Division of Physiotherapy Education

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Undergraduate Studies

Contents

Welcome to The University of Nottingham, Division of Physiotherapy Education

Physiotherapy is not only one of the most popular courses at Nottingham, but Nottingham is possibly the most popular place to study physiotherapy in the UK. We believe that this popularity is based on our reputation for providing education within a supportive and nurturing environment, which not only develops the individual, but produces first class physiotherapists.

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This reputation is borne out of two philosophies which underpin our course:

Welcome Why The University of Nottingham? What is physiotherapy? Why physiotherapy at Nottingham? Teaching, learning and assessment Course structure Student profile

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Applying for a place Non-academic requirements The admissions process Money matters Frequently asked questions Visiting us Contacting us

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• All students accepted onto the course at Nottingham have the capability to succeed. We believe that our central role is to ensure that this happens and we facilitate it by promoting open access to staff, ensuring that all students are part of our supportive personal tutoring system, and encouraging peer support and learning. • We believe in a holistic approach to patient care, which encompasses the physical, mental and social aspects of healthcare. Students are introduced to patients at an early stage of the programme and the academic team work with clinical educators to ensure a wide range of experiences are gained.

We are extremely proud of our graduates and believe that they are a major factor in our continuing popularity; they really are a positive advert for what we seek to achieve. It is worth noting that they tend not to have difficulty obtaining employment, despite the recent graduate employment issues, and are much sought after by potential employers. Finally, I hope that you will consider visiting us at the Division and applying to study physiotherapy at Nottingham. Grahame Pope Head of Division

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Why The University of Nottingham?

Portland Building, University Park Campus

Nottingham Castle

Students choose Nottingham for a whole host of reasons. If it’s academic excellence you’re looking for then Nottingham is the place for you. Renowned internationally for top-class teaching and ground-breaking research, Nottingham is respected worldwide and offers fantastic facilities to ensure you make a success of your studies.
In independent teaching assessments, 39 of our subjects have been rated excellent (with scores of at least 22 out of 24), and our scores in the latest Research Assessment Exercise put Nottingham amongst the top universities in the UK for carrying out research of international importance.

As a result, we offer a range of study-abroad opportunities. Every Nottingham undergraduate, no matter what course they choose, has the opportunity to apply to travel abroad during their time at Nottingham (see page 24). We also have one of the most active Students’ Unions in the UK, offering over 150 clubs and societies where you can gain new skills, meet new people and even learn a new language. For a great social life and an exciting city, Nottingham fits the bill again. Our campuses are buzzing with life, with organised events, trips and parties taking place throughout the year. Our Students’ Union is one of the most active in the UK with over 150 societies on offer, and for sports fans, our Athletics Union hosts over 75 clubs. Nottingham itself is a thriving cosmopolitan city, rich with history and culture, and packed full of bars, restaurants and nightclubs for you to enjoy. With theatres, cinemas, comedy clubs and a diverse mix of music venues, there is always plenty to keep you entertained. To help you settle in, we guarantee all undergraduates a place in University-arranged accommodation so your move will be simple and stress-free. Your room will be on campus and you’ll be able to meet new people, make new friends and enjoy university life. So why not make your next step Nottingham?

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“I like the open space of a campus setting. Nottingham is perfectly located for me – far enough away but not too far!
Physiotherapy student

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

If you’re more interested in great career prospects, then we can help with that too. Nottingham is one of the top three UK universities most often targeted by Britain’s leading graduate employers and the employment record of our graduates is one of the best in the country. We have strong and established links with businesses across the UK and offer short courses to ensure you develop vital transferable skills. For entrepreneurial students, we provide business start-up training to help you gain the skills you need to set up your own business after graduation. We also encourage all students to build a broad range of skills that will appeal to employers. Nottingham is a global institution with around 30,000 students from over 140 countries, and more than 270 partner universities in 35 countries around the world.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

What is physiotherapy?

“The lecturers’ energy and enthusiasm is amazing. You can’t help but be caught up in it. Instantly you understand why Nottingham has such a reputation…. they simply inspire you to excel.”
Physiotherapy student

Why physiotherapy at Nottingham?

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The Division of Physiotherapy Education is committed to excellence in both teaching and research, and aims to promote an environment where students can flourish personally, academically and professionally, with the ultimate goal of becoming practising physiotherapists.
Throughout the course, students work on the development of strong personal and interpersonal skills that are vital to any person seeking to work in a public-facing environment. They are encouraged, through a variety of supportive learning experiences, to manage their own learning within both the academic and clinical fields, and they learn to evaluate current beliefs and practice, and synthesise the results in order to formulate and apply the best possible programme of physiotherapy suited to the needs of the individual patient. In order to achieve our aims, we promote a challenging yet supportive and informal atmosphere within the Division, where students are actively encouraged to seek help from each other and the staff. Particular strengths of the course include the breadth of clinical experiences available and the element of choice evident throughout year three of the course. The support and encouragement we are able to offer as a small Division helped over 87 per cent of our graduates in 2007 to obtain either a first class or upper second class honours degree.

Quality assurance Student feedback forms an important part of our quality assurance programme and so we regularly ask students, through a variety of pathways, for their views on all aspects of the course. We evaluate the responses and act on them as appropriate before closing the loop by feeding back to the students. Professional recognition The Physiotherapy degree at Nottingham is approved by both the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) and the Health Professions Council (HPC). Graduates are eligible to apply for both membership of the CSP and registration with the HPC. Course location The Division of Physiotherapy Education is situated in the Clinical Sciences Building (CSB) on the Nottingham City Hospital Campus. This is approximately four miles away from the main University campus. The CSB is a purpose-built structure which was opened in 1998. It contains a 200 seat state-of-the-art lecture theatre, three large lecture rooms, several smaller tutorial rooms, two large practical rooms and a fully-equipped computer suite containing 29 fully networked personal computers which are available for use 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Full library facilities are available to all students across the University and City Hospital campuses. First year students have a choice of accommodation on the University Park Campus, the Jubilee Campus or the City Hospital Campus.

06 Physiotherapy is one of the healthcare professions. It aims to optimise movement potential in any presenting case using physical, as opposed to pharmacological, methods. Not only do physiotherapists treat physically, they are also concerned with health promotion and illness prevention and consider the psychological and social wellbeing of the individual.
Physiotherapy is a science-based profession in which practitioners aim to continually evaluate their practice and add to the current body of knowledge in order to provide the best possible care for the individual patient. Physiotherapists treat an incredibly diverse range of patients. Within a hospital setting they may work in orthopaedics, neurology, health care of the elderly, respiratory, out-patients, maternity, paediatrics, mental health, women’s health, palliative care, primary care, or burns and plastics, just to name the most common areas. Some physiotherapists choose to work in the private sector or alternative settings such as charities, industry, special needs, sports, health education, research, academia, management, or the armed forces, or with non-human clients in equine or veterinary practices. This wide variety makes physiotherapy an exciting profession in which there are always new challenges and possibilities for career development.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Teaching, learning and assessment

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Ethos of study The Division of Physiotherapy Education is committed to student support. This not only includes pastoral care, through the tutor group system, but extends out into our philosophy of teaching and learning, where we believe in utilising a wide variety of teaching methods in order to deliver the subject in the most appropriate way. Student support With an intake of only 54 students, we can foster an informal, friendly and open environment that is beneficial to both staff and students. On arrival, you will be allocated a personal tutor who will work with you for the whole of your degree programme. They will arrange regular meetings where you will have the opportunity to discuss your academic progress, including assessment feedback, or seek confidential support and advice on any other matters of concern. Where appropriate, your tutor will also be able to help you find support from outside agencies. One outcome of these meetings is the Personal Academic Record (PAR) which not only provides a complete record of your progress throughout your degree but also encourages reflection and self-evaluation, and can contribute to the development of a CV and planning for your future career. In addition to their personal tutor, all students are encouraged to seek tutorial help from lecturers as and when the need arises.

Teaching and learning Years one and two of the course are taught in a similar fashion. Each week starts with lead lectures to the whole group, which will introduce new topics. However, the second half of the week sees the students working in smaller groups for tutorials, practical sessions or small group teaching sessions to reinforce what has already been covered. Here students will look at the material in greater depth, explore related issues, enhance understanding and apply practice to the theory. Assessment of the degree Each module within the course is assessed and must be passed in order for the student to progress to the next year, or graduate. Our philosophy on assessment recognises that students benefit from a wide range of different methods, and that traditional written exams may not be the most effective way of assessing the wide range of modules contained within the course. We consider each module separately in order to select the most fair and appropriate method of evaluation for the material. Assessments are therefore varied to include essays, coursework, multiple choice questions, viva voce examinations, anatomy pro-section assessments, verbal and poster presentations, laboratory reports and assessment of practical skills.

“The course is really well structured and the lecturers are so supportive in making sure we achieve our potential. The teaching is so varied, and takes place not just in a lecture setting, but through tutorials, practicals, and placements in local hospitals. Everyone is so friendly and helpful, and I've made so many fantastic friends. I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to study here.”
Physiotherapy student

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Course structure

“The constant support provided by personable and approachable tutors, who are dedicated to helping each student succeed, makes the challenge of the physio course an enjoyable one.”
Physiotherapy student

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Year one: qualifying year The marks gained in the qualifying year do not count towards the overall degree classification; the year provides the fundamental basis of the academic concepts and practical skills required for professional practice. Year two This year is divided between academic study, where students are introduced to a variety of pathological conditions and their physiotherapeutic management, and four fourweek blocks of supervised clinical experience. Year three We pride ourselves on the flexible approach to education which we are able to offer in year three. In addition to the compulsory year-long modules, students may choose two optional modules in each semester (see year three modules, page 11 for a list of those currently on offer). This enables them to dictate a course of study based on their own interests and preferences. Please note that these modules may change slightly from year to year as new options are added. As with year two, time is divided between academic study and clinical practice.

Year one modules Neuro-musculoskeletal Studies Studies the anatomical structure of the body and its role in the production and control of normal movement. Also introduces the basic manual therapy skills and the tools to measure normal movement. Patho-physiology Considers normal physiology and how this may be affected by the basic pathological processes of inflammation and tissue repair. Pain theory is also introduced. Musculo-skeletal Disorders and Disease Introduces commonly encountered conditions affecting the musculo-skeletal system and their therapeutic management. Includes soft tissue injuries, fractures and the arthritides. Evidence Based Practice (research) Reviews basic research methods and considers the importance of research relative to the practice of physiotherapy. Personal and Professional Development Introduces a three-year theme that develops personal study and communication skills. Discusses the effects of disease on the individual and their carers, and starts to develop a familiarity with the concept of health and social care. Introduces reflective writing skills and the development of a personal portfolio.

Year two modules Therapeutic Studies Continues the development of manual therapeutic skills and introduces the study of both electrotherapy and hydrotherapy. Respiratory & Cardio-vascular Disorders and Disease (Semester 3 only) Involves a mixture of theoretical and practical sessions to enable students to identify patient problems and select appropriate management strategies for people with cardio-respiratory disease. Neurology and Health Care of the Elderly (Semester 4 only) Introduces the pathology, progression and effects of neurological diseases on patients and carers and discusses the rehabilitation strategies, based on research evidence. Additionally, it investigates the effects of the natural ageing process on the physical and psycho-social wellbeing of patients. Teaching methods include evidence-based paper reviews, videos and patient scenarios as well as more traditional methods. Research Methods and Planning Introduces statistics and the start of the student’s own project with the submission of a research proposal. Personal and Professional Development Discusses issues around team leadership and management skills. Stress-management and counselling are introduced.

Year three modules Optional modules (Semester 5): Clinical Reasoning; Exercise Science and Health; Management of Pain; Physiotherapy in Mental Health; Physical Activity and Health; Rheumatology; Spinal Rehabilitation; Women’s Health. Optional modules (Semester 6): Acupuncture for Pain Relief; Analysis of Human Movement; Burns and Plastic Surgery; Cardiorespiratory Rehabilitation; Neuro-rehabilitation; Paediatric Care; Sports Medicine and Sports Injuries. Research Every student undertakes a research project in their third year. This can be a lab-based investigation, a survey, a clinical investigation, an educational development or a literature review. Students have a choice of topics and are allocated a staff supervisor to guide them through the process. The project allows students to demonstrate their abilities to conduct a substantial piece of work and to manage and organise their time appropriately. We encourage students to take this work forward post-graduation and present at conferences or be published. Personal and Professional Development In order to prepare the students for their first position as a qualified physiotherapist, this module focuses on the development of transferable skills for the modern healthcare service and discusses current developments within the field of health and social care. It also looks in detail at the construction of curriculum vitaes, personal statements, application forms and interview skills and considers different working patterns and goalplanning for a future career in physiotherapy.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Student Profile
Will Collett
Course and year of study: Physiotherapy (Second year) Age: 20 Will is also President of the Physiotherapy Society

The Clinical Programme In order to comply with the requirements of the Health Professions Council, each student must undertake a minimum of 1000 hours supervised clinical experience. At Nottingham, this is divided into eight four-week placements plus a threeweek ‘elective placement’ at the very end of the course. Each week comprises 32.5 hours and whilst there are no weekend or night shifts, the times for each placement may vary slightly. All core clinical placements are arranged for students by our team of Clinical Link Tutors and take place in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire and Derbyshire. Because placements are split over four counties, we do our best to arrange them so that no individual does more than their fair share of travelling or living out. The Clinical Link Team also arranges accommodation for students whose placement is outside a 24-mile radius of the Division. We aim to give students no more than one “live-out” placement per year and, providing the student is eligible for a bursary, the cost of one set of accommodation will be met by the NHS.

In year two, students undertake two placements per semester in the core specialities of orthopaedics, basic outpatients, primary care and integrated medicine. Year three has three specified placements in advanced outpatients, neurology and respiratory medicine. For the fourth placement, students are able to choose from a variety of options depending on their individual interests. Current options available include mental health, adult learning disabilities, women’s health, burns and plastic surgery, rheumatology, oncology, RAF rehabilitation and paediatrics. There is also a three-week elective which forms the ninth and final clinical placement of the course, and takes place at the end of year three. It is organised by the students themselves and can be in any specialisation in any country in the world with the sole proviso that the student finds a supervisor who is eligible for registration with the Health Professions Council. For the duration of each placement, students are allocated to a senior physiotherapist who will guide and support them, aiming to provide the best learning environment possible. The assessment process is continual and is undertaken by the supervising clinician in conjunction with an academic tutor, who visits each student twice during the four weeks.

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“At school, they would often give us those tests designed to identify your ideal career and my results always pointed back to medicine or something related. As I love biology and sports, physiotherapy seemed to fit the bill, although I now know that there is a lot more to physiotherapy than just treating sports injuries! I arranged some work experience and loved it, so I then looked for suitable courses. Physiotherapy at The University of Nottingham is taught in a dedicated building at the City Hospital, a short bus ride from the main University campus. The facilities are cutting-edge – we have access to electro-therapy equipment, such as ultrasound and TENS, and respiratory dolls, for example, which replicate different breathing patterns. The first year is very much about laying the groundwork, but I am now on the first of four, four-week placements which will take place during my second year. These placements can be anywhere within the Trent region and can encompass orthopaedics, integrated medicine, primary care and outpatients. In my final year, I can choose an elective placement in whatever field interests me most. As a physiotherapy student, I do work long hours, but these hours reflect what you can expect in practice. However, being based at the City Hospital means that everyone on the course pulls together across the years, so you never feel isolated. Don’t get me wrong, there are still lots of social opportunities too. I lived in self-catered accommodation in my first year and really loved the independence this gave me, as well as living in a student community. I play a lot of sport and belong to the Real Ale Society, Cocktail Society and the Physio Society. When I come to the campus, there’s always something going on.” Top tip: “Think about what type of accommodation would suit you most in your first year. Self-catering was great for me but, for other people, halls are preferable. There’s no right or wrong answer.”

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Applying for a place

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Admissions information All applications must be made through UCAS. They can be made either electronically over the web at www.ucas.com or by contacting UCAS at the following address or telephone number: UCAS, (B160) UCAS Enquiries UCAS, PO Box 28 Cheltenham GL52 3LZ t: +44 (0) 870 1122211 It is the stated policy of UCAS that late applications (received after the mid-January deadline) are considered at the discretion of the individual institutions. Due to the popularity of the course at Nottingham we do not normally consider late applications. Academic requirements Whilst the majority of applicants to Nottingham offer traditional qualifications we are also happy to consider non-traditional qualifications on an individual basis; these must however be taken in relevant subjects and passed at an equivalent standard. For individual advice, please contact the Admissions Secretary, eileen.evans@nottingham.ac.uk. The minimum academic requirements for each of the most common applicant profiles are listed here.

School leavers For the purposes of admission to this course a ‘school leaver’ is defined as a student who will be under 21 years of age on the date of commencement of the course. GCSEs: This profile is required from all school leavers: • minimum of six subjects at A or B grades to include maths, English language and either biology or integrated/combined sciences In addition to our standard GCSE requirements, school leavers would generally be expected to present with one of the following qualifications: • AS & A2 levels • BTEC National or Higher National Diploma • Advanced Vocational Certificate in Education. AS levels: • we require a minimum of three subjects at AS level (although four is the norm), with three of these continuing on to A2 level • the grades achieved at AS level will assume significance if an applicant has only taken three, or narrowly fails to achieve the ABB offer at A2 level in one of the academic subjects (excepting the biological science/physical education) • if a school does not offer the breadth of provision that enables a student to follow more than three subjects at AS level, this should be stated in the school reference.

A2 levels: • ABB in three A2 levels, one of which must be in biology or physical education, or an acceptable biological science, i.e. human biology or social biology • general studies is not accepted. Alternative qualifications: • BTEC Higher National Diploma: – 16 units, majority in biology and the life sciences – merit>distinction profile (MMD). • BTEC National Diploma: – 18 units, majority in biology and the life sciences – distinction>merit profile (DDM). • Advanced Vocational Certificate in Education: – Double Award, 12 units – AB or BB grade profile – science or healthcare related options – plus one A2 level, or two AS levels at A or B grades. Please note: the grade achieved with the AVCE plus the A2 must equate to ABB in any combination.

• Irish Leaving Certificate: – six Leaving Certificate papers at Higher Level, taken at one sitting – minimum of two grade As and four Bs, (over 440 points) – to include maths, English and a biological science. • Scottish Highers: – five Highers – two A and three B grades (24 points) – three, preferably four, to be taken at one sitting – to include two sciences, maths and English – Advanced Highers are also considered. • International Baccalaureate: – 32 points, with 6 in biology – minimum of three subjects at Higher level, including biology. • European Baccalaureate: – 75 per cent Diploma score, including biology at a high grade.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

• French Baccalaureate: – average mark of 14 (bien), with 15 or above in biology.

“Physiotherapy is a friendly course with about 50 students in my year, all of whom I know well.”
Physiotherapy student

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Mature applicants Mature applicants are welcomed and form approximately 25-33 per cent of each cohort. Academic requirements are as follows – • Previous degree: – 2:1 in a relevant subject within the last three years (if in a non-relevant subject, or outside the three-year limit, contact the Division of Physiotherapy Education for advice) – applicants are required to take a year out between completion of one degree and commencement of another. Some use this to gain further experience of physiotherapy by working as a physiotherapy assistant. This not only confirms their choice, but also strengthens their application by proving that they are familiar with the requirements and demands of the profession. Others choose to seek paid employment elsewhere, or travel for a year. Obviously a combination of all three is also possible. • Other previous academic suitability: – mature students who have not studied for three or more years but who would otherwise have been considered academically suitable must show evidence of recent academic study, usually in the form of one A2 level or two AS levels. These should be a biological science or physical education, unless previously achieved in which case we recommend sociology or psychology.

• No previous academic suitability: Applicants who have no relevant academic qualifications, or failed to achieve the required grades are expected to present with a GCSE grade B in maths and English language or its equivalent, plus one of the following: – AS/A2 levels: two academic A2 levels or three AS levels (to include a biological science or physical education) at B grades – BTEC Higher National and National Diplomas: as for school leavers (see page 15) – Access courses (QAA approved only): science or health based majority of credits in biology & life science subjects minimum of 72 credits with at least 48 passed at level 3 (or 24 and 16 if not OCN) if you are unable to take 72 (24) credits please contact the Division for advice – Open University qualifications: 60 points at Level 2, accrued within one year at Pass Grade 2 the following modules are recommended: S204: Biology: Uniformity & Diversity (60 points) or SK277: Human Biology (30 points) plus SD226: Biological Psychology: Exploring the Brain (30 points).

Deferred applications We welcome applications from students wishing to take a gap year and encourage them to use the year creatively. Gap year students form approximately 10-15 per cent of our annual intake. Overseas applicants All places on the course are NHS funded, apportioned to us by the Trent Multi-Professional Workforce Deanery. We are therefore unable to consider students who would not be eligible for an NHS funded place. This ruling affects non-EU students. Applicants should confirm their eligibility using the Department of Health website: www.nhspa.gov.uk/sgu/eligiblecourses Channel Island and Isle of Man students are eligible to apply and can be offered commissioned places (i.e. treated as home students) providing that they can supply a copy of their award letter from the Channel Island or Isle of Man governments. Physiotherapy students need to be fluent in the English language in order to both understand and complete the course and to communicate effectively with patients and members of the multidisciplinary team. For students whose first language is not English we require a TOEFL score of 600 or IELTS score of 7 with no lower than a 6 in any element. Please note that a pass at GCSE English language with a B or above will normally be regarded as meeting this requirement.

If you need further advice on the level of your English language, the Centre for English Language Education – which is located on the main University campus – is there to assist. They can be reached via any of the following: Centre for English Language Education Highfield House The University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD t: +44 (0) 115 951 4405 f: +44 (0) 115 951 4992 e: cele-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Non-academic requirements

“I visited Nottingham University on an open day and thought the facilities were amazing.”
Physiotherapy student

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Non-academic requirements – work experience A BSc (Hons) in Physiotherapy is a vocational degree. Consequently applicants need to be enthusiastic about the profession and sure in their own minds that they really want to be a physiotherapist, in whatever field. In order for you to be able to make an informed decision, we require that you undertake as much physiotherapy work experience as possible. Since a student’s clinical education is conducted primarily within the NHS hospital and community setting, it is important that you gain experience in these settings prior to applying. Experience in other areas, such as special schools, private practice, sports clinics, and centres for the elderly will all strengthen your application. Your experience should give you a feel for the breadth, depth and requirements of the profession and for the personal qualities and characteristics that are necessary in a physiotherapist. At interview, you will be questioned on what you have seen in order for us to evaluate whether or not you are applying with an understanding of, and commitment to, the profession. To be able to discuss this fluently, you will need enough work experience to make you positive, in your own mind, that you have made the right career choice.

We understand that it may be difficult to gain work experience since, due to the popularity of the degree, many hospitals are swamped by requests. In recognising this we recommend that you write to a large number of both NHS and private hospitals in your region, considering the smaller general hospitals as well as the large teaching hospitals. We prefer a candidate to spend two or three days in a variety of different areas than spend a week in the same one. It is important to note that without work experience it is likely that your application will be rejected automatically at the initial stages. Criminal offences and other related matters Owing to the particular nature of this course, the University uses the services of the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) to assess the suitability of applicants to work with a vulnerable population. This is common practice in healthcare professions, and the University undertakes not to discriminate unfairly against any subject of a disclosure on the basis of a criminal conviction or information revealed. Candidates should be aware that the disclosure will list all convictions and cautions received. Certain offences may lead to the candidate being refused entry onto the course, or subsequently being asked to withdraw. On completion of the course, graduates are required to provide another CRB check as part of the State Registration processes. Disclosure information will be handled and disposed of securely in compliance with the CRB Code of Practice, the Data Protection Act and other relevant legislation.

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Students with disabilities or health concerns Disabilities and health concerns do not necessarily form a bar to entry onto the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy. In line with the Special Educational Needs & Disability Act (2001) we treat all students fairly, offering ongoing support and making reasonable adjustments where necessary. However the Division of Physiotherapy Education has a responsibility to ensure that all students admitted to the course will be able to meet the Standards of Proficiency set out by the Health Professions Council (HPC) and therefore be eligible for registration by both the Chartered Society and the HPC on graduation. It is expected that any condition, past or present, will be controlled and stable and, as such, will not impair the student’s ability to complete the course, or care for patients. Any applicant who is offered a place on the course is required to complete a medical questionnaire. This is then forwarded to the Occupational Health Department who may choose to offer the applicant a full medical examination. It is therefore important to note that all offers of a place on the course are conditional on the student obtaining a clear bill of health from our Occupational Health Department.

In line with UCAS guidelines, disability or health concerns can be disclosed on the UCAS form and/or in a letter addressed directly to the Admissions Tutor. This includes, amongst others, conditions such as hearing or visual deficits, dyslexia, diabetes, epilepsy, depression or eating disorders. All of the information disclosed is treated as completely confidential. Accepting someone who is unlikely to fulfil the rigorous demands of professional fitness to practise would not be in the interests of the student and would be contrary to the Division’s overriding duty of care to the public. For that reason, students with disabilities should seek advice from the Admissions Tutor well before the deadline for UCAS submissions so that each case can be given individual consideration.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

The admissions process

“I went to Nottingham University twice over for two different degrees and can say with conviction that it is probably the best university in the world. My second degree was in physiotherapy. The placements were excellent, with most of them being near to Nottingham, and the teaching prepared me well for my first junior physio job. It’s a forward-thinking department with friendly and approachable staff.”

Senior II Physiotherapist, graduated 2000

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We have a transparent selection process through which we aim to select the highest calibre of applicant in order to make offers. This selection process is free from discrimination of any kind and is outlined below.
Selection for interview We receive in excess of 1000 applications per year for 54 places. In 2006/7 we interviewed approximately 200 people. We select for interview using the following procedure: 1. Initial reading of the UCAS forms is undertaken, against strict selection criteria, by the Central Admissions Office.

5. Due to the extremely high demand for places, we run a system of ‘cancellation interviews’ whereby those candidates with excellent forms who did not receive an interview initially may be offered an interview slot vacated by someone who has withdrawn their application. Cancellation interviews are offered on the understanding that they may be at short notice. Completing a UCAS form An excellent UCAS form includes: • a strong academic profile with either traditional or non-traditional qualifications on offer • a highly supportive reference (normally an academic reference) • a personal statement which tells us all about the applicant. The personal statement is paramount in deciding who will be chosen to go forward for interview. We read the statement to see if the applicant knows what the profession involves, not just in terms of actual work, but also in terms of the traits and characteristics that they believe are necessary in a physiotherapist. We look to see if the applicant demonstrates, through everything they have done, that they have those traits and characteristics, and could go on to complete the course and become a credit to the profession.

Interviews It is currently our policy to interview for all places. The interviews are relatively informal with no written or practical tests and are scheduled to take place in December, January and February. Each candidate has two 20 minute interviews with two separate members of staff. The interview process is designed to assess: • insight into physiotherapy via work experience, courses, reading etc. • motivation • ability to communicate, to discuss and form opinions • personal attitudes and attributes • non-verbal communication skills Following the two interviews, the interviewers meet to discuss each candidate. Their comments are forwarded to the Admissions Tutor who makes offers to those students who scored highest overall at interview. Re-applications If you apply one year and are not invited for interview you can apply again for another year. You will need to submit your application through UCAS in the usual way. It is our practice not to reconsider candidates who have previously been rejected post interview.

Timescale of the admissions process UCAS forms arrive at the Division continually between September and January. Students who do not meet our academic requirements, who have no work experience, or whose personal statements do not suggest an in-depth knowledge of, and wish to join, the profession (see previous information and advice), are rejected as quickly as possible to enable them to consider other courses. Forms that we consider to be very good take longer to process since they are continually compared against each other in order to select the best. This means that although you may submit your form in September, you may not hear from us with regard to an interview date until December or January. We accept this delay as inevitable if we are to be fair and equitable to all students who have applied within the UCAS deadline, and as a consequence do not fill our final interview slots until we have received the last non-late application. If you will be unavailable for interview at any point during December, January or February, please write or email and let us know since, whilst we will do our best, it is not always possible to reschedule an interview. Offers of a place are all sent out during the last week in February or the first week in March.

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2. Applicants are rejected in the first instance because they do not fulfil our academic requirements or they lack work experience. 3. The remaining applicants are considered to have acceptable forms. These forms are divided into ‘good’ and ‘excellent’ and the ‘good’ ones are then, unfortunately, rejected. In 2006/7 we had more than 350 excellent forms. 4. Each of the ’excellent’ forms are read and re-read by the Admissions Tutor in order to select the 200 applicants who, it is felt, have the very best overall forms. Inherent time and resource restraints mean that it is impossible for us to interview all applicants and consequently, unfortunate though it is, we reject some exceptional candidates.

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Money matters

“I did a lot of research into the available degrees, and physiotherapy at Nottingham was the best.”
Physiotherapy student

Course fees All places on the course are NHS funded and therefore the decision to charge students £3,150 per year of study top-up fees does not currently apply to the Division of Physiotherapy Education. If however you are unsure as to whether you are eligible to have your course fees paid please read the Department of Health’s ‘Financial Help for Healthcare Students’. This can be downloaded at www.nhspa.gov.uk/sgu/forms/booklets/ students_financial_help.pdf or by contacting The Department of Health: t: +44 (0) 8701 555455 f: +44 (0) 1623 724524 e: doh@prolog.uk.com w: www.nhspa.gov.uk

NHS bursaries for NHS funded courses Students on NHS funded courses may be entitled to a bursary (this being defined as an award to cover your day-to-day living costs whilst you are studying). To find out if you are eligible, read the Department of Health’s ‘Financial Help for Healthcare Students’ (see left for details). In addition to the standard bursary, extra allowances are available for other situations, involving such variables as dependants, single parents and disabled students. Students who are entitled to a bursary will be able to claim back some or all of their accommodation costs whilst on clinical placement (dependant on the amount of the award) so that they do not incur a double rent. Student loans In order to apply for a student loan to cover living costs (you do not need one to cover course fees since these do not currently apply to physiotherapy students) you need to contact the Department for Education & Skills (DfES). To check your eligibility for a loan (including EU & overseas) look on the DfES website: www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsupport or contact +44 (0) 1325 392822. Loans are administered by the Student Loans Company, whose website is www.slc.co.uk.

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You can also contact the Student Grants Unit on 08453 586655 (student helpline), or at the following address: NHS Student Grants Unit, NHS Pensions Agency, 200 – 220 Broadway, Fleetwood, Lancashire, FY7 8SS.

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Course costs Candidates should be aware that certain items or requirements of the course will lead to additional expense/costs. The following are examples of these additional costs. Uniform: clinical uniforms are required for both clinical exams and placements. The cost of two clinical uniforms can be claimed back when registered on the course. Practical classes require the student to be dressed appropriately. The Division of Physiotherapy Education has a supplier who provides a range of clothing for these purposes which can be ordered prior to starting the course, and which will arrive during Freshers’ Week. Skeleton: we loan a half skeleton to each first year student for a hire fee of £30. Books: we do not have a compulsory book list, and the core texts can be found in both the City Hospital and University libraries; however students often choose to purchase copies of their particular favourites. Photocopying/inter-library loans/printing: during the course, students will incur some costs associated with these items. The Division aims to keep these to a minimum.

www.nottingham.ac.uk/chs

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Frequently asked questions

Trent Building, University Park Campus

www.nottingham.ac.uk/chs

Where will I be based and where will I live? Physiotherapy students are based at the Nottingham City Hospital, four miles from University Park Campus, and have the option to live on the City Hospital Campus, University Park Campus or the Jubilee Campus. We guarantee all first year students a place in University-arranged accommodation for at least one year*. Can I study abroad? All undergraduate students at The University of Nottingham have the opportunity to study or work abroad during their time here. However, as physiotherapy students are funded by the NHS these opportunities are limited. You will have the chance to organise a three-week physiotherapy placement overseas to be undertaken at the end of your third year, but this must be self-funded and arranged by you. We can offer you advice and contacts from past placements but the emphasis will be on you to organise your trip. What sports facilities are there? The University has excellent facilities for badminton, cricket, football, hockey, rugby, snooker, squash, swimming, tennis and volleyball. The sports centre on University Park Campus is one of the largest in the university sector, and includes 12 indoor sports courts, seven squash courts, and a climbing wall. There is a 25m eight lane swimming pool, a floodlit astroturf pitch, three tennis courts, and a modern two-storey fitness centre. The Athletics Union hosts over 75 sports clubs so you can get involved in a wide range of sporting activities.
*Students must firmly accept their course place and apply for accommodation by 1 August 2008 to be eligible.

What other opportunities are there outside of my course? Our Students’ Union is one of the most active in the UK and hosts over 150 clubs and societies, from the Art Society to the Yoga Society. The Physio Society runs socials, sporting events, organises balls, and provides welfare support for physiotherapy students. The Students’ Union also runs its own magazine, along with an award-winning radio station and student TV station where there are opportunities for writing, presenting and producing. The New Theatre is a student-run theatre group that puts on around 20 productions a year, some of which travel to the Edinburgh Festival. What career opportunities are there for physiotherapy graduates? In the UK most physiotherapists work within the wide range of specialities offered by the NHS. There are physiotherapists in virtually every area including burns and plastics, health care of the elderly, maternity, mental health, neurology, orthopaedics, out-patients, paediatrics, respiratory, and women’s health. However, there are many other settings including research or academia, patients’ homes, charitable organisations, industry, special schools, sports centres, the armed forces, social services and veterinary practices.

“Physiotherapy is very hands-on – there’s a lot of interacting with people.”
Physiotherapy student

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

Division of Physiotherapy Education

Visiting us

Contacting us

Divisional open days In addition to the general University open days, the Division of Physiotherapy Education holds its own open days. These start with a lecture in the Clinical Sciences Building at 1.30pm (given by the Admissions Tutor) on choosing your university, completing a UCAS form, the physiotherapy degree course at Nottingham and a brief history of the profession. Following the lecture you will have the chance to ask general questions about the Division and the course, and individual questions with regard to your specific application. You will also have the opportunity to meet current staff and students, and look around the Clinical Sciences Building where all of the physiotherapy lectures take place.

www.nottingham.ac.uk/chs

If you are interested in attending one of our open days, please contact the enquiry line on +44 (0) 115 951 5559 or email undergraduateenquiries@nottingham.ac.uk How to find us The Division of Physiotherapy Education is situated within the Clinical Sciences Building at the Nottingham City Hospital (NCH). This is approximately four miles from the main University campus. Full directions to NCH can be obtained from their website at www.nuh.nhs.uk/patientsvisitors/transport/directions-car.htm

For further information please contact: Admissions Secretary Division of Physiotherapy Education Clinical Sciences Building Hucknall Road Nottingham NG5 1PB UK t: +44 (0) 115 823 1783 f: +44 (0) 115 823 1791 e: eileen.evans@nottingham.ac.uk w: www.nottingham.ac.uk/chs

For international student enquiries, please contact: The International Office t: +44 (0) 115 951 5247 f: +44 (0) 115 951 5155 e: international-office@nottingham.ac.uk w: www.nottingham.ac.uk/international

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Division of Physiotherapy Education

We hope that this brochure has answered any questions you may have had about studying physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. If however you have any further queries please contact the Admissions Secretary. This document is available in large print on request. If you require an alternative format, please discuss your needs with our Disability Liaison Officer who can be contacted through the Admissions Secretary.

Nottingham City Hospital NHS Trust Campus

For general undergraduate enquiries contact: The Enquiry Centre Marketing and Communications King’s Meadow Campus Lenton Lane Nottingham NG7 2NR UK t: +44 (0) 115 951 5559 f: +44 (0) 115 846 8062 e: undergraduate-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk w: www.nottingham.ac.uk