Spring 2009

Advertising Supplement of
Clean Slate
12 ways to redefine your windowscape
Kitchen remodeling on the fly
Video-game art ... not just for kids
Why the bedroom floor is recession-proof
Eric Stromer: HGTV handyman to the rescue
New
Ideas
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Gardens
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Page 2–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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13 ideas that will
FREE your
bathroom today
Eliminate clutter, maximize shelf space and
don’t forget the walls. There’s a lot to learn
about redefining your bathroom
1) Achieve a quick victory.
Get your hands on a few stainless
steel baskets to corral all the bottles
lurking in your shower. “I don’t
mean shower caddies,” says Debbie
Wiener, principal designer of
Designing Solutions in Silver
Spring, Md. She prefers metal
accessories that permanently screw
into the tiles. These may require a
handyman, but you’ll buy yourself
a de-cluttered shower and make it
easier to clean – no picking up bot-
tles first.
2) Maximize extra floor space with style.
“I’ve brought in furniture pieces
and used them for storage,” says
Lisa Ball, Design by Lisa, St. Louis
Park, Minn. Add a small armoire or
Y
ou’re running late for
work, and you just need
one more thing out of the
bathroom drawer. Unfortu-
nately, you can’t seem to put your
hand on those vitamins – or maybe
it’s the deodorant, hair gel or your
favorite lipstick. There’s just too
much stuff crammed in every avail-
able nook, cranny and shelf. All
those bottles of creams and pretty
packages keep following you home
from the store, but you’re running
out of places to put them.
It’s time to tackle bathroom clutter
once and for all. Whether you’re full-
scale remodeling or you only have a
spare $20, we tapped design experts
to help you find storage space you
didn’t even know existed. Try this
baker’s dozen of ideas for creating a
simple, stress-free bathroom experi-
ence.
BY MICHELLE TAUTE
CTW Features
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Waste not, want not: Take a minimalist approach to canceling bathroom clutter – only keep the necessi-
ties on hand so your mornings go smoother and your bathroom décor can shine.
chest of drawers to hide tow-
els and toiletries. Or squeeze
a low, narrow bookshelf
against the wall and line the
shelves with baskets. Wiener
even suggests a small ottoman
with storage inside that you
can sit on while giving the
kids a bath.
3) Conquer the make-up monster.
“Go through everything and
look for expiration dates,”
says Geeta Kewalramani,
owner of Kimaya Designs in
Milton, Ontario. “Keep only
the things you need.” If you’re
still stuck, Wiener suggests a
vanity table outside the bath-
room. The bedroom makes a
good spot and might put you
closer to a phone and iPod
dock while you’re primping.
4) Invade the walls for additional
storage.
“I’m always looking for space
between the studs,” Wiener
says. A recessed medicine
cabinet, especially a custom-
made one, can buy you room
for vitamins and prescriptions.
Or you can hire someone to
build recessed shelves into
the walls or even into the
shower tiles. “You have to
weigh the cost versus the
price that space means to
you,” she says.
5) Take inspiration from the
kitchen.
“There are a lot of inserts you
can get into cabinetry now,”
says Sharon Hopkins, owner
of DesignPro in Lafayette,
Calif.
“In a lot of the bathrooms I
do, I look at kitchen inserts.”
It turns out that standard pull-
out shelving meant for spices
and baking supplies work just
as well for toiletries.
6) Make the most of the space
above the
toilet.
You might opt for glass
shelves, metal shelves or an
off-the-shelf medicine cabinet.
But Pam Monaco, president
and principal designer of
Whole House Cabinetry in
Glenmoore, Penn., says you’ll
get the most inches for your
efforts with a custom-made
cabinet. It can take advantage
of all the available space, per-
haps spanning wall-to-wall in
an alcove and up to the ceil-
ing.
7) Embrace a longer, curvier coun-
ter.
If your vanity is next to the
toilet, you can extend the
countertop over the top of the
tank. Kewalramani says it’s a
smart and easy way to gain a
little extra space in small bath-
rooms; the continuous piece
of countertop simply curves
in and becomes narrower
over the toilet. Then you can
top it with baskets, jars or
small shelves to hide your
must-haves. I
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Page 4–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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8.) Install pocket doors.
“Even though the door doesn’t sit
on the floor, it takes up space,”
Wiener says. Taking the door
swing out of the equation gives
you more
places to put
furniture or
shelves, and
it’s a great
move for
aging in place.
If you need a
wheelchair or
walker in your
golden years,
you’ll have
fewer obsta-
cles to con-
tend with as
you move in
and out of the
space.
9) Re-create a
skinny linen closet.
If you’re lucky enough to have a
closet in the bathroom, it’s proba-
bly so narrow and deep that
things disappear in the back for
years at a time. Monaco recom-
mends shortening those black-
hole shelves and adding a hanging
storage unit to the back of the
door. The latter gives you an easy-
to-grab, easy-to-see spot for every-
day essentials.
10) Work without a closest.
No closet? And no wall space to
spare? Look for innovative towel
hooks and bars that fasten into
your door hinges and create extra
spots to hang clothes or wet tow-
els.
11) Choose function over style.
If you’re remodeling, pick out
your new vanity with storage in
mind. “Drawers are key,” Wiener
says. They make it easier to keep
goods organized than one under-
the-sink space. Her other hot tip:
Place your sink slightly off center.
You can buy
room for drawers on one side and
gain uninterrupted counter space.
12) Don’t be afraid to go up.
Hopkins typically makes bath-
room counters 36-inches high
instead of the standard 30-inches
to buy space underneath. ( Just
save this trick for adults-only bath-
rooms.) She also recommends tall
storage cabinets that stretch all
the way up to the ceiling, or cabi-
nets that sit on the counter
between the sinks.
13) Hide and don’t go seek.
If you’re springing for a new vani-
ty, look for thoughtful options to
make every morning easier. Mona-
co has put an electrical outlet, for
instance, behind drawers for hair
dryers and curling irons. “It’s
always plugged in,” she says. “And
it keeps the cords out of the way.”
Up, up and away: The best way to eliminate clutter in the bathroom
is to keep as much as you can off the floor. Consolidate items in
storage devices and mount them on the wall.
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Wednesday, March 25, 2009–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Page 5
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Paving
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ood Health
ood Health
• Pavers • Ponds • Plants
• Water fountains • Landscaping
bet I can list the reasons
you resist starting a garden.
There’s:
• Hard work in the dirt without a
guarantee of success.
• Watering and weeding- big
responsibilities after all- and it’s
all too evident to everybody when
you don’t meet them.
• Harvesting -which tends to
become lengthy and repetitive and
since you’ve planted it, to be a good
person you better harvest it ALL.
• Weather, it may
or may not cooperate leaving you
looking like a careless gardener.
• The whole thing with the bugs
and diseases that, overnight, can
rob you of your dignity and the
humility you thought you’d need
when others saw your bounty.
And most of all, there is the whole
“green”, sustainable”, “fresh food”
thing. Don’t even want to con-
template the moral issues there.
Joining this movement means way
too many demands on a simple
gardener.
Okay. How did I do?
Now, tear out that list, shred it,
and, well, compost it. None of
those reasons make any sense.
Do these things instead:
Plant veggies that can and
will grow perfectly well on their
own ,thank you very much.
Harvest veggies for the eat-
ing and the pleasure, never mind
any kind of obligation that doesn’t
exist..
Ah. The weather. Some
years a help and some years a
drag. Next year will be better. To
those who try to fight the weather,
I say sit near whatever is enjoying
the weather and have a cup of tea.
Relax.
Plant bug and disease re-
sistant varieties (and remember,
it’s often the lazy gardener that
has fewer problems because they
interfere less).
Ignore the goals of garden-
ers who want to reach perfection.
Take them a cup of tea and relax.
Gardens have a way of growing
gardeners and you are both on
`your way.
So, you ask, what veggies will
grow on their own, or nearly so?
What plants are forgiving of weeds
and missed waterings?
These plants:
• Onions from sets (spring and fall)
• Cabbages (spring and fall)
• Peas (spring and fall)
• Lettuce (spring and fall)
• Green beans (summer requires
some watering- water deeply)
• Horticultural beans (as green beans)
• Shell beans (as green beans)
• Chives, parsley, and other herbs
(Plant in spring)
• Garlic (plant in fall))
• Broccoli (plant in early spring
or in fall)
• Swiss Chard (as broccoli)
• Spinach (as broccoli)
• Summer Squash (dig a deep hole, as
a little peat and fertilizier to bottom)
• Winter Squash (as Summer squash)
• Turnips (as broccoli)
• Peppers (as summer squash)
• Tomatoes (as summer squash)
All these plants will do their best
on good watering and lots of fer-
tilizer. Never mind. We are talk-
ing enough to enjoy. What would
you do with 75 pounds of zuc-
chini, anyway?
“Lists for a
Hesitant
Gardener.....”
“Lists for a
Hesitant
Gardener.....”
BY: Debbie Levings
I
Page 6–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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Here is my last list. These are
random tips for growing with little
effort and much pleasure.
Grow plants in season, like
lettuce and spinach. Spring and
fall will water them with rain and
the cool temperatures will keep the
greens sweet, the bugs asleep.
Dig a deep hole for all your
vines. The deeper the better but
anything over a foot is great. Drop
some moist peat moss and some all
purpose fertilizer in the bottom of
the hole. Add the soil back loosely
and plant your vine on top. After
a week or so of regular watering
you can start watering when you
remember to. Use a drip of some
kind, milk jugs with a pinhole near
the bottom of one side will drip
nicely. Put it near the stem.
Plant in your flower garden,
flowers and veggies think they are
family.
Plant in containers. You can
refresh last years soil with some
manure mixed in, or you can put
good potting soil with water hold-
ing polymers mixed in.
Plant in part shade. Five
hours of sun is enough and the
hours in the shade save watering.
Especially potted plants appreciate
this.
Use a fertilizer that is made
out of material that was once liv-
ing, AKA organic material. There
is nothing wrong with chemical
fertilizer except it only lasts about
thirty days and may also run off in
the draining water. Organic materi-
al will likely last the whole season.
For the pleasure of it, start
a garden. Maybe a theme garden?
My favorite is a Salsa Garden-
whatever you like in salsa plant for
yourself. Do not hesitate to take
a cup of whatever you like and
a chair out to watch your garden
in the business of growing like it
knows what it’s doing.
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Experts Experts
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679-3544
2690 Roberts Creek Rd.
Roseburg
uels such as coal, oil and natu-
ral gas currently provide more
than 85 percent of all energy
consumed in the United States.,
according to the U.S. Department of
Energy, and the dependency is likely
to increase. As the country looks for
new ways to use sustainable resourc-
es, take some time in to make your
own impact on the environment.
“Reducing carbon usage is some-
thing that’s practical and not out of
reach,” says Rebekah Hren, co-author
of “The Carbon-Free Home: 36
Remodeling Projects to Help Kick the
Fossil-Fuel Habit” (Chelsea Green
Publishing, 2008). “You don’t have to
be dependent on nonrenewable
resources.” Here are a few simple
ideas from Rebekah and her husband
and co-author, Stephen, to reduce fos-
sil fuel usage:
• Get rid of traditional fertilizers.
“Use organic fertilizers instead,” Ste-
phen says. “Going from chemical to
organic actually builds up the soil,
and the organic matter that slowly
accumulates captures carbon.”
• Solar-powered path lights. “You
can get these for really cheap now,
and they work really
well,” Rebekah says.
“Then you don’t have to
add to the electric bill
to have garden lights.”
• Solar-powered
water pumps. “These are
good if you have any
kind of water feature,”
Rebekah says.
• Plant for the long-
term. “Something like a
blueberry bush, a cher-
ry tree or a peach tree
can save you a lot of
money a couple years
down the road,” Ste-
phen says. “Not only is
it much fresher and
healthier, there is no
shipping cost and no
transportation energy
issues. And you don’t
have to go out and
earn the money to buy
produce.”
Create shade with a leafy plant or
vines on a trellis. “It’s always good
when you combine two ends out of
one activity,” Stephen says. “One
thing we did for cooling purposes
in the summer is
built a trellis over
the windows that
face west. We plant-
ed a deciduous
grape vine so in the
summer it’s shading
the window and
you also get the
grapes. It helps to
regulate the tem-
perature of our
house and attracts
birds and butter-
flies, too.”
REDUCE,
REUSE,
RECYCLE
Plastic is made from petroleum,
and gardeners – either because they
aren’t aware, or don’t have access to a
place that will accept gardening plas-
tic – create a huge waste stream every
growing season. In 2008, the Mis-
souri Botanical Garden in St. Louis
collected and recycled 150,000
pounds of used plastic garden pots
and polystyrene cell packs, trays and
hanging baskets that otherwise might
have ended up in landfills. The gar-
den’s plastic pot recycling program,
which was open May – Oct. and
included satellite collection sites, is
the largest program of its kind.
• See if it’s possible to return
plastic pots to the nurseries where
you purchased the plants. Check
first to make sure they’ll recycle
what you have. Typically, plastic
garden pots will be marked on the
bottom with #2 or #5. Separate
these from cell packs and trays
marked # 6.
• Check with the nearest botani-
cal garden or call your local exten-
sion service to investigate your
options for recycling garden plastic.
Get Eco-Smart
this Season
Did you know your garden
has a carbon footprint?
Here’s how to knock it
down a size or two
BY MELANIE WANZEK
CTW FEATURES
F
Reducing carbon
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Page 8–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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Y
ou think you’re exhausted at
the end of the day? Well,
think about how your win-
dows must feel! They don’t
get to kick back and relax like the plush
sofa in your liv-
ing room, the
reading lamp in
your office, or
your grandma’s
hutch nestled in
the dining
room. Windows
are constantly
pulling double
duty, living up
to their func-
tional and aes-
thetic
expectations,
both inside and
out – or at least
trying to.
Maybe you
want to dress up your bedroom win-
dow to frame the picturesque view of
trees and wildlife just beyond your
backyard. Or you’re trying to figure
how to distract your guests from notic-
ing your neighbor’s eyesore of a garage
staring back at them through your
kitchen window. Perhaps you’re consid-
ering window boxes of your favorite
herbs or flowers, or you just want to
swap in a new color palette to invigo-
rate your family room.
No matter what your décor style is,
some fundamental elements should be
addressed to figure out what you really
want out of your windows, namely pri-
vacy, budget and proximity to sunlight.
The need to be secure in one's home
are individual and can vary from room
to room. For example, keeping prying
eyes away from the bedroom or bath-
room is likely going to be a bigger pri-
ority than the dining room.
"It's OK if the neighbors know I'm
eating pork chops for dinner,” says Sally
Morse, the director of creative services
for Hunter Douglas, one of the leading
manufacturers of window treatment
products. “But I don't want them to
know what brand of underwear I'm
wearing."
If your bedroom window faces east,
you may want a window covering that
better controls the sunlight – unless you
like waking up with the roosters. If the
window faces south or west, it can
allow prolonged sun exposure that can
not only damage your furniture and
rugs, but also allow potentially harmful
UV rays into your abode. You also want
to consider how streetlights and car
lights might come into play. These days,
with the country in the grip of an eco-
nomic crunch, money is a larger factor
than ever. And one of the biggest fac-
tors involving price can be whether
your window treatments are custom-
made, ready-made, or a product of do-
it-yourself embellishment. But
regardless of your budget and style,
take comfort in knowing that your
options are endless.
SHADOWS IN THE NIGHT
Bruce Heyman, the former president of
the Window Covering Association of
America, sells both types of treatments
at his New Jersey-based store, Metro-
politan Window Fashion. He speaks his
BY DAVE WALDON
CTW Features
Clean Slate
12 ways to redefine your windowscape
Wednesday, March 25, 2009–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Page 9
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favorite product, the Silhouette from
Hunter Douglas, which combines
practical needs such as privacy and
sound absorption with the need for
beauty and decoration. But the Sil-
houette is a custom-made piece,
which increases the expense for the
consumer. Much of the same effect
can be had by using ready-made
products.
"You can go into my store or any
big-box store, and you can buy a
miniblind," says Heyman. "It's not
that expensive, and maybe not that
pretty, but you can get privacy at a
[decent]." The same is true for drap-
eries, he adds: "You can do a window
with privacy and draperies easily for
$100 to $150 a window," as opposed
to expensive custom-made treat-
ments.
OFF THE RACK
"There are so many off-the-rack
options in the world of curtains and
blinds that actually look custom and
fit your window really well," says
Sara Costello, the creative director for
Domino magazine. She recommends
stores like Restoration Hardware,
Pottery Barn, the Silk Trading Com-
pany and IKEA as affordable estab-
lishments to pick up your treatment
supplies. Not only are the prices rea-
sonable, but the available looks are
far from boring. "They're picking up
on the things that decorators do in
the same way that fashion designers
get knocked off," Costello says. "It's
exciting – maybe not if you're the
decorator!"
WHEN IN ROME
And if you favor a cleaner look that
provides privacy, Heyman recom-
mends a Roman shade installed onto
the frame of the window. "It's basic; if
you pick a neutral color, it blends
into the room – it's a real contempo-
rary look that works fine," he says.
THAT EXTRA TOUCH
If you've gone with an inexpensive
drape but want to give it some flair,
Costello points to embellishment
stores such as New York City-based
M&J Trimming that sell items such as
trims, fringes, cords and pom-poms.
"You can get wildly creative at a trim-
ming store," she says. "You can really
customize a shade with trimming."
And, depending on the fabric that
the drape or shade is made of, never
underestimate the power of a glue
gun when it comes to adding adorn-
ments. "In these tough times," says
Costello with a smile," I would invest
in a glue gun."
THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS
Most important as far as the glass
goes is adding protection against the
sunlight that can not only damage
your furniture and carpets, but also
put pressure on your energy bills. To
that end, Heyman suggests using
window film, an application that
blocks 99 percent of the sun's UV
rays and reduces the amount of heat
that comes into the home, thus giv-
ing your air conditioner a bit of a
break during those toasty summer
months.
GREEN THUMBS UP
What about the view itself? Beyond
the usual – and often pricey – meth-
ods of improving what's beyond the
window, such as landscaping, there
are cheaper ways of getting this
done. Jeani Ziering, of New York
City’s Ziering Interiors, suggests
something her son did for his Man-
hattan apartment, building window
boxes from which small gardens can
be grown. "It brings a little bit of
greenery to the urban location," she
says.
TIP THE SCALE
Costello refers to the work of decora-
tor Harry Schnapper, who often plac-
es objects outside of windows as
offbeat conversation pieces. "It's
always something surprising like a
bust or a statue of a dog," Costello
says. Any type of statuary or the like
will do the job, so it doesn't have to
be too ritzy. But try to follow Schnap-
per's lead by playing with scale –
large objects outside of smaller
windows, for example.
NAKED INSTINCT
Not all designers are proponents of
the "must treat windows" philosophy.
While Costello agrees that the win-
dow is usually the focal point of most
rooms, she also feels that a bare win-
dow can be as striking as a shaded or
draped one. It may come down to
asking yourself what purpose the
room serves in your life. "Every room
has a different need," she says. "Is the
window treatment decorative or is it
for privacy? From there, you start to
narrow down your options."
Page 10–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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a room. Putting a plant near the window not only looks nice but is also sensible.
“That would be the natural thing because plants love the light,” says Lyon.
3. Get an end table that is the right height for the window. You want to make sure
you measure to see that the height of the table lines up with the bottom of the
window, possibly even a little lower. If you plan to place items on the window, you
don't want to block the entire window by having an end table that is too high.
4. Use a simple wallpaper border. This will accent the window and naturally
entice the eye. “Fixtures with texture are great, but keep it pretty simple. Some
faux marble wallpaper is nice, or Venetian wall treatments,” says Kathleen Dono-
hue, a certified master kitchen and bath designer at Neil Kelly Designs, which
serves the Portland, Ore., area.
– Carley Ribet
Window Wisdom Window Wisdom
Add another dimension to your décor style with four more skillful decorating tips,
courtesy of the people who know windows best.
1. Create a reading nook near a window. Place a chair with a lamp and a small
table near the window. “A table, a reading chair and a light beside a window is a
perfect combination, a little trio that can be great,” says Kim Lyon, owner of San
Rafael, Calif.-based Window Accents. “It helps pull the whole room together, take
an empty shell of a room, and make it cozy and homey and inviting.”
2. Incorporate a plant into the decorating. Whether it is a small, potted plant on a
table, or a larger plant, like a fichus, a plant is a great way to help set the mood of
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*15% down, 0%A.P.R. financing for terms up to 42 months on purchases of new Kubota ZG, ZD, F, BX, B, L, M Series, RTV, TLB and CE models
from available inventory at participating dealers through June 30, 2009. Example: A 42-month monthly installment repayment term at 0%A.P.R.
requires 42 payments of $23.81 per $1,000 borrowed. 0%A.P.R. interest is available to customers if no dealer documentation preparation fee is
charged. Only Kubota and select Kubota performance-matched Land Pride equipment are eligible. Inclusion of ineligible equipment may result
in a higher blended A.P.R. Dealer charge for document preparation fee shall be in accordance with state laws. Not available for Rental, National
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apply. Offer expires June 30, 2009. See us for details on these and other low-rate options or go to www.kubota.com for more information.
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Supplier of Crushed Rock, Ready Mix Concrete & Asphalt
Excavation, Grading, & Paving Contractor
.J. Ruppenthal didn’t intend to
become an expert in “square-inch
gardening,” as he calls it. It wasn’t
a love affair with nature. He worked on an
organic vegetable farm when he was
young, “but I wasn’t all that interested in
it.”
Ruppenthal was motivated by a convic-
tion and a very practical desire. The high
cost of energy will eventually make food
much more expensive and the food sup-
ply unpredictable, he believes. To ensure
his family’s well-being – and for you to
ensure yours, he argues – calls for a return
to traditional methods of growing food.
City dwellers must learn to grow food to
sustain themselves.
“We will need to relearn basic food pro-
duction skills in a hurry if we are to sur-
vive and thrive in this new world,” he says.
Using balconies, patios, rooftops, window-
sills, cabinets, garages and counterspace,
city dwellers can raise enough fresh food
to sustain their families. “No space is too
small or too dark to grow food,” Ruppen-
thal says.
His brief, no-nonsense book “Fresh
Food from Small Spaces” (Chelsea Green,
2008), is the fruit of years of experiment-
ing to produce his family’s fresh food in
his own cramped living spaces. Ruppen-
thal lived in a series of apartments and
small city homes, some of them gloomy
and none of them with yards. Now living
with his family in San Francisco, where he
is an attorney and instructor at a commu-
nity college, Ruppenthal says he has
grown enough in odd corners and nooks
for his family to eat homegrown fresh food
365 days a year.
Using his book,
he says, readers will learn how to produce
10 to 20 percent of their fresh food from
an average-size apartment or condomini-
um space.
“Where there’s space, there’s growing
potential,” says Ruppenthal. He says the
information in the book is “hard-won,
through years of trial and error.”
Assess the light: Fruiting vegetables
such as tomatoes, peppers, potatoes,
cucumbers, eggplant, squash or berries
need at least 4-5 hours of strong sunlight
daily. If your light conditions are less, Rup-
penthal advises sticking with smaller fruit-
ing vegetables: cherry tomatoes, banana
peppers. Leafy greens, bush beans, peas,
carrots and onions tolerate limited light.
Just the one: Start small. Ruppen
thal says he started with one container
containing one “crop.” When that succeed-
ed, he tried another, then another. When
he ran out of limited balcony space, he
expanded to interior space.
Dwarf trees: Many varieties of berries
and dwarf and semi-dwarf fruit trees will
thrive in containers on a balcony or a
patio. A neglected spot next to a walkway
or sidewalk may be perfect for a produc-
tive fruit tree.
Use all windowsills: Containers of
vegetables, herbs and even small fruit trees
will thrive on sunny windowsills.
Top of the refrigerator: Ruppenthal
produces 2 to 3 pounds of sprouts each
week using a vertical sprouting system on
top of his refrigerator: “an armload of alfa-
fa, radish, soybeans and wheatgrass.” They
will grow in little or no light, Ruppenthal
says; if you prefer to green them up just
expose the plants to an hour or so of sun-
light. He uses sprouts fresh in salads and
stir fries and juices the wheatgrass.
Make the most of mushrooms: Look
to dark cabinets, the basement or other
dark areas that you might not immediately
think of as growing areas.
Old plastic bottles: Ruppenthal grew a
thriving bush bean in an old 2-liter plastic
soda bottle cut in half and filled with soil.
The bush produced well with the bottle
positioned in diffuse light. “I got a crop
from it,” he says.
Experiment: “I’m always trying new
stuff,” says Ruppenthal. Last year, his toma-
tillos turned out to be very productive. He
has some small blueberry plants in con-
tainers. “If you get the soil mix right – acid-
ic, with a good amount of peat moss, pine
needles or shredded bark – they’ll grow
like weeds.
Grow Your Own
Self-styled “square-inch” gardener R.J. Ruppenthal
will try growing food just about anywhere inside his
home. In the interest of self-sufficiency, city dwellers
everywhere should do the same, he believes
BY MARY CONNORS
CTW FEATURES
Dwarf fruit trees: Small enough for an urban
balcony, dwarf fruit trees like Park Seed’s
Dwarf Black Fig are a city dweller’s friend.
R
Page 12–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
For Info Call Julie • 541-672-5115
LOCAL PRODUCE, PLANTS & CRAFTS
Every Saturday, 9am - 1pm
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he world is at your fingertips.
Take time this year to bring glob-
al style into your home garden.
“Plants are moving faster from coun-
try to country than every before,” says
Nicholas Stoddan, director of new
plants for Monrovia, the Azusa, Calif.
nursery. “Plantsmen who used to com-
municate by letters now communicate
by e-mail, which has really spirited
their movement.” Consider these
ideas from around the globe:
Smaller gardens: “The trend
toward minimalistic or modern gar-
dening has been gathering pace world-
wide,” Stoddan says. Look for more
compact plants, containers and gardens
heavier on hardscape, like concrete and
wood. “Plants tend to be of real archi-
tectural importance, like yuccas, agaves
or cannas.”
Colors of passion: “For the last few
years plants have been on the pastel
side,” he says. “But in the last few years
colors of passion worldwide have really
come back.” Try incorporating red or
blood red plants into your garden, or
use high gloss containers that now
come in reds, blues, and greens.
Dark and chocolate colors: Stoddan
says black and chocolate are consid-
ered cutting-edge colors in gardening
around the world. Look for plants and
containers in these colors. For other
ideas on how to incorporate global col-
ors into a home garden, he recom-
mends searching the Internet and the
newsstand to look at the colors of
clothes, textures and paint colors on
homes in other countries.
Outside-in: Stoddan is especially
taken with what he calls “migrating
plants,” plants that flourish outside in
the garden and whose flowers or foli-
age can be harvested, dried and used as
decoration. He recommends lavenders,
which grow in all types of climates.
After they bloom, tie a bunch and hang
it up to dry. Use the arrangements in
winter displays or remove the flower
buds and use them for potpourri or
make fragrant sashays to scent closets
and drawers.
Gardeners are looking far
afield for plants, colors and
ideas. Take a quick tour.
BY MELANIE WANZEK
CTW FEATURES
Globe trotting in
the Garden
Global
Garden
Trends:
Smaller gardens,
plants with architec-
tural presence and
flowers and foliage
in strong, uncompro-
mising colors
Dramatic red punchg
Red Begonia
P
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Nursery & Floral
541 459-2223
fax 541 -459-2225
667 E. Central Ave.
Sutherlin OR 97479
• House Plants
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Come See us at our new location
Licensed, Bonded, Insured CCB# 171553
• Kitchens
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No Place Like Home
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541-391-0663
H
aving a repertoire of
trendy cocktail recipes
makes party hosting more
pleasurable. But if you’re
still serving gin and tonics in
jelly jars or your wine glasses
come with an ad for the local soc-
cer team, it’s time to trade up.
Equip your kitchen with glass-
es that are appropriate for differ-
ent types of cocktails and add a
few bar tools to make cocktail
preparation easier and your
drinks special. What’s more you
can do both without breaking
your budget.
“You don’t need to spend a lot
of money on glassware,” says
Tim Laird, chef and chief
entertaining officer
with Brown-Forman
Corporation,
Louisville, Ky.
“I don’t recommend crystal when you’re
starting out. You can get nice glassware
from a variety of outlets.”
You also don’t need a separate shape
for each drink; some glasses do double
duty, according to Laird. Gadgets may also
serve several purposes. Get a blender that
crushes ice and you can use it for your
morning smoothie and your evening mar-
garita.
Here are Laird’s recommendations for
glasses and gadgets:
Glasses
Buy six of each of the following:
• "Rocks” glass: This squat glass with
either straight or slightly angled sides
holds about a half of liquid. As the name
suggests, use this for spirits on ice.
• Highball glass: A tall, slightly chubby
glass that has either straight or slightly
sloping sides. The classic sloe gin fizz is
served in a highball glass, but you can
also use it for iced tea.
• Martini glass: The Y is the epitome of
cocktail style. “Everyone loves to have a
martini glass,” says Laird. But avoid super-
sized glasses, he advises. “When you
make your cocktail and pour it in [an
oversized glass] it will get warm halfway
through; not refreshing,” says Laird. He’s
also concerned that your guests will be
unaware of how much alcohol they’re
consuming.
• Wine glass: Choose a thin-rimmed
glass with a medium bowl, which is versa-
tile enough for both red and white wine
as well as Champagne.
Gadgets
• Cocktail shaker: Select a shaker with
a built-in strainer. For $10 you can get a
shaker “that lasts forever,” says Laird.
• Measuring glass: buy a glass that
measures up to six ounces of liquid.
• Ice bucket and tongs: Look for insu-
lation so the bucket doesn’t sweat when
you put ice in it.
• Strainer: Buy two – one with a coil
that fits over the mixing glass and keeps
the ice in place, and one for straining out
solids.
• Blender: Pick one with a glass con-
tainer so it doesn’t absorb flavors.
Raise the Bar
Update your entertainment arsenal with these suggestions from a top chef
Wednesday, March 25, 2009–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Page 13
975 NE Rifle Range Rd
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Page 14–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
Fireplaces as easy as 1, 2, 3
2583 W. Harvard, Roseburg
672-0306
H
igh style can sometimes
mean high and dry when
it comes to comfort.
Bright lights, frame less
beds and smooth floors might look
great in a magazine spread, but to
kick back and relax in the bedroom
a different set of rules apply.
“A bedroom should be a couple's
sanctuary, and even the single man
or the single woman needs to have a
place where they truly can go to
relax, recoup from the day and sleep
restfully,” says Esther Sadowsky,
owner of the interior decorating
company Charm & Whimsy in
New York. Here are Sadowsky's
tips for turning a sleeping space
into a blissful boudoir.
Pillow Talk
A bed that's half-covered with
throw pillows might be a com-
fortable lounging space, but it
could easily be an annoyance as
well. “Men hate them,” Sadowsky
says. “They end up throwing
them on the floor and whether
the homeowner or a housekeeper
makes the bed in the morning, it
seems to be a chore.”
Sadowsky's advice is to gather just
a few pillows for the bed, or make
sure that the task of pillow arranging
doesn't bother the person responsi-
ble for making the bed every morn-
ing.
Reader's Block
A bedroom needs seating for read-
ing or watching TV, and Sadowsky
recommends deep comfy chaise
lounges with arms so you can sup-
port a book or magazine.
“On a sofa or a love seat, you are
more or less upright and if two peo-
ple are sitting next to each other it's
like waiting for a bus. It isn't the
same feeling as putting your feet
up.”
Bedding Down
Nobody wants a monkey in a bed-
room, so don't make your spouse
climb over you by putting the bed
against a wall or in a corner.
Sadowsky says that placing the
bed directly opposite the door cre-
ates a real photo op, but real comfort
comes from taking temperature into
account. You might not want freez-
ing winter air from a window or a
hot vent blowing on you as you
sleep.
Dim View
Dimmers in the bedroom are a must-
have accessory, according to Sad-
owsky.
“I love lamp light with dimmers or
three way switches so there could be
lower light for just relaxing or
romance, and a higher wattage or
full use of the bulb for reading,” she
says. Recessed ceiling lighting, or
“high-hat” lighting, is better suited to
a kitchen or public space because
the lights only illuminate parts of the
room and their location can't be
changed.
Barefoot Bliss
“I love cushy carpeting. It makes you
feel like you are floating on the
floor,” Sadowsky says. “Remember
that people are going to be barefoot
a lot in this room.”
Turn off the TV
A TV is in an armoire or a lift-up
console keeps the boob tube out of
your face when you don't want to
watch it, Sadowsky says. And they
also make flat screens where a piece
of artwork can slide across the TV.
– Genevieve Knapp
Follow these 6 tips
to create a bedroom that truly is a
cozy getaway from the
rest of the house.
Start fluffing those pillows
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Wednesday, March 25, 2009–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Page 15
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W
alls
haven’t been
this much fun since
you drew on them with cray-
ons.
But creativity can’t be kept off the
walls for long. Wall decals, reusable
surface graphics that stick to almost
any wall, can add play to the paint in
more ways than one.
“We had been working with the
idea of old school video games for a
while,” says Scott Flora, one of the
founders of Venice, Calif.-based blik
surface graphics. “Then we thought,
‘What would be the most amazing
company in the world to connect
with?’ and Nintendo was on the tip of
our tongues.”
Blik has the pixilated worlds of
Super Mario Bros., Donkey Kong and
New Super Mario Bros. ready for your
walls. The decals are made out of a
thin self-adhesive film that can be rear-
ranged on the wall as often as you
please. Mario can migrate to another
wall entirely and Luigi can ground a
different Goomba every day. The
important thing is to have fun doing it.
“Our opinion is that fun and play
are something you don’t ever stop
doing,” Flora says.
“Lots of adults
think you can’t
play or have fun
anymore, and for
us, our whole
lives are about
play. It is about
designing, creat-
ing and having
fun.”
Blast from the Past
Wall decals 2.0: Transform any
room with a pixilated throw-
back to the classic Super
Mario Bros. and Donkey Kong
games of your youth.
When it comes to livening up the living
room, designer Kirsten Floyd of Kirsten
Floyd Interiors in Hartford, Conn. suggests
taking stock of what you've got.
“One thing I've found that really helps
to freshen up a space is to rearrange furni-
ture that you already have,” she says.
“Open your eyes to what you already have
in front of you and see it in a different
way.” She also says changing up the walls
can make a dramatic difference.
“One of the things that is probably the
easiest and most inexpensive is paint.”
Elizabeth Lonseth, of Seattle-based Eliz-
abeth Lonseth Interiors, says you should
ask yourself two key questions when it
comes to color choice: “What colors do I
want to buy and which do I really like?”
Have fun experimenting!
– Jessica Abels
© CTW Features
Create a living room that you want to live in
– rearrange, paint, entertain and enjoy
I
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From Cleaning to
Crafting, Green Living
to Antique Shopping
The Gentle Art of Domesticity: Stitching,
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Home
by Jane Brocket
(Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2008) $35
The Not So Big House:
A Blueprint for the Way We Really Live
by Sarah Susanka & Kira Obolensky
(Taunton, 2008) $32
Jane Packer's Guide to Flower Arranging
by Jane Packer
(Ryland Peters & Small, 2008)
$29.95
The Cleaning Bible: Kim and Aggie's
Complete Guide to Modern Household
Management
by Kim Woodburn
(Penguin Global, 2008) $20
French General: Home Sewn: 30 Projects
for Every Room in the House
by Kaari Meng
(Chronicle Books, 2008) $24.95
The Homeowner's Handbook to Energy
Efficiency: A Guide to Big and Small
Improvements
by John Krigger & Chris Dorsi
(Saturn Resource Management,
2008) $24.95
Making & Installing Handmade Tiles
by Angelica Pozo
(Lark Books, 2008) $17.95
Zakka Sewing:
25 Japanese Projects for the Household
by Therese Laskey & Chika Mori
(STC Craft/A Melanie Falick Book,
2008) $24.95
Barclay Butera
by Barclay Butera
(Assouline, 2008) $65
Neutral Color Schemes:
Neutral Palettes and Dramatic
Accents
for Inspirational Interiors
by Alice Buckley
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Miller's Antiques Price Guide 2009:
30th Edition
by Judith Miller
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Creating a Sustainable Home: A Practical
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Retrofitting Your Home for Healthy Living
by Georgia Mayfield
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Page 16–The News-Review, Spring Home & Garden Roseburg Oregon, Wednesday, March 25, 2009
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