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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 205
KOREAN THREAT
WORLD PAGE 18
M-A GETS
A BIG WIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘DEFIANCE’ IS A TV
SHOW AND GAME
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
KERRY TAMPS ANXIETY OVER NORTH KOREA
MISSILE POWER
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
For many folks, making the easy
trip to the grocery store and pluck-
ing that desired item off the shelf is
not enough anymore. California
consumers are increasingly opting
to buy directly from farmers.
This growing demand for direct
e x c h a n g e s
between the
farmer and the
consumer has
led the
Department of
Food and
Agriculture to
establish regula-
tions for farm-
ers’ markets.
A California Farmers’ Market
certification assures market goers
that the food being sold is actually
grown on the farms represented.
The direct marketing of agricul-
tural products from small farms is
something Assemblyman Rich
Gordon, D-Menlo Park, says the
state needs to encourage further. He
is proposing a certification process
for Community-Supported
Agriculture, or CSA.
Like farmers’ markets, CSAs are
growing in number in California.
Farmers can directly market their
food to community members by
allowing them to invest in a share of
a farm in exchange for a portion of
the farm’s yield. This farm share
can come in the form of a regular
produce delivery basket or some
other portion of an animal or crop.
“More and more people have a
real interest in being connected to
the source of their food,” said
Gordon. “They want it to be as close
and local as possible, and
Bill seeks clarity on citizen-farmer partnerships
Gordon proposes Community-Supported Agriculture certification, protections
Developer
seeks input
on 15 acres
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The New Home Company wants to hear from Foster City
residents about what amenities and features it would like to see
in the senior housing project planned for the last big chunk of
vacant land in the city — the 15 acres tucked between City
Hall and the Peninsula Jewish Community Center.
In October, the City Council picked Foster City Community
Partners to build on the site, which it will purchase for $30
million, and The New Home Company is acting as lead devel-
oper for a senior residential community at the site with about
400 units of housing and 30,000 square feet of retail space.
TNHC officials have been working with the Foster City
Chamber of Commerce, Lions, Rotary and 55+ clubs, the
Youth Committee and other groups in the city to gather input
on what commercial businesses and site amenities residents
After theft, Facebook donates
computers to elementaryschool
El Crystal victim of stolen equipment,
jeopardizing its switch to tech focus
Senior housing community
moves forward in Foster City
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Twenty refurbished MacBook Pros were donated to El
Crystal Elementary School after multiple computers were
stolen from the San Bruno campus in March.
On March 29, El Crystal Elementary School officials found
someone had cut through the gate, broken a window, gone into
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Above: Ruth Waters and Wayne Wichern in his studio admiring his handmade hats. Below:Waters next to her sculptures.
Rich Gordon
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
More than a decade in the making, the
Peninsula Museum of Art and the
Peninsula Art Institute have found a new
home.
The 18,000-square-foot Burlingame
location serves as a mecca for local
artists and the community at large. Ruth
Waters, the museum founder, chair and
executive director, has been in the art
community since the 1960s. She and
members of the Peninsula Art Council
gathered in 1997 to identify and assess
the absence of a museum and perform-
ing arts center in San Mateo County,
Waters said.
Waters’ dedicated dream was realized
in 2003 when the city of Belmont
offered a lease at the Manor House in
Twin Pines Park. The small site served
as a stepping stone toward the new loca-
tion nine times larger.
“We think of Burlingame as the per-
fect location for us and, in return, we
expect to be able to contribute a valuable
community cultural resource,” Waters
said.
The museum and institute are com-
prised of five gallery spaces, a library, a
classroom, a store and 28 working
artists’ studios.
Unlike many large-scale museums
found in San Francisco, coveted work-
space is available onsite for some of the
finest local artists. The studios are in
high demand due to their accessibility
and affordable rent prices. Occupying
A space for artists
Peninsula Museum of Art, Peninsula Art Institute settle into new Burlingame home
See ART, Page 23 See CRYSTAL, Page 23
See INPUT, Page 31
See BILL, Page 31
Speedy Gonzalez had a cousin named
Slowpoke Rodriguez. He was the slow-
est mouse in all of Mexico.
***
Voice actor Joe Dougherty originally
did the voice of Porky Pig. Dougherty
really had a stutter, however, he couldn’t
control it and it made production costs
too high. Mel Blanc (1908-1989) began
doing Porky Pig’s voice in 1937.
***
Daffy Duck had a wife named Daphne.
In the 1955 cartoon short “Stork
Naked,” a stork tries to deliver a duck-
ling to Mr. and Mrs. Daffy Duck, but
Daffy tries to stop him.
***
George Jetson worked for Spacely
Sprockets, owned by Cosmo G.
Spacely. Spacely’s competitor was W.C.
Cogswell, owner of the rival company
Cogswell Cogs.
***
Bubbles, Blossom and Buttercup are the
trio that makes up the Powerpuff Girls.
The girls were created in a laboratory by
a concoction of sugar, spice, everything
nice and Chemical X. The chemical is
the source of the sister’s super powers.
***
More than 40 million Care Bear stuffed
toys were sold between 1983 and 1987.
***
Marion Ross (born 1928), of “Happy
Days” fame, was the voice of Grandma
Squarepants in a 2001 episode of
“Spongebob Squarepants.”
***
Do you know what the first cartoon
series on prime time television was?
The year? See answer at end.
***
Underdog’s alter-identity was
Shoeshine Boy. Whenever television
reporter Sweet Polly Purebred was in
distress, she called for Underdog’s help.
“Underdog” aired from 1964 to 1973.
***
The Pink Panther cartoons began as
opening segments for the Pink Panther
series of movies, starring the bumbling
Inspector Clouseau, played by Peter
Sellers (1925-1980.)
***
Foghorn Leghorn, the obnoxious rooster
with a southern accent, was based on
Senator Claghorn, a character from the
Fred Allen (1894-1956) radio show
“Allen’s Alley” in the 1940s.
***
“Pac-Man” was a Saturday morning car-
toon based on the popular video game.
In the cartoon, which aired from 1982 to
1984, Packy and his family were
pestered by ghosts who were the min-
ions of Mezmaron, a villain who wanted
to rule the world.
***
Betty Boop made her first appearance in
the 1930 animated film “Dizzy Dishes.”
Mae Questel (1908-1998) did the origi-
nal voice of Betty Boop. Questel was
also the voice of Popeye’s girlfriend
Olive Oyl.
***
Shaggy’s full name is Norville Rogers.
Scooby-Doo is Shaggy’s pet Great
Dane.
***
Strawberry Shortcake was created as a
greeting card character in 1978.
***
“Pinky and the Brain,” (1995-1998) a
cartoon series about genetically
enhanced lab mice that want to take
over the world, won an Emmy in 1996
for Outstanding Achievement in
Animation.
***
In 1955, Mighty Mouse was the first
cartoon character ever to appear on
Saturday morning television.
***
Hong Kong Phooey’s alter-identity was
Penrod Pooch, a janitor at a police sta-
tion. When Penrod turned into kung fu
crime-fighting Hong Kong Phooey, his
sidekick Spot the cat usually got him
out of trouble.
***
Answer: The modern Stone Age family
“The Flintstones” premiered on ABC in
1960. The Flintstones was loosely based
on “The Honeymooners” (1955-1956)
starring Jackie Gleason (1916-1987).
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Ron Perlman
is 63.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1943
President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedi-
cated the Jefferson Memorial in
Washington, D.C., on the 200th
anniversary of the third American pres-
ident’s birth.
“The excursion is the same
when you go looking for your sorrow
as when you go looking for your joy.”
— Eudora Welty, American author (1909-2001)
Singer Al Green is
67.
Bandleader Max
Weinberg is 62.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Dany Torres of Spain competes during the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tours 2013 in Dubai.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 40s. Northwest winds around 20 mph
with gusts to around 35 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
50s. Northwest winds 15 to 20 mph.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy. Breezy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Northwest winds 20 to 30 mph. Gusts up to 45 mph in the
evening.
Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday night through Friday: Partly cloudy. Breezy. Lows
in the mid 40s. Highs near 60.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming part-
ly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers Monday)
ANNEX DRESS APATHY OBLIGE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After seeing her former husband for the first
time in years, she was not — “EX-SIGHTED”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ADRAW
GAMIE
CHENRD
ROPOYL
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
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m
/
ju
m
b
le
Print your
answer here:
In 1613, Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, was cap-
tured by English Capt. Samuel Argall in Virginia and held in
exchange for English prisoners and stolen weapons. (During a
yearlong captivity, Pocahontas converted to Christianity and
ultimately opted to stay with the English. )
In 1742, Handel’s “Messiah” had its first public performance
in Dublin, Ireland.
In 1743, the third president of the United States, Thomas
Jefferson, was born in Shadwell in the Virginia Colony.
In 1860, the Pony Express completed its inaugural run from St.
Joseph, Mo. to Sacramento in 10 days.
In 1861, at the start of the Civil War, Fort Sumter in South
Carolina fell to Confederate forces.
In 1912, the Royal Flying Corps, a predecessor of Britain’s
Royal Air Force, was created.
In 1943, Radio Berlin announced the discovery of thousands of
graves of massacred Polish officers in Russia’s Katyn Forest;
the Nazis blamed the killings on the Soviets, who in turn
blamed the Nazis. (Post-Soviet Russia has acknowledged the
massacre was carried out by Josef Stalin’s much feared secret
police.)
In 1958, Van Cliburn of the United States won the first
International Tchaikovsky Competition for piano in Moscow;
Russian Valery Klimov won the violin competition.
In 1964, Sidney Poitier became the first black performer in a
leading role to win an Academy Award for “Lilies of the Field.”
(Patricia Neal was named best actress for “Hud”; best picture
went to “Tom Jones.”)
In 1970, Apollo 13, four-fifths of the way to the moon, was
crippled when a tank containing liquid oxygen burst. (The
astronauts managed to return safely.)
Movie director Stanley Donen is 89. Former Sen. Ben
Nighthorse Campbell, R-Colo., is 80. Actor Lyle Waggoner is 78.
Actor Edward Fox is 76. Actor Paul Sorvino is 74. Poet Seamus
Heaney is 74. Movie-TV composer Bill Conti is 71. Rock musi-
cian Jack Casady is 69. Actor Tony Dow is 68. Actor William
Sadler is 63. Singer Peabo Bryson is 62. Bluegrass singer-musi-
cian Sam Bush is 61. Rock musician Jimmy Destri is 59. Singer-
musician Louis Johnson (The Brothers Johnson) is 58. Comedian
Gary Kroeger is 56. Actress Saundra Santiago is 56. Sen. Bob
Casey Jr., D-Pa., is 53. Rock musician Joey Mazzola (Sponge) is
52. Chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov is 50.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classis,No.5,in first place; Gorgeous George,No.
8, in second place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in
third place.The race time was clocked at 1:46.48.
5 7 0
1 10 13 19 21 28
Mega number
April 12 Mega Millions
1 36 40 52 53 20
Powerball
April 10 Powerball
9 12 25 27 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 7 6 0
Daily Four
4 1 4
Daily three evening
9 18 37 41 42 3
Mega number
April 10 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The Redwood
City Planning
Commission will
consider a tentative
map and permits for
the Classics at
Redwood City project which includes 18
detached, single-family residences at 735
Brewster Ave., 303/313 Fuller St. and 321
Fuller St. The three-story units will be
above a partially subterranean parking
structure with 35 stalls. As part of the pro-
posal, the commercial office building on
Brewster will be demolished while histori-
cal homes on the other parcels will be
removed from the site.
The Planning Commission meets 7 p.m.
Monday, April 15 at City Hall, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
• In October, the Burlingame City
Council wasn’t necessarily convinced rais-
ing train tracks at Broadway is the way to
go, but it supported seeking funds to make
some changes at the crossing. On Monday,
the council will revisit the topic and consid-
er giving staff direction in continuing to be
prepared to qualify for funds.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, April
15 at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
EDUCATION
• On Tuesday, the Millbrae Elementary
School District Board of Trustees will get
back polling results about the public’s opin-
ion about a future parcel tax.
The board meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 16
at City Hall, 620 Magnolia Ave., Millbrae.
SAN MATEO
Suspicious person. Someone reported a per-
son ringing her doorbell and then opening the
fence to her backyard on the 100 block of
Hobart Avenue before 3:18 p.m. Wednesday,
April 10.
Burglary. A rock was thrown through the
window of a Pontiac Vibe and items were
stolen on the 400 block of South Norfolk
Street before 8:31 a.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Vandalism. A man found a knife in his car tire
on the 3000 block of Los Prados before 8:05
p.m. on Monday, April 8.
Hit-and-run. A store caught a hit-and-run
accident on video surveillance on the 1500
block of South Claremont Street before 5:06
p.m. on Monday, April 8.
Fraud. Credit cards were used from a wallet
that was stolen out of a locker room on the
1800 block of South Grant Street before 12:41
p.m. on Monday, April 8.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Suspended license. A man was cited and
released for driving with a suspended license
on New Years Creek Road before 10:54 p.m.
Tuesday, April 9.
Suspended license. A man was cited and his
vehicle was towed for driving with a suspend-
ed license at the intersection of Broadway and
Prospect Way before 9:45 p.m. Tuesday, April
9.
Police reports
What would Jesus do?
A person appeared to be attempting to
break into a car in a church parking lot on
Dolores Way in South San Francisco
before 5:47 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Cheerleading isn’t traditionally thought of
as a sport for guys, but two Sequoia High
School juniors found themselves loving the
spirited group.
This season, the Cherokees team took first
place in the United Spirit Association High
School Nationals competition in the co-ed
division, which requires two or more guys to
be on the team. The competition, which hap-
pened last month, was the icing on the cake
for two guys — 18-year-olds German Barajas
and Lorenzo Bruni — who decided to give
cheerleading a chance this year.
“Cheering’s a family,” said Barajas. “I can’t
live without it. All the girls are like sisters.”
Bruni, an exchange student from Italy,
agreed. A gymnast, Bruni joined the team in
the fall in hopes of continuing to practice.
Since joining, he said he formed stronger
bonds, participated in a sport that doesn’t exist
in his home country and got a chance to prac-
tice his English.
Adding guys onto a squad often enhances
the stunts. Last year, Sequoia’s squad had one
guy, not enough to move the team into the co-
ed division. Barajas took that spot and has
enjoyed the challenges. When Bruni came on,
the team entered a new division. Sequoia’s
competition squad is made up of members
from both the junior varsity and varsity
squads, said coach Stacy Morell. This year’s
routine was choreographed over the summer,
before the squad knew they would be compet-
ing in the co-ed division. As a result, it didn’t
really highlight the boys, said Morell. Now
the team is hoping to continue to grow the
number of guys and become a stronger force
in the co-ed division, she said.
Being that Barajas and Bruni were both
new, neither knew what to expect when taking
the nationals stage in Southern California last
month. There was a team with seven guys
which both boys mentioned intimidated them.
But the win despite having fewer guys
enlivened both juniors.
“I’m excited for the whole team,” said
Barajas.
Bruni, who will be returning back to Italy,
can’t continue on the team next year. Despite
that, he thinks more guys should give it a try.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Sequoia wins national cheer title
Addition of two boys adds new dimension to team
Sequoia High School’s cheerleading squad took first place in the United Spirit Association
High School Nationals competition in the co-ed division.
4
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
County seeks $2M for clinics
The head of the county’s public hospital is
seeking a $2 million grant from the Sequoia
Healthcare District to help operate its clinics.
The request isn’t unusual for Dr. Susan
Ehrlich and the San Mateo Medical Center —
the health care district has already con-
tributed millions to the clinics for the care of
the low-income and under or uninsured. On
Wednesday, hospital CEO Ehrlich will ask
for $2 million for fiscal year 2013-14. If
granted, the funds will join a total of $15.5
million awarded over the past six years,
including $4.3 million to specifically support
the new South County Health Center which is
expected to open later this year.
The Peninsula Health Care District also
gave $4.6 million for fiscal years 2012-14 but
not for the South County Health Center
because it is not within its boundaries, said
Health System spokeswoman Robyn Thaw.
The Sequoia Healthcare District meets at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 17 in the district
conference room, 525 Veterans Blvd.,
Redwood City.
Senior care home
burglarized by ‘utility worker’
A nurse at a senior care home had $800
stolen from her purse after being distracted
by a man posing as a utility worker on the 400
block of Acacia Avenue in South San
Francisco Thursday afternoon, according to
police.
At approximately 3:32 p.m., the nurse
heard the doorbell and answered the front
door where she was greeted by a man who
appeared to be a utility worker. He asked if he
could speak to her about the overhead wiring
on the side yard. She followed him outside
where they spoke for five to 10 minutes,
according to police.
She had left the front door open and dis-
covered that her purse was moved and the
money was missing from it after the man had
left, according to police.
Police believe the man had acted as a dis-
traction while another or others entered the
home and burglarized it. The man is
described as white, approximately 50, with
black hair. He was wearing a black baseball
hat, a dark blue uniform and brown shoes. He
had a lanyard around his neck with an
unknown type of identification badge,
according to police.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A cancer patient who reportedly set a fire in
his county hospital room and threatened a
nurse with a knife before a two-hour standoff
with police will learn in mid-summer if he’ll
stand trial on arson and assault charges.
Zavtcho Stoyanov, 51, has pleaded not
guilty and on Friday scheduled a July 19 pre-
liminary hearing. Meanwhile, he remains free
in the custody of his friends as long as he
maintains contact with the court five times a
week.
The March 6 evening fire allegedly started
by Stoyanov caused chaos and the evacuation
of 29 rooms but little other damage.
Stoyanov, of Hillsborough, was a patient at
San Mateo Medical Center
when he reportedly began
the first floor blaze just
before 11 p.m. After hos-
pital staff extinguished the
small fire, Stoyanov
reportedly blocked himself
in a hospital room with a
chair and hamper. When a
nurse kicked the door
open, she reported seeing
the bed and floor on fire
and Stoyanov walking toward her swinging a
knife. Responding officers needed nearly two
hours and a Taser to negotiate and eventually
apprehend him.
The hospital quickly issued a statement
lauding the quick action of first responders but
withheld further comment on the incident,
including Stoyanov’s reason for hospitaliza-
tion or why he may have become so agitated.
Prosecutors say Stoyanov has terminal cancer
and was generally frustrated with life.
His diagnosis plays no role in whether to
prosecute him, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
“Unless the prosecution was out of the ordi-
nary, such as flying in 10 witness that would
be resource-heavy, we do not take into
account age or physical condition,” Wagstaffe
said. “Punishment is only the second part of
what we do. Holding someone accountable is
the first.”
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Former patient gets hearing for hospital arson
Zavtcho
Stoyanov
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of four alleged gangmembers charged
in the repeated stabbing of a man in Redwood
City was immediately sentenced Friday to 16
years in prison after pleading no contest to
attempted murder and using a deadly weapon.
Jose Luis Segurasuarez, 20, also admitted
committing the crime for gang purposes. The
plea deal makes Segurasuarez the third of the
four to settle their respective cases rather than
stand trial.
Prosecutors previously offered
Segurasuarez a 15-year settlement but revoked
it when he declined to accept.
According to prosecutors, Segurasuarez
along with three others and a 16-year-old boy
stabbed the victim several times in the
abdomen at approximately 4:30 p.m. Dec. 13,
2011 on the 800 block of Brewster Avenue.
Witnesses reported seeing two males jump out
of a gold car, stab the man and flee the area.
Police located a car matching the vehicle
description at a home in the 2600 block of
Marlborough Avenue and ultimately arrested
the three teens inside based on their state-
ments. The victim was hospitalized with criti-
cal injuries but survived.
Co-defendant Billi Ruben Antonio, 19,
pleaded no contest in July 2012 to being an
accessory to a felony and participating in a
street gang. He was sentenced to two years
with 456 days credit for time served followed
by a year of mandatory supervision.
After his competency was confirmed, co-
defendant Bryan Alexander Morales, 20, also
pleaded no contest to attempted murder in
return for 20 years in prison.
Segurasuarez has credit of 472 days against
his term earned while in custody without bail.
He must also pay restitution to be determined
at an April 25 hearing, register as a gangmem-
ber and serve 85 percent of the sentence
before being eligible for parole.
Gangmember sentenced 16 years for stabbing
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
On Friday, Deputy Fire Chief Mark Ladas
was announced as the new chief of the Central
County Fire Department.
The department serves Hillsborough and
Burlingame. The CCFD chief also oversees
the Millbrae and San Bruno fire departments.
“This was a collaborative process, and all
four city managers involved unanimously
selected Chief Ladas for this position,” said
Hillsborough City Manager Randy Schwartz.
“Chief Ladas’ experience as the deputy fire
chief, and his commitment to the success of
the department, impressed the selection
panel.”
Ladas succeeds Don Dornell, who retired
after six and a half years of service as fire
chief for CCFD and 36 years in the fire serv-
ice.
Ladas has served as a chief officer for
CCFD since 2005. Prior to that, he served in
the Hillsborough Fire Department from 1984-
1986 and in the Millbrae Fire Department
from 1986-2005. During his career, Ladas has
also been an Emergency Medical Technician I
instructor for the state of California, a para-
medic and a member of San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Search and Rescue squad.
“We are fortunate to have someone with
Mark’s skills and background in this key posi-
tion,” said Burlingame City Manager Lisa
Goldman.
New Central County Fire chief named
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Anne Updike Newsom
Anne Updike Newsom, born Oct. 27, 1917,
died March 5, 2013.
Anne was born and
raised in Omaha, Neb.,
where she met and mar-
ried William A. Newsom,
a medical student at
Creighton University.
After World War II, the
couple was married and
moved to San Francisco,
where Dr. Newsom estab-
lished his medical practice in neurosurgery.
Together, Anne and Bill raised nine children:
William Jr., M.D. (Christine), Wendy, Rob
(Joanne), David (deceased), Laura, Mark
(Cathy), Mary (Roger Boucher), Sarah (John
Healy) and Philip (Peggy).
Anne was a stay-at-home mother and active
in numerous charitable organizations, includ-
ing the Junior League and the American Red
Cross. She was a graduate of Goucher College
in Baltimore and a member of Kappa Kappa
Gamma Sorority.
When her husband passed away in 2000,
Anne moved to the Magnolia of Millbrae
where she lived for nearly 13 years. In addi-
tion to her husband, she was predeceased by
her son, Dave, her parents, Robert and
Winifred Updike, and her sisters, Mary Sickel
and Lorry Guild. Her survivors include her
eight remaining children, and her grandchil-
dren: Rob (Jen), Chrissy, Danny, Katie,
Lucera (Nova), Beth, James (Wendy), Joseph,
Pete, Joanna, Emily, Marie (John), Roger,
Billy, Patrick, Ali, Angie, Jack and Mariclare.
She is also survived by her five great-grand-
daughters: Keely, Maeve, Mara, Tara and
Penelope, many nieces, nephews and friends,
including Betty Leonard of Glen Ellen, Calif.
and Janice Zimmerman of Omaha, Neb.
A funeral mass was held at Our Lady of
Angels in Burlingame. Should friends wish,
donations may be made to Mission Hospice of
San Mateo.
Frank Gallardo
Frank Gallardo, born in San Francisco Jan.
23, 1930, died April 1, 2013.
He was raised in San Francisco and gradu-
ated from Mission High. In 1951, he married
Emily Salais. Longtime San Francisco resi-
dents, they moved to Belmont 42 years ago.
He and Emily were entirely devoted to each
other and their family. Recently, Frank
became Emily’s loving caregiver. Emily’s
sudden death devastated Frank and he passed
four weeks to the date of her passing.
Frank is survived by daughters Angelica
Grasso-Hotti, Cecilia Mitchell, Francesca
Muhlfelder, son Kevin Gallardo, grandchil-
dren Edward Mitchell and Gabriel Gallardo,
great-grandchild Emily Fay Mitchell, brother
Leo and sisters Sylvia and Abigail.
Frank served as usher
for the Offertory at the
Church of the Immaculate
Heart of Mary. History
was Frank’s passion. Ask a
question and he could
recite details worthy of a
history professor. There
was always a pile of books
and periodicals at his
chair-side. He was blessed with a “green
thumb,” all plants miraculously survived in his
care. He was a diehard emotional San
Francisco Giants and 49ers fan. His potato
salad was the family’s treat; ice cream and
nuts were his treats.
“The family suffers an irreconcilable loss.”
Dominic John Villeggiante
Dominic John Villeggiante, born April
28,1966, died unexpectedly but peacefully
April 9, 2013.
He was 46.
He was a lifelong resi-
dent of San Mateo County
and resided in Burlingame.
He is survived by his high
school sweetheart and lov-
ing wife of 23 years Traci
and their four daughters,
Brittany, Stacey, Victoria
and Sophia; his parents, Dominic and Karen
Villeggiante; his brothers, Kevin and Gary
Villeggiante; sisters-in-law, Nicole and Tina;
his mother and father-in-law, Ray and Debbie
Valentino and his nieces and nephews,
Sabrina, Tony, Isabella, Vincenzo and Gino
Villeggiante, Raymond, Antonio and Delaney
Prieto.
Dominic was a proud longshoreman and
Teamster, a member of the Italian Club and a
part of a successful trade show business.
Family visitation at the Chapel of the
Highlands will be private; Family and friends
are invited to visit after 4 p.m. Sunday, April
14 at Saint Dunstan Catholic Church, 1133
Broadway in Millbrae, with a 7 p.m. vigil
service. A funeral mass will be 11 a.m.
Monday, April 15, also at St. Dunstan Church.
He will be laid to rest at the Italian Cemetery
in Colma.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
ly’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200
words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Lawyer: Girl saw
details online of sex assault
SARATOGA — Fifteen-year-old Audrie
Pott passed out drunk at a friend’s house, woke
up and concluded she had been sexually
abused.
In the days that followed, she was shocked to
see an explicit photo of herself circulating
among her classmates along with emails and
text messages about the episode. And she was
horrified to discover that her attackers were
three of her friends, her family’s lawyer says.
Eight days after the party, she hanged herself.
“She pieced together with emails and texts
who had done this to her. They were her
friends. Her friends!” said family attorney
Robert Allard. “That was the worst.”
On Thursday, sheriff’s officials arrested three
16-year-old boys on suspicion of sexual battery
against Audrie, who committed suicide in
September.
Brown’s appeal of prison
ruling could be difficult
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown’s
continued defiance of a federal court order to
reduce the state’s inmate population could
face a difficult time in the appeals process
because the U.S. Supreme Court has already
weighed in on the matter, a legal expert said
Friday.
The governor’s administration said it will
appeal the decision issued Thursday by a
three-judge panel, which denied Brown’s
request to lift the population cap.
The judges also threatened to hold him and
other state officials in contempt if they failed
to comply with the earlier court rulings to
reduce the prison population.
B
urlingame High School’s 32nd
annual Taste of the Town will be
held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
April 14 at the Marriott San Francisco
Airport Waterfront, Burlingame.
Sample culinary treats and libations gener-
ously donated by Burlingame’s best restau-
rants and local companies while mingling
with friends. Bid on a variety of exciting auc-
tion items and take a chance at winning raffle
prizes. Tickets are $70 at the door. For more
information, and to purchase raffle tickets,
visit http://www.bhs.schoolloop.com.
***
The Burlingame Lions Club is hosting its
fifth annual All Schools Spelling Bee compe-
tition Wednesday, April 17. The event is going
to feature the top 21 best spellers from seven
of Burlingame’s public and Catholic elemen-
tary school fourth and fifth grade classes
(Franklin, Roosevelt, Washington,
McKinley, Lincoln, St. Catherine’s and Our
Lady of Angels elementary schools). Each
school will be competing for the coveted
“Burlingame Lions Club Spelling
Beetrophy.” The event will be held at 4 p.m.
at the Lions Hall located at 990 Burlingame
Ave. The Spelling Bee is a free event and open
to the public, but it is suggested that you get
there early as
seating will be
limited.
“The Lions
Spelling Bee is
open to all of the
e l e m e n t a r y
schools in
Burlingame, and
should be a
great event,”
said Ken
Ingram, Burlingame Lions Club president.
“Come and see if you’re really smarter than a
forth or fifth grader.”
This is a Burlingame Lions Club communi-
ty service program designed to support local
elementary schools and provide a competitive
arena for the exceptional students. The trophy
is a perpetual award, and will be placed in the
winning school for the entire year. Each
school that participates will receive a check
for $250, with the winning school getting
$400.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Heather
Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200,
ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
Around the nation
Around the state
NATION 7
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food, Children's Activities,
Fun, Vendors
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By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A promised
path to citizenship for the 11 million
immigrants in the U.S. illegally may
leave out hundreds of thousands of
them.
Bipartisan Senate legislation
would make legalization and ulti-
mately citizenship available only to
those who arrived in the U.S. before
Dec. 31, 2011, according to a Senate
aide with knowledge of the propos-
als. Anyone who came after that
date would be subject to deporta-
tion.
The bill, expected to be intro-
duced next week, also would require
applicants to document that they
were in the country before the cutoff
date, have a clean criminal record
and show enough employment or
financial stability that they’re likely
to stay off welfare, said the aide,
who spoke on condition of
anonymity because the proposals
had not been made public.
Although illegal immigration to
the U.S. has been dropping, tens of
thousands of people still arrive
annually, so the cutoff date alone
could exclude a large number of
people. The aide said hundreds of
thousands could be excluded over-
all.
Immigration legislation
could exclude thousands
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Aurrela Saenz,center,who has been in the United States for 25 years,joins
others protesting outside the Arizona State Capitol.
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama’s plan to raise
Medicare premiums for upper-
income seniors would create five
new income brackets to squeeze
more revenue for the government
from the top tiers of retirees, the
administration revealed Friday.
First details of the plan emerged
after Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testi-
fied to Congress on the president’s
budget. As released two days earli-
er, the budget included only a vague
description of a controversial pro-
posal that has grown more ambi-
tious since Obama last floated it.
“Means testing” has been part of
Medicare since
the George W.
Bush adminis-
tration, but
ramping it up is
bound to stir
c o n t r o v e r s y.
Republicans are
intrigued, but
most Democrats
don’t like the
idea.
The plan itself is complicated.
The bottom line is not: more money
for the government.
Obama’s new budget calls for
raising $50 billion over 10 years by
increasing monthly “income-relat-
ed” premiums for outpatient and
prescription drug coverage. The
comparable number last year was
$28 billion over the decade.
Currently, single beneficiaries
making more than $85,000 a year
and couples earning more than
$170,000 pay higher premiums.
Obama’s plan would raise the pre-
miums themselves and also freeze
adjustments for inflation until 1 in 4
Medicare recipients were paying the
higher charges. Right now, the high-
er monthly charges hit only about 1
in 20 Medicare recipients.
House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., asked
Sebelius about the new proposal on
Friday, noting that it would raise
significantly more revenue. Part of
the reason for the additional federal
revenue is that Obama’s 2014 budg-
et projects an additional year of
money from the proposals.
Upper-income seniors’ Medicare rising
Barack Obama
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A conserva-
tive senator is proposing to greatly
broaden the background check sys-
tem for firearms purchasers but
require no records of the transac-
tions as the Senate braced for votes
on amendments to gun control legis-
lation next week.
The plan by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-
Okla., was one of several proposals
Republicans were discussing in
preparation for debate. In response
to December’s elementary school
attack in Newtown, Conn., which
killed 20 children and six adults, the
Senate is considering a Democratic
bill backed by President Barack
Obama that would expand back-
ground checks, strengthen laws
against illegal gun trafficking and
slightly increase school security aid.
The possible GOP amendments,
described by aides and lobbyists,
include one requiring states to rec-
ognize permits for carrying con-
cealed weapons issued by other
states. Many gun control advocates
oppose the idea vehemently because
some states’ standards for issuing
the permits are considered weak,
and such a provision, if approved,
might cause some to rethink support
for the overall bill.
It was unclear who might intro-
duce it, but two lobbyists mentioned
Sen. John Thune, R-S.D. His office
declined to comment.
Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, is
working on a sweeping measure
prodding states to send more
records to the federal background
check system, which is designed to
prevent guns from going to crimi-
nals and those with serious mental
health problems.
GOP senator would broaden gun checks, no records
8
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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OPINION 9
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Legislature kills jobs
and hurts families
Guest
perspective
Drones are
useful for public safety
Editor,
Regarding the story, “Drone wars?
Not really” in the April 10 edition of
the Daily Journal, it is disturbing to
think that people object to the use of
drones in our county. Drones could be
invaluable to our Sheriff’s Office in San
Mateo County, with its lengthy coast-
line and expansive woodlands. Drones
are nothing more than cameras for pub-
lic safety. There are cameras in parking
lots, elevators, on BART, buses and in
public buildings (presumably San
Mateo City Hall). To argue that drones
will infringe on the privacy has no legal
basis when air space and public safety
are at issue.
You do not need to be a lawyer to
know that air space is public as the
U.S. Supreme Court made clear in U.S.
v. Causby (1946), noting: It is ancient
doctrine that at common law ownership
of the land extended to the periphery of
the universe Cujus est solum ejus est
usque ad coelum. But that doctrine has
no place in the modem world. The air
is a public highway, as Congress has
declared. Were that not true, every
transcontinental flight would subject
the operator to countless suits.
Common sense revolts at the idea. To
recognize such private claims to the
airspace would clog these highways,
seriously interfere with their control
and development in the public interest,
and transfer into private ownership that
which only the public would have a
just claim.
The need for public safety is indis-
putable. I hope the Sheriff’s Office will
not be dissuaded from using drones for
public safety.
Nanci E. Nishimura
San Mateo
Social Security money
grab not the answer
Editor,
A few members of Congress want to
open the vault which currently holds
around $3 trillion in Social Security
funds scheduled to be paid out in bene-
fits over the next 15-20 years and use
those funds to help decrease the federal
deficit.
Such action would be illegal under
current law as those funds were created
by taxes paid by millions of workers
during their years in the work force,
with the promise of receiving some of
it back in financial security during their
years of retirement.
To change that formula in funding
would require new legislation by
Congress which is being strongly
opposed by those depending on said
benefits for their survival.
Back to square one and the deadlock
in Congress on how to reduce the
deficit without raising taxes. No one
will be pleased with any legislation
brought forward by this Congress
which refused to compromise and end
the suffering from the current reces-
sion.
Jack Rogers
San Mateo
Response to
‘Anti-Catholic Commentary’
Editor,
Kudos to Dorothy Dimitre and her
column “Iconic images” published in
the April 10 edition of the Daily
Journal. It is unfortunate that some
Catholics consider it “anti-Catholic”
when anyone disagrees with the Church
or speaks with insight and truth about
the Catholic corporation. I would hope
Mr. Seely in his letter “Anti-Catholic
commentary” published in the April 12
edition of the Daily Journal, could real-
ize people have different views about
religious subjects. I would also hope
that he realizes that dogma is made up
and may not agree with accepted social
truth/reality or convention. His citation
of various personages of the Catholic
Church is interesting, but still a church
creation and not necessarily a generally
accepted society truth. I remember that,
when I was growing up, every Catholic
I knew had a St. Christopher medal
attached to the dashboard or dangling
from the rearview mirror of their car
until St. Christopher apparently got
demoted. We shall see in June when the
Supreme Court rules on Proposition 8
and DOMA whether the Catholic jus-
tices are able to rise above their
Catholic indoctrination and embrace
our Constitution or submit to the
dogma.
As for “faith,” I yield to Friedrich
Wilhelm Nietzsche when he said, “A
casual stroll through the lunatic asylum
shows that faith does not prove any-
thing.”
David Jonson
Burlingame
Preaching gun control?
Editor,
I am confused. The Obama adminis-
tration has given thousands of guns
gratis to Mexican drug cartel criminal
gangs. Now Mr. Obama is preaching
gun control to his own American citi-
zens!
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
— The Anniston (Ala.) Star
W
hether it’s Darwinian theory
or basic logic is irrelevant.
All job-seekers need to
know that it’s getting increasingly diffi-
cult to land decent employment without
a bachelor’s degree.
That’s not a new premise, of course.
Regardless of the field, four-year
degrees have long been seen as a need-
ed pathway to a better life and sustain-
able employment. While today’s trends
show that bachelor’s degrees are indeed
needed, they’re often earning job-seek-
ers positions that pay low and require
menial tasks.
In other words, today’s BA is fast
becoming yesterday’s high school
diploma. And the trickle-down effect
that has on high-school grads seeking
work is obvious.
Recently, a New York Times story
explained how companies such as law
firms now often require four-year
degrees for entry-level positions such as
file clerks — jobs that used to be filled
by high school graduates or those with
two-year degrees.
According to the Times, economists
call this “degree inflation” and say this
trend is spreading into positions such as
dental hygienists, cargo agents and
claims adjusters. The bottom line: With
high unemployment and tepid job mar-
kets, it’s now more important than ever
for job-seekers to have a college degree
on their resume.
Again, that’s not new.
“Degree inflation” is the real deal; it
may get worse.
Four-year college degrees
By Chuck McDougald
L
iving in Silicon Valley, it is easy to forget that vast
swaths of California are mired in recession. Yet tens
of thousands of Californians are unemployed as our
state takes the dubious prize as having the nation’s highest
unemployment rate at 9.7 percent. Some counties such as
Imperial even have unemployment rates more than 25 per-
cent.
Given this dismal record, it seems to
me that the top priority for California’s
Democratic-dominated Legislature
should be job creation. Struggling
California families wish it were so.
Instead, our one-party Legislature has
gone on a job-killing spree, intent on
increasing the misery of working families
by making it harder for businesses to
thrive and create badly needed job.
The California Chamber of Commerce has just published
its 2013 list of “Job Killer” bills that the state’s legislative
Democrats are considering. Each one will make it harder for
long-suffering unemployed Californians to see another pay-
check
The president of the California Chamber of Commerce,
Allan Zaremberg, notes, “California policy makers should
keep their focus on the number one issues affecting their
constituents — economic recovery and job creation. Each of
these proposed “Job Killer” bills would increase uncertainty
for employers and investors and lead to higher costs of doing
business, which will undermine the economic health of the
state.”
I agree with Mr. Zaremberg that economic recovery and
job creation should be our legislators’ top priority. Here are
just a few of the chamber’s 32 “Job Killer” bills that
Sacramento politicians are considering instead:
• AB 5 (Ammiano; D-San Francisco) Increased Exposure
to Frivolous Litigation — Imposes costly and unreasonable
mandates on employers that could jeopardize the health and
safety of others by creating a new protected classification of
employees and customers who are or are perceived to be
homeless, low income, suffering from a mental disability or
physical disability, and establishing a private right of action
for such individuals that includes statutory damages, punitive
damages and attorney’s fees.
• AB 769 (Skinner; D-Berkeley) Creates Inequity in the
Tax Structure — Harms struggling small businesses and
startups by repealing the Net Operating Loss (NOL) carry
back deduction, a lifeline that helps employers stay afloat,
retain employees and continue investing in their businesses
in an economic downturn.
• AB 823 (Eggman; D-Stockton) Infrastructure — Adds
additional costs and hurdles to critically needed new infra-
structure and development projects by imposing unreason-
able mitigation requirements.
• ACA 3 (Campos; D-San Jose) Lowers Vote Requirement
for Tax Increases — Adds complexity and uncertainty to the
current tax structure and pressure to increase taxes on com-
mercial, industrial and residential property owners to support
public safety services by giving local government new
authority to enact a special tax, including parcel taxes, by
lowering the vote threshold from two-thirds to only 55 per-
cent.
• SB 622 (Monning; D-Carmel) Targeted Tax — Threatens
jobs in beverage, retail, and restaurant industries by arbitrari-
ly and unfairly targeting certain beverages for a new tax to
fund children’s health programs.
Fortunately, Republican legislators are introducing and
supporting bills that focus on job creation and make eco-
nomic recovery state government’s main priority. They’re
doing this by encouraging private sector job creators to come
back to our state and hire workers here; balancing the budget
by reducing overspending and making state government
more efficient and effective for the taxpayers it serves; and
rejecting painful tax increases that will hurt working families
and job creators alike.
They are working to restore economic growth to every
region of our state, create good jobs for all working families
and ensure a healthy and sustainable future for our children.
Your Republican legislators are working hard to make
California the golden state of opportunity once again.
Chuck McDougald is on his second term as San Mateo
Republican Party chair. In 2008, he was head of the California
Veterans Coalition for U.S. Sen. John McCain’s presidential
campaign. In 2010, he was chair of Volunteers for Carly
Fiorina’s senatorial campaign.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • April 15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,865.06 -0.00% 10-Yr Bond 1.721 -3.91%
Nasdaq3,294.95 -0.16% Oil (per barrel) 90.95
S&P 500 1,588.85 -0.28% Gold 1,476.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Rite Aid Corp., up 19 cents at $2.31
A Raymond James analyst upgraded the drugstore chain’s stock rating,
a day after it posted its first annual profit in six years.
Pinnacle Entertainment Inc., up $1.17 at $17.55
A Deutsche Bank analyst lifted the casino operator’s rating and price
target, saying a proposed acquisition may push the stock higher.
Infosys Ltd., down $11.24 at $43.10
The Indian outsourcing company forecast revenue growth for the year
that was below analyst expectations.
Harris Corp., down $2.50 at $44.06
The defense contractor plans to lay off workers and reduce expenses to
help offset the damage caused by government spending cuts.
Ashland Inc., up $7.83 at $86.66
Hedge fund Jana disclosed that it has taken a 7.4-percent stake in the
chemicals company, making it the second-largest shareholder.
Nasdaq
JB Hunt Transport Services Inc., down $2.21 at $72.01
The trucking operator said that its first-quarter profit rose 8 percent but
that was still short of analysts’ estimates.
Abaxis Inc., down $2.47 at $45.80
A Stifel Nicolaus downgraded the blood analysis systems developer’s
stock. It has been hitting all-time highs in recent weeks.
Euronet Worldwide Inc., down $1.33 at $26.71
Sterne Agee analysts downgraded their rating on the payment services
company’s stock after a recent rally in the share price.
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A four-day surge in the
stock market came to an end on Friday as
falling commodity prices brought down
energy and mining companies.
Signs of a slowing economy rattled
commodity markets. The price of crude
oil dropped 2 percent to $91 a barrel as
weak U.S. economic reports followed
forecasts for weaker oil demand.
Gold plunged $64 to $1,501 an ounce,
reaching its lowest level since July 2011.
Prices for other metals including silver
and copper also fell sharply.
One trigger for the latest fall was a gov-
ernment report that U.S. wholesale prices
declined the most in 10 months in March.
Traders tend to sell metals when inflation
wanes. They also pushed gold prices
lower on reports that Cyprus may sell
some of its gold reserves, possibly leading
other weak European countries like Italy
and Spain to do the same.
Compared to commodities markets, the
stock market looked stable. The Dow
Jones industrial average dropped just 0.08
of a point to close at 14,865.05. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 lost 4.52 points, or
0.3 percent, to 1,588.85.
The two major indexes finished the
week with strong gains: The Dow rose 2.1
percent, the S&P 500 rose 2.3 percent.
David Joy, the chief market strategist
for Ameriprise Financial, said it’s as if the
stock market is telling a different story
from the bond and commodity markets.
Copper and other industrial metals slid
along with gold on Friday, while Treasury
yields sank near their lows for the year. He
said both imply traders in those markets
are more worried about a slowdown.
“It gives me pause,” Joy said.
“Commodities and bonds are telling stock
investors: don’t be in such a hurry to say
the U.S. economy is in great shape.”
The sharp drop in gold futures tugged
down mining companies. Barrick Gold
lost 8 percent to $22.62, Newmont
Mining fell 6 percent to $36.37 and
Freeport-McMoRan 3 percent to $31.92.
Materials and energy stocks fell the
most of the 10 industry groups in the S&P
500, 1.5 percent and 1.3 percent.
The Nasdaq composite dropped 5.21
points to 3,289, a fall of 0.2 percent.
A handful of reports out Friday height-
ened concerns about the economy’s
health. Sales at U.S. retailers fell in March
and companies restocked their shelves at a
much slower pace in February than in the
month before. That’s usually a sign that
companies expect weaker spending from
consumers and businesses. A measure of
consumer sentiment from the University
of Michigan also slumped.
The stock market has held up well
despite a string of recent weak economic
reports. That resilience has “left a lot of
investors scratching their heads,” said
Lawrence Creatura, a fund manager at
Federated Investors.
This earnings season will likely deter-
mine which direction the market takes,
Creatura said. Next week, when Bank of
America, Google and other big names
turn in their quarterly results, could make
the difference.
Wells Fargo reported stronger quarterly
profits on Friday but its revenue fell short
of Wall Street’s forecasts. The bank’s
stock lost 1 percent to $37.21.
The weaker economic reports pushed
traders into the safety of Treasurys, send-
ing yield near their lows for the year. The
yield on the 10-year Treasury note
dropped to 1.72 percent from 1.79 per-
cent late Thursday. That’s close to its low
point of the year, 1.69 percent, reached
April 5.
Stocks end four-day advance
“It gives me pause. ... Commodities and
bonds are telling stock investors: don’t be in
such a hurry to say the U.S. economy is in great shape.”
— David Joy, the chief market strategist for Ameriprise Financial
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Sales at U.S. retailers
fell in March from February, indicating that
higher taxes and weak hiring likely made
some consumers more cautious about spend-
ing.
Retail sales declined a seasonally adjusted
0.4 percent last month, the Commerce
Department said Friday. That followed a 1
percent gain in February and a 0.1 percent
decline in January. Both February and
January figures were revised lower.
Consumers cut back across a wide range of
categories last month. Sales at auto dealers
dropped 0.6 percent. Gas station sales
dropped 2.2 percent, partly reflecting lower
prices. The retail figures aren’t adjusted for
price changes.
Excluding the volatile categories of autos,
gas and building materials, core sales dropped
0.2 percent in March. That followed a gain of
0.3 percent in February. Department stores,
electronics retailers and sporting goods out-
lets all reported lower sales.
The retail sales report is the government’s
first look at consumer spending, which drives
about 70 percent of economic activity.
The decline in March shows higher Social
Security taxes are starting to affect consumers
and could dampen growth in the spring.
Many economists still predict economic
growth accelerated to an annual rate of rough-
ly 3 percent in the January-March quarter.
That would be a significant increase from the
anemic growth rate of 0.4 percent reported for
the October-December quarter.
Still, economists say the improvement is
likely temporary. Many now expect weaker
spending will be among factors that slow
growth again in the April-June quarter, to an
annual rate of around 1.5 percent.
“The U.S. consumer looks a little less
resilient,” said Michael Feroli, an economist
at JPMorgan Chase. “It now appears that
close to $200 billion in higher taxes may have
actually had some impact on consumer spend-
ing.”
A separate report Friday on April consumer
confidence seemed to bolster that point.
U.S. retail sales fall 0.4 percent in March
Gov. Brown chooses private
donors to pay for China trip
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown likes to portray his
administration as frugal when it comes to spending taxpayers’
money. So he has taken the same approach as his predecessor,
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, in paying for his trade mission
to China — asking business interests and political donors to
foot the bill.
Some 90 business leaders from a variety of industries are
paying $10,000 each to join Brown on his weeklong trip to
China and cover the costs for Brown and other state officials,
according to the Bay Area Council, a business group that
helped organize the trip.
The delegates get access to the high-level Chinese officials
with whom Brown is meeting and a chance to spend time with
Brown, when they may seek to influence his thinking on issues
that are important to them. Such access is at the heart of many
political contributions and the endless fundraisers lawmakers
hold during which lobbyists pay to mingle with decision-mak-
ers.
California teachers
fund to sell $3M in firearm stocks
SACRAMENTO — The nation’s largest teacher pension
fund says it will sell about $3 million worth of stock from
companies that make guns and high-capacity ammunition
magazines that are illegal in California.
The California State Teachers’ Retirement System
announced Friday that it will sell holdings in Sturm, Ruger &
Co. and Smith & Wesson Holding Corp.
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer made a motion in January to
divest after pension fund officials determined that the $162 bil-
lion fund invests in the owner of a company that manufactured
one of the weapons used in the Connecticut school shooting.
Business brief
650-365-1668
<< Romo blows first save of season, page 13
• Half Moon Bay takes advantage of Dons’ errors, page 12
Weekend, April 13-14, 2013
PLENTY OF STORIES: 14-YEAR-OLD MAKES CUT AT MASTERS; TIGER IN THE HUNT; DAY IN THE LEAD >>> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Menlo-Atherton shortstop Alex Aguiar throws to first to complete a 4-6-3 double play, avoiding Terra Nova’s sliding Tyler Armstrong in the
process. M-A beat the Tigers 9-1 Friday inAtherton.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s not even the halfway point of the
Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division base-
ball season and Menlo-Atherton manager Mike
Amoroso is already thinking playoffs.
Not that the Bears have locked up a postseason
berth. Far from it. Heading into Friday’s home
game against Terra Nova, M-A was mired in a
four-game losing streak and in seventh place in
the eight-team standings. Amoroso is thinking
playoffs because he believes the Bears are in a
must-win situation right now if they have any
hope of securing one of the top four spots in the
standings — and an automatic Central Coast
Section berth that goes along with it.
The Bears took their first step toward accom-
plishing that goal with a 9-1 win over the sec-
ond-place Tigers.
“Today was pretty much CCS,” Amoroso
said. “It’s pretty much a one-game elimination
(for the rest of the regular season).”
If M-A (2-4 PAL Bay, 12-7 overall) can play
and pitch like it did Friday, a playoff spot isn’t
M-A snaps four-game skid
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Ryan Cavan’s outlook upon switching posi-
tions this season may be a fantastic overall life
philosophy.
The Giants minor-league infielder — and
former Menlo School standout — has convert-
ed to third base at High-A San Jose this year,
after playing predominantly second base over
the past three seasons. But the 26-year-old
veteran has taken to the new position with a
spring in his step.
“It’s the hot corner,” Cavan said. “So you
gotta get down and ready, because you’re
going to get some lasers
hit at you.”
Cavan has been hitting
his share of lasers as well.
The switch-hitter entered
into play last night pacing
San Jose with .343 batting
average, while his 12 hits
currently ranks second in
the California League.
After a breakout season
at San Jose two years ago
— when he ranked second on the team with 90
RBIs — Cavan returns to the High-A Giants
this season to anchor the heart of the batting
order in support of young sluggers Angel
Villalona and Mac Williamson.
Returning to the Bay Area is special for
several reasons for the former Menlo School
star. For one, Cavan gets to live in his home-
town of Belmont. Of course, between family,
friends, and baseball students from his offsea-
son work as a private instructor, Cavan is the
odds-on favorite to lead the league in guest
passes.
“I’ve worked so hard for so many years,”
Cavan said. “But I’d go play off in random
places. To be able to play at home is really a
blessing. So I’m really thankful.”
In addition to being the hometown kid,
Cavan’s second year at San Jose marks the
first time outside of summer ball he has played
with the same team for more than one season
since he was in high school. Through three
years of college, he played at three different
schools — Chapman College, Trinity College,
and UC Santa Barbara — the latter of which
Cavan off to hot
start in San Jose
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At the end of the Peninsula
Athletic League 2012 badminton
season, it was obvious that San
Mateo County was ripe with great
young talent.
And with the start of the league
play just a handful of games into the
2013 season, the quality individuals
and, more importantly, the serious
team contenders, are beginning to
rise to the top.
Up in the Bay Division, reigning
league champion Aragon is off to a
middle-of-the-pack start thanks in
large part to a Carlmont team that
sits at 5-1 following a big win over
South San Francisco last Thursday.
The win over the Warriors was
billed as the biggest matchup so far
this year, with both teams at 4-1 to
start league play. But it turned out to
a be blowout, withe the Scots win-
ning 13-2.
“My team didn’t have a good
day,” said South City first-year head
Plenty of badminton talent in PAL
See BEARS, Page 16
See TALENT, Page 14
See CAVAN, Page 14
Ryan Cavan
SPORTS 12
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SALES
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Unless you’re sitting atop the Bay Division
standings of the Peninsula Athletic League in
boys’ baseball, there is no such thing as being
“comfortable” — a handful of games into the
season, and everyone is within two or three
games of each other.
And so, Friday’s matchup between Aragon
and Half Moon Bay high schools was big in
that two middle of the pack teams that are off
to rough starts could begin to build some
momentum with a win.
Coming into the game, that team appeared
to be Aragon, who used four Cougar errors on
Wednesday to come away with a 7-2 win
behind the pitching of Aldo Severson.
But seven innings later, Half Moon Bay
proved just how crazy the rest of the PAL Bay
season could be.
The Cougars used three Aragon errors and
five hits to score all four of their runs on
Friday. That, combined with a complete-
game, four-hit gem by Peter Richardson,
translated to a big 4-1 win.
“We really needed this game if we wanted
to get back into the Bay race,” said Half
Moon Bay manager Steve Terraszas.
“There’s no gimme’s in the PAL Bay. Getting
this one was good.”
“You have to tip your hat to the Half Moon
Bay pitcher,” said Aragon manager Lenny
Souza. “He kept us off-balanced all day. Got
ahead. Didn’t walk anybody. He did a real
good job. Gave us fits. We didn’t do a great
job of swinging the bat today. It is what it is.”
Richardson frustrated Aragon bats the entire
afternoon — with the exception of a fastball
that Severson deposited over the right field
fence in the bottom of the fourth inning. And
from the game’s onset, it actually looked like
we were in for a great pitcher’s duel.
Chris Hahn was solid for the first three
innings of the game. But unfortunately for the
right-hander, his defense came undone in the
fourth and the Cougars took full advantage.
The frame started with a fly ball to left field
that fell between two Aragon defenders. That
non-play was followed by a hit-and-run dou-
ble into the right-field gap off the bat of Peter
Bacich that gave Half Moon Bay the lead.
Tom Howell followed with a bunt that Hahn
pawed but could not get a throw off on, giving
the Cougars runners on first and second with
no out.
After a fly ball, the Aragon defense gave the
Cougars another run when an attempted steal
on a wild pitched turned into a throwing error
into left field. Bacich scored easily to make it
2-0. Richardson then followed with a bunt that
started foul and then swerved its way back
into the infield, hitting the bag and giving the
Cougars even more base runners.
Then, after another fly ball, Resse
Hammerstrom and Brad Kelly really made the
inning sting with back-to-back singles that
gave Half Moon Bay its 4-0 lead.
“We tried to be a little more aggressive on
the bases,” Terraszas said, “and ... make them
play catch for a change — put pressure on
their defense.”
“Take away that inning, and it’s a tight ball
game,” Souza said. “It’s unfortunate, but you
have to be able to not make mistakes in close
ball games. I think we’re all very disappoint-
ed. I think we all thought this was our chance
to get back in the hunt. Now we’re really
going to have to get after it next week. We’re
all having a tough time with it because we feel
like we have a lot of talent on the team. It’s
just not coming through when we need it to.”
“We gave them four runs last time,”
Terraszas said, “We knew if we cut out the
errors, pitched a good game, we’d be alright.
We can swing the bat with the best of them, I
think. It’s just a matter of defense and pitching
— with a senior on the mound and 10 seniors
on the team, we should have the ability to do
that.”
“That inning got extended,” Souza said.
“Hahn is not a 30-pitch inning kind of kid.
He’s a 10-pitch inning kind of kid. And when
we don’t play behind him 100 percent of the
time, people are going to score runs against
him. But what you saw from him the first
three innings is what should have kept going.
We just lost focus in that inning. It’s unfortu-
nate.”
Severson’s one-out home run looked like a
sign of life for Aragon in the fourth. But
apparently, Richardson was having none of
that. After the bomb, Richardson allowed just
two more base runners.
“For the most part, I was just throwing
strikes — fastballs,” Richardson said. “And I
was just letting my defense do the work. We
were a little down (after Wednesday), but we
knew we had to come in here and get a win. I
wanted to go out there and give my best per-
formance to give us a chance.”
“He pitched, certainly his best league game,
maybe the best game he’s pitched all year
long,” Terraszas said. “He had his stuff, he
was pitching from ahead which made a huge
difference. We played good defense and didn’t
make any errors.”
Cougars avenge loss, down Aragon 4-1
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUGUSTA, Ga. — The 14-year-old from
China isn’t going anywhere in a hurry. And
this Masters is still a long way from taking
shape.
Despite being the first player at Augusta
National to get hit with a one-shot penalty for
slow play, teen sensation Guan Tianlang still
made history Friday as the youngest player to
make the cut in a PGA Tour-sanctioned event.
And it came down to the last shot of a wild
and windy day.
Jason Day could have sent the kid home
early with a birdie from just off the front of
the green on the 18th hole. But the Australian
was wide left and tapped in for par, giving him
a 4-under 68 and a one-shot lead over fellow
Aussie Marc Leishman and the ageless Fred
Couples.
The par meant that Guan, who had one shot
added to his score on the 17th hole for his sec-
ond bad time of the round — made the cut
under the 10-shot rule.
“If I can make it, I would be really happy
for it,” Guan said some five hours earlier. “But
if I didn’t make it, it’s still a great week.”
He’s now part of a weekend at Augusta that
should be as dynamic as ever.
Day was at 6-under 138, and 18 players
were within four shots of the lead, including
Tiger Woods.
Woods moved into a share of the lead with
a two-putt birdie on the
eighth hole, and his game
looked to be as sharp as
ever — perhaps too sharp.
Right when it looked like
he might take the outright
lead, Woods hit a lob
wedge that was so perfect
it hit the flag on the par-5
15th and caromed back-
ward off the green and
into the water. Instead of having a short birdie
putt, he had to scramble to save bogey.
Woods posed over another shot on the 18th
and was stunned to see it hop onto the upper
shelf, leading to his second three-putt bogey
of the week. He had to settle for a 71, though
he was still only three shots out of the lead.
“My score doesn’t quite indicate how well I
played today,” Woods said.
Day, a runner-up at the Masters two years
ago, can be one of the most exciting players in
golf when his game is on, and he was firing at
flags from everywhere Friday. Even from the
pine straw under the trees on the dangerous
11th, the Aussie took dead aim at the pin and
set up a rare birdie to join the leaders.
His only blunder was hitting into the water
short of the 12th, though he still managed to
escape with bogey, and then he fired a 4-wood
low enough to stay below the trees and avoid
the wind on the 13th, setting up a two-putt
birdie.
He was cognizant of the guys behind him —
Woods included — though just as much pres-
sure comes from trying to be the first
Australian in a green jacket.
“The moment I start worrying about other
players is the moment I start losing focus on
what I need to do, and when I do that, I’ll start
making bogeys,” Day said. “It’s obviously
great to have the lead. I’m very exciting for
the challenge over the next two days. It really
is exciting to have the opportunity to win the
Masters. I’m very, very happy where I am
right now.”
The 53-year-old Couples, who shared the
36-hole lead last year at the Masters, birdied
the 18th hole for a 71 and will play in the final
group.
“I did tee off Thursday with the idea of
playing well, and now it’s Friday afternoon
late. I’m surprised, but I’m not going to freak
out over it,” Couples said.
Former Masters champion Angel Cabrera
birdied five of his last six holes for a 69 and
was in the group two shots behind, along with
former U.S. Open champion Jim Furyk (71)
and Brandt Snedeker (70). Woods was at 3-
under 141 with six others, including Adam
Scott (72), Lee Westwood (71) and Justin
Rose (71).
And still in the mix was Rory McIlroy, who
turned his fortunes around with a 5-wood
from about 275 yards that set up a short eagle
putt. He added three more birdies on the back
nine and had a 70, leaving him only four
shots out of the lead going into the weekend.
“Anything under par today was going to be
a good score,” McIlroy said.
The hole locations were severe in spots,
with one pin tucked on top of a mound toward
the front of the fifth green.
Day leads at Masters, 14-year-old makes cut
Tiger Woods
SPORTS 13
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Giants’ closer entered Friday’s game
against the Chicago Cubs six for six in save
chances this season.
But after a ninth-inning
San Francisco comeback,
he could not hold a 3-2
lead as Starlin Castro’s
two-out double off the
center-field wall gave the
Cubs a 4-3 victory.
Chicago led 2-0 heading
into the top of the ninth,
but closer Kyuji Fujikawa
allowed a one-out RBI sin-
gle by Pablo Sandoval and hit Buster Posey
with a pitch before Brandon Belt’s two-out
double down the right-field line scored two
runs and gave the Giants a 3-2 lead.
Romo was then summoned from the
bullpen for his fourth appearance in five days.
Pinch-hitter Dioner Navarro tied the game
with a home run to right field to lead off the
inning, the first pinch-hit homer of the season
for the Cubs.
“I made a good pitch. He put the ball in
play,” Romo said. “Things happen when you
put the ball in play. You tip the cap to him. No
excuses.”
Romo then struck out Luis Valbuena and
Brent Lillibridge before David DeJesus sin-
gled to center to set up Castro’s winner.
“It’s a great comeback and a tough loss to
go with it,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said.
“The boys battled back hard there in the ninth.
Sergio’s been so good, he just got a couple
balls up in the ninth.
“It’s going to happen and he’s going to have
to deal with the occasional hiccup. That’s the
life of a closer.”
Matt Cain made his first start since giving
up nine earned runs in 3 2-3 innings in a 14-3
loss to St. Louis on April 7. The Giants’ ace
allowed seven hits— solo home runs to
DeJesus and Castro while striking out six and
walking two.
“A lot of time if you make good pitches,
you get rewarded for it,” Cain said. “If you
make bad pitches, guys get the ball up in the
air and if the wind’s blowing the wrong way,
you’re at the mercy of whatever’s going to
happen.”
Carlos Villanueva pitched 7 1-3 shutout
innings and allowed three hits and struck out
three.
The strong start was Villanueva’s second in
a row. Villanueva made his Cubs debut April 6
at Atlanta and allowed one run in 6 2-3
innings.
After allowing Angel Pagan to lead off the
game with a single, Villanueva retired the next
12 batters until Hunter Pence singled with one
out in the fifth.
Villanueva was replaced with one out in the
eighth by James Russell after giving up a sin-
gle to Gregor Blanco. Brandon Crawford sin-
gled off Russell, but the Cubs’ left-hander got
pinch-hitter Andres Torres to ground into a 5-
4-3 double play.
Chicago took a 1-0 lead in the bottom of the
third when DeJesus led off with his home run.
DeJesus’ blast was helped by a wind that was
blowing out to right field. DeJesus had three
hits.
The Cubs doubled their lead in the bottom
of the fifth when Castro homered, taking a 1-
2 pitch from Cain and lining it into the left-
field bleachers.
San Francisco threatened in the sixth after
Crawford led off with a walk and was sacri-
ficed to second by Cain. With two outs,
Scutaro’s sharp grounder to third was snagged
by Steve Clevenger, who threw to first to get
the San Francisco second baseman.
Sandoval’s ninth-inning RBI single extend-
ed his hitting streak to six games.
Notes: Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don
Mattingly said that San Diego Padres outfield-
er Carlos Quentin shouldn’t play again until
the injured Zack Greinke can pitch. When
asked about Mattingly’s comments before
Friday’s game, Giants manager Bruce Bochy
said “that’s a great point.” ... Saturday’s pitch-
ing matchup has the Giants’ Madison
Bumgarner against Chicago’s Jeff
Samardzija. ... Cubs second baseman Darwin
Barney was presented his Gold Glove prior to
Friday’s game. He is on the 15-day disabled
list with a left knee laceration, but is expected
to return to the lineup Tuesday against Texas.
... Scutaro was back in the lineup after getting
a day off Thursday. He was 1 for 4. ... Usually
a catcher, Clevenger made his first career start
as a third baseman.
Giants come back, but Romo blows the save
Cubs 4, Giants 3
Sergio Romo
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Oakland Athletics second
baseman Scott Sizemore is scheduled for a
second reconstructive surgery on his left knee
Tuesday, another blow for the infielder and
reigning AL West champions after he missed
all of last season.
Sizemore will meet with
Dr. James Andrews in
Pensacola, Fla., on
Monday, then have sur-
gery to repair the torn
anterior cruciate ligament.
The 28-year-old
Sizemore was hurt 14
months ago during the first
full-squad workout of
spring training in 2012
and missed the season with the same injury.
He batted .216 with six RBIs, a double and
triple during 21 spring training games.
“It was hard for me to watch, my stomach
dropped,” teammate and infielder Adam
Rosales said. “Obviously my heart goes out to
him, it really does. Size is strong, he’s a com-
petitor. I hope the best for him.”
Sizemore was a fifth-round draft pick in
2006 out of Virginia Commonwealth by the
Tigers, who were in town Friday to open a
three-game weekend series at the Oakland
Coliseum.
In 110 games between Detroit and the A’s in
2011, Sizemore hit a combined .245 with 11
home runs and 56 RBIs. He was 0 for 5 this
season before injuring the knee Tuesday on
the road against the Angels when hustled to
shallow right field on a bloop single by Mike
Trout that fell between Sizemore and Chris
Young.
Tigers manager Jim Leyland felt terrible for
Sizemore, placed on the disabled list
Wednesday.
“Yeah, anybody like that, any player that
does that, particularly somebody you know,
absolutely,” Leyland said.
“That’s some real tough luck. The biggest
thing about this, is I don’t think anybody,
unless they’ve gone through it, including
myself, understands how brutal that rehab can
be when people get hurt. I’m talking about
whether it be the shoulder, elbow, ankle, what-
ever. Some of those rehabs are so brutal, and
they work so hard. It’s a crying shame, yes,
without question.”
A’s athletic trainer Nick Paparesta didn’t
want to speculate Friday how Andrews would
decide to repair the torn ACL this time after
using a tendon from Sizemore’s hamstring
when operating in March 2012. It also could
be done with cadaver tissue or a patellar ten-
don.
Former A’s catcher Landon Powell needed
two ACL surgeries, so Oakland’s medical staff
has been through this process.
“It’s not something that happens a lot, but
we have a little bit of history with it,”
Paparesta said.
Eric Sogard will become the regular second
baseman, while utilityman Rosales will pro-
vide some depth once he returns from a
strained muscle in his left ribcage area.
Rosales still needed to face live hitting and
throw across the diamond before he goes on a
rehab assignment with Triple-A Sacramento.
“Those are the small, little steps, tests I’ve
got to put my body through,” he said.
Shortstop Hiroyuki Nakajima, on the DL
with a strained left hamstring, was set to take
groundballs and do some running as he con-
tinues to progress before going on his own
rehab assignment.
“We’re going to take the homestand and see
how things go,” Paparesta said of both Rosales
and Nakajima.
A’s Sizemore set for knee surgery
Scott Sizemore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Golden State Warriors
center Andrew Bogut has a bone bruise in his
surgically repaired left
ankle.
An MRI exam on Friday
revealed the latest injury
complication for the often-
hobbled Australian big
man.
Bogut sprained his ankle
during the Warriors’ loss
to Oklahoma City on
Thursday night, keeping
him out of Friday’s game
against the Lakers. He has missed 49 of
Golden State’s 80 games this season.
Bogut’s MRI results will be examined by
the doctor who performed offseason
microfracture surgery on his ankle. The
Warriors should know more about the extent
of the injury in the next few days.
Golden State has clinched its second playoff
berth in 19 years, and began the night leading
Houston by a half-game for sixth place in the
Western Conference.
Warriors’ Bogut
has bone bruise
Andrew Bogut
SPORTS 14
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: April 30, 2013
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coach Gary Woo, who took over the program
this season following four varsity seasons as a
Warrior from 2007-2010. “Mentally, we just
weren’t prepared.”
It appears the Scots enjoy a true “homefield
advantage” back on the Belmont campus,
where Woo said his team had difficulties with
the courts’ set-up.
“I think not having the playing experience
there was one of the biggest factors.” Woo
said.
But even with the loss, Woo said he consid-
ers the Warriors as heavy contenders for the
Bay title.
“I think we’re definitely one of the better
teams in the league,” he said. South City’s
mixed doubles team of Tiffany Ng and Bowie
Yu are currently undefeated on the year, and
the Warrior girls (both singles an doubles) are
really stepping their overall games up.
At 5-1, Carlmont definitely has the upper
hand early. But you can’t count out the Dons,
who sit in third place and boast individual tal-
ent like that of Candy Zhang, the reigning
Daily Journal Girls’ Player of the Year, plus
Viviane Chen and Victoria Sun.
However, the Dons have teams like Mills
and El Camino fighting them for positioning
in the middle of the Bay.
Over in the Ocean, the assenscion of
Sequoia High School to the Bay has opened
the door and at 5-0 Crystal Springs Uplands
School has taken the early advantage.
But second-year head coach Rachell
Berania said the Gryphons’ current mark is a
bit deceiving and that the Ocean Division is
super tight — especially at the top.
“Being undefeated so far hasn’t been easy,”
Berania said. “It’s been tough to get to this
point and there’s a lot of hard work behind it.”
San Mateo High School, at 4-1, and Terra
Nova, at 3-2, are considered contenders to
Ocean badminton supremacy as well.
For the Gryphons, Berania said consistency
and a strong pair of No. 3 doubles teams has
really led the charge.
“At this level, you basically know who’s
good at the No. 1 and No. 2 ranked positions,”
Berania said. “So, if you have a good No. 3,
you have a large advantage.”
For Crystal Springs, that advantage mani-
fests itself in the girls’ doubles team of
Fleming Peck (freshman) and Shikah
Avancha, plus a boys’ duo of Kent Kober and
Zach Canquini.
And, it doesn’t hurt when you’re No. 1
girls’ singles player is the Central Coast
Section’s runner-up in sophomore Tiffany Xi.
“The team has totally exceeded my expecta-
tions,” Berania said. “We want to keep our
heads level though because the other teams
are getting stronger.”
Other teams like Burlingame, who are
hanging in the middle of the Ocean, are dan-
gerous because they are ripe with individual
talent.
The Panthers No. 1 singles player is the
two-time Daily Journal Player of the Year Jan
Banquilles. And in 2013, he’s taken his play
up to the No. 7 ranked talent in the under-17
category for United States Badminton.
Banquilles isn’t alone. The Panthers boast
five players ranked in the top 100 boys in the
nation.
But head coach Sal Banquilles said his team
of Panthers is very young and 2013 has been
a season of rebuilding the program by plug-
ging inexperienced players in key situations.
The immediate results haven’t been great, but
Continued from page 12
TALENT
he was drafted out of as a 16th round pick by
the Giants in 2009.
In four previous seasons of professional
baseball, he moved up a level per year all the
way to Double-A Richmond last season.
Moving back to High-A might discourage
some players, but not Cavan, who is under-
standably upbeat about he prospect of playing
so close to home to start the 2013 season.
“I love it,” Cavan said. “I’m happy to be
back. We have a really good team this year, so
I’m excited to see how it plays out.”
Double-A struggles
Cavan hit the first major downturn of his
professional career last season with his pro-
motion to Double-A Richmond. Entering
2012, he touted a career .277 average in three
pervious seasons. But with the leap to the
Eastern League — notorious as the toughest
leap on the Giants’ organizational ladder —
Cavan scuffled through a .228 season average.
“He’s a guy who can hit,” Giants roaming
infield instructor Jose Alguacil said.
“Sometimes he goes in streaks the way he’s
on-and-off. He’s a guy who puts a lot of pres-
sure on himself. He knows he’s got to do a lit-
tle bit more than other people. He wants to be
in the big leagues like any other player here
with a uniform. I think sometimes that’s what
hurts Cavan. He’s a guy that wants to get
things done today. And he doesn’t understand
that there’s tomorrow. And that can get him in
trouble. But he’s a good kid and he keeps
working.”
One of the benefits for the organization of
Cavan returning to San Jose is it gives the
Giants flexibility to move him between west-
coast teams Triple-A Fresno or short-season
Salem-Keizer as necessary. But Giants roving
instructor Steve Decker said the most impor-
tant thing for Cavan’s development is regular
playing time. But Richmond is all filled up
with top infield prospect Joe Panik currently
playing second base, and 2012 San Jose
Giants Player of the Year Adam Duvall at
third. So at present, Cavan will see far more
playing time with San Jose.
“He’s going to hit every day and he’s going
to play every day,” Decker said. “And as far as
his hitting goes, we wanted to make sure that
he got back to doing what he was doing best
when he was successful here. And that was
attacking. He’s what we call a predator-type
hitter, which means he’s aggressive to and
through the zone. … He lets the bat fly
through the zone.”
Brand new glasses
Even though he’s playing a new position,
Cavan is using the one-and-only infield glove
he’s used in previous years. However, he has
added a new tool to his arsenal — a brand new
pair of prescription glasses. The specs were
issued just four days before Cavan reported
for spring training to correct an astigmatism.
And while he now looks like a superhero alter-
ego, the glasses seem to have given him new
super powers on the diamond.
“I see the ball so much better,” Cavan said.
“I can see the change in speeds, like change-
ups, splitters, cutters. I’m seeing the late
movement now for the first time. And I think
that’s allowed me to make more consistent
contact.”
Cavan’s strong offensive showing started in
spring training. Although the journeyman
reported to minor-league camp, he got the
opportunity to play in a handful of games with
the major league squad. He even started a
game at second base and produced with an
RBI single in his first at bat — before blasting
a home run onto the right-center lawn of
Scottsdale Stadium later in the game.
“Actually a fan caught it,” Cavan said. “And
then [Giants reliever George Kontos] got the
ball back from the fan. So I got the ball. Yeah,
it was kind of cool.”
Outstanding defender
When Cavan first broke into pro ball with
Salem-Keizer in 2009, he was an erratic
defender, to say the least. Over his first two
pro seasons, he committed 43 errors as a mid-
dle infielder. In 2011 at San Jose however, he
turned a corner. Now he is considered one of
the best infield gloves in the Giants organiza-
tion.
“One of the great qualities, and what makes
him such a great player, is no matter how his
hitting was going up-and-down at times, he’s
the best defender in all of baseball,” Decker
said. “And that’s really a testament to who he
is as a person and an athlete. So we were real-
ly happy with that.”
Continued from page 11
CAVAN
Greinke needs surgery,
expected to miss 8 weeks
PHOENIX — Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher
Zack Greinke will need surgery to repair his
broken collarbone and is expected to miss
eight weeks.
Greinke was hurt Thursday night in a
bench-clearing brawl with the Padres that
started when San Diego slugger Carlos
Quentin charged the mound after he was hit
on the arm by a pitch.
The Dodgers said Greinke was examined
Friday by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles
and had a CT scan. ElAttrache and Dr. John
Itamura will operate Saturday at White
Memorial Hospital in Los Angeles to place a
rod in the clavicle to stabilize and align the
fracture.
Speaking to reporters before his team
played Arizona on Friday night, Dodgers
manager Don Mattingly said he wasn’t sur-
prised by the extent of Greinke’s injury.
“We knew last night, for the most part, that
it was going to be extended,” he said. “It’s
unfortunate.”
Greinke, the 2009 AL Cy Young Award
winner, signed a $147 million, six-year con-
tract with the Dodgers during the offseason.
“Obviously, the attention that he got this
winter and things that he’s done in his past tell
you he’s hard to replace,” Mattingly said. “I
guess we’re in a sense fortunate that we have
a few extra starters this spring, and right now
it’s a good thing.”
Ted Lilly and Chris Capuano are the candi-
dates to take Greinke’s next scheduled start on
Tuesday against the Padres in Los Angeles.
Lilly has been on the 15-day disabled list
since March 28.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
@Dallas
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Detroit
4:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
vs. Sharks
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/18
vs.Columbus
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Portland
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/17
PlayoffsTBD
vs. OKC
7:30 p.m.
TNT
4/11
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/15
@Phoenix
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
4/17
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/10
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/14
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
@Cubs
10:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/13
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/14
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs. Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/10
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Tigers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/12
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Portland
7:30p.m.
NBCSPORTS
4/14
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
BASEBALL
Menlo-Atherton 9, Terra Nova 1
Terra Nova 100 000 0 — 1 5 2
Menlo-Atherton 500 022 x — 9 12 2
WP — McGarry. LP — Gordon. 2B — Aguiar
(MA). Multiple hits — McGarry 2, Aguiar 3, Mo-
riarty 3 (MA). Multiple RBIs — Moriarty 4 (MA).
Records — Menlo-Atherton 2-4 PAL Bay, 12-7
overall; Terra Nova 4-2, 11-3.
Half Moon Bay 4, Aragon 1
Half Moon Bay 000 400 0 — 4 9 1
Aragon 000 100 0 — 1 4 1
WP — Richardson. LP — Hahn. HR — Sever-
son (A). 2B — Bacich (HMB). Multiple hits —
Hammerstrom 2, Kelly 2 (HMB); Perkins 2 (A).
RBIs — Hammerstrom, Bacich, Kelly (HMB); Sev-
erson (A). Records — Aragon 2-4 PAL Bay, 9-7
overall; Half Moon Bay 2-4.
Capuchino 6, Hillsdale 2
Capuchino 105 000 0 — 6 10 1
Hillsdale 000 010 1 — 2 5 1
WP — Galea. 2B — Foster-Lorenzini, Hernan-
dez, McDaid (C). Multiple hits — Hernandez 2
(C). Multiple RBIs — McDaid 2, Aberouette 2 (C).
Records — Capuchino 2-4 PAL Bay, 8-9 overall.
Menlo School 7, King’s Academy 2
Menlo School 220 003 0 — 7 9 4
King’s Academy 011 000 0 — 2 7 2
WP — Redman (4-0). LP — Andrews. 3B —
Marcus (MS). 2B — Diekroeger, Pluchar (MS);
Antonicic (KA). Multiple hits — Diekroeger 4
(MS); Myers 2, Antonicic (KA). Multiple RBIs —
Diekroeger (MS). Records — Menlo School 2-0
WBAL, 12-6 overall; King’s Academy 1-1, 10-5.
THURSDAY
GIRLS’ SWIMMING
Sequoia 122, Mills 36
200 medley relay — Sequoia (Bauhaus, Chate-
lain, A. Hartzell, Park) 2:03.61; 200 free —
Yanacek (S) 2:05.27; 200 IM — Larsen (S) 2:27.17;
50 free — Wong (M) 27.33; 100 fly — A. Hartzell
(S) 1:03.41; 100 free — Lee (M) 1:00.34; 500 free
— Nelson (S) 5:23.47; 200 free relay — Sequoia
(A. Hartzell, Huber, Larsen,Yanacek) 1:50.32; 100
back — Bauhaus (S) 1:09.66; 100 breast — Nel-
son (S) 1:08.52. Records — Sequoia 2-2 PAL Bay.
BOYS’ SWIMMING
Mills 111, Sequoia 55
200 free relay — Sequoia (Ma, Knoth, Bittner,
Archbold) 1:47.97; 200 free — Lin (M) 1:49.10;
200 IM — Quan (M) 2:03.35; 50 free — Arch-
bold (S) 23.77; 100 fly — Veng (M) 1:00.60; 100
free — Martinez (Mills) 51.70; 500 free — Lin
(M) 4:51.80; 200 free relay — Mills (Martinex,
Quan, Lee, Lin) 1:37.11; 100 back — Lee (M)
58.36; 100 breast — Quan (M) 1:02.64. Records
— Sequoia 0-4 PAL Bay.
BOYS’ TENNIS
Menlo-Atherton 7, San Mateo 0
SINGLES — R. Fratt (MA) d. Krishna 6-3, 6-1; Men-
jivar (MA) d. Young 6-1, 6-1; Matthews (MA) d. E.
Liu 7-5, 6-1; Volpe (MA) d. Siegle 6-0, 6-1. DOU-
BLES — Iyer-LaPorte (MA) d. Lowe-Yeh 6-0, 6-3;
Wentz-Finn (MA) d. Chew-Li 6-0, 6-0; Novak-Cole
(MA) d. Ho-Huang 6-3, 4-6, 1-0(12).
BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL
Eastside College Prep def. Sacred Heart Prep 23-
25, 25-17, 25-7, 25-19 (Highlights: SHP —
Bennett 12 kills; Matt Hao 20 assists; Grant Chou
21 digs). Records — Sacred Heart Prep 1-6
league, 3-10 overall.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Lt. Col. Rodney Freeman was training for the
2005 Boston Marathon when his New Hampshire Army
National Guard unit shipped out to Iraq.
Goodbye, Heartbreak Hill.
Hello, Ziggurat of Ur.
“I was planning to run, and the government had a different
idea,” said Freeman, who gathered some friends together for a
“shadow marathon” at their military base outside Nasiriyah,
Iraq.
“At that time, Iraq wasn’t a very friendly place. Everything
coming out of Iraq was negative,” Freeman said this week. “It’s
not the T-shirt. It’s not the medal. It’s not the marathon. It’s the
fact that Mom and Dad could see something back home that’s
positive.”
The plans for that first race grew from a handful of buddies
following a Humvee with a cooler of water to more than 350
runners, escorted by gun trucks, through the dusty Iraqi streets.
The Boston Athletic Association, which organizes the
marathon, has supported a shadow race for members of the
military each year since then.
For inspiring a new tradition in the world’s most traditional
road race, the B.A.A. presented Freeman with its Patriots’
Award on Thursday night during the annual marathon kickoff
party.
A high school athlete while growing up in Maine, Freeman
wasn’t willing to give up on his dream of running Boston after
he was deployed overseas. He gathered a few friends for a
26.2-mile run on Marathon Monday and sent off an email to
the B.A.A. to let them know his plan.
The marathon organizers promised support, but they also
encouraged Freeman to see if he could get more people
involved. Soon, he had enlisted hundreds of runners and
arranged for a course that took them off the base and to the
Ziggurat of Ur, a 4,000-year-old pyramidal platform built by
the Mesopotamians.
Leaving the base meant an escort of two gun trucks and
scheduling that part of the run in the morning, before the heat
and the locals were out in full force. Portable bathrooms and
mobile hospitals were set out along the course. The Humvee
with a cooler grew to eight tractor-trailers full of water.
Instead of New England spring rain, Freeman had to worry
about a sandstorm that hit two days before the race and prepare
for sweltering heat. The run started at 6 a.m. to avoid the
hottest part of the day; by noon that day, the temperatures had
climbed to 130 degrees.
The B.A.A. sent over T-shirts and bibs for all the runners and
finishers’ medals just like the ones they hand out in Copley
Square at the end of the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton. A ban-
ner with the organization’s unicorn logo was hung over the
start and finish line.
“Just like Boston shuts down for the day, the base shut down
for the day,” Freeman said. “It became something bigger than
me.”
In fact, the event grew so large that Freeman was too busy to
run in it. After he returned to the States, he was invited back to
run Boston; he finished the 2006 race in about 4 hours, 30 min-
utes.
Since the 2005 race at Camp Adder, thousands of runners
have participated in shadow marathons each year in Iraq and
Afghanistan; the 2008 race on the supercarrier USS Nimitz
was delayed for several days because of 50-knot winds and 14-
foot waves.
Soldier honored
for his ’shadow
marathon’ in Iraq
16
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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out of the question. Starting pitcher Matt McGarry was nails,
pitching a complete game, five hitter in his first start in two
weeks. He threw 97 pitches, striking out five and walking only
one.
“[His performance] was close to flawless,”Amoroso said. “He
had six three-ball counts, which is something he’s been working
on. At least he didn’t walk them. You can’t defend a walk.”
The Bears had experienced the gamut of games during their
slide. They dropped a couple of close games, along with a pair of
blowouts. Things didn’t start out well for M-A as Terra Nova (4-
2, 11-3) scratched out an unearned run in the top of the first
inning on an Anthony Gordon sacrifice fly.
M-A, however, did not sit around feeling sorry for itself.
Instead, the Bears came back with a five-spot in the bottom of the
first, sending nine batters to the plate and banging out four hits in
the process. The first seven M-A batters reached base safely, with
McGarry, Alex Aguiar, Brett Moriarty and A.J. Lemons coming
up with consecutive run-scoring singles to put M-A up 4-1.
Moriarty would steal home on the back end of a delayed double
steal for the Bears’ fifth run of the inning.
M-A scored nine runs on 12 hits, led by Moriarty, who was 3
for 4 with four RBIs. McGarry was 2 for 4 with an RBI and two
runs scored, while Aguiar also went 3 for 4 with an RBI and two
runs scored.
“Hitting is contagious,” Amoroso said. “We strung some hits
together.”
That would be more than enough offense for McGarry, who
was never seriously threatened the rest of the way. Terra Nova
managed to get only four more runners into scoring position over
the final six innings of the game.
“They put us to sleep,” said Terra Nova manager Joey Gentile.
Beau Eastman came on in relief in the second inning for Terra
Nova and he kept the M-A bats in relative check. The senior lefty
kept the Bears off balance with a slinging, side-arm release.
Eastman went the final five innings for the Tigers, allowing four
runs (two earned) on eight hits.
“I thought Beau did a great job,” Gentile said.
Eastman held the Bears scoreless in the second through fourth
innings before they finally got to him in the fifth when they
tacked on two more runs for a 7-1 lead. McGarry led off the
inning with a single and Aguiar followed with a bloop double to
shallow right field. Moriarty followed with a two-run single to
center.
Terra Nova’s best chance to make a game of it disappeared in
the bottom of the inning when Kobe Christo was called out at the
plate as he tried to score on a wild pitch. It appeared Christo beat
the tag, but the umpire thought otherwise.
“That turned the momentum,” Gentile said.
M-A added a pair of unearned runs in the top of the sixth with
Erik Amundson and Charles Grose each scoring to give the Bears
the final margin of victory.
“It’s an inspirational win,” Amoroso said. “Now we’ll try to
build off something.”
Continued from page 11
BEARS
By Graham Dunbar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NYON, Switzerland — It’s a Spain vs. Germany double bill
in the Champions League semifinals.
Barcelona will play Bayern Munich and Real Madrid will
face Borussia Dortmund as Friday’s draw kept the Spanish and
German teams apart.
“I find it very thrilling to be playing against the best team in
Europe,” Bayern chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge said.
Seeking its fourth title in eight years, Barcelona opens at
Bayern on April 23 in a matchup of runaway league leaders,
then hosts the second leg on May 1. Real Madrid starts at
Dortmund on April 24 and is home on April 30.
The draw avoided a rematch of the foul-filled 2011 semifi-
nal between the Spanish powers, won by Barcelona on 3-1
aggregate.
Real Madrid defeated defending champion Dortmund 2-0 in
the 1998 semifinals, winning the first leg 2-0 at home.
“I don’t have to repeat that Real is a difficult opponent, but
from the three possible opponents Real is the only one we’ve
beaten this season,” Dortmund coach Juergen Klopp said.
The winners meet in the final on May 25 at London’s
Wembley Stadium, where Barcelona beat Manchester United
in the 2011 final.
In the second-tier Europa League, Chelsea meets Basel and
Fenerbahce plays Benfica. The Swiss and Turkish teams are
hosts for the first leg April 25, and the second legs are May 2.
Champions League
semifinals are set
WORLD 17
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Egypt leader and military
chief put tension aside
CAIRO — Egypt’s Islamist president made
a strong show of unity with the military,
standing by the country’s top general and
warning in a statement broadcast Friday
against “slandering” the armed forces after
leaks from a report that the president himself
commissioned implicated troops in the killing
of protesters.
The findings of the report — if confirmed,
since the report itself has not been made pub-
lic — are potentially embarrassing for the
military, which has presented itself as the ally
of protesters in the 18-day uprising that top-
pled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011.
The findings would also put President
Mohammed Morsi in a sensitive position.
After vowing to win justice for slain protest-
ers in his election campaign, he commis-
sioned the report soon after his inauguration
in June, forming a fact-finding panel to inves-
tigate the deaths of more than 1,000 killed in
the uprising and during the nearly 17-month
rule by the military that followed Mubarak’s
fall. But now in office, he needs the backing
of the powerful military, and following up on
the mission’s findings would likely bring a
backlash from the generals.
In the statement aired Friday from a meet-
ing the night before, Morsi stood beside army
chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, with the mil-
itary’s top brass lined up around him. El-Sissi
staunchly denied any abuses by the military
and both he and the president denounced
“slanders” against the armed forces, though
neither referred directly to the leaked report.
“I will not ever allow slanders in any way,
shape or form or ... any means to attack any
member of the armed forces,” Morsi vowed.
Beyond the issue of the report, the high-
profile meeting appeared to be putting an end,
for now, to weeks of behind-the-scene ten-
sions between the military and the presidency.
The statements by the two leaders seemed to
be a mutual recognition of the need to work
together at a time of increasing polarization in
the country that has threatened to slip into
sustained bloody violence.
There have suggestions of friction between
the military and the presidency over a string
of issues, including the military’s clampdown
on tunnels between Egypt and Gaza — ruled
by Hamas, an ally of Morsi’s Muslim
Brotherhood — and over the fate of a border
region claimed by Sudan, whose Islamist gov-
ernment is also close to the Brotherhood.
Some Egyptian media have presented the
signs as pointing to a full-blown crisis
between the two sides.
Lithuanian woman shares
home with three puma cubs
KLAIPEDA, Lithuania — A Lithuanian
woman says she has been raising three pumas
in her three-room apartment after fearing for
their lives at the local zoo.
Rasa Veliute, a 23-year-old volunteer at the
zoo in Klaipeda, a Baltic Sea port town, says
she took the cubs home four months ago after
their mother began neglecting them.
The pumas — also known as mountain
lions or cougars — are named Kipsas, Gipse
and Kinde. Veliute says they eat a lot of chick-
en and get along well with her East European
shepherd dog.
There is no Lithuanian law barring keeping
the animals at home, and the zoo did not
object to Veliute’s actions. But Veliute told
reporters Friday that the pumas have grown
fast and will likely return to the zoo this sum-
mer.
Around the world
18
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — On the brink of an
expected North Korean missile test, U.S.
officials focused on the limits of
Pyongyang’s nuclear firepower Friday, trying
to shift attention from the disclosure that the
Koreans might be able to launch a nuclear
strike. They insisted that while the unpre-
dictable government might have rudimentary
nuclear capabilities, it has not proven it has a
weapon that could reach the United States.
A senior defense official said the U.S. sees
a “strong likelihood” that North Korea will
launch a test missile in coming days in defi-
ance of international calls for restraint. The
effort is expected to test the North’s ballistic
missile technologies, not a nuclear weapon,
said the official, who was granted anonymity
to discuss intelligence matters.
Unless the missile unexpectedly heads for
a U.S. or allied target, the Pentagon does not
plan to try to shoot it down, several officials
said. As a precaution, the U.S. has arrayed in
the Pacific a number of missile defense Navy
ships, tracking radars and other elements of
its worldwide network for shooting down
hostile missiles.
The tensions playing out on the Korean
peninsula are the latest in a long-running
drama that dates to the 1950-53 Korean War,
fed by the North’s conviction that
Washington is intent on destroying the gov-
ernment in Pyongyang and Washington’s
worry that the North could, out of despera-
tion, reignite the war by invading the South.
The mood in the North Korean capital,
meanwhile, was hardly so tense. Many peo-
ple were in the streets preparing for the birth-
day of national founder Kim Il Sung — the
biggest holiday of the year. Even so, this
year’s big flower show in Kim’s honor fea-
tures an exhibition of orchids built around
mock-ups of red-tipped missiles, slogans
hailing the military and reminders of threats
to the nation.
The plain fact is that no one can be sure
how far North Korea has progressed in its
pursuit of becoming a full-fledged nuclear
power, aside perhaps from a few people close
to its new leader, Kim Jong Un.
Concern about the North’s threatening
rhetoric jumped a notch on Thursday with the
disclosure on Capitol Hill that the U.S.
Defense Intelligence Agency believes with
“moderate confidence” that the North could
deliver a nuclear weapon by ballistic missile.
The DIA assessment did not mention the
potential range of such a strike, but it led to a
push by administration officials to minimize
the significance of the jarring disclosure.
Secretary of State John Kerry said in Seoul
on Friday “it’s inaccurate to suggest” that the
North had fully tested and demonstrated its
ability to deliver a nuclear weapon by ballis-
tic missile, a message also delivered by the
Pentagon and by James Clapper, the director
of national intelligence.
Indeed, the attention-getting DIA report
made no such suggestion; it simply offered
what amounts to an educated guess that the
North has some level of nuclear weapons
capability. It has been working on that for at
least 20 years, and private analysts who
closely track North Korean developments say
it’s fairly clear that the North has made
progress.
Kerry, who was headed to Beijing to seek
Chinese help in persuading North Korea to
halt its nuclear and missile testing, told
reporters in Seoul that the North’s progress
on nuclear weapons, as described in the DIA
report, pushed the country “closer to a line
that is more dangerous.” Kerry also was due
to visit Japan.
U.S.stresses limits of North Korea’s firepower
By Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry delivered a stark warning to
North Korea on Friday not to test-fire a mid-
range missile, while tamping down anxiety
caused by a new U.S. intelligence report sug-
gesting significant progress in the communist
regime’s nuclear weapons program.
Kicking off four days of talks in an East
Asia beset by increasing North Korean
threats, Kerry told reporters in Seoul that
Pyongyang and its enigmatic young leader
would only increase their isolation if they
launched the missile that American officials
believe has a range of some 2,500 miles — or
enough to reach the U.S. territory of Guam.
“If Kim Jong Un decides to launch a mis-
sile, whether it’s across the Sea of Japan or
some other direction, he will be choosing
willfully to ignore the entire international
community,” Kerry told reporters. “And it
will be a provocation and unwanted act that
will raise people’s temperatures.”
If the trajectory of the test missile suggests
that it could be a threat to either the U.S. or
allies, the military would move to shoot it
down from one of nine warships armed with
sophisticated ballistic missile defense sys-
tems in the Pacific, including two that were
moved closer to the Korean peninsula, U.S.
officials said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because they were not authorized
to publicly discuss military plans.
Kerry said the test would be a “huge mis-
take” for Kim.
“It will further isolate his country and fur-
ther isolate his people who are desperate for
food and not missile launches,” he warned.
“They are desperate for opportunity and not
for a leader to flex his muscles.”
Kerry’s diplomatic tour, while planned
long in advance, is unusual in that it brings
him directly to a region of escalated tensions
and precisely at a time when North Korea is
threatening action. The North often times its
military and nuclear tests to generate maxi-
mum attention, and Kerry’s presence on the
peninsula alone risked spurring Pyongyang
into another provocation. Another key date is
the 101st birthday of the nation’s founder,
Kim Il Sung, on April 15.
Kerry tamps anxiety over
North Korea missile power
REUTERS
Secretary of State John Kerry, left,speaks with South Korea’s Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se
after a joint news conference at the Foreign Ministry in Seoul.
By Rachel Feder
T
here are an uncountable number of
words in the English language. Yet
we use the same four with unfailing
frequency to greet each other.
“Hi, how are you?” we ask to the people
we see on the streets, in hallways, restaurants
and various other meeting
places. We ask this uncre-
ative question multiple
times a day and, more
often than not, we don’t
wait to hear the answer.
The perplexity of this sit-
uation has always puzzled
me. While I myself have
been guilty of perpetrat-
ing this useless and automatic trend, I can’t
help thinking that there must be a better way.
Out of the incredible amount of words in
our everyday vocabulary, it shouldn’t be too
hard to come up with some new ideas, ques-
tions that would provide an actual look into
the life of the person involved. Questions that
would make us pause for a few seconds, long
enough to actually want to catch the answer.
So what would this ideal question do? It
should be personal. No one wants to be
greeted by the same generic phrase over and
over again. As a high school senior, I can
attest to how tiresome it can be. I can only
take so many more questions along the lines
of “Where will you be next year?” and
“What schools did you get into?” If someone
were to ask me a more personal, more specif-
ic question about college, I would not mind
as much. I’d even reward that creative person
with an honest, thoughtful answer.
By taking the time to put a little more
thought into the way we greet each other and
the questions we ask in passing, we’ll get to
know the people we’re greeting exponentially
better. Of course, if mere politeness is what
you go for in a greeting, then simply say
“hi.” Don’t bother asking how someone is if
you’re not going to listen to them answer
you. It would be better not to have asked at
all.
Hi, how are you?
‘DIsconnect’
An earnest
cautionary tale
SEE PAGE 21
You say tomato, I say ...
There will be 35 varieties of tomatoes
and 15 varieties of peppers at the 2013
Tomato and Pepper Sale hosted by the
UCCE Master Gardeners of San Mateo
and San Francisco counties. The sale
takes place 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at
Redwood High School, 1968 Old County
Road, Redwood City.
Tuskegee Airman
Les Williams honored
The Assistance League of San Mateo
County celebrates its 60th anniversary by
honoring Les Williams,Tuskegee Airman,
Congressional Gold Medal recipient and
former dance studio owner and instructor
with a building plaque marking Williams’
former dance studio. Comments by Mr.
Williams followed by book signing of
“Victory:Tales of a Tuskegee Airman.”
Public invited.The event takes place 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Assistance League
Chapter Headquarters, 528 N. San Mateo
Drive in San Mateo.
Fun run
Carlmont High School’s Fun Run for
Everyone. 5K race and 5K walk. Prizes for
fastest racers, fundraising winners and
team spirit. Creative costumes and spirits
encouraged.T-shirts for every participant.
Music, a bake sale, balloon toss and more.
Free pizza lunch included.The event takes
place 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday at
Carlmont track, 1400 Alameda de las
Pulgas in Belmont.
For information and to register visit
http://bit.ly/X8J8WV.
Best bets
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
What if you could take up
swords against the Lannister
family on “Game of
Thrones”? Or solve mysteries
with the “NCIS” crew? Or
pitch an ad campaign to Don
Draper on “Mad Men”?
And then: What if you could
watch the consequences of
your actions on TV the next
week?
That’s the premise behind
“Defiance” (for the Xbox 360,
PlayStation 3, PC, $59.99), a
collaboration between the
online game studio Trion
Worlds and cable TV’s Syfy.
By the time “Defiance” the
TV show debuts Monday,
“Defiance” the video game
will have been out for a few
weeks — enough time for
players to make their own
mark on this new universe.
Both the game and the TV
drama are set in 2046, some
30 years after the Votan col-
lective of alien species arrived
in the skies over Earth. After a
Game merges with TV drama
See DEFIANCE, Page 22 See STUDENT, Page 22
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“The Whipping Man” is a play that’s worth
seeing again because the Marin Theatre
Company production is so gripping in the
hands of MTC artistic director Jasson
Minadakis and his three-man cast.
It takes place between April 13 and 15,
1865, in a once-grand Richmond, Va., home
that’s now in shambles. The Civil War had
ended April 9, thus ending slavery. Simon (L.
Peter Callender), a house slave, has stayed
behind to guard the house while his wife and
daughter joined their master and mistress in a
safer area.
The master’s son, Confederate Capt. Caleb
DeLeon (Nicholas Pelczar), staggers home
from the war with a gangrenous leg wound. A
younger house slave, John (Tobie Windham),
arrives shortly thereafter, apparently fleeing a
pursuer.
Simon tells Caleb that if his leg isn’t ampu-
tated, he could die, but Caleb won’t go to a
hospital. Therefore, Simon amputates the leg
in a wrenching scene.
Because the three are Jewish, they decide to
have an improvised Seder to celebrate
Passover, which had begun a day or so earlier.
Before they begin, though, Simon arrives with
terrible news: President Lincoln has been
assassinated. Calling him “Father Abraham
who set us free,” Simon speaks movingly
about the day he met Lincoln.
This speech is one of the play’s highlights.
John has another when he describes being
savagely whipped by the whipping man, to
whom masters would take misbehaving
slaves. Caleb’s most moving scene comes in a
‘Whipping Man’ a gripping Civil War drama
See WHIPPING, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
REVISITING THE SOUTH: RICHARD
MISRACH’S CANCER ALLEY. The
Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
presents “Revisiting the South: Richard
Misrach’s Cancer Alley,” 19 large-scale color
photographs and 14 contact sheets by the
internationally acclaimed photographer that
highlight the severe environmental degrada-
tion of the Mississippi River corridor from
Baton Rouge to New Orleans. Favorable taxa-
tion policies have drawn industry to the region
and one-quarter of the nation’s petrochemi-
cals are manufactured there, in close proximi-
ty to homes, schools and playgrounds.
Residents within a one-mile radius of facto-
ries are subjected to significant air and water
pollution as well as noxious odors and indus-
trial noise. In focusing on the delicate state of
the Mississippi River, Misrach signals not just
the environmental challenges facing the South
but also the larger costs of the modern world.
Misrach speaks about these works on
Monday, May 13, at 6 p.m., in Annenberg
Auditorium, Cummings Art Building on the
Stanford campus. Revisiting the South:
Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley runs through
June 16.
The Cantor Arts Center is open
Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.,
Thursday until 8 p.m. Admission is free. The
Cantor is located on the Stanford campus, off
Palm Drive at Museum Way. Parking is free
after 4 p.m. weekdays and all day on week-
ends. 723-4177 or museum.stanford.edu.
Cool Café, inside the Museum, overlooks the
Rodin Sculpture Garden at the Cantor Arts
Center, and features art created by Stanford
students.
***
PENINSULA MUSEUM OF ART
LOOKS FOR DOCENTS AND VOLUN-
TEERS. The Peninsula Museum of Art is
expanding its corps of docents and volunteers
at its just opened Burlingame facility. Docents
preside over the Museum lobby, greet visitors,
answer questions about the exhibitions, and
lead tours of the exhibitions. The docents
meet prior to the opening of a new exhibition
for a training session, usually with the artist
and/or curator. Volunteers bring a variety of
much-needed skills and knowledge to the
museum, including expertise in gallery light-
ing, event scheduling, record-keeping, conser-
vation, library cataloguing, public relations,
social media, graphic design, website updat-
ing, equipment maintenance, marketing and
fundraising. Find out about joining the PMA
“family” of docents and volunteers by calling
692-2133 or emailing
peninsulamuseum@gmail.com.
The inaugural exhibits at the Peninsula
Museum of Art are The Legendary Joe Price,
serigraphs from the PMA permanent collec-
tion (through July 14); Lori Kay: Recycle,
Reuse, cREate, cast bronze and fabricated
metal sculpture (through July 14); and Ira
Yeager: Figurative Painting (through May
26). PMA’s Museum Store specializes in one-
of-a-kind fine crafts and small artworks by
regional artists, including hand-painted silks,
jewelry, ceramics, photography and sculpture.
The Reference Library is open during
Museum hours: Wednesday through Sunday
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (to 8 p.m. on
Wednesdays). 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. 692-2133 or www.peninsulamu-
seum.org.
***
BIG BANG: PARTY, PARTY, PARTY
AND SUPPORT CONSERVATION. The
California Academy of Sciences’ 27th annual
Big Bang Gala on April 18 will have guests
mingling with visionary leaders in environ-
mental conservation and sustainability while
reveling in a sensational atmosphere set inside
the greenest museum on the planet. The
evening begins with a cocktail reception at 6
p.m., followed by guests’ choice of two
Insightful Conversations. The Art and Science
of Chasing Ice features renowned nature pho-
tographer and founder of the Extreme Ice
Survey (EIS), James Balog, whose documen-
tation of the world’s receding glaciers was
recently featured in the award-winning docu-
mentary Chasing Ice. The Upcycle: Beyond
Sustainability—Designing for Abundance
features architect William McDonough, recip-
ient of the Presidential Award for Sustainable
Development, the nation’s highest environ-
mental honor, and champion of the Cradle to
Cradle design philosophy which considers a
product’s full life cycle. Conversations will be
followed with a seated dinner by McCalls,
presenting a menu of locally sourced, sustain-
able fare.
At 8:30 p.m., a second wave of guests
arrives for Big Bang: Party After Dark. In
addition to dessert and an open bar of inspired
libations, Gala and Party After Dark guests
will enjoy electrifying entertainment includ-
ing a live DJ set by retro-soul crooner Mayer
Hawthorne, presented by Another Planet
Entertainment; Rock the Bike, an all bicycle-
powered DJ booth with music by Fossil Fool
and DJ Izzy Wise; pedal-powered art installa-
tion El Arbol; and captivating visuals by ALL
OF IT NOW! Party After Dark guests will
also dine on late-night eats by Del Popolo, a
mobile Neapolitan-style pizzeria housed
inside a restored transatlantic shipping con-
tainer, and enjoy a pizza making demonstra-
tion by pizzaiolo Jon Darksy (formerly of
Flour+Water and Pizzeria Delfina.)
The California Academy of Sciences is
located at 55 Music Concourse Drive, San
Francisco. Proceeds benefit Academy conser-
vation and sustainability programs. For ticket
information call (415) 379-5411 or visit
http://www.calacademy.org.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
RICHARD MISRACH
Night Fishing, Near Bonnet Carré Spillway, Norco, La. Richard Misrach. On exhibit in Revisiting
The South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley, at The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
through June 16.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Rooney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It’s a given at multi-
plexes these days that despite switch-off-
your-cellphone announcements and the occa-
sional grumbling protest, whatever’s onscreen
will have to compete with tiny pockets of light
from audience members unable to stay off
their handhelds. Watching those glow patches
come and go during “Disconnect” reinforces
the film’s position on how desensitized we’ve
become to these technological intrusions. Not
that Henry-Alex Rubin’s schematic multi-
strand drama is at all shy about articulating its
themes.
Directing his first narrative feature, docu-
mentary-maker Rubin (“Murderball”) has
assembled a solid cast and weaves together
the three interconnected stories of Andrew
Stern’s original screenplay with elegance and
efficiency. But this is a film that voices its
warning about the hazards of a wired exis-
tence with solemn self-importance. It’s also
quite late in the day to be pointing out that
we’re so plugged into our devices we often
fail to see or hear the people closest to us.
That’s not to say “Disconnect” is without
powerful scenes, and a thread about the heed-
less consequences of cyber pranks among
kids on social network sites probably stands
to reach more adolescents than non-fiction
treatments of bullying.
Nina (Andrea Riseborough) is a TV news
reporter investigating porn chat sites that
recruit underage teens, many of them run-
aways. She establishes a connection online
with Kyle (Max Thieriot), at first in private
chats and then cam-to-cam. They eventually
meet and she convinces him to participate in
an exposi, promising to keep his identity con-
cealed. But when the story is picked up by
CNN, representing a huge professional coup
for ambitious Nina, it lands on the FBI’s
radar, placing her under pressure to betray her
source.
The network’s legal counsel is Rich Boyd
(Jason Bateman), who has more urgent issues
with his troubled 15-year-old son Ben (Jonah
Bobo). An aspiring musician and friendless
high school loner, Ben is targeted for humili-
ation by skater buddies Jason (Colin Ford)
and Frye (Aviad Bernstein), who invent a
female handle and begin messaging him.
They start by admiring his music and then
take it sexual, sending a naked photo and
requesting that he do the same.
Jason’s father Mike (Frank Grillo) is a wid-
owed former cop from the computer crimes
unit, now working as a private investigator.
Victims of credit card fraud, ex-Marine
Derek (Alexander Skarsgard) and his wife
Cindy (Paula Patton) hire Mike when the
police prove unhelpful and the couple’s sav-
ings and assets are taken. Retracing Cindy’s
participation in an online grief support group
following the death of their baby, Mike
believes he has found the identity thief. But
obtaining concrete evidence proves too slow
for Derek, who confronts the suspect
(Michael Nyqvist).
The ways in which technology has polluted
communication for these people are laid out
with exacting thoroughness in Stern’s script.
Rich is constantly consumed by work calls
and emails at home; Ben is so plugged into a
headset or a laptop that he rarely speaks;
Cindy shares secrets about her marriage with
a screen moniker.
The thematic points are made clearly, with
well-sustained tension and no shortage of dra-
matic impact. It’s just that it’s all a bit obvi-
ous, becoming self-consciously operatic when
Rubin crosscuts among the slow-mo violence
that brings each story to its climax. And the
ensuing moral lessons and re-established
human connections are a bit too neat and tidy.
There are compelling performances to bol-
ster the material, however, including from
some of the young cast members.
Thieriot ably straddles the lines within
Kyle. Like his flirty online persona, appearing
in just underwear and tattoos, he has learned
to use sex and cockiness to get by, but shows
vulnerability when he starts to believe there
might be another way forward in life. Ford’s
Jason early on reveals flickers of a conscience
to distinguish him from more callous Frye.
Looking like a young Paul Dano, Bobo makes
Ben a heartrendingly fragile outsider, and as
the popular sister who beats herself up about
ignoring his pain, Haley Ramm has affecting
moments.
Standout among the bigger names is
Bateman, whose obsessive determination to
find the trigger for Ben’s desperation drives
the developments of that strand. Hope Davis
is given too little to do as Rich’s wife, con-
cerned only about her son’s health and not
with assigning guilt.
Riseborough is stuck with a character that
becomes less credible as her interaction with
Kyle continues after the news report. But
Grillo is a strong presence, and Skarsgard,
considerably drabbed down from his “True
‘Disconnect’ an earnest cautionary tale
‘Disconnect’is a film that voices its warning about the hazards of a wired existence with solemn self-importance.It’s also quite late in the day
to be pointing out that we’re so plugged into our devices we often fail to see or hear the people closest to us.
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Oscar Wilde’s play “The Importance
of Being Earnest” has amused audiences
with its wit and satire since 1895. Now
it’s the basis for a world premiere musi-
cal, “Being Earnest,” presented by
TheatreWorks.
Composers Paul Gordon and Jay
Gruska have updated the setting to 1965,
a time captured by Fumiko Bielefeldt’s
costume designs, which are influenced
by Carnaby Street.
Unfortunately, the costumes are more
appropriate to the times than the music.
While the Beatles and other such groups
were dominating pop charts with boun-
cy, hummable tunes, Gordon and
Gruska’s score seems bland and repeti-
tious.
Thanks to a top-notch cast and Robert
Kelley’s direction, however, the show
still has entertainment value. It also ben-
efits from Wilde’s words, which Gordon
has incorporated into his book and some
of the lyrics.
The plot focuses on two young
English gentlemen, Algernon Moncrieff
(Euan Morton) and Jack Worthing
(Hayden Tee), who resort to deception to
woo the women to which they’re attract-
ed. Algernon pursues Cecily Cardew
(Riley Krull), Jack’s ward. Jack courts
Gwendolen Fairfax (Mindy Lym),
Algernon’s cousin.
One of the obstacles they face is
Gwendolen’s mother, Lady Bracknell
(Maureen McVerry), who prefers being
proper and maintaining her social status.
Completing the cast are Diana Torres
Koss and Brian Herndon.
Everyone sings well, but Morton’s
unflappable Algernon and McVerry’s
snooty Lady Bracknell are especially
noteworthy. A mainstay of Bay Area the-
ater, McVerry also may be familiar to
Peninsulans because of her musical the-
ater work with middle school students.
Another reason why she is a standout
is that Bielefeldt has given her some gor-
geous costumes, especially in the final
scene. Bielefeldt has also designed an
eye-catching outfit for Lym, who
appears in a Mary Quant-inspired
ensemble in the second act. Both Lym
and Krull sport the go-go boots so popu-
lar at that time.
Musical director William Liberatore
conducts four other musicians from the
pit. The set is by Joe Ragey with lighting
by Steven B. Mannshardt. The sound
design by Jeff Mockus is sometimes too
loud.
Gordon turned “Emma” and “Jane
Eyre” into award-winning musicals, but
with “Being Earnest,” the costumes are
more memorable than the music.
“Being Earnest” will continue at the
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, Castro and Mercy
streets, through April 28. For tickets and
information call 463-1960 or visit
www.theatreworks.org.
Costumes outshine music in ‘Being Earnest’
MARK KITAOKA
Cecily (Riley Krull) is wooed by Algernon (Euan Morton),who masquerades as Jack’s
‘wicked brother Ernest’in the World Premiere musical ‘Being Earnest,’presented by
TheatreWorks April 3 - 28 at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts.
See DISCONNECT, Page 22
Groundbreaking comic
Jonathan Winters dies
By John Rogers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Jonathan Winters, the cherub-faced
comedian whose breakneck improvisations and misfit charac-
ters inspired the likes of Robin Williams and Jim Carrey, has
died. He was 87.
The Ohio native died Thursday evening at his Montecito,
Calif., home of natural causes, said Joe Petro III, a longtime
friend. He was surrounded by family and friends.
Winters was a pioneer of improvisational standup comedy,
with an exceptional gift for mimicry, a grab bag of eccentric
personalities and a bottomless reservoir of creative energy.
REUTERS
Comedian Jonathan Winters performs at the International
Hotel in Las Vegas, Nev. in this Sept. 7, 1971 photo.
See WINTERS, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tuesday, April 16,
5:30-8:00
The Lagoon Room Foster
City Recreation Center,
650 Shell Boulevard
Come meet some of the vacation world’s top experts
in active, specialized, intensive, hobby-oriented travel.
Indulge your passions while traveling the globe.
Specialists will be presenting their unique
offerings in safaris, biking, wine and food tours,
eco-adventures and many more.
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Your host is Travel Wizards,
serving the Bay area for more than 32 years.
Admission and parking is free.
Please RSVP at 650.696.6900 or
info@travelwizards.com now to save your place!
TRAVEL WIZARDS INVITES YOU TO THE
INDULGE
Y O U R P A S S I O N
TRAVEL EXPO
www.travelwizards.com
info@travelwizards.com
190 Primrose Road,
Burlingame, CA 94010
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
flashback, when he writes a letter to his beloved from a battle-
field.
Each man dreams about what he’ll do now that the war and
slavery have ended. Each also has a secret that makes his
future uncertain.
This gripping, provocative drama looks at that era in a dif-
ferent light and through differing viewpoints. Callender’s
Simon is a wise, centered presence. Pelczar’s Caleb has suf-
fered greatly and has come to doubt his faith. Windham’s John
is the most complex character, an intelligent, angry man with
dreams, a penchant for theft and, like Simon, a deep faith.
“The Whipping Man” also draws intriguing parallels
between the Jews who were freed from slavery in Egypt and
the Southern blacks who were freed from slavery in this coun-
try. Thus it works on many levels, meriting more than one
viewing.
It will continue at Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave.,
Mill Valley, through April 28. For tickets and information call
(415) 388-5208 or visit www.marintheatre.org.
KEVIN BERNE
Tobie Windham (John), L. Peter Callender (Simon) and
Nicholas Pelczar (Caleb) in the Bay Area premiere of Matthew
Lopez’s ‘The Whipping Man’ at Marin Theatre Company.
Continued from page 19
WHIPPING
Blood” look, conveys the simmering anger of an Iraqi vet
reduced to being a thankless paper-pusher. He and Patton
effectively draw the lines that isolate them in their grief and
then the slow thaw as they face a fresh crisis together.
In a curious bit of casting, fashion designer Marc Jacobs reg-
isters convincingly in his couple of scenes as Harvey, the
sleazy surrogate parent of the sex-cam models, luring them off
the street with the promise of shelter and income.
While the city locations are somewhat anonymously any-
place, cinematographer Ken Seng gives the film a suitably
cold, almost grim look, echoed in Max Richter’s mainly elec-
tronic score. Extreme closeups and onscreen text exchanges
are used skillfully to engage us in the cyber dialogue, and edi-
tors Lee Percy and Kevin Tent fluidly keep each of the stories
in equal play.
“Disconnect,” an LD Entertainment release, is rated R for
sexual content, some graphic nudity, language, violence and
drug use — some involving teens. Running time: 116 min-
utes.
Continued from page 21
DISCONNECT
brutal war, the humans and aliens have
settled into an uneasy peace, but alien
technology that crashed to Earth has
drastically changed the landscape.
The “Defiance” game shows the
effects of these “arkfalls” on California’s
Bay Area, now a wasteland packed with
bloodthirsty mutants, hostile cyborgs
and overgrown, fire-spewing insects.
Your character — male or female,
human or Votan — is an ark hunter who
makes a living by scavenging from crash
sites, and the search for a particular alien
artifact brings you to the West Coast.
Soon after your arrival, the game’s
sprawling map opens up, letting you
choose from dozens of missions. You
can race dune buggies around the
wilderness. You can infiltrate raider
strongholds and steal their loot. You can
rescue farmers from “hellbug” infesta-
tions. Most missions can be handled
solo, but if you stumble across a major
arkfall you’re going to need help from
other online players.
You’ll also discover “episode mis-
sions” that relate to the next week’s
installment of the “Defiance” TV show.
In the first such adventure, you meet
military veteran Joshua Nolan and his
partner, an alien named Irisa. They ask
for your help retrieving a lost Votan
doohickey, which turns out to be a sig-
nificant plot device in the premiere of
the Syfy drama.
The titular town of Defiance was built
on the ruins of St. Louis, so I don’t know
how many of its characters will visit us
ark hunters out West. But both sides of
the “Defiance” team have collaborated
on building an impressive world, and
I’m eager to see where they go from
week to week.
I was able to battle through the initial
batch of episode missions in just a few
hours, but there’s plenty more to do. As
with any online shooter, you can engage
in raucous death matches with your fel-
low humans. Or you can enroll in the
Shadow War, in which huge teams of up
to 64 players each battle for control of
sites all over the map.
Such massively multiplayer epics are
popular among computer gamers, but we
haven’t seen many on consoles. I’ve
been playing “Defiance” on the Xbox
360, and I love being able to use an
Xbox controller instead of a PC’s key-
board and mouse. On the other hand, I
was frequently unable to log onto
Trion’s servers during the first few days
after the game went on sale. That prob-
lem has eased up, but there are still too
many glitches, from unresponsive con-
trols to disappearing inventory items.
There’s also a wearying sameness to
the bulk of the missions, which typically
consist of racing to a location, killing a
bunch of monsters and retrieving some
object. The action is intense and chal-
lenging, often reminiscent of 2K Games’
fine “Borderlands.” But it’s missing that
series’ twisted sense of humor, and I’m
hoping Trion delivers more variety in
future episodes. It’s a work in progress;
for now, I give it two stars out of four.
Continued from page 19
DEFIANCE
But if a genuine concern for the well-
being and mental health of those you
greet daily is present, then asking them
unique questions will be much appreci-
ated. Not only will the person you’re
talking to be pleased by the unexpected
cleverness of your questions, they will
reward you with unique answers.
For example, if you ask someone for
three adjectives describing their being
at the current state they are in, you will
get a slew of interesting words in
response. Tired, ecstatic, splendid or
downright miserable, just to name a
few. You could ask how a person’s rela-
tive is doing, although you should be
prepared to hear long, detailed-to-a-
fault stories about so-and-so’s mother’s
toe surgery.
If you ask about cats, dogs, sloths or
other household pets, you might have to
wait through a slide show of pictures
dedicated to Fluffy. You’ll also be
expected to confirm that yes; Fluffy is
in fact the cutest dog, cat, sloth or other
animal alive. And you might have to
assure a proud uncle that, yes; his little
niece definitely is the prettiest princess
around.
So while an unpredictable question
will inevitably generate an unpre-
dictable answer, it will absolutely make
life more interesting. All it takes is a lit-
tle effort to get a big reward which, in
this case, involves a little more thought
of the parts of both people involved.
Instead of the normal, almost mechani-
cal way in which we interact with each
other in passing, it would be much
more fulfilling to take the time needed
to ask personal questions that will gen-
erate interesting answers.
Rachel Feder is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the week-
end edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
Facial contortions, sound effects, tall tales
— all could be used in a matter of seconds
to get a laugh.
“Jonathan Winters was the worthy cus-
todian of a sparkling and childish comedic
genius. He did God’s work. I was lucky 2
know him,” Carrey tweeted on Friday.
On Jack Paar’s television show in 1964,
Winters was handed a foot-long stick and
he swiftly became a fisherman, violinist,
lion tamer, canoeist, U.N. diplomat, bull-
fighter, flutist, delusional psychiatric
patient, British headmaster and Bing
Crosby’s golf club.
“As a kid, I always wanted to be lots of
things,” he told U.S. News & World
Report in 1988. “I was a Walter Mitty
type. I wanted to be in the French Foreign
Legion, a detective, a doctor, a test pilot
with a scarf, a fisherman who hauled in a
tremendous marlin after a 12-hour fight.”
The humor most often was based in
reality — his characters Maude Frickert
and Elwood P. Suggins, for example, were
based on people Winters knew growing up
in Ohio.
A devotee of Groucho Marx and Laurel
and Hardy, Winters and his free-for-all
brand of humor inspired Johnny Carson,
Billy Crystal, Tracey Ullman and Lily
Tomlin, among many others. But
Williams and Carrey are his best-known
followers.
Continued from page 21
WINTERS
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • April 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, APRIL 13
Foster City Multi-Family Garage
Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 299 Beach Park
Blvd., Foster City. Bowditch Middle
School students will be holding the
sale to fund their trip this summer to
the nation’s capital. For more
information call 468-6483.
2013 Tomato and Pepper Sale
Hosted by the UCCE Master
Gardeners of San Mateo and San
Francisco counties. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Redwood High School, 1968 Old
County Road, Redwood City.There will
be more than 35 varieties of tomatoes
and more than 15 varieties of peppers,
herbs and more. For more information
go to
http://ucanr.org/sites/MGsSMSF/Speci
al_events/Tomato_sale/.
Skills Development andApplication
Class. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Skyline
College, 3300 College Drive, San Bruno.
Free. Please wear comfortable shoes
and clothing. For more information call
616-7096.
Non-violent Parade for Peace and
Justice. 10 a.m. Our Lady of the Pillar
Catholic Church, 400 Church St., Half
Moon Bay. Pablo Paredes, immigration
reformer, peace activist and Oakland-
based youth organizer, will give the
keynote speech. The event will begin
at Our Lady of the Pillar Catholic
Church and the parade will continue
down Main Street, cross Cabrillo
Highway and to the Coastside
Lutheran Church for a tamale lunch.
Registration is $40. For more
information go to www.kacw.org.
Author Patricia Schultz. 10 a.m. to
noon. 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. $35. This special event
features author Patricia Schultz, who
wrote ‘1000 Places to See Before You
Die.’ For more information contact
www.braunercompany.com.
Buckeye and Owl Canyon Hike.10
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave.,
Suite 206, Brisbane. Free. Dress for
varied weather and wear long pants.
For more information contact
sanbruno@mountainwatch.org.
City of San Carlos’ Second Annual
Volunteer Expo. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Carlos Adult Community Center, 601
Chestnut St., San Carlos. More than 30
local nonprofit organizations will be
present to showcase volunteer
opportunities within the community.
All ages welcome. Free. For more
information call 802-4218.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Encore
Books on the Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Half off sale. All sales
benefit the programs of the San
Mateo County History Museum. For
more information call 299-0104 ext.
234.
FML Outdoor Bargain Book/Media
Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. All adult books
will be 50 cents and children’s books
will be 25 cents (including foreign
language books and media). Bag of
Books will be $5 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information call 697-7607.
An Evening with Deborah Tannen.
Noon to 2 p.m. UU Fellowship of
Redwood City, 2124 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. $20. All proceeds go
toward CORA (Community
Overcoming Relationship Abuse.) For
more information call 367-9183.
AffordableBooksat theBookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. $1 paperbacks,
$2 and up hardbacks and 25 cents for
children’s books. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
ThereWasSomethingAbout Agnes.
1 p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
The lecture is free with admission to
the museum, $5 for adults and $3 for
seniors and students. Joanne Garrison
will present a talk about the life of
Agnes Poett. For more information call
299-0104.
Seabird and SongbirdWorkshop. 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sea Crest School, 901
Arnold Way, Half Moon Bay. Presenter
Alvaro Jaramillo will lead workshop
suitable for the beginner and
advanced birder. Light refreshments
served. Suggested donation of $15 for
adults, $5 for seniors, kids and students
free. Bird walk from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. See
below for more information. For more
information go to
http://coastsidelandtrust.org.
Assistance League of San Mateo
County Celebrates Its 60th
Anniversary. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Assistance League Chapter
Headquarters, 528 N. San Mateo Drive,
San Mateo. Honoring Mr. Les Williams,
Tuskegee Airman, Congressional Gold
Medal recipient, former Dance Studio
owner and instructor and
distinguished resident of San Mateo
County. Building Plaque Unveiling to
celebrate the historical significance of
the site as the former dance studio Mr.
Williams owned and operated for 22
years. Book signing of ‘Victory:Tales of
a Tuskegee Airman’ following
comments by Mr. Williams. Public
invited to attend. For more
information go to
sanmateocoutny.assistanceleague.org
.
Musical Conversation. 3 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W.Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Features the Amelia Piano
Trio. Free. For more information call
762-1130.
Rembrandt’sCentury. 3 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. This exhibition
examines a wide range of artworks
from the 17th century. For more
information call 591-8286.
Seabird and Songbird Walk. 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. Smith Field, end of Wavecrest
Road, Half Moon Bay. Meet at Smith
Field. Presenter Alvaro Jaramillo will
lead us through an exciting workshop
suitable for the beginner and
advanced birder alike. Light
refreshments served. Wear layers and
sturdy shoes. Bring binoculars. Free.
For more information go to
http://coastsidelandtrust.org.
NDNU FoodTuck Show Ho’olaule’a
2013. 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Notre Dame
de Namur University, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. NDNU’s Hawaii Club is
pleased to announce its second
annual Ho’olaule’a, a fundraiser for
Hawaii Club filled with local food
trucks, raffles, Hawaiian entertainment
and much more. Parking and
admission is free. For more
information go to www.ndnu.edu.
Reception for Art Exhibit, ‘Color.’ 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Coastal Arts League
Museum, 300 Main St., Half Moon Bay.
The exhibit is open from April 5 to May
6 (Friday through Monday, noon to 5
p.m.). Free. For more information go
to coastalartsleague.com.
One Time Live Event Stand-Up
Comedy: Hysterical Houswives
Returns.7 p.m. San Benito House, Half
Moon Bay. $15 and a non-perishable
food item to benefit Coastside Hope.
To register and for more information
contact info@bayareacasting.com.
ViBOFacultyConcert.7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
ViBO Music San Bruno, 488 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. Free. For more
information visit
vibomusicschool.com.
Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. 7:30
p.m. Notre Dame de Namur University,
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. $10. For more information or
for tickets call 508-3456.
Pacifica Performances at the
Mildred Owen Concert Hall:
Houston Jones. 7:30 p.m. Mildred
Owen Concert Hall, 1220 Linda Mar
Blvd., Pacifica. High-octane Americana
quintet Houston Jones will perform
original folk, bluegrass, blues and
gospel. $20 for general admission, $17
for seniors/students, $15 for members
and $12 for senior/student members.
Free for those under 18 years of age.
For more information call 355-1882 or
go to www.pacificaperformances.org.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
‘Cats.’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Office, 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
Taste of the Exotic in Redwood
Symphony’s Notes From Persia. 8
p.m. Canada College Main Theatre,
4200 Farm Hill Road, Redwood City.
$20 purchased ahead of time, $25 at
the door, $10 students and children
under 17 free. For more information
contact mickicartr@aol.com.
Diablo Ballet performs at Hillbarn
Theatre. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre, 1285
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Diablo
Ballet presents classical and
contemporary dance works including
the Web Ballet, the world’s first ballet
created online. For more information
call 349-6411 or go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
SUNDAY, APRIL 14
Day of Noise. 12 a.m. KZSU Stanford,
540 Memorial Way, Stanford.Tune into
KZSU for 24 hours straight of live
experimentation and improvisation.
Continues until April 15 noon Free. For
more information visit
http://kzsu.stanford.edu.
Lessons on B.1527 S. B St., San Mateo.
An afternoon of music featuring
Sigmund Siegel, Tenor; Eric and
Christian Alexanderson, Bariton and
Piano; and Harpist/Singer/Songwriter
Erica Messer. Light refreshments will
be provided. Donations accepted at
the door. For more information call
343-1579.
Carlmont High School’sFun Run for
Everyone. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Carlmont Track, 1400 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont.There will be a 5K race
for runners as well as a 5K walk for
everyone else. Prizes will be awarded
for fastest racers, fundraising winners
and team spirit. Creative costumes and
spirits are encouraged. There will also
be T-shirts distributed to every
participant, as well as music, a bake
sale, balloon toss and more. Free pizza
lunch included. For more information
and to register go to
http://bit.ly/X8J8WV.
Summit Loop Trail. 10 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave., No. 206, Parking
Lot, Brisbane. Free. Dress for varied
weather and wear long pants.The end
of the hike features a 360 view of the
Bay Area. For more information and to
sign up call (415) 467-6631.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Encore
Books on the Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Half off sale. All sales
benefit the programs of the San
Mateo County History Museum. For
more information call 299-0104 ext.
234.
Food Trucks Cookin’ In Foster City.
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Peninsula Jewish
Community Center, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information call 378-2723.
Adopt a Senior Mutt. Noon to 3 p.m.
Muttville Senior Dog Rescue Adoption
Event, Pet Food Express, 261 Park Road,
Burlingame.You can check out all the
adoptable seniors at muttville.org. For
more information contact
patty@muttville.org.
Affordable Books at the BookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. $1 paperbacks,
$2 and up hardbacks and 25 cents for
children’s books. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
‘Cats.’ 2 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Office, 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
‘Opera Rocks!’ 2 p.m. Taube Center,
Notre Dame de Namur University,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Draws
from 400-year tradition of operatic
repertoire and mixes up familiar
stories with their contemporary
musical theatre counterparts. General
admission $10. Tickets can be
purchased online at
brownpapertickets.com.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music Student Recital. 2 p.m. 2575
Flores St., San Mateo. Free.The concert
will feature piano and guitar
performances by students of the
Crestmont Conservatory of Music. For
more information call 574-4633.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd Ave.,
San Mateo. The group will discuss the
latest news about bigfoot/sasquatch
while enjoying pizza and soft drinks.
Anyone is welcome. For more
information call 504-1782.
Project Read Free LiteracyTraining
for Volunteers. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
South San Francisco Library
Auditorium, 840 West Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Free. For
registration and more information call
829-3871.
Amelia Piano Trio. 7 p.m. Kohl
Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. Free public master class
by member of Amelia Trio at 5 p.m.
featuring the Verbena Viola Quintet,
a Young Chamber Musician ensemble.
Pre-concert talk at 6 p.m. by
musicologist Kai Christiansen. Meet
the musicians at a complimentary
reception after the concert. Parking is
Free. For tickets, details and direction
call 762-1130.
‘BURN.’ 7:30 p.m. College of San
Mateo Theatre, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Building 3, San Mateo. Tickets are $15
online or $20 at the door. This film is
about firefighters, told through the
eyes of the crew of Detriot’s Engine
Company 50. For more information
and to buy tickets go to
detriotfirefilm.org/events.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
the workspaces is an array of artists working
in various media including stone carving, jew-
elry, painting, photography, wood working
and fiber.
“We feel we have the opportunity to offer
the community the best we can,” Waters said.
Artists competed for the studio space that
filled up months in advance and were rigor-
ously chosen based on quality, diversity and
originality, Waters said. Seven board members
are responsible for evaluating candidates for
both workspace and exhibitions. Each mem-
ber is an artist, including Waters, who works
in hardwood, bronze, marble and large-scale
installations.
Waters’ affinity for hardwood carving dates
back to her childhood when her parents
restored antique furniture. Waters hand chisels
and sands large blocks of salvaged wood to
create her sculptures.
Millinery fiber artist Wayne Wichern is leg-
endary in his field, having led workshops at
the de Young museum and the prestigious
Penland School of Crafts. He now works out
of space at the Peninsula Art Institute where
he will teach a class in exquisite hat making.
“If you want to learn something well, teach
the next person, because you have to be able to
communicate the technical and, in many
cases, the artistic influence as well,” Wichern
said.
Wichern has amassed more than 1,000
antique wooden hat molds in the 27 years he’s
been in the business. Wichern had previously
worked out of his home studio and was subject
to storing many of his tools. Now a member of
the institute, Wichern said he’s able to share in
the synergistic inspiration of fellow resident
artists. Teaching is both informative and
rewarding, he added.
“I learned a long time ago to give it all away,
because you get so much more back,” he said.
The museum personnel will offer both
youth and adult classes to enrich the commu-
nity and assist in replacing artistic outlets
often dismissed in schools due to budget cuts,
Waters said. Math and science have always
been supported in schools and can be rein-
forced through nurturing the creative mind,
Waters said.
The institute is developing the “Leonardo
Studio,” a program geared toward integrating
the arts and sciences, Waters said. These fields
are not mutually exclusive and success
requires the creative ability to see outside the
box, Waters said. Children from kindergarten
to eighth grade will be encouraged to attend
classes at the museum.
“I think it’s going to catch on very well, it’s
an approach that’s not commonly taken. It’s
natural to this area, the brain power is just out-
standing,” Waters said.
The San Francisco and Berkeley areas have
flourished in the arts and culture scene, while
Silicon Valley became home to some of the
most advanced scientific minds. Waters’ mis-
sion is to create a middle ground that will har-
bor the integration of both.
Resources include a library where visitors
can be inspired while browsing the 1,400
available books. A platen press center in one
of the lower level studios is a unique facility
with equipment publicly accessed in only two
or three places in the North Bay, Waters said.
The museum store is an economic support
to local artists, some of whom are outside of
the museum and institute structure, who can
sell their uniquely crafted pieces. The halls
lining the studios are decorated with examples
of the artists’ works, encouraging visitors to
peek in or chat with present artists.
The facilities exist due to generous dona-
tions, experienced volunteers and docents who
value the cultural arts. The Peninsula Museum
of Art and the Peninsula Art Institute are there
to entertain, support and enhance the local cul-
ture, Waters said.
“We expect to bring in visitors to the
Burlingame area, as well as provide a visual
treat to the Burlingame residents,” Waters
said.
The Peninsula Museum of Art and the
Peninsula Art Institute are located at 1777
California Drive in Burlingame. For hours,
class schedules and more information visit
www.peninsulamuseum.org.
Continued from page 1
ART
classroom 10 and taken 22 computers from a
locked cart, Principal Skip Johnson said at the
time. The theft came as a big blow for the
school which has plans to open as a magnet in
the fall with a technology focus. After hearing
about the theft, two men decided to do some-
thing about it. As a result, Facebook donated 20
refurbished 15-inch MacBook Pros, according
to a company spokesman.
“Eric Sylvester, a program manager on the IT
team at Facebook, heard about the theft from a
colleague at the San Mateo County Health
Department. He initiated the donation at that
time, and his colleague Anup Patel helped get
the laptops ready for the students,” a Facebook
representative wrote in an email Friday.
Now the school can get back to using tech-
nology in all aspects. This fall, El Crystal is
expected to welcome more students and be
converted into a school that focuses on a sci-
ence, technical engineering and mathematics,
or STEM. Even before the switch, computers
are generally used all day at the school and
shared by the student body.
However, the police are still looking for leads
about the theft.
Police responded to a burglary alarm being
activated at El Crystal, 201 Balboa Way, at
10:08 p.m. March 28. Officers found the door
of one the classrooms forced open and the con-
tents of the room had been tampered with,
according to a press release from the police
department. Officers searched the area but did
not find any suspects.
Police Chief Neil Telford encouraged anyone
with information to contact police at 616-7100.
Continued from page 1
CRYSTAL
COMICS/GAMES
4-13-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Watch pocket
4 Gutter locale
8 CSA soldiers
12 Vigoda or Fortas
13 Astronaut -- Shepard
14 Ostrich relatives
15 Punk’s fashion statement
(2 wds.)
17 Trotsky’s frst name
18 Kermit’s street
19 Drizzling
21 Lacking
23 Docs prescribe them
24 Fido’s pal
27 Que. or Ont.
29 Day of the wk.
30 Syrup brand
32 Madame Bovary
36 Mild expletive
38 Yield, as territory
40 Have the fu
41 One-time Mets’ stadium
43 Lorelei’s river
45 Mugger
47 Small coin
49 Undersized pups
51 Tiara
55 Ms. Sorvino
56 Lunch hour
58 Molecule component
59 Groundless
60 Lapel ornament
61 Start of a famous boast
62 Dick Tracy’s wife
63 Three before V
dOwn
1 Makes a breeze
2 Band member
3 Consumer advocate --
Myerson
4 Set aside for
5 UFO pilot
6 Boxy vehicle
7 Amtrak VIP
8 Take over for
9 Make corrections
10 Channel markers
11 9-digit ID
16 Profciency
20 I love (Lat.)
22 Bed covering
24 P.O. service
25 Bobby of ice hockey
26 Itinerary word
28 Drapery support
31 High card
33 -- tai (rum drink)
34 Least amt.
35 Stein fller
37 Tidal wave
39 White furs
42 Alt.
44 Bring to a boil
45 Corny
46 A Great Lake
48 Icons
50 Tizzy
52 Quick swims
53 Give off
54 Choice list
55 Dallas cager
57 Lyric poem
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
saTUrday, aPriL 13, 2013
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- To get what you
want, you might be tempted to employ subterfuge.
However, if you do, it could turn out to be a major
embarrassment.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- If you have a lot of
rushing around to do, you could easily get careless
with your possessions. Make sure you have your
valuables on your person at all times.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- If you’re unprepared to
help yourself, why should you expect others to pick
up the slack? Success is more than likely to elude
you, through no fault but your own.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Fight off any
tendencies toward self-pity, because it is a futile
state. Your family and companions will be immersed
in their own problems and will have little sympathy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Instead of feeling obligated
to do business with a frm that you’ve dealt with
previously, go where you can get the best deal.
Sentiment can be unaffordable at times.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Indecision or
inconsistency on your part can be unnerving to your
associates. To maintain your credibility, you must do
what you say, and do it confdently.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t treat an
assignment indifferently just because you feel it’s
beneath you. If you fail to deliver, it could greatly
damage your prospects.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- There is a strong
possibility that you could be too gullible in your
commercial dealings. Be extra careful and question
everything, especially in unfamiliar waters.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be wary of
getting deeply and quickly involved with someone
you just met. Let things develop slowly, and time will
be the judge.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Strive to be a
productive individual instead of a procrastinator.
What you put off doing now will most likely never
get done.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Your impulse for
instant gratifcation could cause dire fnancial
complications. Stop deluding yourself into making
rash purchases.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Don’t anticipate
failure before you even give something the old
college try. You have as much chance of winning as
you do of losing. Focus on the former, not the latter.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255074
The following person is doing business
as: KMBKOUTURE, 603 Woodside Way,
#1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Kristin-
na Fonua, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Kristinna Fonua /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519784
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
AMENDED
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Cuauhtemoc Torres
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Cuauhtemoc Torres filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
a.Present name: Cuauhtemoc Torres
a.Proposed name: Cuauhtemoc Arroyo-
Torres
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 3, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/27/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/27/13
(Published, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 4/13/13,
04/20/13)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254854
The following person is doing business
as: Canyon House, 16 Coleman Pl.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sliver
Point Plaza, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Ivah Vanessa Ringo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255084
The following person is doing business
as: Woodside Farmers’ Market, 3195
Woodside Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maggie Foard, 265 Portola State Park
Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/07/2013.
/s/ Maggie Foard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254828
The following person is doing business
as: U-Staffing Services, Inc, 1151 Com-
pass Ln., Apt. 109, FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: U-Staffing Services, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kathleen Ng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255075
The following person is doing business
as: Native Cre8ive, 23 Thomas Ct., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Clyde Smith,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Clyde Smith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255078
The following person is doing business
as: Vamp Media, 100 Irene Ct., #10,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: LaDonrick
Powell, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ LaDonrick Powell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254814
The following person is doing business
as: The Rose Pepper Group, 1131
Grand St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sean Head, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Sean Head /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254992
The following person is doing business
as: Godin Financial, 120 Barneson Ave.,
#5, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Gene
Godin, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Keet Nerhan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255019
The following person is doing business
as: Green River Recycling, INC., 475
Searport Blvd., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: FERMA Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marc Ferrari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255119
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Bayside Debris Box Service, 2)
Bayside Hauling and Recycling Service
146 Navarra St., EL GRANADA, CA
94018 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Thomas Allen Corso, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/18/2013.
/s/ Thomas Allen Corso /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255199
The following person is doing business
as: Clock Tower Insurance Services, 446
Old County Re., #220, PACIFICA, CA
94044 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Equim Advantage, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Rebecca Delgado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255146
The following person is doing business
as: San Carlos Pet Hospital, 718 El Ca-
mino Real, San Carlos, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
San Carlos Pets, Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/16/2007
/s/ Kim Haddad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255148
The following person is doing business
as: Redwood Pet Hospital, 2875 El Ca-
mino Real, Redwood City, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
San Carlos Pets, Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/01/2006
/s/ Kim Haddad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255149
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Animal Hospital, 2320
Palm Ave, San Mateo, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner: San
Carlos Pets, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/24/2004
/s/ Kim Haddad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255334
The following person is doing business
as: ATM Unlimited, 206 Rockwood Dr.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
John Gonzalez, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ John Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254950
The following person is doing business
as: Pretty Please, 4060 S. El Camino
Real, Ste. 9, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Andrea Rose Laguillo, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
02/19/2013.
/s/ Andrea Rose Laguillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255158
The following person is doing business
as: Dinosaurs, 50 Eureka Square, PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Dinosaurs Sand-
wiches, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liabiliity Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Christopher Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255346
The following person is doing business
as: Pioneer Comics, 915 Palmito Dr,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Scott Taki-
guchi, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 4/4/13.
/s/ Scott Takiguchi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255294
The following person is doing business
as: CapGain Solutions, 1259 El Camino
Real, #500, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Zah, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/29/13.
/s/ Michael McTeigue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/06/13, 04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255365
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Catered Too, 2) Cafe Too, 325 De-
meter St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Greg Casella, 74 South 15th, San
Jose, CA 95112. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 04/01/2013.
/s/ Greg Casella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
26 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254952
The following person is doing business
as: La Tartine, 96 Douglass Way, ATHE-
RTON, CA 94027 is hereby registered by
the following owner: La Tartine Group,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
02/28/2013.
/s/ Natalya Guterman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255400
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Low Ltd., 2615 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Na-
nette 1) Low Lew, same address, 2) Le-
slie Low, 961 Cape Buffalo Dr., San
Jose, CA 95133, 3) Murray Low, 240 S.
Humboldt St., San Mateo, CA 94401, 4)
Raymond Low, 1394Stanton Way, San
Jose, CA 95131. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Nanette Low Lew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255454
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Back Yard Athletics, 2) Chi-
deren’s Sports Center, 1220 Spring St.
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: William
Frazier, 630 Los Robles Ave., # 9, Palo
Alto, CA 94306 and Michele Casale,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Michele Casale /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254887
The following person is doing business
as: Sharkey’s Hair It Is, 1050 El Camino
Real, Ste C, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
HII NC, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/13/2013.
/s/ Rose Cliton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255415
The following person is doing business
as: Pushpin Law Group, 597 Willow Rd.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Pushpin
Law Group, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Gina Freschi Nellesen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255369
The following person is doing business
as: MP Distributions Account, 4080
Campbell Ave., MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Warren Clark, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
04/01/2013.
/s/ Warren H. Clark /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255378
The following person is doing business
as: LB Consulting, 81 Madrona St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Laura Bhatnagar,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/08/2013.
/s/ Laura Bhatnagar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Manuel J. Gil
Case Number: 123245
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Manuel J. Gil. A Petition
for Probate has been filed by Marsha Ca-
sillas. in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Marsha Casillas
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 10, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Kevin A. Taheny (State Bar # 88146)
Law Offices of Kevin A. Taheny, Inc
700 S. Claremont St.
SAN MATEO, CA 94402
(650)345-4000
Dated: April 11, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 13, 20, 27, 2013.
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV513881
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): COUNTY OF SAN MATEO;
All Persons Unknown Claiming Any Le-
gal or Equitable Right , Title, Estate,
Lien, or Intrest in the Property Described
in the Complaint Adverse to Plaintiff’s Ti-
tle or Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s Title There-
to; and Does 1-25 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): LEE STE-
VEN ENGDAHL, an individual, ANNE
GRANNIS, an individual
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
203 Public Notices
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Charles S. Bronitsky (SBN 124332
Law Offices of Charles S. Bronitsky
2501 Park Blvd., 2nd Flr.
PALO ALTO, CA 94306
(650)918-5760
Date: (Fecha) May 16, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
R. Kril, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
March 23, 30, April 6, 13, 2013.
SUMMONS
CROSS-COMPLAINT
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV50828
NOTICE TO CROSS-DEFENDANT:
(Aviso Al Demandado): JAMES LUM, an
individual; LILLAN LUM, an individual;
FLORA LOOK and HENRY LOOK; as
Trustees for the LOOK FAMILY TRUST
DATED 02/15/03; JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK N. A., an Acquirer of Certain As-
sets, and Liabilities of Washington Mutu-
al Bank From the Federal Deposit Insur-
ance Corporation Acting as Receiver;
ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN CLAMING
LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DE-
SCRIBED IN THE CROSS-COMPLAI-
NANT’S TITLE; and Does 1-20 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): WELLS
FARGO BANK, N. A.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
203 Public Notices
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
800 County Center Dr.
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Nancy J. Johnson CSBN 111615
Berliner Cohen
10 Almaden Blvd., Ste 1100
SAN JOSE, CA 95113
(408)286-5800 (408)998-5388
Date: (Fecha) Oct. 21, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk
Una Finau (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 13, 20, 27 May 4, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
296 Appliances
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
27 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Trial run for a far-
fetched
argument, say
10 Developing
areas
15 Coroner’s
conclusion
16 China from Japan
17 Escape
18 Pre-heist job
19 Begin to develop
20 Provençal sauce
21 As a friend, to
François
22 Encumbrance
24 Tender cuts
26 Familia titles:
Abbr.
27 Buddha’s
birthplace, per
most scholars
29 Slack
31 Lake of the
Woods prov.
32 “Hanging __
Moment”: 2001
Lifehouse hit
34 “When pigs fly!”
36 Winter Palace
rule
40 Not so cool
41 Whistling past the
graveyard, so to
speak
43 May honoree
44 __-jongg
45 Pitch indicator
47 BB?
51 Manages
somehow, with
“out”
53 Aid for an
overhead view
55 Nobel Laureate
portrayed in “A
Beautiful Mind”
56 Cause of a hair-
raising
experience?
58 Regatta racer
60 Sew up
61 Philip Glass’s
“Waiting for the
Barbarians,” e.g.
62 Author whose
only published
novel won a
Pulitzer
64 Saltpeter
65 “Be right with
you!”
66 Schoolboy jackets
67 Something to
throw when
you’re down
DOWN
1 Westernmost
capital in
Continental
Europe
2 Harmonize
3 Tapped out
4 TV debut of 1975,
for short
5 Dance in a raffia
skirt
6 Track
7 Title director in a
1994 biopic
8 Aquarium
attraction
9 Fitting activity
10 Spy wear, maybe
11 Tarot cards, e.g.
12 Salad component
13 Modern-day male
bonding
14 Villainous
23 1999 Stanley Cup
finals competitor
25 Unlikely
command to a
Chihuahua
28 Prone
30 Beat
33 Converse rival
35 Pitching
specialists
36 One of America’s
nine
37 Hostile
environment
38 Follow
39 Jukebox setting
42 “Sweet __”:
Oscar-winning
song from
“Waikiki
Wedding”
46 Piece of broccoli
48 Fitting employee
49 Rise
50 Ally of the Brat
Pack
52 “Either/Or” writer
Kierkegaard
54 Stowe slave girl
57 Long-nosed fish
59 Sound often
prohibited?
63 Kelly Clarkson
record label
By John Farmer
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/13/13
04/13/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
302 Antiques
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
28 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
311 Musical Instruments
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE &
BAKE SALE
Fundraiser for local
baseball team!
Belmont
1250 Avon St.
(off Ralston, just east of Barrett Park)
Sat., April 13th
9am-3pm
Sports equipment, furniture,
electronics, toys, dishes, books,
DVDs, costume jewelry and
more!
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE & MOVING
SALE
BURLINGAME
18-20 Clarendon Rd.
(x-st. Peninsula)
Sat. & Sun.
April 13 & 14
8 am - 4 pm
No Early Birds!
Furniture, clothing,
housewares, music
equipment, handmade
china pieces & much
more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Pre month, Near Shop-
ing center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL OR
ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry • Drywall • Tile
Painting • Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
29 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Weekend • Apr. 13-14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
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Community-Supported Agriculture is
about as close as you can get.”
Right now, CSAs are operating with-
out any established certification process.
“They’re kind of in a no-man’s-land,”
said Gordon.
And this “no-man’s-land” could create
an environment where regulators con-
cerned with public safety could come in
and say you cannot operate anymore, he
said.
There have not been any serious issues
with these small citizen-farmer partner-
ships as of yet. But Gordon does not
want to wait around for regulators to
come down on these small operations.
“We’re trying to be very proactive,” he
said. “We want to make sure these farm-
ers are protected.”
The details of Gordon’s proposed leg-
islation, Assembly Bill 224, are still
being worked out, but he said his main
purpose is to avoid the establishment of
a one-size-fits-all regulation that ham-
pers the operations of CSAs. He aims to
establish a no-cost certification process
that takes into account the various sizes
and types of CSAs.
He would like the Department of Food
and Agriculture to help increase public
awareness of CSAs by listing options on
its website, like it does for farmers’ mar-
kets.
Regulating relationships
In the ideal CSA, the consumer has a
direct relationship with the farmer.
“[Consumers] are the weekly moni-
tors,” said Jered Lawson, executive
director of Pie Ranch in Pescadero.
“Where the relationship is real and gen-
uine, you don’t need regulators looking
over your shoulder.”
Lawson has been working for decades
establishing CSAs — including the
Homeless Garden Project — and train-
ing others at UC Santa Cruz on starting
their own.
“For small farm viability, of course,
continuing to operate without any regu-
latory involvement would be great,” he
said.
But Lawson knows that the idea of the
CSA now encompasses larger farm
operations that aggregate products.
“That relationship becomes more
transactional,” he said.
As these larger operations emerge, so
will public health concerns. Lawson did
not want to comment on Gordon’s bill,
which is still in the works, but he said
that establishing varying regulatory stan-
dards for large and small operations
would help small farms. Exemptions
could be made for very small farms that
demonstrate a certain level of communi-
ty involvement, he suggested.
As a farmer, Lawson has accepted the
regulations that have emerged in
response to the proliferation of farmers’
markets. The annual inspection from the
agriculture commission is worth the
extra cost to assure customers of the
integrity of his food, he said.
“If we want a relationship-based food
system, you can have integrity and
knowledge of what each other is doing,”
he said. “But where it grows beyond the
personal relationship, then there needs to
be legitimacy in that.”
For more information on Gordon’s
legislation visit
http://www.asmdc.org/members/a24/.
Continued from page 1
BILL
would like to see for the area.
Monday night, the City Council will
hear an update on the project.
City staff is currently working with a
consultant on the draft environmental
impact report and expects the public
review period to begin at the end of
April.
It is anticipated that the final project
details will be in place by June, accord-
ing to a staff report.
The City Council will ultimately make
the final decisions on the general devel-
opment plan, development agreement
and EIR sometime in the fall, according
to the staff report.
A preliminary schedule assumes that
the sale of the property will be finalized
in late 2013, with site development
occurring in 2014 and the first construc-
tion to be completed between 2015 and
2017, according to the staff report.
The city has had other developers in
the past committed to building senior
housing on the site but financing for
those projects fell through.
The city will reap $30 million by sell-
ing the site but property and sales tax
revenue generated from the project once
it is completed will add significant rev-
enue annually to the city’s general fund,
which pays for police, fire and other city
services.
The project includes the construction
of 200 for-sale units, 138 assisted and
independent living units and 66 senior
affordable apartments. It will also fea-
ture a town square.
The for-sale units will be available for
those 55 and older and the other units
will be set aside for those 62 and older.
The city entered an exclusive rights to
negotiate agreement with Foster City
Community Partners Feb. 6 through
August 2013.
The Foster City Community Partners
consortium is comprised of Merrill
Gardens, SRM Development, Mid-Pen
Housing, Urban Community Partners
and Campus Property Group.
Residents can participate in an online
survey on the project at www.tnhcfoster-
city.com.
The Foster City Council meets 6:30
p.m., Monday, April 15, City Hall, 620
Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
INPUT
BBC in hot seat as
anti-Thatcher song
climbs British chart
By Raphael Satter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Opponents of the late Margaret Thatcher are
taking a kind of musical revenge on the former prime minister,
pushing the song “Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead” up the
British charts in a posthumous protest over her polarizing poli-
cies.
By Friday the online campaign had propelled the “Wizard of
Oz” song to No. 1 on British iTunes and into the top five of the
music chart used by the BBC to compile its weekly radio
countdown.
David Karpf, who studies online campaigns, said the chart
battle was an example of a new kind of protest enabled by
social media — “A way for people to signal protest en masse
without shouting from the rooftops.”
“It’s a form of symbolic protest,” he said.
The unusual campaign has caused a headache for the BBC.
With the ditty near the top of the charts, the broadcaster faced
the prospect of airing the words “The Wicked Witch is Dead!”
on its Sunday countdown show, just days before Thatcher’s
funeral, scheduled for Wednesday.
Some lawmakers from Thatcher’s Conservative Party had
called for the publicly funded broadcaster to drop the song,
while others warned that such a move would mean censoring
a form of dissent.
The BBC, caught between allegations of censorship and
complaints about poor taste, split the difference, saying it
would broadcast only part of the tune — along with a news
item explaining why it was there.
BBC director-general Tony Hall said that while the broad-
caster found the campaign “distasteful and inappropriate,” he
and other executives had decided the song should not be
banned — but should not be broadcast in full, either.
“We have agreed that we won’t be playing the song in full,
rather treating it as a news story and playing a short extract to
put it in context,” he said in a statement.
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