Five-­‐year-­‐old  Heidi,  an  orphan,  has  just  been  taken  by  her  Aunt  Dete  to

 stay  with  her   grandfather,  Alm-­‐Uncle,  who  lives  alone  in  a  hut  in  the  mountains  in  Switzerland.       1                          
         

Heidi   by  Johanna  Spyri  

As   soon   as   Dete   had   disappeared   the   old   man   went   back   to   his   bench,   and   there   he   remained   seated,   staring   on   the   ground   without   uttering   a   sound,   while   thick  curls  of  smoke  floated  upward  from  his  pipe.  Heidi,  meanwhile,  was  enjoying   herself   in   her   new   surroundings;   she   looked   about   until   she   found   a   shed,   built   against   the   hut,   where   the   goats   were   kept;   she   peeped   in,   and   saw   it   was   empty.   She   continued   her   search   and   presently   came   to   the   fir   trees   behind   the   hut.   A   strong   breeze   was   blowing   through   them,   and   there   was   a   rushing   and   roaring   in   their   topmost   branches,   Heidi   stood   still   and   listened.   The   sound   growing   fainter,   she   went   on   again,   to   the   farther   corner   of   the   hut,   and   round   to   where   her   grandfather  was  sitting.  Seeing  that  he  was  in  exactly  the  same  position  as  when  she   left  him,  she  went  and  placed  herself  in  front  of  the  old  man,  and  putting  her  hands   behind   her   back,   stood   and   gazed   at   him.   Her   grandfather   looked   up,   and   as   she   continued  standing  there  without  moving,  “What  is  it  you  want?”  he  asked.   “I  want  to  see  what  you  have  inside  the  house,”  said  Heidi.   “Come  then!”  and  the  grandfather  rose  and  went  before  her  towards  the  hut.   “Bring  your  bundle  of  clothes  in  with  you,”  he  bid  her  as  she  was  following.   “I  shan’t  want  them  any  more,”  was  her  prompt  answer.   The   old   man   turned   and   looked   searchingly   at   the   child,   whose   dark   eyes   were   sparkling   in   delighted   anticipation   of   what   she   was   going   to   see   inside.   “She   is   certainly  not  wanting  in  intelligence,”  he  murmured  to  himself.  “And  why  shall  you   not  want  them  any  more?”  he  asked  aloud.   “Because  I  want  to  go  about  like  the  goats  with  their  thin  light  legs.”   “Well,  you  can  do  so  if  you  like,”  said  her  grandfather,  “but  bring  the  things  in;   we  must  put  them  in  the  cupboard.”   Heidi   did   as   she   was   told.   The   old   man   now   opened   the   door   and   Heidi   stepped   inside   after   him;   she   found   herself   in   a   good-­‐sized   room,   which   covered   the   whole   ground   floor   of   the   hut.   A   table   and   a   chair   were   the   only   furniture;   in   one   corner   stood   the   grandfather’s   bed,   in   another   was   the   hearth   with   a   large   kettle   hanging   above   it;   and   on   the   further   side   was   a   large   door   in   the   wall—this   was   the   cupboard.   The   grandfather   opened   it;   inside   were   his   clothes,   some   hanging   up,   others,  a  couple  of  shirts,  and  some  socks  and  handkerchiefs,  lying  on  a  shelf.  On  a   second  shelf  were  some  plates,  cups,  and  glasses,  and  on  a  higher  one  still,  a  round   loaf,   smoked   meat,   and   cheese,   for   everything   that   Alm-­‐Uncle   needed   for   his   food   and  clothing  was  kept  in  this  cupboard.  Heidi,  as  soon  as  it  was  opened,  ran  quickly   forward   and   thrust   in   her   bundle   of   clothes,   as   far   back   behind   her   grandfather’s  
Grade  5  ELA   2   Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

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things   as   possible,   so   that   they   might   not   easily   be   found   again.   She   then   looked   carefully  round  the  room,  and  asked,  “Where  am  I  to  sleep,  grandfather?”   “Wherever  you  like,”  he  answered.   Heidi   was   delighted,   and   began   at   once   to   examine   all   the   nooks   and   corners   to   find   out   where   it   would   be   pleasantest   to   sleep.   In   the   corner   near   her   grandfather’s  bed  she  saw  a  short  ladder  against  the  wall;  up  she  climbed  and  found   herself   in   the   hayloft.   There   lay   a   large   heap   of   fresh   sweet-­‐smelling   hay,   while   through   a   round   hayloft  =  A  loft  for  storing  hay   window  in  the  wall  she  could  see  right  down  the   valley.               www.gutenberg.org          

Grade  5  ELA  

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Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

 

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An  important  contrast  in  the  story  is  between   A B C D Heidi’s  grandfather’s  concern  and  Aunt  Dete’s  neglect   Heidi’s  old  clothes  and  her  new  clothes   Heidi’s  former  bedroom  and  her  new  bedroom   Heidi’s  cheerfulness  and  her  grandfather’s  lack  of  emotion  

Key:  D   Aligned  CCLS:  RL.5.3   Commentary:   This   question   aligns   to   CCLS   RL.5.3   in   that   it   asks   the   student   to   identify  an  important  contrast  within  the  story.   Rationale:  Option  D  is  correct.  Both  the  point  of  view  and  the  narration  of  actions   highlight  the  two  characters’  contrasting  traits.  There  is  no  mention  of  Aunt  Dete’s   behavior  or  any  contrast  between  clothes  or  bedrooms.  

Grade  5  ELA  

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Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

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The  narrator  of  the  story  helps  the  reader  understand  the  grandfather  by   A B C D describing  his  face  and  revealing  his  thoughts   describing  his  home  and  quoting  his  speech   telling  Heidi’s  opinion  of  him  and  revealing  his  past   telling  his  emotions  and  showing  his  frustration  

Key:  B   Aligned  CCLS:  RL.5.6   Commentary:  This  question  aligns  to  CCLS  RL.5.6  in  that  it  requires  the  student  to   understand  how  a  third-­‐person  limited  point  of  view  (primarily  aligned  with  Heidi)   develops  the  grandfather’s  character.   Rationale:  Option  B  is  correct.  The  grandfather  is  characterized  through  the  things   he  says  (dialogue)  and  the  setting.  The  narrator  does  not  describe  the  grandfather   physically,   does   not   reveal   his   inner   thoughts   or   tell   about   his   past,   and   does   not   directly  provide  Heidi’s  opinion  of  him.    

Grade  5  ELA  

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Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

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When   the   grandfather   says   in   paragraph   6   that   Heidi   is   “not   wanting   in   intelligence,”  he  means  that  she     A seems  to  be  a  very  bright  child   B says  things  she  does  not  mean   C impresses  him  with  her  knowledge   D appears  to  misunderstand  what  he  is  saying  

  Key:  A     Aligned  CCLS:  RL.5.4,  L.4     Commentary:   This   aligns   to   CCLS   RL.5.4   and   L.4   in   that   the   question   asks   the   student   to   determine   the   meaning   of   an   unknown   word   or   unusual   phrasing   (“wanting”)  from  context.       Rationale:   Option   A   is   correct.   Heidi’s   curiosity   and   her   sparkling   eyes   provide   evidence  of  her  intelligence,  and  “not  wanting”  means  “not  lacking.”  It  is  clear  from   the  context  that  the  grandfather  does  not  think  she  is  trying  to  impress  him  or  that   she  lacks  insight  into  what  he  is  saying.      

Grade  5  ELA  

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Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

 

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How  does  the  final  paragraph  contribute  to  the  reader’s  understanding  of  the   story?     A It  suggests  that  Heidi  will  make  the  most  of  her  new  surroundings.   B It  shows  that  Heidi  will  feel  uncomfortable  in  her  new  home.   C It  indicates  how  poor  the  family  is.   D It  shows  how  tired  Heidi  is.  

  Key:  A     Aligned  CCLS:  RL.5.5     Commentary:  This  question  aligns  to  CCLS  RL.5.5  in  that  it  requires  the  student  to   analyze  what  a  particular  portion  of  a  text  (the  ending)  contributes  to  the  structure   of  the  entire  passage.     Rationale:   Option   A   is   correct.   The   description   of   the   loft,   and   of   Heidi’s   feelings   about   it,   reveal   Heidi’s   happy   adaptability   to   her   new   home.   The   final   paragraph   does  not  highlight  discomfort,  poverty,  or  tiredness.        

Grade  5  ELA  

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Common  Core  Sample  Questions  

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