy limit

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Honest Bond to cover all employees and volunteers. Limits to be determined by the governing board, but no less than $25,000. Coverage shall include faithful performance and loss of moneys and securities Property insurance shall be required on all owned or leased buildings or equipment. The insurance shall be written to cover the full replacement cost of the building and/or equipment on an “all risk of direct physical loss basis” including earthquake and flood perils.

Additional Requirements: The Medford School District shall be additional insured on commercial general and automobile liability insurance. The policies shall provide for a 90-day written notice of cancellation or material change. A certificate evidencing all of the above insurance shall be furnished to the district. The public charter school shall also hold harmless and defend the Medford School District from any and all liability, injury, damages, fees or claims arising out of the operations of the public charter school operations or activities. The Medford School District shall be loss payee on the property insurance if the public charter school leases any real or personal district property. The coverage provided and the insurance carriers must also be acceptable to the Medford School District. The V.I.B.E.S. public charter school will have secured the above outlined insurance coverage and will provide the Medford School District with written proof of coverage upon signing of the school’s Charter Agreement. Please refer to the signed Insurance Coverage Quote attached to this document.

XLIV. Plan in Case of Charter Termination or Non-Renewal
If the Medford School Board does not renew and/or terminates the V.I.B.E.S public charter schools’ Charter Agreement, the V.I.B.E.S. board of directors may address the reasons for denial of the renewal and any remedial measures suggested by the Medford School Board and submit a revised request for renewal to the Medford School Board. If the Medford School Board does not renew the V.I.B.E.S. Charter based on the revised request for renewal or the parties do not negotiate a charter contract within the timeline established in the Medford School District’s Board Policy LBE-AR, the V.I.B.E.S. board of directors may appeal the Medford School Board’s decision to the State Board of Education for a review of whether the Medford School District Board used the process required by Oregon law in denying the charter renewal. If the State Board of Education finds that the Medford School Board used the appropriate process in denying the request for renewal, it shall affirm the decision of the Medford School Board. At that time, the V.I.B.E.S. board of directors may seek judicial review of this order. If the State Board of Education finds that the Medford School Board did not use the appropriate process in denying the request for renewal, it shall order the Medford School Board to reconsider the request for renewal. If after reconsideration, the Medford School Board does not renew the charter, V.I.B.E.S. public charter school may seek judicial review of the Medford School Board’s decision.
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In addition, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School’s Board of Directors will ensure that all student records maintained at V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School are transferred to the student’s host district. The students at that time will have the opportunity to re-enroll in their host district or enroll in another charter or private school. In the event that V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School is not renewed or its contract with the sponsoring entity is terminated, employees of V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will be released from service without cause from V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School. If they are serving the charter school during an approved leave of absence from an Oregon school district, V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School will make provisions to provide a reference as outlined in At -Will Employee Status Board Policy (V.I.B.E.S. Public Charter School Board Policy PA.1.AR). To prevent the termination and/or non-renewal of the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school’s Charter, the school leadership will work diligently to ensure that none of the reasons for termination listed in Medford School Board Policy LBE-AR occur.

XLV. Proposal, Approval and Review of Charter Application
The founding group for the V.I.B.E.S. public charter school understands the timeframe outlined in the Medford School District Board Policy LBE-AR regarding the Public Charter School Proposal Process. We look forward to receiving your feedback regarding this extensive proposal, so that any errors, omissions and/or weakly developed areas may be adjusted to meet the standards of the Medford School District for the sponsorship of a public charter school of choice.

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Borman, G. D., Slavin, R. E., Cheung, A., Chamberlain, A., Madden, N., Chambers, B. (2007). Final Reading Outcomes of the National Randomized Field Trial of Success For All. American Educational Research Journal, 44(3), pp. 701-731. www.successforall.org Bowman, C.A. (2008). The Economics of Trust. Workshop Presentation at U.S. Department of Education: Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools Mentoring Program Regional Training. Brendtro, L. K., Mitchell, M. L., McCall, H. J. (2009). Deep Brain Learning: Pathways to Potential with Challenging Youth. Starr Commonwealth, Albion, Michigan. Brier, N. (2006). Enhancing Academic Motivation: An Intervention Program for Young Adolescents. Research Press. Champaign, Ill. Carroll, S. R., Carroll, D. (1994). How Schools Get and Keep Community Support. National Educational Service, Bloomington, IN Clary, E. G., Rhodes, J. E. (2006). Mobilizing Adults for Positive Youth Development: Strategies for Closing the Gap Between Beliefs and Behaviors. Springer, New York, NY. Covey, S. M. R. (2006). The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything. Free Press, New York, NY. Dallmann-Jones, A. (2006). Shadow Children: Understanding Education’s #1 Problem. RLD Publications, Lancaster, PA. DuFour, R. (2004). ‘What is a Professional Learning Community’, Educational Leadership. Durlak, J.A., & Weissberg, R.P. (2007). The Impact of After-School Programs That Promote Personal and Social Skills. Chicago, IL: Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning. DuBois, D. K., & Karcher, M. J. (2005). Youth mentoring: Theory, research, and practice. In D. L. DuBois & M. J. Karcher (Eds.), Handbook of Youth Mentoring (pp. 2-11). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Echevarria, J., Vogt, M.E., & Short, D.J. (2013). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model, Fourth Edition. San Francisco, California; Pearson. Edwards, P., Biocchi, K. (unknown). Community Schools Across America: 135 Community/School Partnerships That Are Making a Difference. C.S. Mott Foundation, Flint, Michigan. Egley, A., Jr., Howell, J. C. (2012). Highlights of the 2010 National Gang Survey. OJJDP Juvenile Justice Fact Sheet. Washington, D.C. Eitzen, D. S., Smith K. E. (2003). Experiencing Poverty. Wadsworth, Belmont, CA.
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Hong, Soo. (2011). A Cord of Three Strands: A New Approach to Parent Engagement in Schools. Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA. Jarvis, J. ( 2009). What Would Google Do? Harper Collins Books, New York, NY. Jennings, G., Anderson, T., Dorset, M., Mitchell, J. (2011). Report on the Step Forward iPad Pilot Project. Trinity College – University of Melbourne. Jensen, E. (2009). Teaching With Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids’ Brains and What Schools Can Do About It. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Jucovy, L., & Garringer, M. (2008). ABC’s of School-Based Mentoring (Rev. Ed.). Washington, DC: The George Washington University, Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence; Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, National Mentoring Center. Karr-Morse, R., Wiley, M. S. (1997). Ghosts From the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence. Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, NY. Katzenbach, J. R., Smith, D. K. (1993). The Wisdom of Teams: Creating the High-Performance Organization. Harper Business School Press, New York, NY. Kaye, C. B. (2004). The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action. Free Spirit Publishing. Minneapolis, MN. Kirby, J. R. (2002). Helping Children Learn to Read: Evaluating the Programs From Essential Skills Software in the Context of Current Research: Final Report. Queens University. Retrieved from http://essentialskills.net/content/final-report. Koball, H., et.al. (2011). Synthesis of Research and Resources to Support At-Risk Youth, OPRE Report #OPRE 2011-22, Washington, D.C.: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Lambert, R. G., Algozzine, B. (2009) Accelerated Math Evaluation Report. The Center for Educational Measurement and Evaluation at UNC, Charlotte, NC. Larose, S., Tarabulsy, G. M. (2005). Academically At-Risk Students. Handbook of Youth Mentoring. (pp. 440-453). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Lencioni, P. (2002). The Five Dysfunctions of a TEAM. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA. Lesure, B. (2007). Evaluation of New Hampshire Education and Environment Team-Summer Institute 2003 – 2006. Prepared for New Hampshire Project Learning Tree. www.plt.org/development---evaluation.org
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Popham, W. J. (2003). Test Better, Teach Better: The Instructional Role of Assessment. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Probst, Kristie. (2006). Mentoring for Meaningful Results: Asset-Building Tips, Tools, and Activities for Youth and Adults. Search Institute, Minneapolis, MN. Rath, T. (2007). Strengths Finder 2.0. Gallup Press, New York, NY. Romney, V. A. (1996). Strategic Planning and Needs Assessment For Schools and Communities. National Community Education Publication Series, Fairfax, VA. Rhodes, J. E. (2002). Stand by Me: The Risks and Rewards of Mentoring Today’s Youth (pp. 2553). Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. Ringers, J, Jr., Decker, L. E., (1995). School Community Centers: Guidelines for Inter-Agency Planners. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Rose, R., (2010). Shifting Gears: A Brain-Based Approach to Engaging Your Best Self. Stay Well Press, Salem, OR. Rubin, J. A. (2005). Child Art Therapy. Wiley, Hoboken, NJ. Sagawa, S., Jospin, D. (2009) The Charismatic Organization: 8 Ways to Grow a Nonprofit. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA. Schmoker, M. (2006). Results NOW: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and Learning. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Schmoker, M. (2001). The Results Field Book: Practical Strategies From Dramatically Improved Schools. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Seccombe, K. (2007). Families in Poverty. Vol. 1 in Families in the Twenty-First Century Series. Pearson, New York, NY. Senge, P. (1990). The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of The Learning Organization. Doubleday, New York, NY. Senge, P., Cambron-McCabe, N., Lucas, T., Smith, B., Dutton, J., Kleiner, A. (2000). Schools That Learn: A Fifth Discipline Fieldbook. Doubleday, New York, NY. Senge, P., Kleiner, A., Roberts, C., Ross, R., Roth, G., Smith, B., (1999). The Dance of Change: A Fifth Discipline Fieldbook for Mastering the Challenges of Learning Organizations. Doubleday, New York, NY. Senge, P., Roberts, C., Ross, R. B., Smith, B. J., Kleiner, A., (1994). The Fifth Discipline Field Book. Doubleday, New York, NY.
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Shriver, M., Watson T.S. editors (2009). Journal of Evidence Based Practices for Schools. Lanham, MD Simkins, M., Cole, K., Tavalin, F., Means, B. (2002). Increasing Student Learning Through Multi-Media Projects. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. Slavin, R. E., Madden, N. A. (2000). Research on Achievement Outcomes of Success For All: A Summary and Response to Critics. www.successforall.net Smink, J., Schargel, F. P. Helping Students Graduate: A Strategic Approach to Dropout Prevention. Eye on Education, Larchmont, New York, NY. Smith, M.K. (2002, 2008). ‘Howard Gardner and Multiple Intelligences’, The Encyclopedia of Informal Education, http://www.infed.org/thinkers/gardner.htm Stoddard, L., Dallmann-Jones, A. (2010). Educating for Human Greatness, 2nd Edition. Peppertree Press, Sarasota, FL. Success For All. (2002). Family Support II-Spring: Success For All - Roots and Wings. Education Partners, Success For All Foundation. Tolan, P., Henry, D., Schoeny, M., & Bass, A. (2008). Mentoring interventions to affect juvenile delinquency and associated problems. Campbell Systematic Reviews, 16. Doi: 10.4073/csr.2008.16. Retrieved from http://www.campbellcollaboration.org/lib/download/238 Tough, P., (2008). Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, MA. U.S. Department of Education; Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools. (No. 19, 2008). Engaging Matches in Volunteer Service. Mentoring Resource Center Fact Sheet. Folsom, CA. Retrieved from http://www.edmentoring.org Weber, K., Editor. (2010). Waiting for Superman: How We Can Save America’s Failing Public Schools. Public Affairs, New York, NY. Winer, Michael and Ray, Karen. (2003). Collaboration Handbook: Creating, Sustaining, and Enjoying the Journey. Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, Saint Paul, MN. -------------. (1990). The Family Connection: A Guide to Leading Parent Meetings. Lions-Quest Skills For Growing; A Joint Program of Lions Club International, NAESP, National PTA, Quest International. Granville, OH.

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APPENDIX
Student Handbook – Code of Conduct ……………. TAB A Job Descriptions and Job Applications …………… TAB B Staff Annual Notifications and Handbook ……….. TAB C Staff Evaluation/Charlotte Danielson and INTASC TAB D Financial Policies and Procedures ………………… TAB E Kids Unlimited Audit/Oregon Accounting Manual TAB F

Insurance Documentation …………………………. TAB G Governance Structure …………………………….. Board Policies ……………………………………… Singapore Math ……………………………………. Accelerated Math ………………………………….. Essential Skills – Math ……………………………. Grammar and Writing/Oregon K-12 Writing ….. Health and Physical Fitness ………………………. Science ………………………………………………
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TAB H TAB I TAB J TAB K TAB L TAB M TAB N TAB O

Success for All – Reading ………………………….

TAB P

Essential Skills – Reading …………………………. TAB Q Assessments ……………………………………….... TAB R Technology Plan …………………………………… TAB S

Safe Schools Procedures ………………………….... TAB T School-wide Behavior Support/School Improvement TAB U Student Study Team Procedures (SST) …………... TAB V Talented and Gifted/TAG Procedures Manual ….. TAB W

English Language Learner Protocols/Procedures .. TAB X-Z Parent Rights for Special Education ………………. TAB Mc Volunteers in Medford Schools (VIM) Handbook

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