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ADVISER TIAL ON EN
ACE PRO E PE CE TH

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Office of the President of the Philippines OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

CITIZEN’S CHARTER

SS

OF

As of October 7, 2013

CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

Table of Contents
ABBREVIATIONS...........................................................................................................................................3 A BRIEF HISTORY OF OPAPP AND THE PEACE PROCESS................................................................5 VISION.............................................................................................................................................................6 MISSION.........................................................................................................................................................6 MANDATE......................................................................................................................................................7 CORE VALUES...............................................................................................................................................9 PERFORMANCE PLEDGE.........................................................................................................................10 OPERATIONALIZING THE COMPREHENSIVE PEACE PROCESS...................................................11 PHILIPPINE DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2011-2016.................................................................................11 THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS...............................................................13 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY (OSEC) SUPPORT UNIT.....................................................................14 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF OPAPP......................................................................................16 THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE................................................................................................................17 THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR....................................................................................................................18 PEACE NEGOTIATIONS.............................................................................................................................19 GOVERNMENT PEACE NEGOTIATING PANEL...................................................................................19 MORO ISLAMIC LIBERATION FRONT (GPNP-MILF)........................................................................19 GOVERNMENT PEACE NEGOTIATING PANEL–CPP/NPA/NDFP..................................................21 PEACE ACCORD MONITORING SECRETARIATS................................................................................22 BANGSAMORO PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT UNIT........................................................................24 COMPLEMENTARY TRACK......................................................................................................................25 PAYAPA AT MASAGANANG PAMAYANAN PROGRAM COORDINATING UNIT.......................25 PEACE INTEGRATION UNIT....................................................................................................................27 PLANNING AND COMPLIANCE UNIT.................................................................................................28 PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP..........................................................................................................................29 POLICY AND PROGAM DEVELOPMENT GROUP.............................................................................34

ABBREVIATIONS
AECID Agencia Española de Cooperacion International para el Desarrolo AHJAG Ad-hoc Joint Action Group ARMM Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao ASEC Assistant Secretary CAR Cordillera Administrative Region CARHRIHL Comprehensive Agreement on Respect for Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law CBA-CFPD Cordillera Bodong Administration-Cordillera Forum for Peace and Development CCCH Coordinating Committee on the Cessation of Hostilities CLIP Comprehensive Local Integration Program COIN Counterinsurgency COS Chief of Staff CPLA Cordillera People’s Liberation Army CPP-NPA-NDF or CNN Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army-National Democratic Front CSOs Civil Society Organizations CSPP Conflict-Sensitive and Peace Promoting CSW Complete Staff Work DDR/SSR Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration/ Security Sector Reform DMS Document Management System EA Executive Assistant ExeCom Executive Committee FAS Finance and Administrative Services GPH Government of the Philippines GPH-MC Government of the Philippines-Monitoring Committee GPNPs Government Peace Negotiating Panels HEA Head Executive Assistant IDPs Internally Displaced Persons IMT International Monitoring Team IP Indigenous People LGUs Local Government Units M&E Monitoring and Evaluation ManCom Management Committee MAO Mindanao Affairs Office MILF Moro Islamic Liberation Front MINHRAC Mindanao Human Rights Action Centre MNLF Moro National Liberation Front MOA Memorandum of Agreement MOGOP Moslem Organization of Government Officials and Professionals, Inc. MOI Memorandum of Instruction MPC Mindanao People’s Caucus NAP National Action Plan NGA National Government Agency NPP Nonviolent Peaceforce Philippines NUC National Unification Commission ODA Official Development Assistance OIC Officer-in-Charge OPAPP Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process OSEC Office of the Secretary PAG Public Affairs Group PAMANA Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan

CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PAMANA-LV Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan-Luzon Visayas PAPP Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process PDO Project Development Officer PDP Philippine Development Plan PIP Policy and Institutional Partnerships PIU Peace Integration Unit PMO Project Management Office PPO Peace Program Officer PSC Peace and Social Cohesion RPM-M Rebolusyonaryong Partido ng Manggagawa-Mindanao RPM-P/ RPA/ ABB or RRA Rebolusyonaryong Partido ng Manggagawa-Pilipinas/ Revolutionary Proletarian Army/Alex Boncayao Brigade RWC EOH/ DOF Reciprocal Working Committee on the End of Hostilities and Disposition of Forces RWC-PCR Reciprocal Working Committee on Political and Constitutional Reforms RWC-SER Reciprocal Working Committee on Socio-Economic Reforms UNDP SNPI United Nations Development Programme Strengthening National Peace Infrastructures TC Transition Commission TWG-DAF Technical Working Group on Disposition of Arms and Forces USEC Undersecretary

A BRIEF HISTORY OF OPAPP AND THE PEACE PROCESS
Although the creation of the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) could be traced back to a few decades only, efforts towards peace and reconciliation in the Philippines have been ardently pursued earlier by various administrations. As early as the 1960s, groups were formed, each spurred by its own cause. One of these was the advocacy group, Mindanao Independence Movement, created by Nur Misuari. This was later transformed in 1972 into the armed group, Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), which called for recognition of the rights of Muslim Filipinos. In 1969 as well, the New People’s Army (NPA) was formed fighting for a socialist state. By 1975, the administration of then President Ferdinand Marcos started negotiations with the MNLF, and in Libya on December 23, 1976 the two parties signed the Tripoli Agreement. The first peace deal sought to give autonomy to 13 provinces and nine cities in the southern and western Philippines. In a later plebiscite, however, the people did not opt for the autonomous region, and the MNLF itself rejected it, claiming a one-sided implementation on the part of the government. On the other hand, no negotiations were started with the NPA. In 1977, Hashim Salamat and a number of his companions broke away from the MNLF. This breakaway group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), was formally established in 1984. After the first People Power revolution and Corazon Aquino’s subsequent assumption to power, the president undertook the restoration of peace by reaching out to the MNLF, CPLA, and CPP-NPANDF or CNN. In May 1986, a letter from Conrado Balweg opened the way for peace negotiations
1 (The Media and Peace Reporting: Perspectives on Media and Peace Reportage, 2000 2 (Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) 3 (The Media and Peace Reporting: Perspectives on Media and Peace Reportage, 2000

between the CPLA and the Philippine government. This latter led to a bodong or peace pact and the eventual creation of the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) through Executive Order No. 220 issued in July 1987. On the other hand, in November 1986, after four months of preliminary discussions with the NDF (also representing CPP and NPA), both sides penned the Memorandum of Agreement on Safety and Immunity Guarantees and a Memorandum of Agreement for a ceasefire lasting 60 days. This ceasefire ended in February 8, 1987, without the government achieving any closure in its peace negotiations with NDF. President Aquino then appointed 12 bishops to pursue separate peace talks in their own regions, but this was adamantly rejected by the rebel group . Simultaneous with the NDF talks were meetings with MNLF chair Nur Misuari, which led to the signing of the Jeddah Accord on January 4, 1987. This contained the agreement to continue talks on peace and to “continue discussion of the proposal for the grant of full autonomy to Mindanao, Basilan, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi and Palawan.” May 8, 1987, however, saw the breakdown of talks due to varying interpretations of the Tripoli Agreement and the Jeddah Accord . Thus, recognizing the need for a “full and lasting peace” and the “need to systematize the pursuit of peace as an organized process that will involve the mobilization of the various components of the whole society,” President Aquino signed Administrative Order No. 30 in July 1987. This created the Office of the Peace Commissioner (OPC) to assist the president in coordinating peace efforts and the “Joint Executive-Legislative Peace Council which [served] as a consultative and coordinative body between the executive and legislative branches of the Government on fundamental issues relating to the attainment of full and lasting peace.” Despite the creation of the peace commission and the peace council, the government support for peace initiatives, and the numerous meetings with rebels, Aquino’s term ended without the MNLF and the CPP-NPA-NDF/CNN returning to the peace tables. Only the peace negotiations with the CPLA were completed . In 1992, when Fidel V. Ramos won the presidency, the first efforts were towards peace as a key factor in economic development. Among other efforts, he sent a delegation to the Netherlands to meet with CNN leaders for the possibility of a new round of negotiations. He also issued Proclamation No. 10, granting amnesty to rebels. This was later amended through Proclamation No. 10-A, and a significant addition was the creation of the National Unification Commission (NUC), tasked to conduct a round of nationwide consultations and to “recommend to the President of the Philippines. . . a viable general amnesty program and process that will lead to a just, comprehensive and lasting peace.” Haydee Yorac, then a University of the Philippines Law professor and the Comelec Commissioner, was appointed as chairperson. Eight commissioners representing the legislative and judicial departments as well as the church were also appointed. It took the Commission six months “to conduct a nationwide program of public consultations to gather inputs for the formulation of a peace process.” Assisted by the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines and the National Council of Churches of the Philippines, the Commission held consultations in 71 out of 76 provinces. During this time as well, talks were rekindled with MNLF, and MILF signified willingness to enter into negotiations. September 1, 1992 also saw the release of the Hague Joint Declaration with NDF leaders in the Netherlands.
4 5 6 7 Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines The Media and Peace Reporting: Perspectives on Media and Peace Reportage, 2000 (Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines The Media and Peace Reporting: Perspectives on Media and Peace Reportage, 2000

CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

On July 31, 1993, after submitting its report to the President at the beginning of that same month, the NUC ended its term. Taking the NUC’s recommendations into consideration, the President on September 15, 1993, signed Executive Order (EO) No. 125, charting the 3 Principles Underlying the Comprehensive Peace Process and the 6 paths to peace. Mentioned herein as well was the appointment of a cabinet-level Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (PAPP) to manage and supervise the comprehensive peace process, and the creation of the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) to assist the PAPP in his duties . The OPAPP has since been diligently and ardently fulfilling the mandate set in the edict which led to its creation. Bibliography
The Media and Peace Reporting: Perspectives on Media and Peace Reportage. (2000). Pasig City: Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process. Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2013, from http://www.gov.ph/1987/08/11/administrative-order-no-30-s-1987/ Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2013, from http://www.gov.ph/1993/09/15/executive-order-no-125-s-1993/ Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2013, from http://www.gov.ph/1992/07/28/proclamation-no-10-a-s-1992/ Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP). (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2013, from Uppsala Universitet Department of Peace and Conflict Research: http://www.ucdp.uu.se/ gpdatabase/peace/Phi%2019870104.pdf

VISION
A just and lasting peace for the nation and for all Filipinos.

MISSION
To oversee, coordinate, and integrate the implementation of the comprehensive peace process.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

MANDATE
The Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) is the office created through Executive Order no. 125, s. 1993, to provide technical and administrative support to the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (PAPP) in the discharge of his/her functions for the coordination and implementation of all components of the comprehensive peace process. Recognizing the growing demand for peace as a vital component in Philippine development and responding to the changing situation of the country, Executive Order no. 3, s. 2001, was signed to amend the previous order and reaffirm the government’s commitment in achieving just and lasting peace through a comprehensive peace process spearheaded by OPAPP. Executive Order no. 3, s. 20011 , outlined the following underlying principles to govern the comprehensive peace process: i. A comprehensive peace process should be community-based, reflecting the sentiments, values and principles important to all Filipinos. Thus, it shall be defined not by the government alone, nor by the different contending groups only, but by all Filipinos as one community.

ii. A comprehensive peace process aims to forge a new social compact for a just, equitable, humane and pluralistic society. It seeks to establish a genuinely pluralistic society, where all individuals and groups are free to engage in peaceful competition for predominance of their political programs without fear, through the exercise of rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution, and where they may compete for political power through an electoral system that is free, fair and honest. iii. A comprehensive peace process seeks a principled and peaceful resolution to the internal armed conflicts, with neither blame nor surrender, but with dignity for all concerned. E.O. 3, s. 20012 , further noted six (6) vital components to comprise the peace process, or the Six Paths to Peace that will be pursued in a simultaneous and integrated fashion, namely: i. PURSUIT OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL REFORMS. This component involves the vigorous implementation of various policies, reforms, programs and projects aimed at addressing the root causes of internal armed conflicts and social unrest. This may require administrative action, new legislation or even constitutional amendments.

1 (Executive Order No. 3 - Defining Policy and Administrative Structure: For Government’s Comprehensive Peace Efforts, 2001) 2 Ibid.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

ii.

CONSENSUS-BUILDING AND EMPOWERMENT FOR PEACE. This component includes continuing consultations on both national and local levels to build consensus for a peace agenda and process, and the mobilization and facilitation of people’s participation in the peace process.

iii. PEACEFUL, NEGOTIATED SETTLEMENT WITH THE DIFFERENT REBEL GROUPS. This component involves the conduct of face-to-face negotiations to reach peaceful settlement with the different rebel groups. It also involves the effective implementation of peace agreements. iv. PROGRAMS FOR RECONCILIATION, REINTEGRATION INTO MAINSTREAM SOCIETY AND REHABILITATION. This component includes programs to address the legal status and security of former rebels, as well as community-based assistance programs to address the economic, social and psychological rehabilitation needs of former rebels, demobilized combatants and civilian victims of the internal armed conflicts. v. ADDRESSING CONCERNS ARISING FROM CONTINUING ARMED HOSTILITIES. This component involves the strict implementation of laws and policy guidelines, and the institution of programs to ensure the protection of non-combatants and reduce the impact of the armed conflict on communities found in conflict areas.

vi. BUILDING AND NURTURING A CLIMATE CONDUCIVE TO PEACE. This component includes peace advocacy and peace education programs, and the implementation of various confidence-building measures.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

CORE VALUES
To take on the mandate that created and strengthened the functions of OPAPP, the agency recognized a set of core values. These core values will enable its executives and personnel not just to understand peace but also to be part of the process by being agents and pro-active seekers of peace. Patience, through unrelenting pursuit of the comprehensive peace process towards a just and lasting peace for all Filipinos; through equal distribution of peace dividends for conflict-affected communities, and through competitive compensation and recognition of OPAPP employees; through pursuit of a comprehensive peace process that does not replicate and exacerbate the armed struggle;

Equity,

Active Non-Violence,

Compassion and Kindness, through formation of an environment conducive to peace that truly cares for others; Excellence, Faith and Hope, through diligence in work and unwavering commitment to deliver the best results each day; through trust in the comprehensive peace process and in the different people that have made the progresses in peace possible; through unbiased and unprejudiced conduct of the peace process that recognizes, welcomes, and appreciates religious and cultural roots of people; through compassionate and unselfish valuation for conflict-affected communities and for colleagues; through commitment to the highest ethical standards required of government employees as civil servants; through fair and unbiased appreciation and recognition of different classes, genders, cultures, and religions; through acceptance of different people and their different ways-of-life as possible contributors to the peace process; through recognition of each and everybody’s esteem and their personal worth without prejudice; through fair adherence to the laws of the land, in its words and its spirit.

Understanding,

Love, Honesty and Integrity, Equality, Acknowledgement,

Respect, Truth and Justice,

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PERFORMANCE PLEDGE
Furthermore, OPAPP personnel commit to imbibe the following pledge in their daily lives and in the workplace towards the success of the comprehensive peace process: I will work towards peace through my own goals and initiatives, starting with thoughts and actions. I will promote a culture of non-violence in my daily life and contribute in developing a progressive country. I will contribute in building a better future for Filipinos and I promise to do my best to achieve these goals through peaceful means. I pledge to support peace in every way possible for I am and will always be a Filipino for a just and lasting peace. I am a Filipino and I am for peace.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

OPERATIONALIZING THE COMPREHENSIVE PEACE PROCESS
PHILIPPINE DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2011-2016 To actualize the guidelines of EO 3, s.2001, and to transform directives on the peace process to actual programs and projects, the national government dedicated a section for peace on the Philippine Development Plan of 2011-2016 (PDP). Particularly, Chapter 9, Section 1 of the PDP recognizes the vital role of winning the peace in achieving holistic national development. Specifically, the plan provides concrete directives that the peace process should be geared towards bringing all armed conflict to a permanent and peaceful closure. To this end, the PDP promotes a two-pronged strategy in winning the peace, namely: A. Negotiated Political Settlement of all Armed Conflicts (Track 1) a. Resumption and completion of negotiations with the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army-National Democratic Front (CNN-NPANDF) and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), respectively; Completion and implementation of signed closure agreements with the Cordillera People’s Liberation Army (CPLA) and the Rebolusyonaryong Partido ng Manggagawa-Pilipinas / Revolutionary Proletarian Army / Alex Boncayao Brigade (RPM-P/RPA/ABB), respectively; Adoption and implementation of actions agreed upon in the Tripartite Implementation Review of the 1996 Final Peace Agreement with the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF); Final disposition of arms of the abovementioned armed groups and mainstreaming of former rebels as productive members of society, in accordance with peace agreements; and Establishment of mechanisms for participatory and accountable peace process.

b.

c.

d.

e.

B. Complementary Track to create a conducive environment for peace through the PAMANA Program The PAMANA program is the government’s premier development strategy to (i) reduce poverty and vulnerability in conflict-affected areas, (ii) improve governance, and (iii) empower communities and strengthen their capacity to address issues of conflict and peace through activities that promote social cohesion.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

To deliver this, PAMANA stands on three pillars: i. Pillar 1 refers to interventions at the macro-level that help establish the foundations of peace and the building of communities capable of addressing peace issues. Among the policy issues that the framework seeks to address are: • • • Dialogues and policy formulation to improve governance and address threats to identity and marginalization; Ancestral domain, agrarian reform and natural resource conflict resolution; and Security guarantees and transitional support especially to internally displaced persons (IDPs).

ii. Pillar 2 refers to micro-level interventions focused on households and communities. These include delivery of basic services at the community level through conditional cash transfer approaches, community driven reconstruction and development and community livelihood. iii. Pillar 3 refers to meso-level interventions that address local development challenges, including constraints to local economic development, economic integration of poor areas with more prosperous areas, and physical and economic connectivity improvements. These include high-impact local development projects, such as ancestral domain management plans, support services for farmers and farm-workers, including roads and post-harvest facilities, or culturally sensitive industries, such as development of communitybased tourism and halal industry.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS As articulated in the EO 3, s. 2001, the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (PAPP) is the manager and supervisor of the comprehensive peace process. Appointed by the President as a member of his Cabinet, the PAPP, in behalf of the Chief Executive, has the authority to coordinate and integrate all existing peace efforts. The said Executive Order further outlines the following functions and responsibilities of the PAPP: 1. 2. 3. 4. Advise and assist the President in the management, direction and supervision of the comprehensive peace process; Recommend to the President policies, programs and actions to implement the comprehensive peace process; Report to the President on the progress of implementation of the comprehensive peace process; Supervise the government agencies and instrumentalities to include their program and activities, purposely created for the implementation of various components of the comprehensive peace process, such as the Government Peace Negotiating Panels, etc. Coordinate with other government agencies involved in the implementation of the comprehensive peace process, as well as the various departments and instrumentalities which should participate or provide support to the overall effort; Conduct regular dialogues with peace partners to seek relevant information, comments and recommendations as well as to render appropriate and timely reports on the progress of the comprehensive peace process. Perform such other functions as directed by the President.

5.

6.

7.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY (OSEC) SUPPORT UNIT The Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process is assisted by the OSEC Support Unit that is in-charge of managing the PAPP’s day-to-day activities and ensuring that technical and administrative requirements for each function are efficiently met. It coordinates and liaises with other units the instructions of the PAPP, and communicates the PAPP’s directives and pronouncements to agencies concerned.

CHIEF-OF-STAFF The Chief-Of-Staff (COS) is tasked to oversee the OSEC Support Unit and keep abreast the team in order to efficiently cater to the specific needs of the PAPP. The COS also serves as the alter ego of the PAPP who cascades agency-wide or unit-specific directives from the Principal and ensures that these are carried out accordingly. As the confidante of the PAPP, she handles confidential matters and provides significant updates and recommendations to the Principal. Together with the Chief-of-Staff, the OSEC Support Unit is composed of the following: • Head Executive Assistant (HEA) – is in-charge of the technical aspect of operations in the OSEC Support Unit. The HEA reviews the incoming and outgoing documents of the PAPP, including communications, correspondences, reports and minutes of the meetings, to gather significant information, agreements and guidance given by the PAPP that entail monitoring. She also maintains the classified documents and other important files of the PAPP. Under her supervision are the following staff:

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

Executive Assistant (EA) – serves as the close-in assistant who provides all the necessary technical, administrative and logistical support to his/her principal. The Executive Assistant facilitates the provision of necessary materials that the PAPP may need for each function, engagement or travel, and ensures that logistical arrangements are in place. As the person who accompanies the PAPP, he/she produces the minutes for official meetings attended by the Principal and reports back to the HEA/ COS. o Technical Staff – prepares and ensures that complete staff work (CSW) is made for official functions of the PAPP, through proper conduct of research, vetting and coordination with relevant unit, agency or organization. The Technical Staff also drafts correspondences for various proponents, proofreads submissions of other units in compliance with agency requests, and prepares reports or other technical requirements as instructed by the PAPP and/or the COS. o Appointments Secretary – manages the calendar of the PAPP, schedules approved meetings and activities, coordinates appointment requests, and arranges venues and other logistical needs, as appropriate. She also prepares the travel itinerary of the PAPP for out-out-town and out-of-thecountry trips, in coordination with the Executive Assistant. o Document Management System Staff – handles the document management system (DMS) of the office, particularly communications received and sent out by the OSEC to ensure efficient filing, routing and retrieval of documents and contacts database, as well as tracking of updates and actions taken. Chief Administrative and Finance – oversees the effective provision of all logistical and administrative requirements of the PAPP and manages the financial resources provided for such activities. She takes on the Officer-in-Charge (OIC) function in OSEC in the absence of the Chief-of-Staff. Under her guidance are the Finance Staff, Administrative Staff, Drivers and Utilities of the OSEC Support Unit.

o

To get in-touch with the PAPP and her support unit, people can contact the following: Secretary Teresita Quintos Deles Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (02) 636-0701 loc. 808 stqd@opapp.net Ms. Vanessa Maynard Executive Assistant (02) 636-0701 loc. 806 vmaynard@opapp.net

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ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF OPAPP Beyond the OSEC Support Unit, the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process is further composed of various units that will help carry out the mandates of the agency. For 2011-2012, OPAPP pursued an organizational structure that addresses the needs of the different peace tables and closure tracks, as well as the PAMANA Program, supported by the units in-charge of policy and program development, public affairs and Bangsamoro matters. Following its mandate to provide support to the PAPP in the implementation of the comprehensive peace process, the office is organized as follows:
 

As of 26 April 2013

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE The Executive Committee (ExeCom) is the core advisory body in OPAPP who assists the PAPP in the formulation of policies and implementation mechanisms of peace and development programs of the agency. The ExeCom serves as the oversight of operations and programs being implemented within and outside of OPAPP, and provides strategic updates and recommendations on matters related to the peace process that will enable the committee to make collective decisions. Moreover, the Executive Body can elevate policy and organizational concerns raised in the Management Committee (ManCom) level that require further guidance from the PAPP, and is therefore entrusted to communicate the PAPP’s instructions to respective units, and ensure that these are translated to appropriate actions. The Executive Committee is composed of the following: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Executive Director / Undersecretary for Operations Undersecretary for Policy and Program Development Undersecretary for Bangsamoro Peace and Development Assistant Secretary for Bangsamoro Peace and Development Assistant Secretary for Planning, Monitoring & Evaluation, and Compliance Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs Group / Chief-of-Staff Director for Financial and Administrative Services

The ExeCom convenes every month, or as necessary, with a Technical Staff from the OSEC Support Unit that acts as secretariat. For ExeCom-related matters, people can contact: Ms. Karen Domingo Peace Program Officer IV (02) 6360701 loc. 808 kdomingo@opapp.net

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Executive Director is responsible for managing and overseeing the organization’s operations. He works closely and reports directly to the PAPP, and cascades the directives and instructions of the PAPP to all OPAPP units and ensures compliance of all units. In making sure that OPAPP is on track in achieving its mandate, he is also in-charge of the integration of Track 1 and the Complementary Track. The Executive Director serves as the representative of the PAPP in some functions and acts as the officer-in-charge in the absence of the PAPP. The Executive Director convenes the Management Committee of OPAPP, composed of all unit heads, to discuss unit updates and the progress of the programs and projects led by the agency, and reports to the Executive Committee for information and/or appropriate actions. He also holds the position of Undersecretary for Operations, in which he supervises the following units:

To contact the Office of the Executive Director: Undersecretary Luisito Montalbo Executive Director (02) 6360701 loc. 815 lmontalbo@opapp.net Mr. Christian Medina Executive Assistant (02) 6360701 loc. 815 christianmedina0502@gmail.com
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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PEACE NEGOTIATIONS OPAPP pursues peace negotiations as the first track in the attainment of a just, comprehensive and enduring peace under the rule of law. Negotiated political settlement is viewed as the primary vehicle to resolve internal armed conflict and social unrest. In accordance with the guidelines set by the E.O. 3 s.2001, the Government Peace Negotiating Panels (GPNPs) for negotiations with different rebel groups shall be established, to be composed of a Chairman and four (4) members who shall be appointed by the President as his official emissaries to conduct negotiations, dialogues, and face-toface discussions with the armed groups. They shall report to the President, through the PAPP, on the conduct and progress of their negotiations. Each negotiating panel shall have a Panel Secretariat tasked to provide technical support under the direct supervision of the Chairman. There shall also be a Legal Secretariat that will provide legal assistance to the panel in ensuring that all points and elements of the agreement are within the flexibilities of the Constitution. In addition, President Benigno S. Aquino III issued a Memorandum of Instruction (MOI) to the GPNPs containing the following parameters for peace talks: • • • • The 1987 Constitution, being inclusive of the flexibilities provided within its provisions; The experience and lessons learned from past negotiations and with the creation and operation of the ARMM; Government’s ability to deliver – politically, economically, and socially – commitments that will be made and signed on the negotiating table; Inclusiveness and transparency, sensitivity to general public sentiment as far as practicable, with the aim of restoring full confidence and trust in the peace process.

Currently, the Government of the Philippines (GPH) aims to complete negotiations with the MILF and the CPP-NPA-NDF, fulfill the implementation of agreements with the MNLF and the CPLA, and put closure to peace tracks of breakaway groups such as the RPM-P/ RPA/ABB. GOVERNMENT PEACE NEGOTIATING PANEL – MORO ISLAMIC LIBERATION FRONT (GPNP-MILF) The Government Peace Negotiating Panel for the Moro Islamic Liberation Front is tasked to conduct negotiations with the MILF and undertake inclusive consultations with the relevant stakeholders. The peace talks between the two parties aim to end armed conflict through political settlement with the MILF that seeks to realize the exercise of Bangsamoro self-determination under the sovereignty of the Philippines. The peace negotiations formed the following bodies that will complete the negotiations, • Ceasefire Implementation – bodies with GPH and MILF counterparts that ensure

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• •

that both parties abide by the agreements on ceasefire. Represented by Local Monitoring Teams that report from the ground to the Committee on Cessation of Hostilities Coordinating Committee on the Cessation of Hostilities (CCCH). The CCCH coordinates with the Ad-hoc Joint Action Group (AHJAG) and the International Monitoring Teams. Bangsamoro Leadership and Management Institute – Located at the Simuay Village in Sultan Kudarat, Maguindanao, the Japan-funded institute provides human resources development to increase the capacity of Moros to govern themselves and help them manage their resources. Rehabilitation and Development – To address the needs for rehabilitation and development that are part of the framework agreement, the Bangsamoro Development Agency will determine, lead, and manage rehabilitation and development projects in conflict-affected areas. The agency coordinates with line agencies, the ARMM, and LGUs.

For concerns regarding the GPH-MILF peace process, citizens may contact: Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer Panel Chairperson, Government Peace Negotiating Panel-MILF (02) 636-0701, loc. 831, 833 mferrer@opapp.net Dir. Iona Gracia Jali-jali Director IV, Government Peace Negotiating Panel-MILF Secretariat (02) 636-0701, loc. 832 ijalijali.peace@gmail.com

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

GOVERNMENT PEACE NEGOTIATING PANEL–CPP/NPA/NDFP This involves furthering peace talks with the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army-National Democratic Front of the Philippines (CPP-NPA-NDFP or CNN) for putting a peacful end to the decades-old communist insurgency in the country; addressing the roots of conflict; administering socio-economic reforms; and pushing for an enduring political settlement and cessation of hostilities. To implement this, the GPNP-CNN panel created the following bodies: • GPH-Monitoring Committee – the monitoring committee was created under EO 404 (s. 2005) to monitor the status of implementation of the Comprehensive Agreement on Respect for Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law (CARHRIHL) and shall operate under the supervision of the GPH Panel to create an environment conducive to the process. • Reciprocal Working Committees – formed through a joint agreement between the GPH and the NDF to draft a tentative comprehensive agreement to deal with topics of Social and Economic Reforms, Political and Constitutional Rights, and Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law.

For concerns regarding the GPH-CNN tables, citizens may contact: Atty. Alexander Padilla Panel Chairperson, Government Peace Negotiating Panel-CNN (02) 636-0701, loc. 829, 828 alpaddy@yahoo.com Dir. Maria Carla Villarta Director IV, Government Peace Negotiating Panel-CNN Secretariat (02) 636-0701, loc. 827 mcmvillarta@gmail.com

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PEACE ACCORD MONITORING SECRETARIATS The government aims to achieve closure for the peace accords with the Cordillera People’s Liberation Army (CPLA) and the Rebolusyonaryong Partido ng ManggagawaPilipinas / Revolutionary Proletarian Army / Alex Boncayao Brigade (RPM-P/RPA/ABB). These efforts also include demilitarization and creating development projects for the communities involved with the said armed groups. Dir. Alexander S. Umpar Director IV, Peace Accord Monitoring Secretariat (02) 636-0701, loc. 858 alexumpar@yahoo.com

PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE FOR THE CPLA CLOSURE To close the negotiations with the CPLA and ensure the delivery of agreements, a Project Management Office (PMO) under OPAPP was formed. The PMOs are composed of provincial coordinators that then report to the area coordinator. The PMO on CPLA closure is also in-charge of ensuring institutional transformation of the CPLA into a socio-economic entity called the Cordillera Forum on Peace and Development with OPAPP as facilitator in the transformation. Also part of the closure agreement is the economic reintegration through economic assistance in the form of infrastructure, basic services, and social protection delivery handled by the Area Coordinators. The PMO also documents and compiles, with the assistance of the UNDP, the CPLA struggles throughout the years. The office also ensures the delivery of community development projects, and inter-municipal development projects. And to complete the reintegration process, the national government pays for the rebel group’s arms and will integrate the insurgents as AFP enlisted personnel and DENR forest guards.

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE FOR THE RPM-P/RPA/ABB On the other hand, another project management office will oversee the implementation of the agreements and finally close the peace accord with the RPM-P/RPA/ABB. The PMO is in-charge of civil and political rights of rebels by sorting their political and criminal cases and dropping cases that fit DOJ guidelines. The PMO will also monitor the delivery of peace dividends to 100 communities in the form of development assistance worth Php 500,000.00 per community. This is tied up with economic reintegration of profile members through economic assistance in their settlement sites. The economic assistance packages also include infrastructure, basic services, and social protection measures. While the CPLA is aimed to be transformed into a socio-economic entity, the RPM-P/ RPA/ABB will be transformed into a socio-political entity, i.e. a party-list. Also following OPAPP’s framework on the disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration, the PMO will help ensure the disposition of arms and forces and the surrender of arms. In return, they will be provided with in-kind goods. The former rebels will also be given an interim security arrangement with some members undergoing training for CAFGU and some will be part of the forest protection program of the DENR as forest rangers.

In contrast with the CPLA PMO, the area coordinators of RPM-P/RPA/ABB are in-charge of implementing the five (5) components mentioned above. This PMO follows this organization structure as part of their operations:

 

While the CPLA is aimed to be transformed into a socio-economic entity, the RPM-P/ RPA/ABB will be transformed into a socio-political entity, i.e. a party-list. Also following OPAPP’s framework on the disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration, the PMO will also help ensure the disposition of arms and forces, the surrender of arms, and in return, they will be provided by in-kind goods along. The former rebels will also be given an interim security arrangement with some members undergoing training for CAFGU and some will be part of the forest protection program of the DENR as forest rangers. In contrast with the CPLA PMO, the area coordinators of RPM-P/RPA/ABB are in-charge of implementing the five (5) components mentioned above. This PMO follows this organization structure as part of their operations:
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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

BANGSAMORO PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT UNIT The unit is in-charge of the final peace agreement between the government and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) to advance development and peace in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). It provides for the necessary groundwork to ensure such closure and ensures that ARMM reforms are also implemented.

However, it is outside of OPAPP’s mandate to actually deliver the basic services that might comprise the negotiated packages for MNLF. In these cases, inquiry from a citizen concerned will follow this route:

 

Usec. Jose I. Lorena Programs on the Bangsamoro (02) 636-0701 to 06, loc. 837 joe_lorena@yahoo.com
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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

COMPLEMENTARY TRACK To complement the negotiations of the peace tables, the Philippine Development Plan recognizes the need to address the roots of conflict by pursuing a complementary track. The track’s flagship program, the PAMANA program, is the national government’s program and framework for peace and development. Together with the PAMANA program, OPAPP is also composed of units that provide crucial support to the peace tables and to the comprehensive peace process, in general. PAYAPA AT MASAGANANG PAMAYANAN PROGRAM COORDINATING UNIT Rooted in the good governance agenda of the Aquino Administration, the PAMANA program aims to (i) improve local governance in conflict-affected communities through partnerships with national and local institutions, (ii) reduce poverty and vulnerability through sustainable rural development, and (iii) empower communities and strengthen their capacity to address issues of conflict and peace through activities that promote social cohesion. The program operates on three foundations to achieve lasting peace. First, it lays the foundation at the national level by creating policies that are crucial for reform and for the establishment of the foundations of peace. Second, the program provides, at the community level, the delivery of much-needed social services by promoting the convergent delivery of services and goods focused on households and communities. Lastly, at a regional and sub-regional level, the PAMANA program links conflict-affected areas to markets and promotes jobs generation in provincial and municipal government. To handle the delivery of the program, two PAMANA Coordinating Units were set-up, specifically in (i) Luzon-Visayas areas, and (ii) Mindanao area. The Coordinating Unit serves as overseer to ensure that the memorandums of agreements between parties are carried according to terms. The coordinating unit also generates updates and reports and prompts policy guidelines. In addition, the Coordinating Unit serves as a hub for resources to which people can go. Some of these resources include process inputs and capacity development trainings, policies, and capacity building programs. It is also open to those who wish to inquire about the status of projects, fund status utilization as well as general information on PAMANA. The PAMANA coordinating unit also releases information to partner offices, project billboards, and community billboards to update the public with the developments in the program. To avail of funding for projects, partner offices should follow the process below:

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

 

The PAMANA program can be reached through: Asec. Howard Cafugauan Assistant Secretary for Programs (02) 636-0701 to 06, loc. 849 hcafugauan@opapp.net Dir. Ma. Eileen Jose Director IV, PAMANA Luzon Visayas (02) 636-0701 to 06, loc. 845 aylinjose@yahoo.com Dir. Yusop Paraji Director III, PAMANA Mindanao (02) 636-0701 to 06, loc. 825 yuspar04@yahoo.com

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PEACE INTEGRATION UNIT OPAPP, in-line with its mandates, installed another unit to process claims from returnees other than from MNLF alone. This unit is the Peace Integration Unit. The unit handles the Comprehensive Local Integration Program to ensure that remunerations of returnees are substantial enough to support their livelihood and eradicate or minimize incentives towards insurgency. Previous combatants can avail of a package worth a maximum of Php 50,000.00 by undergoing process:

 

Dir. Ma. Eileen Jose Director IV, PAMANA Luzon Visayas (02) 636-0701 to 06, loc. 845 aylinjose@yahoo.com

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PLANNING AND COMPLIANCE UNIT The Planning and Compliance Unit is the agency’s oversight unit that ensures the timely accomplishment of the agency’s deliverables through close monitoring and evaluation of various programs and projects. They are also part of the annual and year-round planning of the agency to ensure that programs are in-line with OPAPP’s mandates. They are also the unit in-charge of preparing annual and quarterly reports submitted to other government agencies. Dir. Susana Guadalupe Marcaida Director IV, Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Unit (02) 636-0701 loc. 857 sunmarcaida@yahoo.com

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP OPAPP is also equipped with a Public Affairs Group (PAG) that provides support to the peace tables to achieve successful outcomes by (1) strengthening the peace constituency through capacitated existing and new peace partners and (2) providing the agency with effective knowledge products and communications services through different media channels and mechanisms. To deliver these functions that zero-in on the mainstreaming of peace, PAG is composed of three units, namely, (i) the Communications Unit, (ii) Social Mobilization Unit, and (iii) Liaison Unit, following this simple structure:

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS GROUP The Assistant Secretary for the Public Affairs Group supervises the operations of the three PAG units. She is the group’s lead strategist and oversees the smooth implementation of the PAG programs and projects. Weekly group meetings and unit-level meetings are presided by the Assistant Secretary to ensure the timely delivery of commitments and implementation of relevant activities. She is supported by a technical team to assist in managing the group. For general matters on the Public Affairs Group, people may contact: Asec. Rosalie Romero Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs Group (02) 636-0701, loc. 808 COMMUNICATIONS UNIT The Communications Unit is the agency’s frontline communications arm, in-charge of preparing press-releases, monitoring the news, and generating communications products like advertisements and collaterals. Not only do they keep the media and public abreast with the latest in the peace process, but they also provide support to

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

units inside OPAPP by linking them with the abovementioned stakeholders. The unit also delivers the following communications products following these procedures:

 

 

 

 

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

These deliverables are subsumed in the over-all organization structure of the Communications Unit. For communications-related concerns, the following can be contacted: Dir. Polly Michelle Cunanan Director IV, Communications Unit pcunanan@opapp.net Ms. Anj Segovia PDO V, Communications Unit anjsegovia@gmail.com

 

SOCIAL MOBILIZATION UNIT Meanwhile, the Social Mobilization Unit handles the mobilization of public support to create an enabling environment for a successful comprehensive peace process. The SocMob unit spearheaded the I Am For Peace Campaign and garnered Peace Ambassadors, including prominent celebrities like apl.de.ap, Anne Curtis, and Derek Ramsey, to support the peace process domestically and internationally. They further work together with Business Partners for Peace, the youth sector, and various civil society organizations.

 

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

To streamline these operations, the Social Mobilization Unit formed the structure and work distribution found below:
 

Citizens can get in-touch with the SocMob unit by contacting: Asec. Rosalie Romero Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs Group, SocMob OIC-Head (02) 636-0701, loc. 823 Ms. Ofelia Escauriaga PDO V, Social Mobilization Unit ofeliaescauriaga@yahoo.com

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

LIAISON UNIT Lastly, the Liaison Unit is one of OPAPP’s support units tasked to coordinate and build relationships with local government units, members of both chambers of Congress, and other key interest groups. The unit likewise helps ensure that the overall peace agenda is pushed and supported by key stakeholders and groups. The unit generates bimonthly bulletins to update key persons on the current political climate with regard to support for the peace process. To achieve their end, the Liaison unit is structured in the following manner:

 

Finally, for matters on the Liaison Unit, citizens may contact: Asec. Rosalie Romero Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs Group, SocMob OIC-Head (02) 636-0701, loc. 823 Ms. Josielyn Linga Liaison Unit Local: 824 Email: jmlinga@gmail.com
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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

POLICY AND PROGAM DEVELOPMENT GROUP To provide further support to the tables and to create an environment that enables the peace process, OPAPP created the Policy and Program Development Group for shaping policies and programs that assist in the negotiations. Headed by the Undersecretary for Policy and Institutional Partnerships (PIP), the group oversees the CBA-CPLA closure track implementation and completion, the Comprehensive Local Integration Program, overseas development assistance, and program development. The Undersecretary for PIP also promotes gender issues of peace through the National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and through Gender and Development Programs. To enable the group deliver this function, the group follows this structure:

To deliver these functions of the group, they follow these processes:

 

 
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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

 

 

To get in touch with the Policy and Program Development Group, people can contact: Atty. Maria Cleofe Gettie C. Sandoval Undersecretary for Policy and Institutional Partnership (02) 636-0701, loc. 810 gsandoval@opapp.net Program Development Unit

 

Under the guidance of the Undersecretary for Policy and Institutional Partnership, the Program Development Unit is the agency’s think-tank in generating programs and mobilizing resources that will provide support to the peace tables, and incorporate policy changes in the negotiation processes and programs. The latter includes the inclusion of gender sensitivity and other necessary frameworks to facilitate the comprehensive peace process.

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CITIZEN’S CHARTER | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

Specifically, the unit is tasked with the following activities: • Development of policies and programs needed in support of peace negotiations and the complementary track: o Capacity building on mainstreaming conflict-sensitive and peace promoting (CSPP) approaches in governance for PAMANA implementing partners, o OPAPP-DENR employment and livelihood programs for returnees (mostly as forest rangers), and o Development of peace and social cohesion (PSC) metrics scheme with technical units and partner agencies for the negotiations and for PAMANA program. Mobilize resources from the following overseas development assistance facilities: o OPAPP-AUSAid Technical Assistance Facility in Support of the Government of the Philippines Security, Peace and Development Agenda o UNDP Strengthening National Peace Infrastructures (SNPI) Programme o AECID Mainstreaming Peace and Development in Local Governance Program o World Bank – Institutional Development Fund

To know more about the Program Development Unit, people may contact: Dir. Pamela Ann Padilla Director, Program Development Unit (02) 636-0701 to 07, loc. 857 papadilla@opapp.net

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F THE PRE EO SID FIC

ADVISER TIAL ON EN
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Office of the President of the Philippines OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ADVISER ON THE PEACE PROCESS

www.opapp.gov.ph

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