FOG HORN

Columbia River Knife and Tool Kangee T-Hawk.
By: Sal Palma

2013
Twobirds Flying Publication

Evidence of the axe exists as far back as the Paleolithic era, which began over 2.6 million years ago. No other tool has served more functions in human history than the axe. In times of peace, the axe built communities and fed them; transitioning to a devastating and dreaded weapon in times of war. The axe has done it all.

Time and advances in technology have made the axe less ubiquitous; hence, their use in military circles has also declined over the years. Yet the axe remains as functional and appropriate as ever. That paradigm certainly holds true for members of our armed forces serving in Afghanistan and those who have served in Iraq.

Copyright 2013, Towbirds Flying Publication. All Rights Reserved.

Columbia River Knife and Tool Kangee T-Hawk.
One notable designer, Ryan M. Johnson, founder of RMJ Tactical, is known worldwide for his Tactical Tomahawk’s. Late in 2012, Ryan collaborated with Columbia River Knife and Tool to bring outdoor enthusiasts and servicemen and women the Kangee T-Hawk. CRKT’s Kangee T-Hawk takes the tactical tomahawk to the next level of performance. The T-Hawk is constructed from SK5 carbon steel. There’s been an abundance of discussion on the suitability of SK5 steel, which is unwarranted. SK5 is excellent Japanese steel comprised of 0.8 – 0.9 % Carbon, .15 - .35% Silicone, 0.15-0.50% Manganese, ≤0.03% Phosphorous and ≤0.03% Sulfur. SK5 is formulated as a carbon tool steel. It is not quite as hard as D2 but sharpens more easily. The THawk’s cheek is approximately 0.25 inches thick resulting in a Rockwell harness of 54-55. It’s also a full tang design extending the full length of the axe, which is 13.75 inches.

2013

One side of the head terminates in a flat ground plain edge blade. On the opposite end, Ryan Johnson dispensed with the tobacco bowl, found in tomahawks used by the American Indians, opting for a very serious spike. Unlike the more traditional tomahawk designs, the T-Hawk sports two additional edged surfaces. One extends from the toe all the way back to the spike; the other is at the beard. This unique concept is characteristic of RMJ’s Tactical Tomahawks, serving as a can opener In practical application.

So, where and how would you use the additional edges? Let’s say you had to cut open a 55 gallon steel drum. You puncture the top or sides using the blade or spike then use the toe or beard edges to slice through the steel. The feature is particularly useful in rescue efforts where you may have to cut through a vehicle or a helicopter’s fuselage.

Copyright 2013, Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved

Columbia River Knife and Tool Kangee T-Hawk.
Other applications include breaking through a wall to create a spider hole for a sniper’s hide or severing conduit to isolate a structure.

2013

serious impact tool and it’s unlikely that a cranial or trunk impact is survivable. The most important part of this review for me is the handle and scales design. I’m sure that I’ll end up offending someone with this comment, so be it. Folks, all of the edges, steels and blade profiles in the world, when combined with a poorly designed handle, will not yield excellence. In an impact tool, like the T-Hawk, the handle is your user interface. It is what provides control, isolates you from impact and provides a secure gripping surface. Handle design is key to the overall equation; I can say the Kangee T-Hawk has one of the best handles on the market. Everything: belly, throat, grip and knob, all extremely well thought-out and functional. Traditional tomahawk designs will generally use a linear handle. Although functional it does not correspond to the arm and wrist’s circular function; the T-Hawk’s recurve, on the leading edge of the handle, makes swinging this tomahawk a joy. The user achieves proper alignment of hand, wrist, arm and blade to increase efficiency The handle material, Glass Filled Nylon; EDM Finish, contributes greatly to shock isolation and control; although, I have to admit that I’m a sucker for Linen Micarta. Whether breaking glass, front doors, vehicles, heads or just getting out of a predicament, CRKT’s Kangee T-Hawk is up to the task. My hat is off to Ryan Johnson and CRKT for a superb tactical tool that is extremely rugged and eminently functional. At an M.S.R.P of $185, act fast because they seem to be flying off the shelves. -SP
Copyright 2013, Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved

These are applications that would destroy a combat knife but nevertheless are essential tactical applications and ideally suited to the Kangee T-Hawk’s talents.

I was never much on the idea of batoning a finely honed combat knife for firewood nor attaching it to a stick to use as a harpoon on something that I’d have to chase down to get my knife and stick back; so, you probably won’t see me throwing a Tomahawk either. However, rest assured that the Kangee T-Hawk is one

Columbia River Knife and Tool Kangee T-Hawk.
Manufacturer Specifications              Dimensions Open Overall Length 13.75 inches Weight 1 lb. 8.4 ounces Blade Length 2.93 inches Thickness 0.23 inches Material SK5 Carbon Steel Blade-HRC 54-55 Finish Black Powder Coat Grind Flat Style Axe Edge Front with Spike Edge Plain Handle Material Glass Filled Nylon; EDM Finish Carry System Black Kydex Sheath with Molle Clip Platform Weight 3.6 ounces

2013

Copyright 2013, Twobirds Flying Publication, All Rights Reserved

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