You are on page 1of 192

Township of Brick, Master Plan Introduction

Introduction
Brick Townships Master Plan is not only a road map for its future but a reflection of its past. Since 1955, when the Garden State Parkway made Brick a convenient commute to and from points north, Bricks population has grown exponentially. Along with that growth have come significant increases in housing, commercial development and traffic. The issue for Brick, now in its twilight as a developing community, is how to make the best use of its remaining undeveloped land, while improving that which has been already developed. This was the opening statement in the introduction to the 1997 Master Plan. In keeping with the tone set in the opening line, it would be prudent to reflect progress made since the 1997 Master Plan and where we are in regards to the recommendations made in that document. Since setting the stage for the two most important issues facing Brick at the turn of the century, the Township has accomplished much towards make the best use of its remaining undeveloped land while improving that which has already been developed. At this time, it is important to reflect upon those accomplishments which improved the quality of life for the residents of the Township, while identifying those issues that still need improvement. In the context of open space and recreation, much progress has been made and to stay on-course should be the main objective, while recognizing that much of the large tracts have been preserved, a focus should be placed on providing for expansion to existing preserved areas through smaller lot acquisitions and preservation of waterfront areas, where fiscally feasible. In the context of commercial development and re-development, much has been done in the way of the upgrading and beautification of existing commercial areas in the area known as the Brick Town Center. A new approach to the redevelopment and enhancement of commercial areas is currently being explored through the New Jersey State Planning Commission Plan Endorsement Process and the Office of Smart Growth to create overlay zoning for redevelopment and the identification of Redevelopment Areas in the Township through the employment of the N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-6 and 40A:12A-5 Redevelopment Statute. These efforts are also being folded into the topic of traffic patterns and congestion issues. Improvements of problem intersections, and coordination with County and State agencies is currently underway through the Plan Endorsement Process and the New Jersey Department of Transportation to improve timing at lighted intersections and the integration of alternate means of transportation through pedestrian facilities, mass transit and the improvement of bikeway systems. In the 1997 Master Plan, a strong emphasis was placed upon open space preservation and water quality protection. As we approach the next century, there is a narrow window within which to guarantee that future generations will be left with green areas to enjoy in Brick Township. For that reason, the foremost priority of this Master Plan is to preserve as much of Brick Townships remaining woodlands as possible. To accomplish this goal most of those woodlands have been designated as public, green or protected. In addition, the Township is defined and bounded by significant waterways including the Atlantic Ocean, Barnegat Bay, the Manasquan River and the Metedeconk River. These too must be protected. In response to these goals, in the year 2000, the Townships citizens overwhelmingly passed a referendum approving a one cent tax to be set aside for the purposes of preserving and developing open space and recreation areas. These funds, in addition to those provided through grants and loans through various State and County programs have led to the successful preservation and enhancement of one of the best systems of park and conservation lands in Ocean County. A more detailed description of these areas is outlined in the Open Space and Conservation Element and the Recreation Element of this document. The goal for the future development and protection of remaining areas of vacant developable lands is to continue the successful protection and enhancement of these areas through acquisition and development programs, following those identified in the Open Space and Recreation Plan. In addition, the goals to protect water quality were furthered through the BTMUAs Reservoir project and the implementation of the Municipal Stormwater Management Program promulgated through the State of New Jersey. As an element in this plan, the Municipal Stormwater Management Plan is to be adopted and coordinated with the Municipal Pollution Prevention Plan and associated ordinances for the protection of the adjacent waterways and water quality. The future of these plans will depend on the close monitoring of land development projects and improvement of areas where stormwater infrastructure is antiquated or malfunctioning. Grant funding will be sought and associated development fees will be implemented to upgrade these areas and meet the requirements of the Municipal Stormwater Regulations. 1

Township of Brick, Master Plan Introduction

Housing development which has taken place in Brick has met the needs of its citizens and has complied with the housing standards prescribed by Federal and State law. The quantity and diversity of Bricks present housing stock essentially meets present and future needs. It is for that reason, as well as to limit the overburdening cost of further unrestricted single family development on our infrastructure and economic strength, that the focus of this plan is to improve existing housing stock rather than to increase it. In December of 2005, the Township of Brick will adopted a Round Three Housing Element and Fair Share Plan under the Council of Affordable Housing. While, in 1997, the Housing and Fair Share Plan identified affordable housing needs and guidelines, more opportunities for affordable units must be provided for under the new round three regulations. These regulations were promulgated to allow for growth share. Growth share assigns a number based on projected population and commercial growth within the Township, however, only those units which are built have to be complied with. The Growth Share methodology was overturned by the Superior Court of New Jersey in early 2007 and the Council on Affordable Housing was directed to propose new regulations the provided for a better estimate of affordable housing needs in New Jersey and incentives for developers to construct units. The Township of Brick Planning Board adopted the Housing Element & Fair Share Plan in December of 2005 which complied with the Council on Affordable Housing Rules, however, the Township Council chose to pursue sustentative certification through an appointed court master rather than the Office on Affordable Housing due to the fact that the Township was contesting the methodology for its fair share contribution number. Since the Court Master did not act on the Townships Plan prior to the Superior Court ruling, the plan will have to be amended once the Council on Affordable Housing releases new rules in response to the Courts decision. However, the Township has continued its pursuit of providing affordable housing opportunities through partnerships with Homes Now, Inc. and other affordable housing development entities and will continue this tradition regardless of the States progress in providing new rules. This Master Plan calls for strict enforcement of the newly adopted National Property Maintenance Code; a reduction in housing construction on small or undersized lots; and a reduction in the overall lot coverage of individual single family lots in an effort to improve aesthetics and maintain sufficient light, air and open space. In response to the recommendation of strict enforcement of the National Property Maintenance Code, the Township established the Property Maintenance Board. The Township Council amended the Township's Property Maintenance Ordinance in the fall of 1998 to expand the powers available to Township officials for dealing with dilapidated and unsafe buildings. The original ordinance had been adopted in the 1980s and needed enhancement. Through this program we maintain a list which began as the Dirty Dozen and has evolved into the Dirty Thirty worst maintained properties in town. Owners of these properties are put on notice to clean-up their property. If the property owner does not comply, the Township performs the clean up work and places liens on the land. The program has resulted in the demolition of three (3) rundown buildings and the clean up of numerous other properties with liens being placed on the property so that the Township may recoup the cost of clean-up. Numerous other properties have been cleaned up by the owners themselves once they were put on notice. This is just one of the ways that we are working to enhance the quality of life for our residents. The Township Council addressed the recommendation in the 1997 Master Plan to reduce the overall lot coverage of individual single family lots in an effort to improve aesthetics and maintain sufficient light, air and open space by changing the maximum lot coverage for residential lots in the R-5 Zone to 35% from 40%. The Council also adopted changes to increase the required total side yard setbacks in the R-5, R-7.5 and R-10 Zones. And residential building height requirements were redefined to decrease the overall height and mass of new homes. These measures served to control the size of homes that can be built in neighborhoods where small lots dominate the residential landscape, helping to maintain the character and integrity of these communities. In addition, the Council passed ordinances limiting impervious coverage on commercial lots to decrease the impact that the development of commercial properties have on stormwater runoff and quality. Residential growth in the Township has led to significant commercial growth. Starting in the 1960s, large scale shopping centers were introduced to Brick Township. In the 1970s and 1980s commercial growth often took the form of strip centers. Today many of the existing shopping centers have become outdated, and the strip centers have been vacant in times of economic distress. The Township has witnessed the solution to outdated shopping centers with the recent renovations including but not limited to Brick Plaza, Kennedy Mall, Riviera Plaza, Laurel Square & Towne Hall Shoppes. The Master Plan encourages additional commercial renovations as part of the 2

Township of Brick, Master Plan Introduction

economic upturn in Brick and has encouraged better planning of these commercial areas through the drafting of the Mixed Use Overlay Zone and the Streetscape Ordinance within the Brick Town Center. The development of Brick Township has often been of a linear fashion: with commercial enterprise along the major state and county highways and residential areas located immediately to the rear. This has caused areas of conflict between such dissimilar uses. The Township is exploring new ways to encourage the transition between these single lot uses and the conflicts that result from their construction through the suggestion of creating mixed use overlay zones and the use of streetscape designs within the Brick Town Center. These mixed use and streetscape areas will allow for transitions from commercial uses to areas of commercial and residential to only residential areas while providing amenities and designs that encourage walking, bicycling and cross access areas for vehicular connections without having to travel on County or State highways. The institution of these types of mixed use developments within the Brick Town Center will serve as a catalyst to future beautification, enhancement and improvement of other areas of the Township. The overall growth of both commercial and residential uses in Brick Township has impacted most heavily on its infrastructure. Roads are congested, motor vehicle accidents are common and the waterways accept the pollution associated with storm water runoff. Growth must constantly be reviewed and limited so that it does not surpass the ability of the Townships infrastructure and the tax dollars to support it. To this end, Brick Township will continue to require any potential land user to meet the strict environmental standards, not only of the Township, but of all levels of government. Brick Township has enjoyed an economic rebirth. This revitalization must be extended to the planning process to the benefit of all citizens in their everyday life. This will be accomplished by ensuring that the neighborhoods in which their homes are located remain undisturbed by unnecessary and unwanted development. It is essential that residents be confident that stores are safe and attractive; that the traffic routes between their homes, stores, houses of worship and other destinations are safe and sufficient for the purposes for which they were intended; and that their free time may be spent in both active and passive recreational areas featuring clean waters, dense woods, updated facilities and a beautiful environment within their own Township. As we look back upon the recommendations of the 1997 Master Plan, we observe many of the items have been acted upon and have served the community well in their intent and employment. As we look forward, a new emphasis on redevelopment, better design, infrastructure capacity and community enhancement become center stage in the future development of Brick Township. The Townships focus has shifted from development of new uses, to the redevelopment of existing areas with improvements that serve the community as a whole. This is the task for the Township Officials into the next phase of land use and design in the Township of Brick, to improve the quality of life for all of Brick Townships residents while balancing density, design, traffic, economy and environment.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Assumptions

Assumptions
That the population of Brick Township will continue to increase, but at a substantially slower rate due to the limited availability of vacant land without environmental constraints which prevent or inhibit development. That the Planning Board and the Board of Education will work together to plan for the Educational and Recreational needs of the student population. That due to the rate of population growth over the last 30 years in Brick and surrounding communities, new commercial development will continue, but at a lesser pace. The focus is now on redevelopment of existing commercial centers, conforming to upgraded improvement standards and construction of mixed use developments to encourage growth into the Brick Town Center. That continued road improvements will be required due to past population growth and development. That infrastructure will require expansion and improvement. Recurring drought conditions have made apparent the need to protect the current potable water supply, while investigating additional resources such as desalinization, improving groundwater recharge and grey water recycling. Recent innovations in energy efficiency and green building technologies make the employment of environmentally sensitive and energy efficient building practices more feasible. That major portions of the remaining vacant land include areas of tidal wetlands and freshwater wetlands which will restrict and limit the amount of land that can be developed. That traffic congestion in Brick Township will be eased through the anticipated improvements to the Garden State Parkway, N.J. State Highways ,Ocean County Road system, and public transportation. That public transportation may become a more viable means of travel as progress continues toward the opening of the Monmouth/Ocean/Middlesex rail system. That the Township will meet its housing objectives through the continued implementation of the Townships Affordable Housing Program, Housing Element & Fair Share Plan; the continuation of zoning which permits various types of housing opportunities; and housing rehabilitation through the Community Development Block Grant Program.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Statement of Objectives

Statement of Objectives
Environment To implement the Open Space & Recreation Plan. To encourage the continued Municipal acquisition and recreational development of vacant waterfront property for public access & use. To Implement the Conservation & Open Space Plan Element. To implement the conservation plan by protecting the environmentally sensitive lands as delineated on the Master Plan To provide for additional open space and recreational areas and to provide incentives for dedication to the Township of lands for those purposes. To Implement the Recycling Plan Element and encourage the continued expansion of the Townships recycling program. To implement the Municipal Stormwater Management Plan Element. To improve surface & groundwater quality through the completion of the Sewerage Infrastructure Improvement Act requirements by adhering to the NJDEP Water Quality Standards and Municipal Stormwater Regulations Program. To discourage direct discharge of storm water into bodies of water, to discourage the off-site flow of storm water and to require on-site retention in underground facilities whenever feasible. To implement the Community Forestry Management Plan Element To protect environmentally critical areas and preserve woodlands and open space and to encourage the beautification of the Township through landscaped areas. To encourage energy conservation policies through techniques as applied in Site Plan and Subdivision Review and other governmental action. To improve the quantity and quality of landscaping and buffer plantings. To protect existing threatened and endangered species habitat from new development. To protect riparian buffers from encroachment from new development. Transportation To improve traffic circulation and reduce hazardous traffic conditions throughout the Township by implementing the recommendations contained in the Circulation Element. To actively urge the N.J. Highway authority to pursue and provide additional interchanges along the Garden State Parkway within and in close proximity to the Township which will alleviate traffic congestion within the Township. To establish a unified circulation system. To continue seeking funds from Federal, State & County sources for Township road improvement projects. To provide opportunities for alternate means of local & regional travel including but not limited to pedestrian walkways, bicycle paths, bus routes, air and rail transit and the utilization of the inland waterways. To encourage mixed use developments to reduce dependence on vehicles for modes of travel. Development To encourage a balanced and compatible arrangement of residential, commercial and other appropriate land uses. To encourage mixed use developments in the Brick Town Center to direct new development into areas of existing infrastructure. To encourage streetscape designs that area aesthetically pleasing that encourage pedestrian use as well as providing for an improved visual environment. To encourage upgrading of residential neighborhoods through housing rehabilitation increased Code Enforcement, landscape improvements, and infrastructure maintenance. To allocate proper areas of the remaining vacant land for future community facilities including school sites, recreation, open spaces, fire and first aid stations, future water resource facilities and sites for government functions. To continue providing incentives through zoning and code enforcement for re-planning and rehabilitating of all major commercial areas in general, and the neighborhood business districts and the Brick Town Center in particular. 5

Township of Brick, Master Plan Statement of Objectives

To discourage the development of additional commercial strip centers. To utilize the Architectural Review Committee to prepare a set of building and landscaping themes and guidelines to be established in the Herbertsville and Mantoloking sections of the Township. To reduce the visual impacts of existing and future commercial uses through the enforcement of present landscaping standards and through architectural reviews by the Boards Subcommittee. To provide affordable housing through continued implementation of the Townships Housing Element and Fair Share Plan. To revise the Lot Area definition to reflect physical impairments and encumbrances on individual parcels of land including but not limited to steep slopes, wetlands, deed restrictions and easements. To continue to encourage the development of facilities in the vicinity of Brick Hospital which complement the Hospitals services.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

Table of Contents

Introduction Land Uses A. Residential B. Commercial Development C. Office/Professional D. Hospital Support Zone E. Industrial F. Public/Semi Public Fig.1 Township of Brick - Land Use G. Brick Town Center Fig.2 Center Location H. Preliminary Concepts for the Town Center MAPS Center Zoning Center Improvements Center Land Use

1 1 1 4 6 6 6 6 7 7 9 9 A B C

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

Land Use Element


Introduction The Land Use Plan for the Township of Brick is a guide for the future physical, economic, social and recreational development of the Townships remaining vacant land and for the redevelopment of inappropriately developed or substandard property. This Plan was prepared with an emphasis on the continued preservation of open space within the Township in an effort to sustain the current environment and quality of life for its residents. In addition, this Plan was prepared to be consistent with the State Development and Redevelopment Plan. The goal of township to be consistent with the State Plan is achieved by incorporating the requirements of the State Plan Endorsement process into the Land Use Plan and other appropriate Elements of this Master Plan. To ensure consistency with the State Plan, the Townships Land Use Plan mapping was designed to be consistent with the State Plan Map identifying areas for Suburban Land Uses (PA2) and Environmentally Sensitive Lands (PA5) to be consistent with residential, commercial and public lands. The Initial Plan Endorsement submission has been appended to this Master Plan update. The vast majority of the Township is presently developed, with few large parcels of vacant developable land remaining. This Master Plan update has identified the most environmentally sensitive vacant and underdeveloped parcels and designated them as areas for conservation or limited recreation. Preservation of these lands will increase recreational opportunities while also protecting the natural environment. This plan also addresses the economic needs of the community when examining the vacant commercially zoned properties within the Township by determining the most appropriate uses of those lands. However, consideration has been given to preservation of vacant commercially zoned property if there is the potential for significant negative impacts associated with such development. Redevelopment will be considered for sites or areas such as but not limited to those containing obsolete buildings or layouts, known health or safety issues, or lands not likely to be developed by reason of location, remoteness or lack of access. If the township chooses to formally redevelop a targeted site or area, it must follow the statutorily defined process set forth in the Local Redevelopment and Housing Law. Several of the sites within the Township which are suitable for redevelopment or Smart Growth development lie within Townships designated Center, to be labeled Brick Town Center as depicted on the Land Use Plan Map. Four sites within the Brick Town Center have been slated for Mixed Use development or redevelopment through the creation of an Overlay Zone, as described subsequently in this Plan. Land Uses The Township is divided into six broad land use categories: Residential, Commercial, Office/Professional, Hospital Support, Industrial and Semi-Public/ Public. The Brick Town Center overlays portions of all the aforementioned categories. In addition, certain areas within the various land use categories have been identified for redevelopment consideration. The following identifies and describes these categories including the Brick Town Center:

A. Residential Brick Township has established extensive residential development patterns throughout the community. Of the total developed land area, the vast majority consists of various residential uses. The objective of the land use plan, as it pertains to residential development, is to provide appropriate strategies for the small residential tracts of vacant land and to permit the reasonably conforming infill of existing single-family residential neighborhoods to appropriate density standards, while preserving the larger tracts. The plan also provides areas for future affordable housing sites and mixed use development. The overall residential development plan is to allow for flexibility in design while discouraging the over development of individual lots and preserving open spaces and environmentally critical areas. Additional high density single family and multi-family residential development will be limited. However, opportunities for high density residential development will be accommodated in the Center within the Mixed Use Overlay Zone areas. 1

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

1. Low Density Residential The low density designation corresponds to the Rural Residential zoning category, including the RR-1, RR-2 and RR-3 Zones. Gross densities in the Rural Residential Zones approximate one (1) dwelling unit per acre. Planned Residential Retirement Communities, Planned Residential Communities and Clustering are permitted within the RR-2 and RR-3 Residential Zones on smaller lots provided certain development standards are satisfied. Adult Community Multi-family/Townhouse units are also permitted at a three (3) dwelling unit per acre maximum. In addition, a cluster option is available in the RR-2 and RR-3 Zones which approximates a gross density of 1.5 dwelling units per acre. The majority of the property that is zoned RR-1 is not suitable for the more dense development options due to the presence of high water tables. The Rural Residential zoned properties that have not been developed for senior housing are predominantly vacant or underdeveloped and are likely lands being considered for preservation by the Township, County, State or Federal Governments. The majority of the remaining, large, vacant, privately owned parcels contains freshwater or coastal wetland areas and is located within or in close proximity to the Edwin B Forsythe Wildlife Refuge. Efforts to preserve these properties are ongoing. 2. Medium Density Residential The medium density residential classification corresponds to the R-10, R-15 and R-20 zones which generally yield a gross density of 1.6 to 3 dwelling units per acre. The majority of the medium density development and zoning occurs north of State Highway Route 70. Few privately held vacant properties remain in the Medium Density Residential areas. There are no changes proposed in the Medium Density category. 3. High Density Residential This classification corresponds to the R-5 and R-7.5 zones, permitting 7 and 4.5 units per acre, respectively. This category includes those existing developments built to high density parameters with little developable land remaining with the exception of sporadic infill parcels. The majority of the High Density Residential development and zoning occurs on the south side of State Highway Route 70. However, the Timber Ridge project was constructed at the intersection of Van Zile and Burnt Tavern Roads north of Route 70 in 1994. It was an Affordable Housing project of one hundred twenty single family detached dwellings on lots of 5,000, 6,000 and 7,000 square feet. No additions are proposed to the High Density Residential Category. 4. Multi-family Residential The multi-family designation corresponds to the R-M Multi-Family Zone, permitting six units per acre. The Township has accommodated such a zone to permit a wider range of housing options within its boundaries. This plan is proposing no additions of vacant land to this designation with the exception of those parcels included in the Townships Fair Share/Affordable Housing Plan and in the Mixed Use Overlay Zone within the Brick Town Center. These areas are described in the Housing Element and also described Brick Town Center section of the Land Use Plan and in the Initial Plan Endorsement submission appended to this Master Plan. 5. Planned Residential Retirement Communities Planned Residential Retirement Communities (PRRCs) are permitted within the (RR-2&3) Rural Residential Zones. These communities are age restricted, generally fifty-five and older, and contain a club house, outdoor recreational facilities, open space and common areas. PRRCs within the Township are of condominium or fee simple forms or ownership. The following parcels have been approved and developed under the PRRC designation since the adoption of the 1997 Master Plan: a. The Cedar Village site at the northeast corner of the Burnt Tavern Road/N.J. State Highway Route 70 intersection. b. The Wedgewood Place site at the northeast corner of the Burnt Tavern Road/Lanes Mill Road intersection. 6. Planned Residential Communities (PRCs) Planned Residential Communities were created by Ordinance in 1995 as a permitted use within the (RR2&3) Rural Residential Zones. PRCs allow for a mix of attached and detached housing at controlled percentages and densities on tracts of land in excess of 100 acres. The Sailors Quay/Grande Quay development between Hooper Avenue and Cherry Quay Road is the Townships only Planning Residential Community. 2

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

7. Planned Multi-family Residential Retirement Community (PMRRC) The PMRRC Zone was created in 2005 to address the apparent need for senior housing opportunities within the Township in a form other than the traditional single family detached dwelling. The PMRRC allows for multi-family condominium type dwellings in four story buildings at a density of twenty units per acre. The only identified PMRRC location is a twenty acre site located within the Brick Town Center adjacent to the Shop-rite/ Kohls Shopping Center and the Post Office. The Planning Board granted site plan approval for approximately three hundred age-restricted units in 2006. To date, development of the site has not been initiated. The Land Use Plan designation for this parcel has been changed from Highway Commercial to PMRRC and allows for the Mixed Use Overlay Zone as a developer option. In addition, the Zoning Board of Adjustment approved a senior condominium project in 2005 on a twelve acre tract in the B-3 Highway Development Zone. The site fronts on Brick Boulevard and Hooper Avenue at the southern end of the Township. It was approved for one hundred ten age restricted units. The site is presently vacant. The Land Use Plan designation has been changed from Highway Commercial to PMRRC. 8. Affordable Housing As a result of the Supreme Court decisions commonly known as Mount Laurel I & II, the Township of Brick, along with every other community within the State of New Jersey, is required to provide for its fair share of affordable housing opportunities. The affordable housing sites approved by the Council on Affordable Housing are designated on the Land Use Plan. The affordable housing sites are described in detail in the Housing Element of this Master Plan and the COAH approved Fair Share Plan and amendments thereto. Since the adoption of 1997 Master Plan three affordable housing sites have been developed. Dotties House, at an undisclosed location, the Bancroft Facility on Route 70 West adjacent to the Industrial Park and the Pier Avenue Project at the northern end of Pier Avenue. The Bancroft and Pier Avenue sites have been designated Affordable Housing on the Land Use, changing the current Industrial and Residential designations, respectively. The Townships proposed Affordable Housing Plan is currently under review. However, midway through the review process, the Court determined that the 3rd Round COAH Rules, upon which municipalities based their Affordable Housing Plans, was invalid. COAH was given six months to rewrite their rules and address the Courts concerns. Once the new rules are adopted, the Township will have to amend its Housing Plan. The Township will continue to seek suitable locations and innovative methods to provide for its fair share obligation. 9. The Barrier Island The Barrier Island of Brick Township has been developed largely for high density residential land use. However, hurricanes, storms, and flooding pose major hazards to life and property on the island. Maintaining and enhancing the island beach-dune system is vital to the safety of residents and the protection of property. Where allowed to achieve sufficient breadth and height, the beach-dune system is a barrier against destructive storm surges. Accordingly, the Township zoning and development regulations should be coordinated with the State rules on Coastal Zone Management (N.J.A.C. 7:7E-1.1 et. Seq.) in an effort to protect the Townships beach-dune area from inappropriate development. State policy is to prohibit development on land that has no prudent or feasible alternative use other than a dune. Moreover, development must not cause significant long-term adverse impacts on the natural functioning of the beachdune system. In recognition of the special attraction and scenic value to residential uses of a barrier island location and the over-water views it provides, the intensity of development and the height of future buildings should be managed to maintain a desirable scale and relationship among existing dwellings. Land disturbance and the construction or expansion of principal and accessory buildings and structures should be permitted only west of the beach-dune area. Consistent with State policy, development seaward of the line will be limited to defined access ways and approved shore protection efforts.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

B. Commercial Development The established commercial development pattern in Brick Township consists of a loosely defined central core area, bound by Route 70, Brick Boulevard, Chambers Bridge Road & Cedar Bridge Avenue (which contains Brick Plaza), and linear development along such commercial corridors as Brick Boulevard, Route 70, Route 88 & Chambers Bridge Road. The Brick Town Center consists of the central core area and the linear development in proximity to it and the Hospital Support Zone. Neighborhood commercial areas exist along portions of Herbertsville Road, Hooper Avenue, Mantoloking Road and Drum Point Road. This plan recognizes that Bricks existing commercial development pattern is well established and attempts to encourage new commercial development and redevelopment in the most appropriate locations within that pattern, while at the same time controlling the site specific intensity of commercial development. Specific objectives of the plan are to: Encourage commercial establishments at appropriate locations as infill developments as opposed to creating new commercial areas. Where feasible require that commercial establishments are setback sufficiently from adjacent road rights of way to allow road widening without major disruptions. Require existing and proposed commercial tracts to meet improved standards with increased buffer areas and landscaped areas. Reduce the planned commercial areas along certain County corridors such as Mantoloking and Herbertsville Roads where there exists adequate commercial space to service the existing neighborhoods but the roads are not equipped to receive higher volumes of traffic and/or the vacant lands are environmentally sensitive. Create a restoration plan for the Herbertsville Road and Mantoloking Road neighborhood commercial areas which encourages improvements to existing commercial sites that are consistent with the character of the areas, such as historic preservation for Herbertsville Road, and a prescribed restoration motif, such as a nautical theme, for the Mantoloking Road area. Maintain existing residential uses along the Townships arterial roadways, such as but not limited to, Van Zile Road, Burrsville Road, and Hooper Avenue (south) by discouraging nonconforming commercial conversions of residential structures and new Commercial Development in such areas. Create mixed use development areas within the Brick Town Center that encourage integrated retail, office and residential development. Continue to require vehicular and pedestrian connections between existing and proposed adjoining commercial sites. There are five commercial designations within the Township: 1. Highway Commercial Highway Commercial refers to large-scale commercial development which serves major regional population centers. The Brick Plaza area at the junction of Route 70, Cedar Bridge Road and Brick Boulevard is presently the most intensely developed commercial area in Brick Township. In zoning terms, the B-3 and B-4 Highway Development categories correspond with the Highway Commercial land use designation which permits a broad variety of commercial uses along the major transportation corridors traversing the Township. Recent approvals and redevelopment projects have been concentrated along the Route 70 corridor between Chambers Bridge Road and the Lakewood border. There are no additions proposed to the Highway Commercial designation. 2. General Commercial General Commercial uses consist of a broad variety of small retail and service facilities that are easily accessible by major residential sections of the community. The uses may rely on pedestrian and vehicular access. The scope of services and size of the commercial facilities will depend largely upon per capita income and density of the supporting population. In terms of zoning, general commercial corresponds to the B-2 General Business Zone. General commercial shopping areas are located along most major arterial roads in the Township. 4

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

Commercial facilities which can service the area neighborhoods will provide convenient access, while reducing the need for cross town travel. Commercial development on the single lane County Roads should exclude uses that will have regional appeal to avoid congestion caused by attracting consumers from outside of the area. There are no additions proposed to the General Commercial designation. 3.Neighborhood Commercial Neighborhood commercial facilities consist of small retail and service establishments such as pharmacies, delis, bakeries and dry cleaners that can provide for the everyday needs of people within a neighborhood. These uses are identified by the Master Plan in those areas of the community where presently, some neighborhood commercial facilities exist. It is not anticipated that these neighborhood commercial areas will evolve into general commercial centers. The B-1 Neighborhood Business Zone corresponds to the neighborhood commercial category. The most extensive neighborhood commercial zone exists along Herbertsville Road, although sections of Mantoloking Road are also neighborhood business oriented. The Herbertsville Road commercial area has retained some of its 18th and 19th century buildings creating historic character in the neighborhood. The Brick Historical Commission and Society have requested that a section of Herbertsville Road be recognized as a Historic District as described in the Historic Preservation Element of this Master Plan. Steps should be taken to begin working with the State to investigate the necessary steps needed to create a Historic District and to coordinate with the impacted homes and businesses in the designated area. Many view Mantoloking Road as Bricks gateway to the Atlantic Ocean. Thousands of area residents and tourists travel Mantoloking Road annually between Memorial Day and Labor Day en route to Bricks and other Barrier Island beaches. Presently, the Mantoloking Road neighborhood commercial areas consist of a variety of neighborhood businesses with varying services. However, the area lacks any identifiable character or cohesiveness attractive to tourists. The preparation of a comprehensive redevelopment plan for the Mantoloking Road commercial areas is recommended. Such a plan should identify the limits of existing commercial neighborhoods, and establish a set of standards for faade and site improvements streetscapes, pedestrian realms and most importantly funding sources to facilitate those improvements. 4.Waterfront Commercial Waterfront Commercial applies to all of the existing marinas within the Township. Rather than allowing the existing marinas to remain unidentified within the Townships commercial or residential land use categories, it was deemed appropriate to assign to them the Waterfront Commercial designation in 1997 Master Plan. Marinas which are located in residential zones are encouraged to limit on-site uses to those of a water dependent nature, such as, docks, boat slips, upland storage, dock masters quarters, marine supplies, bait & tackle shops & maintenance facilities for minor repairs and other required appurtenances. These marinas must also be reviewed on a case by case basis to ensure that adequate buffering is provided to adjacent residential uses. Marinas in commercial zones would be encouraged to construct on-site facilities which are primarily water dependent, such as the uses described above for marinas located in residential zones, in addition to water oriented uses, such as boat sales, limited boat building, major boat repairs and where appropriate, restaurants. The Marina Overlay Zone was created in 2004 to further recognize existing marinas and to encourage their improvement and redevelopment.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

C. Office/Professional The Office/Professional designation accounts for a small area of Bricks proposed land uses. This designation corresponds with the Office Professional and the Office Professional Transitional Zones. The Office/ Professional designations are intended to encourage low intensity office uses on small lots abutting residential areas, as opposed to retail establishments that tend to be greater traffic generators and sources of noise and odors.

D. Hospital Support Zone In 1984, the Hospital Support Zone was created as a home for Brick Hospital and the numerous medical service establishments that were anticipated to be generated by its existence. To date, the Hospital Support Zone has been extremely successful at fulfilling its intended goals. There is only one Hospital Support Zone in Brick Township. It is located between N.J. State Highway Route 88, Route 70 and Jack Martin Boulevard. Since 1984 this area has experienced substantial growth in the form of health care related facilities. There are few remaining parcels within the Hospital Support Zone with sufficient land area likely to be developed for a health care oriented business. The only large vacant parcel of land remaining within the Hospital Support Zone is within the Brick Town Center area and is designated for Mixed Use Overlay Zone development. The site is approximately ten acres in area and fronts on Jack Martin Boulevard, Burrsville Road and Route 88.

E. Industrial There are only two (2) areas designated within this plan for industrial development. The first area if the small industrial park on the northern side of Route 70 west. Also included in this area is a mini-warehouse facility located immediately east of the industrial park. The second industrial designation is located on the south side of Burnt Tavern Road and is the site of the existing Anchor Concrete block plant and an adjacent single-family home on approximately five acres of property. No additions to the Industrial Land Use designation are planned.

F. Public/Semi Public Public lands are those which are owned by a public entity such as the Municipality, County, State or Federal Government. Semi-public lands are those owned by non-profit or publicly regulated groups such as a house-of worship, hospitals, convalescent homes, club houses. This Master Plan identifies a number of properties as planned public land holdings to limit the development of environmentally sensitive lands, preserve the quality of life for Township residents, and provide the open space and recreation areas required to support a community approaching 80,000 residents. Targeted land acquisitions for public open space and recreation areas are concentrated within and adjacent to the Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Refuge, adjacent to the Airport Tract and along riparian corridors to create needed buffer areas to those water bodies and significant wetlands areas. A riparian buffer ordinance should be adopted by the Township to supplement existing Federal and State regulations to limit development in these sensitive areas.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

Township of Brick - Land Use Property Class 1 2 3A 4A 4B 4C 15A 15B 15C 15D 15E 15F Type Vacant Land (including wetlands) Residential Farm (Regular) Commercial Industrial Apartment Public School Property Other School Property Public Property Church & Charitable Property Cemeteries & Graveyards Other Exempt Total Acres 1717.03 6471.32 1.48 1184.33 38.35 175.17 290.07 1.06 3606.44 106.38 3.05 106.99 13701.68 Square Miles 2.68 10.11 0.00 1.85 0.06 0.27 0.45 0.00 5.64 0.17 0.00 0.17 21.4 % of Land Use 12.53 47.23 0.0 8.64 0.27 1.27 2.2 0.0 26.32 0.78 0.02 0.78 100%
Fig. 1

G. Brick Town Center: The Township of Brick is seeking to re-establish a Town Center within the boundaries of the recently expired CAFRA Coastal Town Center and to expand the center boundaries to encompass more of a mix of uses in the Townships downtown area. It was determined that a Town Center was the most appropriate Center designation for the area in question as it is consistent with the Townships zoning relative to maximum impervious coverage of seventy percent and complies with most of the State Plan criteria for a Town Center. The Township is proposing to expand the Center to incorporate more of the commercial district surrounding and including businesses and residential areas along Brick Boulevard, Chambers Bridge Road and Cedar Bridge Avenue. The goal of the Brick Town Center is to encourage redevelopment in the new Town Center that will redesign and improve the historic core of linear commercial development along our arterial roadways and highways. The Brick Town Center will encourage development of a mix of housing opportunities, variety of retail and service business and improve a sense of place through the design of public spaces, and improve circulation through design solutions to the existing highway infrastructure, pedestrian linkages and connectivity between exiting developments. 1. The Brick Town Center Boundary: Brick Town Center Facts The Center will be referred to as the Brick Town Center. The Center is depicted as an overlay on the Land Use Plan. The Center 1.12 Square Miles encompasses an area of approximately 1.12 square miles beginning 6,362 Persons (estimate) at the northerly extent of Chambers Bridge Road, abutting the 5,680 Persons per square Garden State Parkway. The Center area travels south and east on mile Chambers Bridge Road covering the land area on both sides of the 3.31 Dwelling Units per acre road from the Cedar Bridge Branch to the Forge Pond area to a 3:1 Jobs-to-Housing Ratio point at the Route 70 intersection. The Center continues across Route 70 to the intersection of Mantoloking Road/Cedar Bridge Served by Rt. 88, Rt. 70 & Avenue and continues west down Cedar Bridge Avenue including all NJ Transit Bussing of the land between Cedar Bridge Avenue and Chambers Bridge Road until it meets with the beginning of The Center at Route 70 and the Cedar Bridge Branch of the Metedeconk River. The Center then moves east on the north side of Route 70 to the intersection of Route 88. The Center area then travels northwest on Route 88 to the intersection of Jack Martin Boulevard and includes the land area between West Princeton Avenue, Jack Martin Boulevard and Route 70. The Centers boundaries are defined by natural and man-made features. In the Chambers Bridge Road section of the Center the northern Boundary is the Garden State Parkway, the western boundary is the Cedar Bridge Branch of the Metedeconk River, the eastern boundary is the intersection of Mantoloking Road/Cedar Bridge Avenue and Chambers Bridge Road the southern boundary is Route 70. The Route 88 section of the Center is bound by Jack Martin Boulevard to the north and east, West Princeton Avenue to the west and Route 70 to the south. The two areas are joined by a small section of Route 70. 7

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

2. The Brick Town Center Land Uses: The Brick Town Center is a fairly compact mix of uses. Along Chambers Road the Center contains the Brick Municipal Building (including the police and municipal court), the Civic Plaza, the County Library, Municipal Tennis Courts, Brick High School, Ocean County Vocational School, the Primary Learning Center, the Post Office, the Housing Authority (including 450 affordable age restricted units and an approved multi-rise senior housing complex with 300 units) ,an ice rink, fitness center, Forge Pond County Golf Course, a number of regional shopping centers including Brick Plaza, Kennedy Shopping Mall and Town Hall Shoppes, a mix of out-dated office and retail uses and four residential neighborhoods consisting of a total of 834 Single family dwellings and 1540 multi-family dwellings including apartments, townhouses and senior assisted living residences totaling 2374 residential units. The Route 70 section includes a Church and Parochial School, a 10 acre site acquired by the Township that contains an abandoned 90,000 sq. ft. retail building that abuts Forge Pond and several mid-sized retail buildings. The Route 88 section of the Center contains the Townships Hospital Support Zone. The Hospital Support Zone has been a corner stone of economic growth over the past 15 years. The Hospital support Zone contains the Ocean Medical Center, the VA Hospital, two nursing homes, three assisted living facilities and several large Medical/Office complexes. In addition to the Hospital Support Zone is a Costco Wholesale Warehouse, the Jersey Paddler (Canoe and Kayak sales and rentals), small to mid-sized office and retail uses and three small residential neighborhoods totaling 227 single family dwellings on lots of less than a of an acre plus two small garden apartment buildings. The Center area reflects a high level of public investment and services. Although the Chambers Bridge/Route 88 section is only serviced by limited mass transit, in the form of pass through NJ Transit bus service, it is traversed by four arterial roadways, two of which are State Highways. In addition, many of the Townships senior developments provide bus service to shopping areas, the Medical Center and various municipal services within the Center. Also, the Chambers Bridge Road and Cedar Bridge Avenue sections of the Center are pedestrian friendly as they have continuous sidewalks along the full length. The majorities of the Centers resident population resides in the Chambers Bridge Road section and make regular use of the sidewalk areas for access to the High School, other public services and retail areas. In all, the Center area is easily accessible and surrounded by a mix of housing types capable of providing adequate housing to support the commercial and office uses in the center. The jobs-housing ratio is approximately 3-1. The Center supports a population of approximately 6362 persons in a 1.12 square mile area, exceeding the State Plan Center requirement of a center supporting 5,000 persons per square mile with a gross population density of 5680 persons per square mile and has a gross housing density of 3.31 dwelling units per acre. The Center area as well as the whole of the Township of Brick is serviced by the Ocean County Waste Water Treatment Facility and has more than adequate infrastructure to support new infill development. The entire Center area is also serviced by the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority for potable drinking water. The Center area is subject to the Township of Bricks Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance and will be able to support the infill of new commercial development relative to stormwater controls. The Center also comprises a major employment center within the Township. The Townships three largest employers are located within the Center. Over three hundred and fifty people are employed at the municipal building, three hundred and five people are employed at Brick High School and the Primary Learning Center and one thousand three hundred people are employed at Ocean Medical Center. The large commercial areas also contribute significantly to the areas employment as two of the Townships super food stores are located within the Center, employing approximately 400 people. In addition, these retail centers employ approximately 800 additional people. 3. Opportunities for Development & Redevelopment: There are six vacant or under-developed parcels within the Center. These properties account for approximately fifty-six acres. Of those fifty-six acres approximately thirty acres involving two of the six sites have received recent development approvals. However, there are a number of outdated uses, sites and systems in the Center that the Township anticipates to be candidates for planned redevelopment possibly involving public participation with potential for mixed use design, employing smart growth principles. Through this Master Plan update and the Townships concurrent participation in Ocean Countys Regional Smart Growth Plan and the States Plan Endorsement process a strategic planning effort is in place that will focus on the redevelopment of the designated Center area and identify public and private sources to facilitate the fulfillment of policy objectives for the planning area. 4. Future Development of the Brick Town Center: 8

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

As a result of limited system capacity by way of available land for development, locational limits by way of the location of the two state highways and the Metedeconk River that bisect the Brick Town Center and the current stress on local infrastructure, the future development of the Brick Town Center will focus on four areas of mixed use design for residential and commercial growth as well as redevelopment of the Brick Town Centers commercial base. The Brick Town Center has been tightly delineated around existing places that fit into the criteria for center designation and have potential to redevelop utilizing smart growth principles including mixed uses, connectivity and innovative design criteria. The Brick Town Center will be a place where redevelopment and reutilization of existing infrastructure and implementation of sustainable growth and development initiatives will be emphasized while striving to improve pedestrian linkages, increase housing diversity, provide a mix of residential and commercial uses, upgrade commercial areas for new businesses and coordinate state, county and municipal agencies for better transportation amenities The Township of Brick is an older developed suburban community, where opportunities for New Urbanist designs are limited; however, to encourage a diverse mix of residential and commercial growth four areas within the center have been identified to receive additional residential and commercial opportunities in mixed use overlay zones. In these mixed use overlay zones, we are encouraging careful planning of denser forms of villagelike developments that will be linked to other single-use nodes in the center that will focus on commercial redevelopment. The design criteria in each area of the Brick Town Center will utilize smart growth principles such as connectivity, public spaces, shared infrastructure, streetscaping, redevelopment of single use sites as mixed use developments and natural resource protection strategies.
Fig. 2

The Township of Brick has the most waterfront of any municipality in New Jersey; therefore, protection of this resource is a paramount priority. The current trend of land use decisions within the Township have focused on decreasing the amount of impervious cover on older, antiquated, developed commercial areas in order to improve water quality and decrease non-point source pollution to our receiving waterways. A number of commercial projects have come before the land use boards for redevelopment and upgrade. As a result of this review opportunity, the Township revised its land use ordinances to require a larger amount of landscaping, a smaller amount of impervious coverage and improved and innovative stormwater controls. These techniques have served to aesthetically improve the commercial areas within the township while also improving the environmental quality of the runoff that enters our streams and rivers through regulation at the local level. A few high density residential communities have also been planned for through use variances and re-zoning in the Center area which will increase density. However, these planned communities were approved in order to meet Council On Affordable Housing obligations. H. Preliminary Concepts for the Town Center: 1. Redevelopment: Recent commercial redevelopment projects have incorporated more aesthetically pleasing architectural designs, landscaping improvements and improved stormwater controls at the major commercial sites within the Brick Town Center. The Township of Brick envisions the Brick Town Center to continue to be the hub of activity in the coming years and will continue to encourage innovative commercial, multipurpose recreational, cultural and residential redesign of antiquated areas in need of improvements through the planning and review process. As previously mentioned, four areas of the Center will be identified to allow for re-development and development allowing mixed uses employing smart growth principles in order to encourage growth into areas that currently contain supportive infrastructure. 9

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

2. Mixed Use Overly Zone: The challenge of the mixed use overlay zones will be to develop a design criteria that permits most uses including residential, retail, office and service uses while taking care to provide an authentic village-like setting that is able to interact with the surrounding suburban setting. Bulk development standards will provide for more liberal setbacks and parking standards. An increase in the height restriction and story limitations in this zone will allow for mid-rise developments, while maximizing developable floor areas. Landscaping and architectural design will be carefully scrutinized for maximum creation of public spaces and inviting places for pedestrian traffic and interaction. Environmental standards must be adhered to in order to remain respectful of the water quality and habitat protection principles the Township is committed to preserving. 3. Development Incentives: While new to the Township leadership, exploration of incentives for developers to concentrate density and development in the Brick Town Center will be entertained. These may include land swaps from outlying undeveloped parcels through Transfer of Development Rights or density bonuss for providing affordable housing in excess of the current Council on Affordable Housing obligation. 4. Linkage Improvements: Linkages between road networks and pedestrian interfaces can be improved through coordination between State and County Transportation Agencies. The Brick Town Center is the location at which two state highways and three County roadways intersect. These roadways can be improved through intersection redesign, light timing evaluation and sidewalk connections. In addition, opportunities for connectivity between sites will be implemented to reduce entrances and exits onto roadway networks to gain access from adjacent sites. These connections will be encouraged during development review and through roadway and parking area design guidelines. 5. Pedestrian Movement: The Brick Town Center will benefit significantly from improved pedestrian and vehicular connections. Currently, this area has problems relating to level of service at several intersections and the pedestrian infrastructure is in need of improvement. Sidewalks exist in most of the center; however, gaps need to be filled where sidewalks end. In addition, timing at lighted intersections needs to be improved to accommodate pedestrians from the high density residential developments crossing roadways to reach commercial areas. Traffic calming devices will be considered to aid pedestrians in areas where increased pedestrian activity will not result in further traffic congestion. The areas that are planned to be re-developed or developed as mixed use areas will serve as hubs of connectivity. These areas will enable pedestrians to access various uses on foot without having to travel by vehicles throughout the Township for services. 6. Roadway Improvement: The Township has embarked upon a long-term study of the Route 70 corridor between the intersection of Route 88 and Princeton Avenue westerly to Cedar Bridge Road. This area, also known as the Missing Mile, has been identified as an area in need of significant vehicular improvements. The Township has developed a long-term and short-term improvement plan and is in the early phases of negotiation with NJDOT to begin the short-term projects. The Missing Mile plan will improve connectivity between the Hospital Support section and the Chambers Bridge Road Section of the Brick Town Center. The improved connectivity between these two areas will provide for linkages to areas of multi-use residential and commercial clusters that will advance the development of the Center design. 7. Transit Improvement: Currently, NJ Transit services the Brick Town Center at many un-official bus stops along Route 70 and Route 88. An increase in the frequency of service in the vicinity of our Hospital Support Area along Rt. 88 and Jack Martin Boulevard would benefit many of the employees in this area. Additional services would be advantageous along Chambers Bridge Road and Brick Boulevard and would provide for a more comprehensive rider-ship in the Center. The Township will work with NJ Transit to accomplish more accessible and convenient transit services to the Center area in addition to exploring the incorporation of bus stop shelters at the existing stops and future locations to provide riders with proper amenities.

8. Center Street Scaping: 10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Land Use Element

The Brick Town Center has also been the focus of recent redevelopment projects wherein major investments to the aesthetics of the area have been improved through Streetscaping and landscaping of commercial developments. The Township would like to expand upon these improvements and implement a streetscaping project in the center area to provide for a cohesive visual built environment that incorporates green spaces, public spaces, street trees, landscaped gardens, buffers and berms and shade trees along the arterial roads and highways that transect the Center. 9. Brick Town Center Design Guidelines: The desired design theme should be "timeless" and mimic the homes and businesses that dot the historic New Jersey shore downtown areas such as Asbury Park, Spring Lake, Toms River, and Point Pleasant Beach. The specific characteristics of these desired structures include: Building materials used in area historic structures including but not limited to wood and clapboard shingles or modern replications in more durable materials or brick faced faades. Muted or natural colors and signage that coordinates with building facade. Buildings greater than one (1) story with clear delineation of the boundary between each floor of the structure through belt courses, cornice lines or similar architectural detailing. Pitched or gabled rooflines. Overhanging eaves. Utilization of awnings, covered walkways, opens colonnades or similar weather protection where applicable. Main pedestrian entrances must face the street and be clearly articulated through architectural detailing; however access is also encouraged at the rear of the buildings adjacent to parking areas. Other architectural features in the center area should include corner towers, cupolas, clock towers, spires, balconies, colonnades or similar features.

11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Table of Contents

Population Fig. 1 - 50 year Population Growth Fig. 2 - Population Growth Fig. 3 - Comparative Population Growth Fig. 4 - Percent Population Growth Fig. 5 - Comparative Population Growth Fig. 6 - Comparative Percent Population Growth Density Age Fig. 7 - Median Age Fig. 8 - Senior Citezen Population (62+) Fig. 9 - Township of Brick Change in Population 1990 2000 Fig. 10 - School Enrollments Fig. 11 - Change in Population Race Housing Fig. 12 - Total Housing Units 1980-2000 Households Fig. 13 - Average Household Size Fig. 14 - Household Size Groups Projection of Housing Stock Fig. 15 - NJTPA Percentage Change in Projected Number of Households, 2000-2030 Population Projection Fig. 16 - Township & County Population Projection Population and Employment Projections Fig. 17 - Forecast of Population, Employment & Household at Build-Out Employment Characteristics Fig. 18 - Number of Resident Workers by Percent Population 2000 Fig. 19 - Number of Employers by Occupation Type, 2002 Fig. 20 - Certificates of Occupancy Issued for Non-Residential Space Fig. 21 - Rate of Commercial Growth (Square Feet) Residential Building Permits Fig. 22 - Rate of Job Creation by New Commercial Development Fig. 23 - Residential Building Permits Fig. 24 - Median Family Income Income Poverty Conclusion

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Population Growth And Projection Element


Population Population growth in the Township of Brick over the past fifty years was strongly influenced by the effects of suburbanization and the impact of the proximity of the Garden State Parkway. Since 1950, the population of the Township of Brick has grown exponentially from 4,319 in 1950 to 76,119 in 2000. Fig. 1 shows the fifty-year population growth for the Township. Since the 2000 Census, the US Bureau of Census, Population Division published Estimates of Resident Population by Municipality, Ocean County, 2000-2005. Brick Township was estimated to have 78,155, showing a growth of 2,036 persons. Year 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 Estimate Township of Brick 50 year Population Growth Population Number % Change Change 4,319 16,299 11,980 73.5 35,057 18,758 53.5 53,629 18,572 34.6 66,473 12,844 19.3 76,119 9,646 12.6 78,115 2,036 2.6
Fig. 1

The percent of population growth has been declining over the past few decades. Total population growth between 1990 and 2000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census was approximately, 9,646 people, 12.67 %. Fig. 2 shows that, the population for the Township of Brick has climbed upward since 1950. The largest population increase occurred during the decades of the 1960s and 1970s in terms of total number of persons. The growth trend has slowed due to the diminishing supply of available land for development. The growth in population is leveling off and as demonstrated by the 2005 Census Estimate, if growth continues at the current pace, it will not even reach one half of the previous decades rate of growth at 12 percent. The Township of Brick is the second most populous municipality in Ocean County, following Toms River Township. The 2000 Census reported a total population of Fig. 2 76,119 in the Township of Brick. Toms River Townships population was reported to be 89,706 and Lakewood Townships population was 60, 352. However, Toms River Township and Lakewood Townships rate of growth has not slowed as significantly as the Township of Brick and has resulted in an estimated population in the US Bureau of Census, Population Division published Estimates of Resident Population by Municipality, Ocean County, 2000-2005 of 94,660 for Toms River Township and 68,834 for Lakewood Township. Fig. 3 shows comparative population growth for the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey. Comparative Population Growth 1950 4319 Brick Ocean County 56586 4835329 New Jersey 1960 16299 108192 6066782 1970 35057 208270 7171112 1980 53629 346038 7364823 1990 66473 433203 7730188 2000 76119 474933 8414350
Fig.3

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

The percent population growth for the Township of Brick for the years 1970 through 2000 is shown in Fig. 4. The percent population growth has been declining since the 1950s. The large percent growth occurred in post World War II 1950s and 1960s when families were moving out of the cities into suburbanized communities. The population growth in the Township of Brick between 1960 and 1980 saw the most significant increase. This 20-year span saw an increase of 37,510 persons. This growth occurred as the Garden State Parkway (GSP) made daily travel to points north more convenient for the working class. The GSP allowed Fig. 4 people to work in the northern cities while living in the developing suburban, seashore community. In response, major suburban, residential developments were constructed to provide ample housing.

The comparative population growth for the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey for the years 1950 through 2000 are show in Fig. 5 and the Comparative Percent of Population Growth is shown in Fig. 6. While between 1970 and 1980, the Townships population growth was significantly higher than the State of New Jersey, over the past thirty years, that growth has had a marked decrease and is more in keeping with the County and State of New Jersey.
Fig. 5

Fig. 6

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Density The number of persons per square mile is the measure of population density. In the US Bureau of Census, Population Division, Estimates of Resident Population, Population Density by County and Municipality: New Jersey, 2000-2005, the population density of the Township of Brick was estimated to be 2,979 persons per square mile. The Township of Brick is ranked the 11th most densely populated municipality in Ocean County. Age The age distribution of the population of the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey is shown in Fig. 7. The residents of the Township are generally younger than the population of the County and generally older than the population of the State of New Jersey based on the comparison of median age.

Fig. 7

The population of the Township of Brick has been aging as shown in Fig. 7. A closer look at the growing senior citizen population, shown in Fig. 8, demonstrates the upward trend of the 62+ age group over the past twenty years. This increase is most probably due to the new senior citizen developments, the increased life expectancy and the overall aging population.

Fig. 8

As shown in Fig. 9, the increase in population occurred in nearly all age group categories except the under 5, 20- , 25-34 and 65-74 age groups. These age groups experienced minor reductions in population, where the remaining age groups experienced significant increases. The largest numerical population growth occurred in the 45-54, baby

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

boomer age group. This group saw an increase of 3,912 persons with a percent change of 37.04 %. The largest percent increase occurred in the 85+ age group. This age group almost doubled with an increase of 821 individuals and a 49.13% increase. Township of Brick Change in Population 1990 2000 Subject Under 5 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-59 60-64 65-74 75-84 85+ 1990 Population 4,734 4,315 4,214 4,065 3,813 11,369 10,092 6,738 2,733 2,905 6,676 3,969 850 2000 Population 4,721 5,331 5,249 4,336 3,359 9,372 13,078 10,650 3,920 3,140 6,242 5,050 1,671 Change (number) -13 +1,016 +1,035 +271 -454 -1,997 +2,986 +3,912 +1,187 +235 -434 +1,081 +821 Change (percent) -0.27 +19.0 +19.7 +6.25 -11.9 -17.56 +22.83 +37.04 +30.28 +7.48 -6.5 +21.4 +49.13
Fig. 9

The 2000 Census Data indicates that the population cohort, under the age of 5, has shown a decrease in growth from that indicated in the 1990 Census Data and a substantial decrease in the same cohorts growth rate from 1980 to 1990. In 1980, the population cohort under 5 years of age totaled 3,901. In 1990, the under 5 cohort increased to 4,734. A significant shift in the growth trend occurred from 1990 to 2000, as the under 5 age cohort actually decreased from 4,734 to 4,721. What makes the above numbers significant is that the Baby-Boom generation (generally considered to be those individuals born from 1946 to 1964) was at ages 26 to 44 in 1990. That age span would place the Baby-Boomers at primary child bearing age. Even though the Baby-Boom Generation was at primary child bearing age during the decade of the 90s, Bricks population under age 5 decreased in number from the prior decade. Fig 10. New Jersey Department of Education data of school enrollments below demonstrates the declining enrollment of school children in the Township of Brick School District over a six year period. The number of new children entering the system through pre-k and kindergarten has been decreasing over the past six years.

Fig. 10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Also curtailing additional growth in the Township is the fact that the Baby-Bust Generation (a period of a low number of births following the Baby-Boom generally considered to include those individuals born between 1965 and 1979) will be at primary child bearing age from 2000 to 2015. A lower number of couples at child bearing age equal lower birth rates. Of course, the development in the 1990s has also left the Township with even less developable land. The rate of population growth within the Township of Brick has been decreasing significantly due to the lack of developable land and increasing environmental regulations affecting the density of new developments. Therefore, the projected population growth between 2000 and 2015 should reflect a similar, if not more significant, decline in growth due to the lack of available land for development and factors associated with the Baby Boom/ Bust age groups. This statement is further supported by the publishing of The US Census Bureau 2005 American Community Survey estimated decreases in all age groups in the Township of Brick except that of the 45-55 age group. It also estimated the total population of the Township to be less than the 2000 census at 73,110 with a margin of error of +5,127. Even with the margin of error added to the estimate, the US Census Bureau confirms the Townships position that growth is slowing at a significant rate and will result in minimal population increases in the next century. As demonstrated in Fig. 11 below, the population of Brick is aging and the birth rates are declining.

Fig. 11

Race The 2000 Census data indicates that almost 99% of Bricks population is White, while the other 1% is occupied by Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, or a combination of two or more of these races. The population of the Township of Brick is less racially mixed than that of Ocean County, where the data indicates that almost 96% of the total population of the County is White and the remaining 4% is comprised of Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander or a combination of two or more of these races.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Housing The majority of the Townships housing stock consists of single-family residential units accounting for approximately 32,689 residential properties according to the 2000 Census.

Fig. 12

This is an increase of 3,846 housing units between 1990 and 2000, an 11.7% increase in housing stock as shown in Fig. 12. The Township of Brick was ranked third in New Jersey for the biggest rise in owner occupied homes, representing more than 75% of the total housing units in the Township. The Township of Brick also ranked in the top ten municipalities in New Jersey for the biggest drop in vacant housing units, a decrease of 700 vacant units, which are now occupied. This statistic may have occurred due to the fact that many of the municipalities vacation summer homes have been converted to year-round residences. Households In 1990, there were 25,023 households, an increase of 6,155 from 1980. In 2000, the number of households was 29,511. This was an increase of 4,488 households. The average household size and percent change is shown in Fig. 13. Township of Brick Average Household Size 1990 2000 2.65 2.56 6.6% Change 1980-1990 3.3% Change 1990-2000
Fig. 13

1980 2.84

Household size continued to decrease, however, at a slower rate than between 1980 and 1990. The decrease in average household size between 1990 and 2000 was 3.3 %, half of the rate of decrease between 1980 and 1990 of 6.6%. This may be attributed to the fact that much of the senior housing, in the Township of Brick was built between the years of 1980 and 2000. The types of families and other households residing within the Township are diverse with no one type dominating. Several important types were found in large numbers in 2000. Single persons accounted for 8,643 households while, married couples without children accounted for another 9,051 households. Most large families fell into two categories. The first, nuclear families (couples with children), formed 7,705 households. The second, single parent families made up another 2,210 households. The largest number of households contained only two persons. This group was almost twice as large as any other household size with the exception of single person households. Single person households increased from 5,298 in 1990 to 7,367 in 2000.

Household size groups were distributed as follows:

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Single Person Household Two Person Household Three Person Household Four Person Household Five Person Household Six or More Person Household

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS 7,367 9,821 4,948 4,541 1,996 838

PERCENT 25.0 33.3 16.8 15.4 6.8 2.9


Fig. 14

Older households make up a large part of Bricks population. Older households, households headed by persons aged 65 or more made up 8,161 or 27.6 percent of the total in 2000. Single older persons headed 3,848 households, while older married couples formed 4,313 households. Few gender or race differences exist within the Township. A total of 3,021 female headed households were identified in the 2000 Census. Only 1,737 minority headed households were counted, the largest group being Hispanic with 824. Household incomes within Brick were typical for the Monmouth-Ocean County Housing Region. It is estimated that the 7,291 low income households residing in the Township in 1990 made up 29 percent of the total households. The estimated 3,772 moderate income households, made up 15.1 percent of the total. There are a total of 14 apartment properties in the Township. The median age of residential structures within the Township is 35 years with an average built date of 1970. The condition of the majority of the housing stock within the Township is in reasonably good condition. According to the 2000 Census, owner-occupied units greatly out numbered rental units when owner occupied units accounted for 83.4% of the total housing stock. Rental units in the Township accounted for approximately 16.6 % of all residential units. Projection of Housing Stock The New Jersey Transportation Authority has forecasted the Township of Brick will experience a 32.46% growth in the number of Households. This change represents a projected total of 9,580 new households by 2030. The NJTPA projections are provided below; NJTPA Percentage Change in Projected Number of Households, 2000-2030 Township of Brick February 2005(2) 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 # change 30,462 30,340 32,840 35,080 37,320 38,510 39,090 9,580

2000(1) 29,510

% change 32.46
Fig. 15

Source: NJTPA, March 18, 2005 1- Number of units obtained in 2000 Decennial Census 2- Actual Housing Units Certified by Local Construction Official added to 2000 U.S. Census counts.

Due to the built-out nature of the municipality, the Township of Brick does not agree with the NJTPA Household Projections included in the table above the Township of Brick does not accept the data prepared in the Rutgers report as being the most up-to-date reliable data and we have not utilized this data in the preparation of our population and employment projections for the Township. Furthermore, in 2005, the Township conducted a build-out analysis to identify all properties within the Township available for development. The municipal build-out analysis identified 340 acres of developable land remaining in the Township. This available land will not support the NJTPA projections for new growth as currently zoned. The build-out analysis was completed through manipulation of the GIS parcel layer coverage, tax assessor data and inspection of all tax maps for the Township calculates the amount of vacant land in the Township at 340 acres. The 340 acres excludes our environmentally sensitive properties that are tidally influenced or subjected to wetland preservation and buffers. The Township projects 760 new households at full build-out in the Township of Brick. The NJTPA household projection is not achievable when taking the buildout calculation prepared by the Township of Brick. Furthermore, when the household projection of 760 new households is multiplied by the projected persons per household of 2.66 persons, a population projection of 2,022 at full build-out is more realistic than the projected 9,580 persons by 2030 set forth in the NJTPA Forecast. Population Projection Population projections were prepared by the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA) in 2005. The population of each municipality and Ocean County was projected out to 2030. The population projections for the Township of Brick and Ocean County are shown in the table on the following page.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

2000 Ocean County Township of Brick 510,900 76,120

2005 553,500 77,350

Township of Brick & Ocean County Population Projection 2010 2015 2020 2025 579,500 81,900 610,400 85,970 651,000 90,100 697,200 92,430

2030 739,300 93,680

# change 228,400 17,560

% change 44.7 23.1


Fig. 16

Source: NJTPA, March 18, 2005

Population and Employment Projections The rate of population growth within the Township of Brick has been decreasing significantly due to the lack of developable land and environmental regulations affecting the density of new developments. Therefore, the projected population growth between 2000 and 2030 should reflect a similar, if not more significant, decline in growth due to the lack of available land for development and factors associated with the Baby Boom/ Bust age groups. Also, building permits issued in 2003 for new residential and commercial developments reflect the decline in available land for development. In 2003, approximately 17 acres was approved for residential development by the Planning Board. The 17 acres includes major and minor subdivisions, some of which involved two lot subdivisions where homes were already located on one lot. In some cases, the application only included adjustments to lot lines with no new structures planned for development. The net number of new homes constructed in Brick Township in 2003 was only 80. Township of Brick Forecast of Population, Employment & Household at Build-Out Projected to be added to Census 2000 Data and 2005 Estimates Population Household Employment Township of Brick Projection for 2025 2005 Build-out + MPO 2005 Projection 2000 Census MPO 2005 Projection MPO 2025 Projection + 3,142 (households x persons/households 2.66) 77,350 + 3,142 =80,492 76,119 77,350 92,430 + 1,181 (more households) 30,340 + 1,181 =31,521 29,510 30,340 38,510 + 1,957 (jobs generated) 18,470 + 1,957 =20,427 16,810 18,470 21,440
Fig. 17

Taking into consideration the Townships 2005 Build-out Analysis, when the Population, Household and Employment projections are added to the MPO 2005 projections, at 2025 or at Build-Out, the Township of Brick estimates that the 2025 Population will be 80,492, Households will be 31,521 and Employment will be 20,427. As demonstrated above, the MPO projection to 2025 would be difficult at best due to the fact at full build-out, the land use in the Township of Brick will only be able to support an additional 2,142 persons, 1,181 households and 1,957 jobs. These projections will fall short of the MPO projection for 2025 Population 92,430, Household 38,510, and Employment 21,440. Employment Characteristics An analysis of the existing and probable future employment characteristics of the municipality is provided herein; According to the New Jersey Department Township of Brick of Labor, 2003, the Township of Brick Number of Resident Workers by Percent Population 2000 ranked third in Ocean County for the 27.1 Management, Professional & related Occupations average number of employees covered 13.1 Service Occupations under the New Jersey Unemployment 27 Sales & Office Occupations Compensation Law with 18,369 jobs. 0.2 Farm, Fishing & Forestry Occupations The number of resident workers by 10.1 Construction, Extraction & Maintenance percent of population is provided below, 9.7 Production, Transportation & Material Moving as reported in the 2000 Census. 12.7 Government Workers Fig. 18 41,552 Total Number of Workers

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

The service industry is the predominant employer in the Township according to the 2002 US Economic Census. The service industry category includes a number of business types including the arts, entertainment and recreation, administration, support, waste management, and remediation services, professional, scientific and technical services, management and educational services. Retail Trade ranked second in the Township of Brick including department stores, office supply stores, building materials dealers, plumbing supply stores, electrical supply stores, gasoline service stations and automotive dealers. The Construction Trade was the next largest employer. Below is a table listing the Number of Employers by Occupation Type, 2002. These three entities do not have any plans for further expansion and will not be significantly adding to their work force as it presently exists. Therefore, the future employment characteristics for the municipality consist of the majority of the employers to be a variety of commercial and retail businesses with the associated educational, medical and public sector providing for the balance of jobs available within the Township. According to the NJ Department of Labor, 2004, the major employers in the Township of Brick employed the following: Brick Township Board of Education - 1,617 employees Meridian Health: Ocean Medical Center - 1,325 employees Brick Township Municipal Offices - 660 employees Certificates of Occupancy Issued for Non-Residential Space from 2000 to February of 2005 highlight the healthy growth of the Townships commercial industry. Township of Brick Number of Employers by Occupation Type, 2002
* Data on public employees is not available

129 182 23 349 2 37 77 90 9 898

Construction Retail Trade Transportation & Utilities Services Farm, Fishing, Forestry & Mining Manufacture & Wholesale Trade Finance, Insurance & Real Estate Health Care Unclassified (zip code boundary not defined) Total (except public)
Fig. 19

Township of Brick Certificates of Occupancy Issued for Non-Residential Space by UCC Use Group and Potential # Jobs Generated*, 2002 to February 2005 Office (B) & Assembly (A-2, A-3 Uses) 144,223 SF 433 Jobs Retail (M) 267,049 SF 267 Jobs Education(E) 118,809 SF 119 Jobs Industrial (F) 23,553 SF 47 Jobs Institutional (I) 241,846 SF 484 Jobs Storage (S) 459,217 SF 92 Jobs Total 1,254,697 SF 1,442 Jobs
* Potential number of jobs estimated using COAH job multipliers contained in Appendix E of N.J.A.C. 5:94, Substantive Rules Fig. 21 Fig. 20

However, the amount of commercial land available for development is becoming severely limited due to the fact that most of the commercially zoned property has already been developed, redeveloped or approved for development. In addition, our industrial park is nearing build-out and is relatively small, totaling less than twenty acres. Two of the last remaining industrial zone properties have just been certified for occupancy in 2005 totaling 35,079 square feet and the final parcel was approved at the Zoning Board of Adjustment. Employment Projections forecast by NJTPA project employment growth is not consistent with the recent trends for commercial growth in the Township of Brick. The peak of commercial growth for job creation based on use group occurred in 1999 as seen in the Ten-year Historic Trend of Certificate of Occupancy of Commercial Developments. In contrast, the peak for development of commercial square footage occurred in 2000. This is a result of the decrease in the amount of land zoned for the largest job creating uses including office

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

and assembly becoming built-out in this time frame. As a result, the diversity of commercial development has become more narrowed with a major concentration in retail,storage and institutional growth and less in the larger job creation uses including office and assembly. We expect to see a decline in the rate of commercial job creation, due to the fact that there is limited remaining available commercial land for development, where the NJTPA projections show an increased rate of commercial growth. Residential Building Permits A good indicator of a municipalities growth is the number of building permits issued annually. According to the Ocean County Planning Department, between the years 1990-2000, 4,000 new construction - building permits were issued in the Township of Brick as shown in Fig. 23.

Fig. 22 Fig. 23

Building permits issued in 2003 for new residential and commercial developments reflect the decline in available land for development. In 2003, approximately 17 acres was approved for residential development by the Planning Board. The 17 acres includes major and minor subdivisions, some of which involved two lot subdivisions where homes were already located on one lot. In some cases, the application only included adjustments to lot lines with no new structures planned for development. The net number of new homes constructed in Brick Township in 2003 was only 80. In 2004, 155 housing units were certified, and a total of 71 demolition permits were issued for residential units, with a net new development of 84 units. This demonstrates that the building occurring in the Township is primarily in-fill or the replacement of older, smaller homes with new more modern housing for single families. Due to the lack of available land for development and the declining baby boom population, building permits are expected to continue to decline. In support of this statement, the Construction Official in the Township of Brick has reported that in the year 2005, the number of residential certificates of occupancy that were issued was 137, however, the number of residential demolition permits was 73. This is a net increase of only 63 new residential units within the Township in 2005, This supports the anticipated decline in the rate of residential development due to the lack of build-able land.

10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Population Growth and Projection Element

Fig. 24

Income At present, the 2000 Census money income data ranks the Township of Brick at 353rd for the State of New Jersey. The Township of Brick exceeds Ocean Countys Per Capita Income average by more than $1,000. The Township of Brick continues to have higher than average income levels than Ocean County, but slightly lower than the New Jersey average as shown in Fig. 24. Poverty Ocean County s poverty levels were determined for 502,712 persons and reported in the 2000 census that 7.0 percent of those individuals, or 34,945 persons were below the poverty level. In the Township of Brick, the percentage of persons below the poverty level are significantly less than the County average. Only 4.5 % or 3,411 persons out of 75,440 persons were determined to be below the poverty level. Conclusion In 2005, the Township prepared an inventory of all available developable property. The data set created through manipulation of the parcel layer coverage calculates the amount of vacant land in the Township at 340 acres. Considering that the total acreage of the Township is 16,768, this only leaves 2.3% of the land area of the township available for development, or 97.7% built-out. Most of the only remaining parcels of undeveloped land are severely constrained by environmental sensitivity, making development, at large scales, difficult at best. The current policy of the administration to purchase undeveloped parcels of land for conservation and development controls will have a significant impact on the future population growth. It is expected that the growth trend over the next ten years will be more like that of more developed urban areas, where in-fill developments, re-development of already built areas, in-migration of a more diverse ethnic population and the cyclic pattern of birth and death of persons will be the main thrust of the population make-up resulting in limited population growth.

11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Utilities Plan Element

Table of Contents

Service Area The Water System The Water Distribution and Storage System The Sewerage System Environmental Compliance Public Works Solid Waste Disposal and Collection System Ocean County Landfill - Manchester Recyclables Maintenance and Road Facilities Other Public Utilities Cable TV Natural Gas Electric Telephone

1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4

Township of Brick, Master Plan Utilities Plan Element

Utilities Plan Element


The Township of Brick is fortunate to have a public utilities authority to serve the 26.4 square miles of the Township with a comprehensive water and sewer system. This authority is the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority (BTMUA). In addition to BTMUA, the Township Public Works Department manages and maintains all other aspects of municipal maintenance including solid waste disposal and collection, road, storm sewer, and public equipment maintenance. The BTMUA is a public body politic and corporate of the State of New Jersey, created by an ordinance by the Township Council on February 6, 1969. The BTMUA has approximately 120 employees organized into five (5) departments: Field Operations, Water Quality, Engineering, Finance and Customer Accounts. Service Area The BTMUA services the 26.4 square miles of Brick Township with a comprehensive water and sewer system. All of the mainland areas are served with both systems while on the barrier island, sewer service is provided by the BTMUA and water service is provided by the New Jersey American Water Co., a private water purveyor. Sanitary sewer service is also provided to a portion of southwestern Wall Township. Under Ocean County Utilities Authority (OCUA) and the Manasquan River Regional Sewerage Authority (MRRSA) agreements, up to a maximum of 250,000 gallons/day, from Wall Township can be conveyed through the BTMUAs systems to the OCUA interceptors. Approximately 20,000 gallons/day of the capacity is already being utilized. The BTMUA also supplies approximately 1,250,000 gallons of potable water per day to Point Pleasant Borough and Point Pleasant Beach Borough. The Water System As of September 1, 2000, the BTMUA provided 32,410 customers with water service. According to the BTMUA records, the total volume of treated water delivered to the system in 1999 was 2,776,000,000 gallons or an average of 7.61 million gallons per day (MGD). Currently, the BTMUA obtains water from there separate sources, namely: (1) groundwater from the Cohansey wells, (2) groundwater from the deep Raritan-Magothy wells, and (3) surface waters from the Metedeconk River. All sources of water are located on BTMUA property adjacent to the treatment plant. The existing well field consists of eight (8) Chohansey wells and four (4) Raritan-Magothy wells, for a total of twelve (12) production wells. All the wells have been constructed in accordance with rules and regulations promulgated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The total production capacity of the well field is 11.00 MGD. The present capacity of the surface water supply intake is 16 MGD. The BTMUA has been granted diversion rights of 385.00 million gallons (MG) per month by the NJDEP, with a maximum of 327.81 MG from the Cohansey wells and surface water combined. There are no limitations on the daily diversion so long as the monthly and yearly totals are not exceeded. The total annual diversion limit is 3,496.70 MG, which is an annual average of 9.58 MGD. The BTMUAs existing water treatment plant has a maximum capacity of 16 MGD. The plant is designed to produce water at a peak hourly rate of 20 MGD for short periods of time. The excess capacity is required to meet the summer peak demands, which are substantially higher than winter demands. Seasonal fluctuation in water use is due primarily to weather patterns and, secondarily, to increase summer populations. The last six years have shown only a slight increase in the average water demand from 7.29 MGD in 1994 to 7.61 MGD in 1999. The peak demand has reached as high as 13.34 MGD in 1999. The Water Distribution and Storage System Except for the Barrier Island, the BTMUA supplies water to all those areas of the Township, which are developed. The New Jersey American Water Supply Company supplies water to that portion of the Township, which lies on the Barrier Island between the Atlantic Ocean and Barnegat Bay. There are 1,425 water customers on the Barrier Island that are not being serviced by the BTMUA. The BTMUAs distribution system consists of approximately 336 miles of pipe, which range in diameter from 4 through 20. Major transmission lines extend from the water treatment plant to the storage tanks and then to the domestic distribution pipelines. The system delivers water to approximately 32,410 users.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Utilities Plan Element

The BTMUA service area consists of a low service zone and a high service zone. Water is stored in two standpipes in the low service area (each containing two million gallons of water), and in two standpipes located in the high service area (one having a storage of two million gallons, the other 0.35 million gallons). There is also an additional 0.32 million gallons of water stored in the clear well below the water treatment plant and 1 million gallons in the storage tank at the plant site. Of the total 7.67 million gallons stored within the water system, approximately two million gallons are available to meet the operating needs of the water system and are therefore considered usable volume for meeting the normal consumption. The remaining storage is considered to provide water for fire-fighting purposes and can be removed from the water system through any of the 2,114 fire hydrants maintained by the BTMUA for fire-fighting purposes. The BTMUA also owns and operates six water pressure booster stations to increase the pressure of the water for the higher areas of the Township. It should be understood that the BTMUA is located in the NJDEPs Water Supply Critical Area #1 and this designation has severely restricted groundwater withdrawals. In order to lessen reliance on groundwater, and to increase the reliability of the system, the BTMUA has evaluated numerous water supply initiatives and has begun the construction of a 900 million-gallon pumped water storage reservoir. The reservoir site is located on the border of Brick and Wall Township and is currently anticipated to be operational by 2003. The Sewerage System As of September 1, 2000, the BTMUA served 33,796 sewer customers. The sewage collection system within the Township consists of approximately 340 miles of sewer pipe and 25 pumping stations, serving all developed areas of the Township, including the Barrier Island. Approximately 107,622 of gravity sewer mains traverse the Township ranging in diameter from 16 to 72. Most of the sewerage system has been constructed within the past twenty-five years and a limited portion of the system is now in need of rehabilitation. For this reason, the BTMUA has initiated a long-term rehabilitation project to address the high priority areas in the system. Sewer system maintenance also includes periodic inspection and flushing of the lines. The BTMUA uses video cameras to inspect the sewer pipes, using its own TV truck and full-time crew. Currently, the bulk of sewer extensions being installed throughout the Township are constructed by developers of various projects. Upon completion, the lines are donated at not cost to the BTMUA and thereafter are operated and maintained by the BTMUA. The BTMUA currently has 25 pumping stations in operation. Similar to the collection system, all stations have been constructed within the last thirty years. A continuing program of operation, maintenance and evaluation is being carried out in order to maximize the operating efficiencies of the stations. The BTMUA has a service contract with the OCUA. The OCUA agreement provides for the treatment and disposal of all the wastes collected by the BTMUAs sewage collection system. The BTMUA provides for the collection of the sewage within the Township which, in turn is discharged into the trunk sewers of the OCUA. The OCUA provides treatment of all sewerage within the Township. The OCUA treatment plant, the Northern Water Pollution Control Facility, is located off of Mantoloking Road and is permitted by the NJDEP Pollutant Discharge Elimination System to discharge the treated effluent one- mile off shore of Mantoloking, NJ through 5,000 of piping into the Atlantic Ocean. The OCUA plant is a secondary treatment plant using the activated sludge technology to more efficiently treat the sewage before discharge. The capacity of the OCUA plant is currently 32 million gallons/day (MGD) and had an average daily flow of 22 MGD in 1999. The estimated 2000 population for the Township is 76,509 full-time residents. The total population increases during the summer season due to the influx of vacationers. The growth in the Township is almost exclusively residential units, of which a significant portion is senior citizen or adult communities. Residential customers constitute the major users of the BTMUA systems, accounting for 71% of the system demand in 1999. In addition, there are both commercial and industrial customers, however, with the exception of Brick Hospital, none of these constitute major water users. Environmental Compliance All BTMUA operations are in compliance with the environmental guides prescribed by the various State and Federal regulatory agencies. The BTMUA maintains State-licensed certified laboratory, staffed by a graduate chemist, to perform all necessary testing. The BTMUA also employs a State-licensed Water Treatment Operator (T-4), a Water Distribution Operator (W-4) and a Sewage Collection System Operator (C-4). These licenses are of the highest level attainable and require monthly reporting of environmental compliance.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Utilities Plan Element

Public Works The Department of Public Works performs some of the Townships most important services for the people of Brick Township. These include the collection and disposal of solid waste, leaves and recyclable, the paving and maintenance of Township roads and drainage facilities, the maintenance and repair of Township vehicles, the operation of two recycling collection facilities, snow plowing and the maintenance of the Townships parks. Brick Township also has a fully automated solid waste collection and semi-automated recycling collection system. Solid Waste Disposal and Collection System The Township of Brick operates weekly curbside collection of solid waste. The Township employs an automated collection system which uses special trucks with robotic arms that lift specially designed carts (provided to the residents by the Township), dump their contents into the truck and replace the cart to the curbside. The automated system requires only one driver / operator, and reduces manpower requirements, enhances worker safety, dramatically reduces on the job injuries and resultant workmans compensation costs, and increases productivity. Ocean County Landfill - Manchester The Township utilizes the Ocean County Landfill located in Manchester for its solid waste disposal needs. On average, the Township disposes of over 31,000 tons of solid waste a year at that facility. As a result of solid waste deregulation and the elimination of some extraneous solid waste tipping fee taxes, the Municipal Tipping Fee has dropped into the low $50s per ton in the last several years. It is anticipated that the Ocean County Landfill will continue operating for the next two decades. Private Haulers service most of the Commercial Facilities in Brick Township. These include Waste Management, Marpal, Big-n-Little Carting, and Ocean Carting. Most of them utilize the Ocean County Landfill. When the automated collection system began in the township, small businesses and commercial uses continued to be serviced by municipal solid waste pickup. However, new businesses or any business that changes the operation or land use through municipal review must begin to provide their own solid waste pickup. Brick Township currently has three landfills, two of which are closed. The only operating landfill is at the Ridge Road Public Works facility. This facility is utilized exclusively for leaves and composting. The James H. James Landfill was a privately owned and operated landfill that was closed by NJDEP in 1986. This landfill had experienced problems with methane gas in the past. The NJDEP has since installed a permanent methane extraction system which seems to have alleviated the problem. Another major problem has been that the landfill was not correctly delineated when closed and as a result, several homes were built close to the edge of the buried wastes. The Township of Brick owns the other landfill named for its previous owner French. The Frenchs Landfill was purchased by the Township in 1974, operated by the Township for several years and ultimately closed by the Township in April 1979. Unfortunately, contaminants from the landfill have leaked into the groundwater and migrated off of the site. In September of 1999, the Township imposed a ban on the use of private irrigation wells in the vicinity while testing was conducted to determine the extent of contamination. Following delineation of the contamination plume, the Township reduced the size of the ban by approximately forty-percent. The Township has installed additional permanent monitoring wells and will be sealing the affected wells in the coming months. Recyclables The Township of Brick collects residential recyclables at the curbside weekly. Recyclable items are newspaper, junk mail, magazines, plastics, aluminum, glass and cardboard. The Township also operates a recycling / disposal facility at Ridge Road for residential use. In addition to standard recyclables, residents can drop off construction debris, scrap metal and yard waste at this facility. After collecting the recyclables at the curbside, the recyclables are brought back to Ridge Road and dumped into large roll-off containers. When these containers are full, they are transported to the Northern Ocean County Recycling Facility in Lakewood. Leaves are composted at Ridge Road. Brush is transported to the Lakewood facility for handling by the County.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Utilities Plan Element

Maintenance and Road Facilities The Public Works Department maintains all Township vehicles including police cars, garbage trucks, recycling trucks, and municipal light trucks as well as the communitys first aid squad vehicles. Altogether, the department is responsible for nearly 300 vehicles. The Township currently operates two street sweepers. They generally operate during spring, summer and fall. Snowplowing is performed by the Township utilizing dedicated snowplowing trucks. During plowing operations, through streets and intersections are given priority. Once these have been cleared, single passes are made down the middle of all streets to open them up for emergency vehicles. Once that has been accomplished, all streets are then plowed curb to curb. Sand and salt are kept at Ridge Road in a storage building. The Township has its own in-house paving program. From late spring until early fall, Township crews re-pave Township streets in residential areas. Some re-paving jobs are more complex and require outsourcing. The Township does perform some storm water drainage maintenance. This includes cleaning out storm drains. Some drainage basins are maintained by the Township; others are the responsibility of the development associations that the basins serve. The Township owns and operates three public ocean beaches. The Department of Public Works rakes these beaches frequently during the summer months. In the spring, the department and students from the elementary schools plant dune grass at the beaches in an effort to provide for dune stabilization and reduce erosion. Other Public Utilities Other utility companies supply Brick Township residents with cable TV, natural gas, electric and telephone services. Cable TV Cable services are provided through the Comcast Network. Cable hook-up services are available for all residents of the Township. Comcast also makes Brick Township its home for billing and maintenance services. The building is located on Brick Boulevard. Natural Gas Natural Gas is also available to all residents in the Township through underground gas piping. The natural gas is distributed through NJ Natural Gas. However, natural gas suppliers are chosen by the customer as a result of the deregulation of the energy industry. Electric Electric supply is distributed to all residents through Jersey Central Power and Light. However, energy suppliers are chosen by the customer as a result of the deregulation of the energy industry. Deregulation of the electric generation industry and the unbundling of services have failed to produce a significant response to consumers all across the state, including here in Brick Township. Electricity is provided through underground utilities in newer developments and along power lines that line most streets and highways within the Township. Telephone Telephone services are provided through a variety of companies, available to each homeowner. These companies will provide local and long distance services, if desired to all residents of the Township. One of Verizon's maintenance and storage facilities is also located within the Township. The building is located on Rt. 88 west, east of the Laurelton intersection. Telephone services are provided through telephone wires that traverse the Township along roads and highways. In newer developments, underground hook-ups are provided through fiber optic cables.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recycling Element

Table of Contents

Process Fig. 1 Tons of Recycled Material Issues Fig. 2 2006 Recycling Cost Analysis Recommendations

1 1 2 2 3

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recycling Element

Recycling Element
On April 14, 1981 the Township of Brick established a program for the collection of recyclables under Ordinance No. 31 E-81, it then became mandatory for all residents to separate paper, glass, plastic and metals; also yard waste including leaves, grass clippings and wood cuttings. As required under New Jersey Statute 40:55D-28 (12): A recycling plan element which incorporates the State Recycling plan goals, including provisions for the collection, disposition and recycling of recyclable materials designated in the municipal recycling ordinance, and for the collection, disposition and recycling of recyclable materials within any development proposal for the construction of 50 or more units of single-family residential housing or 25 or more units of multi-family residential housing and any commercial or industrial development proposal for the utilization of 1,000 square feet or more of land 40:55D-28 (12). Process The Township has material collections of all of the above materials once a week. Leaves are picked up curbside in bags from October to December and from April through May. Holiday trees are also picked up after the holidays. The Ocean County Department of Solid Waste holds a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day once a year, held at the Public Works yard. In 2006 the Township established facilities for collection of batteries, paint cans and propane tanks. An open container recycling center is open to the public six days a week for the drop off of all recyclable materials and bins for concrete, computers and clothing. In total, Brick Township recycled 36,406.01 tons of recycled materials in 2006. Figure 1, below shows the material distribution of those materials recycled.

Fig. 1

In 2005 the amount of materials collected represents a recycling rate of 58.91% far exceeding the State recycling goal set forth by the State Recycling Act and County Recycling Plan. The Township of Brick ranked second, behind Point Pleasant Borough in Ocean County for the largest percentage of total materials recycled by municipality. Recyclables are also picked up by the township at the Civic Plaza and Public Schools.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recycling Element

Issues: The Townships Solid/Waste Recycling percentage has dropped from 59% in 2005 to 41% in 2006. This drop in recycled materials presents a number of fiscal issues for the Township. For each ton of recycled material, the Township saves $65.40 in land fill tipping fees. In 2006, the Township recycled 29,266 tons of materials, which resulted in a savings of $1,914,031. However, the Township has potential to save more in tipping fees if the percentage of recycled materials is increased. The more materials the Township recycles, the less we pay to dispose of the materials in landfills. In addition, the Ocean County Solid Waste Department sells the recycled materials to be recycled in various industries. The Township receives revenue from the County for the sale of those materials to be recycled. The following issues have been identified by Township officials to increase recycling in the Township to reduce tipping fees to landfills and increase recycling of materials and revenue received by the sale of those recyclables: 1. Prepare a plan for the County mandated transition to Dual Stream recycling. 2. Promote more commercial recycling from local merchants. 3. Increase residential and commercial tonnage by ten percent. A cost analysis was performed by the Townships Administration Office to outline the fiscal benefits of increasing recyclable materials.
Fig.2

Expenses Salary Truck Debt Service Fuel Benefits Insurance Disposal Fees Total

Dollars $525,233 $65,292 $58,080 $199,588 $7,499 $8,131 $863,823

Revenue/Savings Tipping Fees Avoided County Revenue Share State Revenue Share White Goods Propane Tanks Auto Scrap Total

Dollars $1,914,031 $126,869 $35,887 $101,385 $997 $143 $2,17,9314

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recycling Element

Recommendations To achieve the aforementioned goals, the Township will pursue increased awareness through an educational program that will present the benefits of recycling to every child K-8 (7,223). Each student will be given materials to bring home for parents to review. A DPW employee will be assigned to identify residential and commercial locations that are not recycling. Educational materials will then be sent to these individuals to encourage recycling. If they continue their non-compliance fines may be levied. Increase the number of containers in high traffic areas such as beach and park locations.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Stormwater Management Plan

Table of Contents

Introduction Goals The Water Cycle Fig.1 - The Water Cycle Natural Drainage Watersheds Land Use and its impact on Water Quality Habitat Loss Non-point Source Pollution Stomwater System A Developed Community Fig.2 - 50 Year Poulation Trend Density Fig.3 - 50 Year Poulation Growth Population Projection Households Average Household Size Residential Building Permits Fig.4 - Residential Building Permits The Declining Rate of Growth Fig.5 - Percent Change In Population What the Future Holds Natural Resources . Waterways and their Condition Fig.6 - Navigable Waterways NJDEP AMNET New Jersey Impairment Score Fig.7 - NJDEP AMNET NJ Impairment Score Ground Water Non-Point Sources Point Sources Illicit Discharges Design and Performance Standards Fig.8 - Basin Safety Ledges Runoff Controls for Construction Sites Runoff Controls for Post Development and Redevelopment Pollution Prevention Good Housekeeping Practices at Public Facilities BMP-Based Control Measures Ordinance Requirements Public Education and Outreach Fig.9 - Best Management Practices Public Involvement and Participation Fig.10 - Estuarine Land Use Fig.11 - TMDL Requirement Issues and Strategies Plan Consistency Non-Structural Stormwater Management Strategies Municipal Build-Out Analysis Fig.8 - Residential and Commercial Build-Out of Privately-Owned Vacant Land Municipal Mitigation Plan Environmental Enhancement Projects

1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 8 8 8 9 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 13 13 14 15 15 15 16 16 19

Township of Brick, Master Plan Stormwater Management Plan

Table of Contents Maps

Stormwater Infrastructure Hydrologic Units (HUC14's) Land Use Plan. Open Space & Recreation Wetlands FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Zones Waterways Groundwater Recharge Areas Wellhead Protection Areas USGS

A B C D E F G H I J

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Stormwater Management Plan


Introduction Brick Township boasts the most waterfront property of any municipality in New Jersey. To this end, Brick Township has an obligation to protect those waterfront areas from degradation from land uses and stormwater runoff. To address this obligation, this stormwater management plan is being introduced as an element to the Master Plan to meet standards set forth in N.J.A.C. 7:14A-25 Municipal Stormwater Regulations. This plan will comply with the New Jersey Stormwater Management Planning Rules N.J.A.C. 7:8-4.2. This plan contains all required elements as described in N.J.A.C. 7:8 and is intended to serve as a guide for future stormwater management issues within the Township of Brick. This plan addresses groundwater recharge, stormwater quantity, and stormwater quality impacts by incorporating stormwater design and performance standards for new major developments, defined as projects that disturb one or more acres of land. These standards are intended to minimize the adverse impacts of stormwater runoff on water quality and water quantity and the loss of groundwater recharge that provides baseflow in receiving water bodies. The plan describes long-term operation and maintenance measures for existing and future stormwater facilities. Since the Township of Brick has less than 640 acres or one square mile of vacant, developable land left, a build-out analysis was not required to be completed as part of this plan, however, a detailed land use analysis was completed in 2005 showing approximately 330 acres of remaining vacant, developable land within the Township. It should be understood that while not more than one square mile of land in the Township remains vacant and developable, the Township boasts close to 3,000 acres permanently preserved as open space and recreation areas. Goals Under New Jerseys Municipal Land Use Law, Chapter 291 N.J.S.A. 40:55D-95 Storm Water Management Plan Requirements, A storm water management plan and storm water management ordinance or ordinances shall conform to all relevant Federal and State statutes, rules and regulations concerning storm water management or flood control and shall be designed: a. to reduce flood damage, including damage to life and property; b. to minimize storm water runoff from any new land development; c. to reduce soil erosion from any development or construction project; d. to assure the adequacy of existing and proposed culverts, bridges and other in-stream structures; e. to maintain groundwater recharge; f. to prevent, to the greatest extent feasible, an increase in non-point pollution; g. to maintain the integrity of stream channels for their biological functions, as well as for drainage; and h. to minimize public safety hazards at any storm water detention facilities constructed as part of subdivision or pursuant to a site plan. In addition, the Township further outlines goals to: a. minimize pollutants in stormwater runoff from new and existing development to restore, enhance, and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the waters of the state, to protect public health, to safeguard fish and aquatic life and scenic and ecological values, and to enhance the domestic, municipal, recreational, industrial and other uses of water; and b. protect public safety through the proper design and operation of stormwater basins. A stormwater management plan shall also include such structural changes and such additional nonstructural measures and practices as may be necessary to manage stormwater. This plan outlines specific stormwater design and performance standards for new development. Additionally, the plan proposes stormwater management controls to address impacts from existing developments including maintenance and monitoring of existing stormwater structures and education and outreach. Preventative and corrective maintenance strategies are included in the plan to ensure long-term effectiveness of stormwater management facilities. Preventative and corrective maintenance is required under Section 396-16 of the Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance and are discussed on page 11 of this document. The plan also outlines safety standards for stormwater infrastructure to be implemented to protect public safety. See MAP A Stormwater Infrastructure. The current Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance addresses all of the issues required by the MLUL. In addition, other stormwater related ordinances address non-point source pollution, landscaping, and vegetation, buffers and impervious cover requirements that help to make the stormwater management techniques more effective. 1

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

In addition, under the Sewage Infrastructure Improvement Act, Brick Township and the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority completed a comprehensive study of all sewage and stormwater infrastructure in the municipality. This study includes all locations of inlets, outlets, basins and piping throughout the municipality and is updated annually by the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority. This information is valuable to the management of stormwater and water quality management in Brick Township. This plan identifies stormwater management areas by using watersheds as management units. Watersheds provide manageable geographic areas by which to identify sources of pollution, manage flooding and erosion and target areas for public education and outreach. The Water Cycle When it rains, the rainwater flows over land into waterways or is absorbed by the ground or plants. Water evaporates from land and water bodies becoming water vapor in the atmosphere. Water is also released from trees and other plants through transpiration. The water vapor from evaporation and transpiration form clouds in the atmosphere, which in turn, provides precipitation to start the cycle again. This process of water recycling, known as the water cycle, repeats itself continually. Natural Drainage Watersheds A watershed is the area of land that drains into a body of water such as a river, lake, stream or bay. Ridges or high points, such as hills or slopes separate watersheds from each other. A watershed includes the waterway itself, the land bounded by the divides and all of the land uses contained within the watershed. Conglomerations of watersheds make up drainage basins. These basins usually encompass the watersheds of many smaller rivers and streams that eventually drain into a larger water body, such as the Barnegat Bay or the Atlantic Ocean. A map of the watersheds within the Township is provided with labels detailing the United States Geologic Survey Hydrologic Unit Codes. See MAP B - Hydrologic Units (HUC14's). Watershed boundaries do not follow political divides. Most municipalities are located partially within watersheds. Brick Township is located within two large watershed areas identified by the NJDEP. The extreme northern portion of the Township drains to the Manasquan Watershed while the southern portion of the Township drains entirely to the Barnegat Bay Watershed. However, the Township has sub-watersheds located entirely or partly within the municipality. These subwatersheds include: The Manasquan River, North Branch of Metedeconk River, Beaverdam Creek, Metedeconk River, Kettle Creek, Metedeconk Neck, the Barrier Island and the Atlantic Coastal Watersheds. Land Use and its impact on Water Quality Urbanization (or development) has a great effect on local water resources. It changes how water flows in the watershed and what flows in the water. Both surface and groundwater flows are changed. As a watershed becomes developed, trees, shrubs and other plants are replaced with impervious surfaces (roads, rooftops, parking lots and other hard surfaces that do not allow stormwater to soak into the ground). Without the plants to store and slow the flow of stormwater, the rate of stormwater runoff is increased. Less stormwater is able to soak into the ground because sidewalks, roads, parking lots, and rooftops block this infiltration. This means a greater volume of water reaches the waterway faster and less of that water is able to infiltrate to ground water. This in turn leads to more flooding after storms but reduced flow in streams and rivers during dry periods. The reduced amount of infiltrating water can lower ground water levels, which in turn can stress local waterways that depend on steadier flows of water. The sediment settles to fill in stream channels, lakes and reservoirs. This also increases flooding and the need for dredging to clear streams lakes or lagoons for boating. Providing recharge areas and detention basins in newer developments as required through the Township Stormwater Management Ordinance can prevent flooding. Habitat Loss The erosion of stream banks and scouring of channels will occur due to an increase in the volume of water. This in turn degrades habitat for plant and animal life that depend on clear water. Sediment from eroded stream banks clogs the gills of fish and blocks light needed for plants. 2

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Non-point Source Pollution In addition to the high volume of runoff caused by urbanization, contaminants in the urban runoff increases. These include litter, cigarette butts and other debris form sidewalks and streets, motor oil poured into storm sewers, heavy metals from brake linings, settled air pollutants form car exhaust and pesticides and fertilizers from lawn care. These contaminants reach local waterways through our stormwater system quickly after a storm and can cause clogging and pollution of our streams. The decreased water quality found in Brick Townships waterways is mostly due to Non-Point Source Pollution a.k.a. people pollution. People pollution is caused from the everyday activities of people. Fertilizing lawns and gardens, walking pets, changing motor oil and littering provide a cumulative negative effect on our waterways. All of these activities leave residue or chemicals on the land. When it rains, these residues are washed into our stormdrain system and discharged directly into our waterways. This type of pollution can cause algal blooms, beach closings, excessive siltation of water bodies; shellfish bed closures and overall degraded water quality. Stormwater System In areas where no development exists, water naturally flows down hill to the lowest point of the watershed, where the stream or waterway resides. The water flows over soil and vegetation where pollutants can filter out and where the speed of the flow of water is slowed by the natural topography. When development changes the direction of this flow and replaces the natural topography with roadways, storm drains and gullies, it reduces potential for filtration and speeds the flow of the water creating flooding and erosion of the streams. Stormwater flows into the stormwater system through storm drains. These are frequently located along the curbs of parking lots and roadways. The grate that prevents larger objects from flowing into the storm sewer system is called a catch basin. Once below ground, the stormwater flows through pipes, which lead to an outfall where the stormwater enters a stream, river, lake or lagoon. In Brick Township, most of the older systems drain directly to local waterways without any treatment. In some areas of the Township, the outfall may lead to a stormwater management basin. These basins control the flow of stormwater and can also improve water quality, depending on how they are designed. These basins are frequently seen in newer commercial and residential areas. In the first rush of water from a rainstorm, much of the debris and other pollutants that had settled on the land surface and in the stormwater sewer since the last storm will be picked up and carried into the local stream. This can significantly add to water quality problems. It is therefore important to protect the stormwater system from sources of pollution. Managing stormwater to reduce the impact of development on local watersheds and aquifers relies on minimizing the disruption in the natural flow both quality and quantity of stormwater. By designing with nature, the impact of urbanization can be greatly reduced. This can be accomplished by following these principles: minimizing impervious surfaces; maximizing natural areas or areas of dense vegetation; structural stormwater controls such as stormwater management basins; and practicing pollution prevention by avoiding contact between stormwater and pollutants. The stormwater system in the Township of Brick is at varying levels of sophistication. Older, more dense residentially developed areas of the township have antiquated or non-existent stormwater controls. In many instances, curbing and sidewalks do not exist, therefore allowing water to flow along natural slopes or down the edge of pavement of the residential roadways directly into stormdrains or culverts. In some of these areas, this system works well, while in others, drainage is insufficient and causes major seasonal flooding. In new, residentially developed areas, the stormdrain system is more updated and provides for more efficient movement of water along curblines that help direct the water to infiltration systems in detention facilities. Some degree of treatment occurs in these more updated systems. Commercial areas that were developed prior to the newest technology are severely inadequate when it comes to water quality and quantity control. These areas are the reason for much of the larger non-point source pollution issues such as litter, siltation and eutrophication. The more recently developed or redeveloped commercial properties within the Township provide adequate water quality and quantity management controls as they utilized the most up-to-date technologies including storm septors and below ground recharge systems.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

A Developed Community Brick Township is a Suburban/Urban municipality of 26.2 square miles located in the northeastern portion of Ocean County. It is bordered by the Manasquan River to the North, the Atlantic Ocean to the East, Dover Township to the South and Lakewood to the West. The headwaters of the Barnegat Bay reside within the Township as well as many tributaries to the Manasquan River Watershed and the Metedeconk River Watershed. Brick Township has experienced an explosion of development since the early 1970s. In the years between 1980 and 1990 alone, the municipalitys population doubled. Presently, the Township is estimated to have more than 79,000 residents and has approximately 330 acres of developable privately owned vacant lands left in which to build or add to the open space preservation rolls. It is currently a built-out community struggling to retain the remaining rural character that once drew vacationers and settlers to its shores. Brick Township is a community that has been developed over the years in spurts due to economic viability and its attractive location along the Manasquan and Metedeconk Rivers. Recreational boaters, fishermen, and tradesmen originally occupied riverside bungalows and bedroom communities until the construction of the Garden State Parkway in the 1950s. The Garden State Parkway brought many new residential developments such as Lake Riviera, Midstreams, Bay Harbor and many other smaller sub-divisions that brought year-round residents to a once summertime recreational destination. Now major commercial chains such as Barnes and Noble, Wal-mart, Bon-Ton, Kohls and Lowes Home Improvement Stores call Brick Township their home, bringing a viable commercial and retail contingent to the local economy in a mostly residential municipality. See MAP C - Land Use Plan.

Since 1950, the population of the Township of Brick has grown exponentially from 4,319 in 1950 to 76,119 in 2000. Figure 3 shows the fifty-year population growth for the Township of Brick.
Fig. 3

The percent of population growth has been declining over the past few decades, due to the diminishing availability of developable lands, however, the absolute population increase since the 1990 Census is still fairly significant when compared to growth in other municipalities. Total population growth between 1990 and 2000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census was approximately, 9,646 people, 12.67 %. The Township of Brick continues to be the second most populous municipality in Ocean County, following Dover Township. The 2000 Census reported the population of the Township of Brick to be 76,119 and the Township of Dover to be 89,706. The total population of Ocean County was reported to be 510,916 persons.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Density The number of persons per square mile is the measure of population density. In 1990, the population density of the Township of Brick was 2,529 persons per square mile. Population density increased to 2,896 persons per square mile according to the U.S. Census 2000. The Township of Brick is ranked the 12th most densely populated municipality in Ocean County. Population Projection Population projections were prepared by the NJ Department of Labor, Division of Labor Market and Demographic Research and took into account the 1990 Census and estimates as of 1998. The population of each county was projected out to 2015. Population projections for individual municipalities based on the 2000 Census have not been released as of the printing of this report. However, the NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development have released population projections by County for 2002-2025. The Ocean County projections continue to show exponential growth into the year 2025. The NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development projects a total growth of 220,984 persons. The 2000 Census reports 510,916 persons in Ocean County and the 2025 Projection is for 731,900 persons. Due to the steady decline in the percentage of growth in the Township of Brick over the past thirty years, it is logical to assume that the projected growth for the Township into the year 2025 is not expected to be a significant contributing factor to the 2025 Ocean County Projection. Households In 1990, there were 25,023 households, an increase of 6,155 from 1980. In 2000, the number of households was 29,511. This was an increase of 4,488 households. Average Household Size Household size continued to decrease, however, at a slower rate than between 1980 and 1990. The decrease in average household size between 1990 and 2000 was 3.3 %, half of the rate of decrease between 1980 and 1990 of 6.6%. This may be attributed to the fact that much of the senior housing, in the Township of Brick was built between the years of 1980 and 2000. Residential Building Permits A good indicator of a municipalities growth is the number of building permits issued annually. According to the Ocean County Planning Department, between the years 1990-2000, 4,000 new construction - building permits were issued in the Township of Brick. Building permits issued since 2000 for new residential and commercial developments reflect the decline in available land for development. In 2003, approximately 17 acres was approved for residential development by the Planning Board. The 17 acres includes major and minor subdivisions, some of which involved two lot subdivisions where homes were already located on one lot. In some cases, the application only included adjustments to lot lines with no new structures planned for development. The net number of new homes constructed in Brick Township in 2003 was only 86 when demolition permits were factored in. The Declining Rate of Growth The amount of commercial land available for development is also severely limited due to the fact that most of the commercially zoned property has already been developed, redeveloped or approved for development. In addition, our industrial park is nearing build out and is relatively small, totaling less than twenty acres.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005


Fig. 5

The major employers within the Township include the Ocean Medical Center, Board of Education, and the Township itself. These three entities do not have any plans for further expansion and will not be significantly adding to their work force as it presently exists. The trend towards declining growth is seen in the decrease in the percent of population growth over the past twenty years. From 1980 to 2000 the rate in population growth decreased by one-half from 6.6% to 3.3%. This is decrease is indicative of the lack of available land for large-scale residential developments. What the Future Holds At the time of the Census 2000, the population of the Township of Brick was, 76,119, and the Township of Brick was more than 95% built. Most of the remaining parcels of undeveloped land are severely constrained by environmental sensitivity, making development, at large scales, difficult at best. The current policy of the administration to purchase undeveloped parcels of land for conservation and development controls will have a significant impact on the future population growth. It is expected that the growth trend over the next ten years will be more like that of more developed urban areas, where infill developments, re-development of already built areas, in-migration and the cyclic pattern of birth and death of persons will be the main thrust of the population make-up. Natural Resources Open Spaces, Floodplains & Wetlands An aggressive Comprehensive Open Space Preservation and Recreation Plan has been underway for the last decade to preserve environmentally sensitive areas for open space, recreation and/or preservation, while still allowing for growth through zoning and responsible planning. Brick Township currently boasts approximately 3,000 acres of preserved lands. These areas include Federal, State and County lands as well as municipal parcels. These areas have been preserved in cooperation with the Izaak Walton League, Save Barnegat Bay, and Ocean County. The Township itself has purchased over 1,000 acres for preservation over the past seven years. The municipality has put in place an open space tax to provide a stable funding source to purchase additional areas available for preservation. Preservation of all of the areas identified in the Open Space and Recreation Plan will further the Townships goals to provide contiguous preservation areas, protect water quality, preserve headwaters of the Barnegat Bay Watershed, and reduce potential for further development in an already densely developed portion of New Jersey. See MAP D - Open Space & Recreation. Conservation of environmentally sensitive areas provides protection from flooding, provides food and shelter for endangered and threatened species, protects surface and drinking water quality and quantity and provides for better planning and watershed protection. Presently, the municipality has approximately 3,000 acres of preserved lands and 700 acres of recreational lands. However, the main goal of the Open Space and Recreation Plan is to provide for more recreational opportunities, where needed, and to protect environmentally sensitive lands from development impacts. The origin of the Open Space Preservation initiative in Brick Township began as a series of recommendations in the 1981 Natural Resource Inventory (NRI). As a part of the NRI, a Green Belt Study was produced to identify undeveloped lands in the Township, inventory the surface and subsurface conditions, soil types, vegetation, fish and wildlife; and as a result of the inventory, make recommendations concerning the potential for preservation of the subject areas. These areas were prioritized by value, both monetary and ecological. The process for preservation not only looked at fee simple purchase but also the utilization of the acquisition through development rights, conservation easements and other options resulting in less costly alternatives. The municipality took action from these recommendations to preserve open spaces to provide areas of passive and active recreation. Wetlands and floodplains have been areas targeted for preservation since the original inventory was written in 1981. Floodplains and wetlands act as large-scale sponges, or environmental safety cushions, among other more intricate 6

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

functions, absorb excesses of energy released during storms and spring thaws in the form of tremendous volumes of surface water run-off. The impact of these volumes of water is magnified by increased impervious coverage of the soil, which would normally accept a considerable portion of the runoff if left undeveloped. When these soils are covered with impervious surfaces when land is developed, it impedes water absorption and the result is an increase in the volume of water running to streams. As this run-off reaches streams and rivers, these waterways eventually may spill over their banks onto the floodplains. See MAP E - Wetlands. Being relatively wide and flat with a surface roughened by vegetation, a floodplain distributes the excess water across its surface area, thus reducing flow speed and concentration. The downstream result is a generally slow, controlled rise and then fall in water level over the duration of a storm. When a floodplain is encroached upon by structures which reduce its effective area, or by man-made surfaces which reduce friction and accelerate the flow of floodwaters, (the extreme being chanelization of the river within concrete walls), results downstream can be disastrous. As more water now reaches a point in a shorter amount of time, flood levels and velocities increase dramatically. As development proceeds along additional tributaries, without protection of floodplains, the downstream effects are intensified. Working in close association with the floodplains are wetland areas, especially those abutting streams. Run-off water passing through an ecosystem is naturally detained, permitting it to drop some of its sediment load and filter out pollutants and impurities. This water, thus delayed in its introduction into a flooding stream, has its volume decreased by absorption and its flow into the stream distributed over a greater amount of time, usually when the flood peak has passed. Brick Township, because of its location on the Atlantic Coast and due to the number of streams, which traverse it, has a considerable portion of its lands in flood prone areas or wetlands as defined by various government agencies. The flood hazard areas have been mapped by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Flood Insurance Program in 1984. See MAP F - FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Zones. Since the floodplain and wetland areas are so important to the proper function of natural systems and to the safety of large populations, their protection to some degree is assured through a variety of federal, state and local legislation. However, to further insure the future of these areas, they have been incorporated into a comprehensive conservation and open space plan, which would link the linear systems of flood hazard areas with wetland and parklands throughout the Township. Floodplains are often ideal locations for park and recreation uses, such as field sports and picnic grounds. Wetlands, not all of which are wet on the surface, provide settings for nature trails and quiet relaxation as well as access to water activities, like canoeing. The Township has successfully preserved two of these main floodplain and wetland areas known as the Sawmill Tract and the Airport Tract. These preserved areas have been augmented with bicycle and hiking trails to allow residents to appreciate the extent of these natural areas. These areas also serve as vegetative buffers along the Sawmill Creek, that drains to the Manasquan River and the Reedy Creek/ Kettle Creek watershed that drain directly to the Barnegat Bay. In addition, the Reedy Creek cuts through the middle of the northernmost area of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Preserve which encompasses more than 1,700 acres that border the Barnegat Bay. The NJ Department of Parks and Forestry has also preserved more than 350 acres of critical floodplain and wildlife habitat in the northern portion of the Township at the mouth of the Manasquan River. Other lands of concern in Brick Township are those which fall under the Beach and Dune Protection Program of the NJDEP. These areas are found on the barrier island system along the ocean and are defined and regulated under the New Jersey Coastal Management Plan. Flood hazard areas and beach dunes have been regulated through municipal ordinances and incorporated into the Master Plan. In general, these areas are strongly protected through state regulations and pose severe development restrictions. In addition, municipal ordinances address preservation and encroachment into these environmentally sensitive areas (Chapter 134 Dune Preservation, Chapter 155 Flood Hazard Areas). During development and review of lands associated with these environmentally sensitive areas, the Planning Board and Zoning Board of Adjustment take careful consideration of any and all impacts of these natural resources. Waterways and their Condition The Township of Brick has the most privately owned waterfront property of any municipality in New Jersey totaling 53.2 miles. The navigable waterways, excluding lagoons, of which there are many, are broken down in Figure 6.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Fig. 6

The Township is spanned by five watershed areas the Manasquan River, Metedeconk River, Beaver Dam Creek, Kettle Creek, and Reedy Creek Watersheds. A one mile stretch of barrier island also exists which drains to the Barnegat Bay and Atlantic Ocean. The Manasquan River watershed contains the Sawmill Creek, Godfrey Lake and a number of unnamed tributaries, creeks and streams. The Metedeconk River watershed contains the Main Branch of the Metedeconk River, the North Branch of the Metedeconk River, Beaver Dam Creek, North Branch of Beaver Dam Creek, and the Cedar Bridge Branch. The Kettle Creek Watershed contains Kettle Creek, Lake Irisado, Tunes Branch, Long Causeway Branch and Polhemus Branch which drain into the Barnegat Bay. The Reedy Creek Watershed contains only the Reedy Creek and many lagoons and unnamed tributaries of the Barnegat Bay Watershed. See MAP G - Waterways. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has established an Ambient Biomonitoring Network (AMNET) to document the health of the states waterways. There are over 800 AMNET sties throughout the state of New Jersey. These sites are sampled for benthic macro invertebrates by NJDEP on a five-year cycle. Streams are classified as non-impaired, moderately impaired, or severely impaired based on the AMNET data. The data is used to generate a New Jersey Impairment Score (NJIS), which is based on a number of biometrics related to benthic macro invertebrate community dynamics. There are two major rivers, the Manasquan and the Metedeconk located within the Townships boundary in addition to the mouth of the Barnegat Bay. According to the NJDEP AMNET GIS data from 2000, there are five AMNET sites within the Township of Brick. The quality of the water tested at those sites varied from No Impairment to Severely Impaired. Figure 7 details each site:

Fig. 7

The NJDEP data reveals that these waterbodies, when tested for benthic macro invertebrates, were impaired. The measurement of benthic macro invertebrates in these waterbodies indicated a level of pollution that affects the amount and type of organisms that this body of water can support, in other words, these water bodies exhibit habitat damage. Due to the impairment status, the State is required by the Federal Clean Water Act to prepare a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) in each waterway to address this type of pollutant measurement. A TMDL is the amount of a pollutant that can be accepted by a water body without causing an exceedance of water quality standards or the interference with the ability to use a waterbody for one or more of its designated uses. Once these standards are developed by the NJDEP, each municipality will be required to follow an implementation plan prepared by the NJDEP to correct areas that exceed the water quality standard and protect those areas that currently meet these standards. The State is currently developing TMDLs for impaired waterways throughout the state. A number of TMDLs have been prepared for the drainage area of the Atlantic Coastal Region, however, none have been developed for these stream segments as of yet.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

In addition to the abovementioned waterway impairments for benthic macroinvertebrates, the Metedeconk River is impaired for Fecal Coliform (at Windward Beach) and total coliform. The Barnegat Bay, Cedar Bridge Branch at Moore Road (Cedar Bridge Road), and the Beaverdam Creek are all impaired for total coliform. As indicated above, the Township of Brick is currently experiencing multiple issues and problems related to the quality of its stormwater. Most of the issues are directly related to Non-point sources as a result of land uses within the Townships boundaries and the land uses upstream within the Manasquan and Metedeconk River Watersheds. Non-point and stormwater point sources are the primary contributors to fecal coliform loads in these streams and can include storm-driven loads transporting fecal coliform from sources such as geese, farms and domestic pets to the receiving water body. Nonpoint sources can also include steady-inputs from sources such as failing sewage conveyance systems and failing or inappropriately located septic systems. The Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority conducts inspections and replacement of segments of failing stormwater and sanitary sewer lines through their capitol improvement program. This program is proactive and replaces infrastructure at the first sign of failure or based on age and location as to avoid catastrophic failures. For TMDL purposes, point sources include domestic and industrial wastewater treatment plants that discharge to surface water, as well as surface water discharges of stormwater subject to regulation under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The Metedeconk River does not have any permitted point source discharges including treatment facilities that potentially contribute to the impaired water bodies of the Metedeconk River. Flooding also occurs in these areas due to the high percentage of impervious cover from land uses, poor drainage facilities and improper grading from development. The State of New Jersey has proposed new TMDLs for total coliform to address shellfish impaired waters of Watershed Management Area 13 (WMA), published February 21, 2006 and approved September 2006, as well as the TMDLs for fecal coliform for the Metedeconk and Barnegat Bay approved on September 29, 2003. The potential sources of this impairment to these waterways has been long-term non-point source pollution from the way in which residents utilize their property in addition to water foul populations who are contributing to fecal coliform contamination from run off. This plan, once implemented will help to address the abovementioned pollutant loadings through providing mechanisms for the Township of Brick to identify and evaluate non-point sources of pollution and how they are arriving in the waterways of the Township. Through the implementation of the monitoring program, the Township will be able to identify each outfall that currently discharges pollutants in to the Townships waterways. Once these outfalls are identified, a corrective maintenance and investigative survey will begin to identify the source of the pollutants. If it is determined that simple maintenance of stormwater facilities needs to be undertaken, the Township will work with the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority to repair and/or improve infrastructure to address the problem and continue to monitor these areas to ensure compliance. If it is determined that the source of the pollution is from an illicit discharge, the Township will utilize its authority through the Illicit Discharge Elimination Ordinance to address the issue. In addition, the implementation of the design standards set forth in the new Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance will reduce any further impacts from development and redevelopment in the Township. It is anticipated that the Townships plan will have a positive effect on the reduction of pollutant loadings in the Metedeconk River and Barnegat Bay through the effective utilization of these programs. Ground Water The Township of Brick receives its drinking water from the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority (BTMUA). The BTMUA is a public community water system consisting of 11 wells, 2 wells under the influence of surface water, 1 surface water intake and 3 purchased groundwater sources. The systems source water comes from the Kirkwood-Cohansey and the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer systems and the Metedeconk River. The Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority has also recently completed a One Billion Gallon reservoir located on Herbertsville and Sally Ike Roads. The Reservoir was filled utilizing an elaborate piping system from the Metedeconk River. At high flows of the Metedeconk River, water is withdrawn through an intake located behind the BTMUA property and pumped to the reservoir. The water stored in the reservoir provides for an extra source of potable water during times of low flow or drought. See MAP H - Groundwater Recharge Areas. Although the main supply of water for the BTMUA originates in the upper reaches of the Metedeconk Watershed, the groundwater withdrawals are affected by land use and over-development. During times of drought, stresses placed upon the 11 well systems can be significant as many township residents have wells for out-door watering and landscaping needs. In addition, the built-out nature of the municipality does not provide for enough ground water infiltration to replenish the aquifer systems adequately. See MAP I - Wellhead Protection Areas.

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Non-Point Sources Brick Township is more than 95% developed. The majority of this development has occurred over the past thirty years at an alarming rate. The effects of this development have serious implications for water quality and quantity. Most of the waterways in Brick Township are identified by the NJDEP as impaired or moderately impaired for biological indicators. Shellfish beds located within the Metedeconk River and the Barnegat Bay are restricted for harvesting because of the effects of pollution. Point Sources Point source discharges, or permits for the legal discharge of pollutants into a waterway by the NJDEP are not abundant in the Township. Only six permitted discharges are identified within the watersheds of the Township and include industrial as well as sanitary discharges. These permitted discharges have to meet stringent environmental and chemical standards set forth in the NJ Surface Water Quality Standards, developed by the NJDEP. Illicit Discharges Detection of illegal discharges of pollutants into the stormwater system or directly into a water body is very difficult to detect. If a pollutant such as motor oil or a solvent is obvious to the naked eye, the pollutant can be traced back to where it was originally dumped. This will give inspectors an idea of where the source of pollution is originating. However, if the pollutant is not visible, as in the case of some solvents and chemicals, it is very difficult to identify it as a point source pollutant. The Township adopted an Illicit Discharge Ordinance to address the seriousness of these instances and will assign an inspection schedule and fines associated with the ordinance. Design and Performance Standards The Township recently adopted a new stormwater control ordinance in compliance with N.J.A.C. 7:8-5 to minimize the adverse impact of stormwater runoff on water quality and water quantity and loss of groundwater recharge in receiving water bodies. This new ordinance, Chapter 396, Stormwater Management was adopted November 29, 2005. The Design and Performance Standards, Section 396-6 include the language for maintenance of stormwater management measures consistent with the stormwater management rules at N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.8. Under this section, Stormwater Management, measures for major development shall be developed to meet the erosion control, groundwater recharge, stormwater runoff quantity, and stormwater runoff quality standards outlined in Sections 396-7 through 396-10 of the Township of Brick Stormwater Management Ordinance. To the maximum extent practicable, these standards shall be met by incorporating nonstructural stormwater management strategies into the design. If these strategies alone are not sufficient to meet these standards, structural stormwater management measures necessary to meet these standards shall be incorporated into the design. Maintenance Requirements and language for safety standards consistent with N.J.A.C. 7:8-6 is addressed in Section 39616. Maintenance and Repair. The general maintenance of stormwater basins includes requirements to submit a maintenance plan that includes specific preventative maintenance tasks and schedules; cost estimates, including estimated cost of sediment, debris, or trash removal, the name and contact information for the person responsible for the maintenance of the structure. Preventative and corrective maintenance is required under Section 396-16 and shall be performed to maintain the function of the stormwater management measure, including repairs or replacement to the structure; removal of sediment, debris or trash; restoration of eroded areas; snow and ice removal; fence repair or replacement; restoration of vegetation; and repair or replacement of non-vegetated linings. Yearly evaluations of the maintenance plan are required and responsible parties shall provide documentation of such to any public entity with administrative, health, environmental or safety authority over the site. In Section 396-14. Safety Standards for Stormwater Management Basins, sets forth requirements to protect public safety through the proper design and operation of stormwater management basins. These safety standards include requirements for trash racks, overflow grates and escape provisions for all structures and basins and illustrations of safety ledges in new stormwater management basins. Compliance and enforcement of these measures is addressed through Section 39617. Violations and penalties. This section states, In the event that any person who erects, constructs, alters, repairs, converts, maintains or uses any building, structure or land in violation of this chapter shall be subject to a fine of $500 per day until the unauthorized improvement is removed or repaired. This provision allows for the enforcement of construction standards, compliance and repair of stormwater facilities. 10

Fig. 8

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Runoff Controls for Construction Sites During construction, the Townships engineering inspectors closely monitor the construction of a development to ensure that the stormwater management measures are constructed and function as designed. This practice will be continued under the adoption of the new stormwater ordinance. Runoff Controls for Post Development and Redevelopment Applicants for development must obtain approvals from the Ocean County Soil Conservation Service before beginning any earthwork on construction sites. Runoff controls on construction sites must comply with the Ocean County Soil Conservation Service permit regulations. In addition, as a condition of all site plan approvals by the municipality, no topsoil shall be removed from the site or used as spoil. Removed topsoil must be redistributed throughout the subject property and utilized as such. In addition, the removal of subsoil is restricted by Ordinance and requires a permit from the Township in accordance with Section 190-19. Section 245-360. Topsoil protection. No person, firm or corporation shall strip, excavate or otherwise remove topsoil or any other soil material for use off tract unless he shall obtain a permit from the Township Council as provided in a separate ordinance. Pollution Prevention Every individual on an every day basis should practice pollution prevention; however, this does not always occur. To meet the needs of preventing pollution from land uses, the municipality has adopted many new ordinances and standards to increase protection of our waterways and water quality. Impervious surfaces are the number one indicator of how developed an area is. Recently, the municipality adopted new impervious cover standards for all commercial and industrial developments. In addition, the maximum building coverage in the residential zones was also decreased to prevent over-development of residential areas with impervious materials. These measures were taken by the municipality to reduce the impacts of impervious areas on the local waterbodies. Water quality control designs are always considered when developing a site. The size, location and pollution control mechanisms on the site are carefully reviewed and considered when developing a site. Information such as wetland presence, wildlife habitat and non-point source pollution controls are weighed when sites are considered for residential or commercial development. Those standards are incorporated into the Stormwater ordinance. Vegetation, landscaping and buffers are taken very seriously when considering a development application. Recently, the Township Council passed revised ordinances for these issues. The new and revised ordinances make the requirements for development on any site more stringent for vegetation, landscaping and buffers from streams and other uses. Good Housekeeping Practices at Public Facilities The Township of Brick practices common sense maintenance at its facilities. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is used for fertilizer and pesticide maintenance on each of the fields and all of the municipal grounds. Fertilizers are only used on fields for football, soccer and baseball uses. Other fields are not fertilized, but re-seeded every year for thicker turf. Pesticides are only used when all other methods fail. Herbicides are not typically used unless absolutely needed in severe cases. Salt and sand used to de-ice roadways are contained in buildings to avoid shrinkage from rain. Spreading of salt and sand is done in an as-needed basis to avoid excess materials from washing into the storm drain system. Roadways that are covered in ice are usually salted and sanded first and secondary roadways are plowed. A new method of pre-treatment during the anticipation of a snow storm is currently underway. This new process pre-treats roadways with liquid calcium to prevent the roads from icing during winter storm events and reduces the amount of salt and sand used. BMP-Based Control Measures BMP (Best Management Practices) are utilized in construction sites and in the retrofitting of developed areas to reduce the impacts of non-point source pollution. Developed areas are also managed through maintenance procedures that comply with stormwater control measures for post-construction sites. These BMPs are required in all site plan and subdivision applications for development in the Township and for all Township construction projects. These techniques are outlined in the Stormwater Management Ordinance.

11

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Examples of the types of techniques recommended in the Ordinance are as follows: Green bank Parking Wet Tolerant Planting Minimum Disturbance Landscaping Retention/Detention Basins Perforated Piping
Fig. 9

Swirl Separators Vegetated Swales and Filter Strips Stormwater Channels Oil/Water Separators Recharge Areas

Ordinance Requirements In 2000, the Township of Brick adopted a Stormwater Management Ordinance, which incorporates the stringent NJ Residential Site Improvement Standards for stormwater management on commercial properties as well as residential developments. This ordinance includes provisions for water quality controls for non-point source pollution and sediment control. Other ordinances which attempt to address issues of water quality include a pooper scooper ordinance which requires animal owners to pick up after their pets while walking them, a littering ordinance which prevents people from littering on the streets, which in turn prevents large amounts of litter from entering our waterways and a variety of other ordinances which try attempt to protect water quality in the Township. These ordinances including others have been amended to include language to create consistency with the Stormwater regulations.

The revised ordinances include: Pet Waste Littler Control Improper Disposal of Waste Wildlife Feeding Containerized Yard Waste Yard Waste Collection Program Public Education and Outreach Information is provided to citizens of Brick Township through literature available at Town Hall. This literature includes information provided by the Ocean County Agricultural Extension, NJDEP and other sources. Brochures including What is a Watershed, How does Urbanization Change a Watershed, Non-point Source Pollution, What you can do Today! and What is Ground Water? are available for all residents. These brochures give advice about: 9 9 9 9 9 Lawn and Garden Maintenance Pesticide/ Fertilizer Use Animal Waste Phosphorous Management Litter Management

Other information is available upon request including ways for homeowners to: 9 9 9 9 9 Reduce impervious surfaces by using pavers or bricks rather than concrete for a driveway, sidewalk or patio, Divert rain from paved surfaces onto grass to permit gradual infiltration. Landscape with the environment in mind. Choose the appropriate plants, shrubs and trees for the soil in your yard; dont select plants that need lots of watering (which increases surface water runoff), fertilizers or pesticides. Maintain your car properly so that motor oil, brake linings, exhaust and other fluids dont contribute to water pollution. Keep stormwater clean. Never dump litter, motor oil, animal waste or leaves into storm drains or catch basins. 12

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Public Involvement and Participation The Township of Brick, Public Works Department has set up a Litter Hotline to work to further improve the quality of life in the Township, by providing the citizens of the Township with a way to report illegal dumping activities or identify areas that need litter removal. The hotline gives citizens the opportunity to speak to a Clean Communities Representative and receive information about litter and pollution issues. The Township of Brick, Environmental Commission holds annual beach and Township-wide clean up days to remove litter from roadways and beach areas. This annual clean-up event brings many citizens out to remove litter and pollutants from the roadways and waterways in the Township and is a very successful event. TMDLs TMDLs were developed by the NJDEP for WMA 13, in September of 2006 for shellfish impaired waters and in September of 2003 for fecal coliform in the Metedeconk and Barnegat Bay. The potential sources of the impairments identified in these TMDLs are caused by a number of categories of sources including human, domestic or captive animals, agricultural practices and wildlife. Since the Township of Brick does not have a zoo or active agricultural lands, it is assumed that the sources of total coliform and fecal coliform have resulted from human, domestic and wildlife sources. The Townships approach to addressing management strategies for each of the potential sources of elevated bacterial levels to meet the TMDLs are listed in Table below. The 2003 TMDL for Fecal Coliform in the Atlantic Water Region, The South Branch Metedeconk River near Laurelton (Site ID #01408152) recommends: 1. Monitoring: a fecal survey is recommended to narrow the scope of the major sources of impairment; 2. Strategies; prioritize for EQUIP funds to install agricultural BMPs; 3. Organize local community based goose management programs; 4. Phase II Stormwater Program. Since the bulk of the upland areas of this watershed segment are located outside the Townships boundaries, the Township has focused most of its efforts through Education and Outreach to the community and through building partnerships with upstream communities including Lakewood, Howell, and Jackson Townships. The Township of Brick and the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority participated in a partnership program and study with the Trust for Public Lands in 2003 to identify the health of the Metedeconk Watershed as a source for drinking water. The recommendations from that study focused on open space acquisitions and public education and outreach. As a result of those recommendations, the Township has employed the use of the Geese Police to manage the large goose population on public lands in this watershed and has provided brochure materials to owners of waterfront property on the topic of the over-use of pesticides and fertilizes. Additionally, through the adoption of the Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance for new developments, through the Stormwater Phase I (SIIA) and Phase II programs, the Township has taken steps towards improving the quality of the waters regarding fecal coliform in the Metedeconk River. The TMDL for Total Coliform to address Shellfish Impaired Waters in WMA13, September 2006, identifies the Beaver Dam Creek Estuary and the Metedeconk River Estuary as having impairments for total coliform. These two water bodies are coastal estuaries that have large populations of resident and/or migratory water fowl; in addition, these watersheds have large undeveloped lands as forests, coastal wetland habitats and estuaries and large areas of developed urban lands.
Fig. 10

Beaver Dam Creek Estuary Metedeconk River Estuary

Agricultural 0.01% 4.2%

Barren Land 1.1% 1.4%

Forest 11.7% 29.3%

Urban 68.1% 35.3%

Water 6.3% 3.0%

Wetlands 12.8% 26.8%

TMDL Reduction 41% 87%

13

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Due to the land use/ land cover in these areas and the large areas of natural estuarine habitat, management measures to reduce coliform bacteria contributed by wildlife are not generally practical, therefore, the Townships goals to meeting the TMDL reduction for fecal coliform bacteria from developed land use contributions will be focused on monitoring, track down, maintenance, education, outreach and better design of new stormwater infrastructure through the Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance for new developments. Fig. 11 outlines the issues and strategies the township has employed to meet the TMDL requirement.
Fig. 11

Source Category Inadequate (per design, operation, maintenance, location, density) on-site disposal systems Inadequate or improperly maintained stormwater facilities; illicit connections

Response Sanitary surveys, septic management programs/ ordinances

Responsible Entity Municipality Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority (BTMUA)

Steps taken to meet Implementation Strategies The Township of Brick currently has no septic system, the sanitary sewer infrastructure is maintained and controlled by the BTMUA, which has an on-going capital improvement program to replace antiquated sewer lines and repair any problem areas. The Township Public Works Department has initiated an on-going monitoring project to survey and test water quality at each stormwater outfall location. The investigators inspect each stormwater outfall for dry weather flow, if water is detected during dry weather; sources of the flow are investigated. The Township has a capital improvement program that continually monitors, maintains and replaces antiquated and damaged facilities and investigates illicit connections; The Township adopted an Illicit Connection Detection Ordinance to prohibit connections. The BTMUA is responsible for the operation and maintenance of all conveyance facilities. The Ocean County Utility Authority operates and maintains a Waste Water Treatment Facility in the Township of Brick The Township of Brick encourages marinas to apply for Clean Marinas Program out of the 27 Marinas approved in NJ, 4 are located within Brick Township. The Manasquan River, Metedeconk River and Barnegat Bay are all EPA designated No Discharge Zones.

Measures required under Municipal Stormwater permitting program including any additional measures determined in the future to be needed through TMDL process Identify through source track down and repair

Municipality, State and County regulated entities

Malfunctioning sewage conveyance facilities

Owner of malfunctioning facility

Marinas

Clean Marina Program; No Discharge Zones

Owner of Marina, Municipalities

Domestic/captive animal sources Pets Pet waste Ordinance Municipality The Township has installed pooper scooper signage and pet waste baggies at a number of Township owned parks and has implemented a Pet Waste Ordinance 14

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Wildlife Locally excessive populations of resident Canada geese or other waterfowl Feeding ordinances; Goose Management BMPs Municipality The Township has promoted BMPs for the control of Geese populations through education and outreach materials to homeowners along waterways and has maintained vegetative buffers on all Township owned water bodies in addition to employing Geese Police to manage populations on public lands The Township has drafted a Riparian Buffer Ordinance to maintain 300 buffers along all waterways. In addition, the Metedeconk River has a C-1 designation, protecting the stream buffers up to 300 feet.

Indigenous wildlife

Confirm through track down; riparian buffer restorations; consider revising designated uses

Municipality

Plan Consistency The Township of Brick is not within a Regional Stormwater Management Planning Area (RSWMPs), therefore this plan does not need to be consistent with any regional stormwater management plans at this time. At such time a Regional Stormwater Management Plan is developed, the Township will amend its plan to be consistent. The Municipal Stormwater Management Plan is consistent with the Residential Site Improvement Standards (RSIS) at N.J.A.C. 5:21, as the townships own ordinance is a duplicate of this rule. The municipality will utilize the most current update of the RSIS in the stormwater management review of residential areas and its own Municipal Stormwater Management Ordinance. This Municipal Stormwater Management Plan will be updated to be consistent with any future updates to the RSIS. The Townships Stormwater Management Ordinance requires all new development and redevelopment plans to comply with New Jerseys Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Standards. During construction, Township engineering inspectors will continue to observe on-site soil erosion and sediment control measures and report any inconsistencies to the Ocean County Soil Conservation District. The Township of Brick is entirely within the regulatory boundaries of the Coastal Areas Facilities Review Act (CAFRA) Zone. CAFRA Rules incorporate the new Stormwater Rules by reference and require compliance with the regulations promulgated by the State of New Jersey for all new developments and redevelopments that trigger a CAFRA permit. If an applicant requests waivers from the performance standards under CAFRA or the Municipal Stormwater Control Ordinance, a mitigation plan could be required by CAFRA reviewers as well as the Townships reviewing entity. In addition, the Township is currently under review for Plan Endorsement by the New Jersey Department of Community Development, Office of Smart Growth for consistency with the State Plan and a Town Center designation. Once the review is completed, the Township will be considered consistent with all state regulatory and voluntary programs including all programs promulgated under NJDEP. Non-Structural Stormwater Management Strategies Many of the suggested non-structural strategies to pre-treat or better manage stormwater were already included in the Townships ordinances. However, many of these ordinances were amended to include or clarify low impact development design techniques. The ordinances that have been amended are listed below: Buffers - 245-409 Cluster Development - 245-300 Curbs and Gutters - 245-356(14) & 245-356(2) Drainage, Watercourse & Flood Hazard Areas - 245-386;(T)(6) Chapter 196 & 196-1 thru 196-24 Driveways and Accessways 245-310 Location Requirements Parking, loading and access areas. Natural Features 245-365(C) Off-site and Off-tract Improvements - 245-341 Off-street Parking and Loading - 245-310 & 245-15 15

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Performance Standards 396-6; 396-7; 396-8; 396-10; Shade Trees 245-356(15) Sidewalks - 245-359 Streets - 245-356 Municipal Build-Out Analysis As a requirement of the Municipal Stormwater Management Rule, the Township must prepare a build-out analysis based on existing developable land and current zoning unless; the Township has less than one-square mile or 640 developable acres of land. The Township of Brick, in conjunction with Schoor Depalma Consulting Engineers and Planners prepared a build-out analysis to satisfy this requirement. Knowing that the Township is significantly built-out, we conducted a planning exercise to determine the actual acreage of vacant, developable, privately owned lands within the Township. The results of this exercise are shown in Figure 12. Schoor Depalma took the information further and calculated the potential build-out based on the zoning regulations. The inventory was based on properties that were of one acre or more and identified as developable or not impacted significantly by wetlands.

Fig. 12

Developable vacant lands are defined as property of one or more acre, excluding wetlands areas. Wetlands have been factored out of the total vacant land number, and 20% has been subtracted from the total vacant land acreage to account for development of roads and infrastructure and lot layout and irregularities. ** Source: Tara Paxton, Assistant Planner, Brick Township

Municipal Mitigation Plan A mitigation plan is required to grant a variance or exemption from the design and performance standards of a municipal stormwater management plan. The mitigation requirements should offer a hierarchy of options that clearly offset the effect on groundwater recharge, stormwater quantity control, and/or stormwater quality control that was created by granting the variance or exemption. This mitigation plan is provided for a proposed development that is granted a variance or exemption from the stormwater management design and performance standards. The issuance of a waiver under a Land Use permit by the Department does not automatically waive the requirement for mitigation to be performed under the municipal review. The Applicant must obtain all required permits for the mitigation project prior to municipal approval and if possible, mitigation must be addressed on-site as much as possible before looking for off-site options. Presented is a hierarchy of options.

16

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Mitigation Project Criteria 1. The mitigation project must be implemented in the same drainage area as the proposed development. 2. The project must provide additional groundwater recharge benefits, or protection from stormwater runoff quality and quantity from previously developed property that does not currently meet the design and performance standards outlined in the Municipal Stormwater Management Plan. 3. The developer must ensure the long-term maintenance of the project, including maintenance requirements under Chapters 8 and 9 of the NJDEP Stormwater BMP Manual. 4. Legal authorization must be obtained to construct the project at the location selected. This includes the maintenance and any access needs for the project. 5. The project, if possible, should be located upstream at a similar distance from the permit location from the receiving water body and should be based on similar hydrologic distance to the receiving water body. 6. If areas are identified that will be affected by the proposed development activity, it is preferable to have one location that addresses any and all of the performance standards waived, rather than one location for each performance standard. 7. It must be demonstrated that implementation of the mitigation project will result in no adverse impacts to other properties or receiving water bodies. 8. Mitigation projects that address stormwater runoff quantity can provide storage for proposed increases in runoff volume, as opposed to a direct peak flow reduction. 9. Perform a specific Environmental Enhancement Project to address areas in need of mitigation throughout the Township. The Applicant can select one of the following projects listed to compensate for the deficit from the performance standards resulting from the proposed project. More detailed information on the projects can be obtained from the Township Planner. Listed below are specific projects that can be used to address the mitigation requirement. Groundwater Recharge Recharge is regulated to maintain the availability of ground water as a water supply source as well as to provide a stable source of base flow in streams. There are two requirements associated with the recharge standard. The first is that 100 percent of the sites average annual pre-developed ground water recharge volume be maintained after development and the second is that 100 percent of the difference between the sites pre- and post-development 2-year runoff volumes be infiltrated. To mitigate for groundwater recharge design requirements, either computational method can be utilized to determine the volume lost that needs to be provided by the mitigation project. One method to accomplish ground water recharge mitigation is to discharge runoff as sheet flow across a vegetated area to allow for the infiltration of runoff. It should be noted that, if this measure is used, calculating compliance with the recharge standards is limited to the 2 year storm standard, given existing methods. Some examples of areas or features sensitive to ground water recharge changes include: Springs, seeps, wetlands, white cedar swamps sensitive to changes in ground water level and hydrology Threatened and Endangered Species or their habitat some are sensitive to changes in ambient ground water levels Streams with low base flow or passing flow requirements would be particularly sensitive to changes in hydrology Aquifer recharge zones loss of recharge in these areas can adversely affect ground water supply Category One waters loss of base flow can affect many of the bases for designation Some options for mitigation for waivers to groundwater recharge criteria include; Replace existing impervious coverage at any of the municipal, county or state owned parks or facilities with permeable pavement to provide additional average annual groundwater recharge. Retrofit any municipal, county or state detention basins that are currently not operating at optimum capacity to provide additional groundwater recharge.

Water Quality Stormwater Quality is regulated for the purpose of minimizing or preventing nonpoint source pollution from reaching waterways. Mitigation for stormwater quality can be achieved either by directing the runoff from the water quality design storm into a natural area where it can be filtered and or infiltrated into the ground, by constructing a new BMP to intercept previously untreated runoff or by retrofitting existing stormwater systems that previously did not provide sufficiently for water quality.

17

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Existing forested and other vegetated non-wetland areas can also be used as a water quality mitigation area if runoff is discharged as sheet flow through the area in a non-erosive manner, and the vegetated area is restricted from future development. A discussion of the appropriate widths for these vegetative filters is provided in Chapter 9 of the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual (BMP Manual). If a mitigation project cannot be identified that would compensate for a waiver related to water quality, and provided the project requiring a waiver would not result in a measurable change in water quality relative to TSS and nutrients, the mitigation project could be designed to address another parameter of concern in the watershed (as indicated by an impairment listing and or an adopted TMDL) for which stormwater is a source, such as fecal coliform. Some examples of areas or features sensitive to water quality change include: Trout associated waters chemical pollutants and temperature effects can diminish viability of populations Lakes, ponds or other impoundments these waterways are sensitive to addition of nutrients Threatened and endangered species or their habitat sensitive to both quality and quantity changes Drinking water supplies adverse affects on quality can increase the cost of treatment or threatened use Category One waters an issue where quality was the basis of the designation Waterways with a water quality or use impairment deterioration of quality in an impaired waterway will increase the cost and challenge of restoration Some options for mitigation for waivers for water quality criteria include; Retrofit existing municipal, county or state stormwater management facility to provide the removal of 80 % of total suspended solids from the parking lot runoff. Retrofit the existing parking areas at any publicly owned facility to provide removal of 80% of total suspended solids. Re-establish a vegetative buffer (minimum 50 ft. wide) along 1,500 linear feet of the shoreline at any navigable waterway as a goose control measure and to filter stormwater runoff from the high goose traffic areas. Provide goose management measures including public education at any public park or facility. Water Quantity Increased stormwater runoff volume from new development can cause damages to property and habitat due to increased flood elevations and or flood velocities. Mitigation project areas can include locations that will provide for additional storage and slower release of excess stormwater. Mitigation of stormwater quantity can be accomplished by increasing flood storage areas a long the waterway, creating new best management practices (BMPs) to control previously uncontrolled runoff or by retrofitting existing stormwater structures to decrease the volume and peak or runoff. In areas adjacent to the stream, a hydrologic and hydraulic analysis can be performed to determine if increasing storage capacity would offset the additional volume of runoff and associated peak increase from sites upstream of the storage area. Increases in the storage capacity of an existing structure, such as upstream of a bridge or culvert, can also be considered provided that it is demonstrated that such an increase does not exacerbate flooding in other areas. Note that work in regulated areas, such as floodplains and wetlands must be performed in accordance with applicable regulations such as the Flood Hazards Area Control Act Rules and the Freshwater Wetland Act Rules. Also, many areas of open space in New Jersey have received funding by the Departments Green Acres Program and many of those encumbered lands have restrictions placed on them as a result of that funding. Any and all restrictions place don these lands must be investigated by the municipality before these areas can be utilized for mitigation to ensure that there are no conflicts. Some examples of areas or features sensitive to changes with regard to flooding include: Culverts and bridges these features may constrict flow and cause flooding or may provide storage that, if lost, would cause downstream flooding problems Property subject to flooding areas of concern include those where there is historical evidence of recurrent problems, particularly if exacerbated over time because of increasing impervious surface in the contributing watershed Eroding/widening stream banks or channels particularly if due to changes in hydrology due to effects of development Category One Waters flooding affects could alter habitat that was the basis for the designation Wetlands- changes in hydrology can affect viability f wetlands, either by increasing or decreasing volumes and velocities of water discharging to the wetlands 18

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Some options for mitigation for waivers for water quantity criteria include; Install stormwater management measures in the open space areas that are publicly owned or where conservation and drainage easements are held by the public in any planned unit development or residential sub-division to reduce the peak flow from upstream development on the receiving stream for the 100 year storm.

If a suitable site cannot be located in the same drainage area as the proposed development, as discussed above, the mitigation project may provide mitigation that is not equivalent to the impacts for which the variance or exemption is sought, but that addresses the same issue. For example, if a variance is granted because the 80% TSS requirement is not met, the selected project may address water quality impacts due to a fecal impairment. Listed below are specific projects that can be used to address the mitigation option. Environmental Enhancement Projects The Township of Brick is also working on adopting a fee schedule to provide funding in lieu of the mitigation work to go towards an environmental enhancement project that has been identified in the Municipal Stormwater Management Plan. The funding must be equal or greater than the cost to implement the mitigation outlined above, including costs associated with purchasing the property or an easement for mitigation, and the cost associated with the long-term maintenance requirements of the mitigation measure. The Township has identified a few specific locations that would fall under the environmental enhancement Projects. Those sites are as follows: Windward Beach stormdrain retrofits geese controls vegetative buffer enhancements stream stabilization controls Bambi Cross Waterfront Park beach stabilization re-vegetation of dunes dune stabilization removal of debris Drum Point Sports Complex vegetation of retention/detention basins planting of shade trees for wind breaks groundwater recharge areas Airport Tract Conservation Area Wetland Restoration Trail creation/enhancement Saw Mill Track Conservation Area Trail creation/enhancement Wetland Restoration/Creation/Enhancement Stream bed stabilization/protection Lake Restoration/Enhancement Lake Irisado Eutrophication management Dredging/plant management Beaver Dam Creek/Silverman Tract/Midstreams Greenway Creek restoration/cleaning Sedimentation control Retrofit of antiquated storm system Re-vegetation of cleared areas All environmental enhancement projects will be funded based on fees collected in lieu of compliance with the stormwater rule. 19

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

Administration of Stormwater Mitigation Plan The following information is required for each waiver granted from the performance standards;

Impact from noncompliance provide a table quantifying what would be required for the project to achieve the standards, the extent to which this value will be achieve on site and the extent to which the value must be mitigated off site. Narrative and supporting information regarding the need for the waiver including; o The waiver cannot be due to a condition created by the applicant. If the applicant can comply with the Stormwater Management rules through a reduction in the scope of the project, the applicant has created the condition and a waiver cannot be issued. Demonstrate that the need for a waiver is not created by the applicant. o Provide a discussion and supporting documentation of the site conditions peculiar to the subject property that prevent the construction of a stormwater management facility that would achieve full compliance with the design and performance standards. Site conditions may include soil type, the presence of karst geology, acid soils, a high groundwater table, unique conditions that would create an unsafe design, as well as conditions that may provide a detrimental impact to public health, welfare and safety. o Demonstration that the grant of the requested waiver/exemption would not result in an adverse impact that would not be compensated for by off site mitigation. Sensitive Area Identify areas that are sensitive to the proposed activity related to the performance standard form which a waiver is sought. Demonstrate that the mitigation site contributes to the same sensitive area. Design of the Mitigation Project Provide the design details of the mitigation project. This includes, but is not limited to, drawings, calculations and other information needed to evaluate the mitigation project. Responsible Party List the party or parties responsible for the construction and the maintenance of the mitigation project. Documentation must be provided to demonstrate that the responsible partys aware of, has authority to, and accepts the responsibility for construction and maintenance. Under no circumstance shall the responsible party be an individual single-family homeowner. Selection of a project location that is under municipal authority avoids the need to obtain authority from a third party for the construction and future maintenance of the project. Maintenance Include a maintenance plan that addresses the maintenance criteria at N.J.A.C. 7:8-5:8. In addition, if the maintenance responsibility is being transferred to the municipality or another entity, the entity responsible for the cost of the maintenance must be identified. The municipality may provide the option for the applicant to convey the mitigation project to the municipality, if the applicant provides for the cost of maintenance in perpetuity. Permits Obtain any and all necessary local, State or another applicable permit for the mitigation measures or project must be obtained prior to the municipal approval of the project for which mitigation is being provided. Construction Demonstrate that the construction of the mitigation project coincides with the construction of the proposed project. A certificate or occupancy or final approval by the municipality for the project requiring mitigation cannot be issued until the mitigation project or measure receives final approval. Any mitigation projects proposed by the municipality to offset the stormwater impacts of that municipalitys own projects must be completed within 6 months of the completion of the municipal project. In order to remain in compliance with their NJDPES General Permit.

20

Township of Brick, Stormwater Management Plan 2005

This Stormwater Management Plan has been provided to address the requirements of the Municipal Stormwater Regulations & N.J.A.C. 7:14A25 and is intended to serve as a guide for all future stormwater management issues within the Township of Brick

21

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Table of Contents
Conservation Goals and Policies Natural Resources Geology & Soil Discussion Relationship between Geology and Soils Soils Soils Subject to Flooding Floodplains Wetlands Natural Drainage Watersheds Fig1 Surface Water Resources Habitat Open Space Goals Policies Inventory Preservation Goals Water Quality Protection Conservation Zoning Funding Priority Acquisition Plan Analysis MAPS NJ Geology Soils Wetlands Waterways Habitat Recreation Conservation 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 6 8 8 8 9 10 10 11 12 12 12 A B C D E F G

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Conservation and Open Space Plan Element


Conservation Certain lands naturally lend themselves to the purposes of conservation and open space preservation than do others. These lands include those, which are most sensitive to development in the Township, is necessary for a continued favorable quality of life and for protection of health, safety and general welfare of the public. Brick Townships quality of life and unique character are shaped by its natural environment. Vistas to the Barnegat Bay and the Metedeconk River, interconnected wetland systems, forested areas, fallow fields and coastal landscapes define the natural environment. The conservation of these areas minimizes the impact of development upon the quality of life for all of the Townships residents and creates a desirable suburban destination. The purpose of the Conservation and Open Space Plan is to provide for the recognition, protection and preservation of these natural resources. Goals and Policies Identify and map critical environmental resources including wetlands, floodplains, soils, rare and endangered species, aquifer recharge areas, surface water systems, watersheds and habitats Provide for floodplain overlay zoning Prepare and implement a plan for the preservation of stream corridors, greenways and greenbelts Encourage acquisition and expansion of preserved areas that encourages consolidation of contiguous areas of open spaces Create linkages between recreational and conservation areas

Natural Resources Geology & Soil Discussion Geology is a function of sediment, which is deposited, sometimes consolidated, and then eroded. Brick Township lies adjacent to the existing shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean and the riverine areas of the Manasquan River, Metedeconk River and Barnegat Bay. The sediments, which make up the regions geology, are some of the youngest sediments along the coastal plain. They were deposited during the Tertiary Period of the Cenozoic Era. The different layers or strata of sediments have been divided into map units called formations. When exposed at the surface, a formation is called an outcrop area. These surface formations are the parent material for the local soils. Brick Township has two outcropping geologic formations; the Kirkwood Sand formation and the Cohansey Sand formation. The Kirkwood is the older of the two formations. The Kirkwood sediments were deposited during the Miocene Epoch of the Tertiary Period. The Miocene Epoch occurred between twenty-five and eleven million years ago. Near the end of this epoch, Cohansey sediments began to be deposited. This deposition lasted into the Pliocene Epoch, which occurred between eleven and one million years ago. The Kirkwood Sand Formation was deposited as sea level rose and the ocean advanced northwestward. The sediments reflect shallow near shore and marginal marine environments. Fine sands overlie a black clay. Gravel and sand beds are interspersed. The Cohansey Sand Formation sediments were deposited during a period of sea level drop, which caused the ocean to retreat southeastward. This formation is primarily made up of course sands. Occasional clay lenses are, however, interspersed. A thin layer of deposits from the Quaternary period, mostly sand, clay and gravel, were deposited here through glacial outwash, or the melting water from the glaciers that once covered northern New Jersey. These deposits are on top of the Tertiary formations. See MAP A NJ Geology.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Relationship between Geology and Soils Geologic formations are the parent material for soils. As such, the composition of surface formations dictates the composition and texture of the soils. Some of the Agronomic Soil Series which formed from the Cohansey and Kirkwood Formations are Atsion, Berryland, Downer, Evesboro, Fripp, Klej, Hammonton, Humaquempts, Lakehurst, Lakewood, Manahawkin, Mullica, Pits, Phalanx, Psamments, Sulfaquents and Sulfeheims and Urban land. See MAP B Soils. Soils A Soil Survey of Ocean County, New Jersey, was compiled in April 1980 by the United States Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service, in cooperation with the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station and the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. The soil survey is used as a general planning guide for determining the areas most suited to farming, recreation, construction, wildlife management, and waste disposal to name a few. It presents a preliminary view of the problems which may be encountered in the field, and therefore, warns the potential developer to test the soil properties. This Soil Survey is not intended to replace field investigations, and on-site inspections must always be performed. Soil properties do not alone determine the develop ability of land, and other factors such as utilities and roadways must be considered to prevent potential construction problems relating to soils. Soils Subject to Flooding Soils hold water. Their ability to store water varies by texture. Organic and larger grained soils hold more water because there is more air between the soil particles for water to occupy. Fine grained silts and clays hold less water because they are more compacted. The water table is the contact point between saturated and unsaturated soils. Groundwater is the water that is stored below the water table. Groundwater recharge only occurs when percolating water reaches the water table. Soils are classified into hydrologic soil groups that indicate their capacity for infiltration. These groups were defined by the USDA in 1955. The USDA classifies agronomic soil series into four basic hydrologic soil groups: Group A, soils with low runoff potential and high infiltration rates, Group B, soils with moderate infiltration rates, Group C, soils with low infiltration rates and Group D, soils with high runoff potential and very low infiltration rates. Soils are also classified into recharge soil groups to indicate their ability to add to the quantity of water stored in the water table. The New Jersey Geologic Survey defines twelve recharge groups, A through L. If a proposed development site is shown as having a seasonally high water table, soils tests should be performed in order to accurately determine the soil properties and water table level. Special design parameters may be required against flooding, frost action, septic systems, compaction, or any number of potential dangers. For example, basements might not be able to be constructed without their flooding or a house might need pilings. For an additional reference of areas in Brick where problems may be encountered, the two Flood Insurance Rate Maps for Brick Township prepared by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Federal Insurance Administration, are enclosed in the Inventory. These maps delineate the areas of 100-year to 500-year flooding. For example, if a site is located within zone b, it can be assumed that it will flood with less than one foot of water in 100 years or will flood once in 100 to 500 years. Therefore, flooding is not likely to be a major setback. Each site must be evaluated on its own merit before construction is approved. However, if land is suspected of having detrimental soil properties, the Environmental Commission, Planning Board and public should request data from specialists and the individuals involved which either show evidence to the contrary or which specify precautions that will be undertaken to prevent flooding and other water-related problems. Floodplains Floodplains in the Township of Brick are identified through Federal Emergency Management Agency maps and are located along the streams and tributaries of the Metedeconk and Manasquan Rivers, the Barnegat Bay and its tributaries and the Atlantic Ocean. Floodplains are low, flat areas located on one or both sides of a stream channel which are subject to frequent flooding. Floodplains generally contain either hydric soils, wetlands or soils with a high water table. Floodplains are a valuable natural resource which should be preserved as part of any conservation plan. Development in floodplains should be limited because of the potential for flood damage. More restrictive development regulations should be established for floodplains to limit floodplain development and ensure adequate drainage.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Wetlands The Township of Brick is fortunate to have hundreds of acres of wetlands preserved through the open space preservation program. However, due to the rapid rate of development in the latter part of the 20th century and the lack of regulatory control until the 1980s, hundreds of acres of wetlands were lost to development. Efforts are now focused on preserving and protecting the remaining wetland systems in the municipality through open space preservation and improved land use controls. Fortunately, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has the ultimate governing power over wetland regulation; however, local land use controls can help to minimize the piece meal filling of isolated wetland areas for development. The wetlands located within Brick Township may be seen on the Wetlands of Brick Township map. See MAP C - Wetlands Wetlands are commonly referred to as swamps, marshes or bogs. Wetlands provide critical habitats for fish and wildlife. They can serve as areas where species can protect themselves from predators and they serve as a place for many juvenile species of fish can mature in the protection of the dense vegetation. Wetlands protect drinking water by filtering out chemicals, pollutants and sediments that would otherwise clog and contaminate our waters. Wetlands soak up runoff from heavy rains, provide flood control and help release stored flood waters during droughts. Wetlands also provide open spaces and opportunity for recreation and tourism. Wetlands are an integral part of our economic wellbeing because they supply the habitat for most fish and shellfish species harvested for the commercial fishing industry along the Eastern seaboard. In addition, wetlands provide habitat for the fish that drive the large recreational boating industry which is a large part of the economy in the Township of Brick. Natural Drainage Watersheds A watershed is the area of land that drains into a body of water such as a river, lake, stream or bay. Ridges or high points, such as hills or slopes separate watersheds from each other. A watershed includes the waterway itself, the land bounded by the divides and all of the land uses contained within the watershed. Conglomerations of watersheds make up drainage basins. These basins usually encompass the watersheds of many smaller rivers and streams that eventually drain into a larger water body, such as the Barnegat Bay or the Atlantic Ocean. Watershed boundaries do not follow political divides. Most municipalities are located partially within watersheds. Brick Township is located within two large watershed areas identified by the NJDEP. The extreme northern portion of the Township drains to the Manasquan Watershed while the southern portion of the Township drains entirely to the Barnegat Bay Watershed. However, the Township has sub-watersheds located entirely or partly within the municipality. These sub-watersheds include: The Manasquan River, North Branch of Metedeconk River, Beaverdam Creek, Metedeconk River, Kettle Creek, Metedeconk Neck, the Barrier Island and the Atlantic Coastal Watersheds. See MAP D Waterways.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Fig. 1

The Township is spanned by five watershed areas the Manasquan River, Metedeconk River, Beaver Dam Creek, Kettle Creek, and Reedy Creek Watersheds. A one mile stretch of barrier island also exists which drains to the Barnegat Bay and Atlantic Ocean. The Manasquan River watershed contains the Sawmill Creek, Godfrey Lake and a number of unnamed tributaries, creeks and streams. The Metedeconk River watershed contains the Main Branch of the Metedeconk River, the North Branch of the Metedeconk River, Beaver Dam Creek, North Branch of Beaver Dam Creek, and the Cedar Bridge Branch. The Kettle Creek Watershed contains Kettle Creek, Lake Irisado, Tunes Branch, Long Causeway Branch and Polhemus Branch which drain into the Barnegat Bay. The Reedy Creek Watershed contains only the Reedy Creek and many lagoons and unnamed tributaries of the Barnegat Bay Watershed. The Barrier

Island drains into the Barnegat Bay and Atlantic Ocean. Habitat A variety of vegetation needs to be preserved for aesthetic, educational and ecological reasons. In the past, tracts of land have been cleared of indigenous vegetation without measures being taken to replace the lost plant life or prevent soil erosion and sedimentation. The adverse result of the clearing of vegetation can also cause an increase in noise and wind problems since trees and other plants are natural buffers. Wildlife depends on woodlands for their habitats. Since some ecosystems are more environmentally valuable that others, it is necessary to locate the different areas in the Township and determine how to protect the more valuable areas while encouraging development on the least valuable sites. The importance of preserving the woodlands is greater at the present time than ever before. Population growth and the demand for housing are increasing daily and the prime construction sites in Brick have long been developed. Therefore, planners must offer suggestions and alternatives to the clearing of habitats for development and encourage the protection of vegetation, while at the same time allow development to continue. Cluster zoning, preserving green areas, and prohibiting building on floodplains are some examples of planning techniques that can be employed. Several factors are important in the distribution of vegetation throughout Brick Township. Among these factors are the soil types, rainfall, topography and human activity. The soil moisture is perhaps the most important factor in determining the distribution of the vegetation throughout the Township. Those plants requiring an abundant supply of water will be located along the streams and lowland areas, while those plant species that requires less water will be able to survive in higher, drier grounds. The soils which are generally considered wet are the tidal marsh, alluvial, musk, Berryland and Atsion, with the drier soils being the Evesboro, Lakewood, Downer and Sassafras. The Lakehurst, Klej and Hammonton soils are either wet or dry soils depending on their location. An understanding of the soil types and moisture conditions of the soils will indicate which type of vegetation is indigenous to the area. The vegetation within Brick Township can be broken into three major categories; 1. The Dry Upland; 2. the Wet Lowland Forest and, 3. The Pitch Pine Lowland Forest (which is a transition zone between the Dry Upland and Wet Lowland Forest). There are two types of Dry Upland forests; the oak-pine is the first in the succession. After the pine trees establish themselves, an accumulation of leaf litter builds upon the forest floor; the oak trees then infiltrate the area. If left undisturbed, the oak trees will eventually take over the pine forest and the forest will become the oak-pine variety. However, human disturbance or forest fires sometimes stop this natural evolution.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

The Wet Lowland Forest is comprised of Cedar swamp, hardwood swamp and marshland. The cedar forest generally consists of pure stands of white cedar. As the white cedar forest is invaded by deciduous tree species (such as the red maple, black gum and sweet bay magnolia), the cedar swamp will change into a hardwood forest. This is a very gradual transition unless it is accelerated by the interference of man. By using the soil and soil moisture content information in reviewing the potential development of a site, certain things can be determined prior to construction. It is easier and less expensive to develop in the Dry Upland Forest, because the soils and the moisture content permit standard development techniques. The environmental impact is also the least in the Upland Forest. The Pitch Pine Lowland Forest is somewhat more difficult to develop due to the high water table and the soil types that are found in these areas. The Wet Lowland Forest areas are subject to the greatest environmental impact from development due to the abundance of water. In order to minimize this impact, more effort and expense must be put into their development than is required in the Dry Upland Forest Areas.

The developed lands on the Habitat Map (See MAP E - Habitat) are those areas in Brick Township that have been disturbed by man. This includes the residential and commercial areas, farmlands and gravel pits. The sandy, welldrained soils in the township support both the pine-oak and the oak-pine forests. The existing soil and water conditions here are generally more conducive to development than the cedar and hardwood swamps. The soils with a low water table support forests which have open under-story with fewer varieties of vegetation such as lowbush, blueberry and black huckleberry. The drier soils support forests which are composed of generally pitch pine or oak trees. The pitch pine dominates those areas that have recently been cleared of leaf flitter by either fire of for agricultural purposes. The oak trees, on the other hand, grow better in areas that have a deep leaf litter build up on the bottom of the forest floor.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

The oak-pine forests are those areas in which more than half of the trees are oak trees. The most common species of oak trees found in these forests are black, scarlet, white, chestnut and post oak; pitch pine and sort leaf pine are present in smaller quantities throughout this forest. The oak-pine forest is one of the two types in the upland vegetation. The forest canopy is between 35 and 50 feet high. The soils found in the oak-pin forest are Evesboro, Lakewood, Downer and Sassafras with a water table of 5 feet or lower.

The pine-oak forest consists primarily of pitch pine. Generally 10 to 20% of the trees are black oaks with some scarlet, white or chestnut oaks present. The canopy of the pine-oak forest is about 35 feet high. This forest is the second type of upland vegetation found in the Pine Barrens. The soils found in the pine-oak forests are Evesboro, Lakewood, Downer and Sassafras with a water table of 5 feet or lower.

The pitch pine lowland forests occur in low areas and along the edges of cedar and hardwood swamp forests. The canopy of this forest is generally 15 to 20 feet high. The pitch pine forest is a transition between the lowland and upland vegetation types, and is made up primarily of pitch pine. Small quantities of red maple, black gum and grey birch are also found in these forests. The soils found in the pitch pine forest are Lakehurst, Klej and Hammonton with water table between 1 to 4 feet.

The hardwood swamp forest occurs along the streams and the upland edge of cedar forests. The forest canopy is 25 to 30 feet high. The principal tree type found in this forest the trident red maple; however, sweet bay magnolia, black gum grey birch and sassafras are also found, as well as pitch pines. The soils found in the hardwood swamp are the alluvial, muck, Berryland and Atsion soils with a water table of 0 to 1 feet.

The cedar swamp forest is made up almost exclusively of American white cedar, with small quantities of pitch pine red maple, black gum and sweet bay magnolia. The canopy of this forest is between 50 and 60 feet high. The cedar swamp forest usually lines Pine Barren streams, flood plains, drainage ways and bogs, and are underlayed with saturated organic peat deposits. The soils found in the cedar swamp forest are the alluvial, muck, Berryland and Atsion soils with a water table of 0 to 1 feet. Open Space The Township of Brick recognizes the need to preserve open spaces for conservation and recreational purposes. Conservation of environmentally sensitive areas provides protection from flooding, provides food and shelter for endangered and threatened species protects surface and drinking water quality and quantity and provides for better planning and watershed protection. Presently, the Township has approximately 3,000 acres of preserved lands owned by the Federal, State, County, Municipal governments and non-profit entities. (See MAP F Recreation) The origin of the Open Space Preservation initiative in Brick Township began as a series of recommendations in the 1981 Natural Resource Inventory (NRI). As a part of the NRI, a Green Belt Study was produced to identify undeveloped lands in the Township, to inventory the surface and subsurface conditions, soil types, vegetation, fish and wildlife, and as a result of the inventory, make recommendations concerning the potential for preservation of the subject areas. These areas were prioritized by value, both monetary and ecological. The process for preservation not only looked at fee simple purchase but also the utilization of the acquisition through development rights, conservation easements and other options resulting in less costly alternatives. The municipality took action from these recommendations to preserve open spaces to provide areas of passive and active recreation.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

The purpose of the initial preservation campaign was to preserve sensitive areas for open space, recreation and/or preservation, while still allowing for growth through zoning and responsible planning. These purposes include the following: a. To encourage municipal action to guide the appropriate use of or development of all lands in the Township in a manner which will promote the public health, safety and general welfare; b. To secure safety from fire, flood, panic and other natural and man-made disasters; c. To provide adequate light, air and open space; d. To promote the establishment of appropriate population densities and concentrations that will contribute to the wellbeing of persons, neighborhoods and communities, and the preservation of the environment; e. To provide sufficient space in appropriate locations for a variety of residential, recreational, commercial and industrial uses and open space, both public and private, according to their respective environmental requirements in order to meet the needs of all Brick Township citizens. f. To protect water supply sources through preservation and management of headwaters, aquifer recharge and drainage areas.

As a result of the initial plan, Brick began to acquire property through Green Acres funding, private non-profit partnerships and partnerships with other agencies such as the U.S. Department of Interior, Fish, Game and Wildlife Service and Ocean County. Since the 1981 plan, many parcels have been preserved. Since 1994, more urgency has been placed on preserving parcels to provide contiguous areas of protection for surface water, ground water, drinking water quality, wildlife protection, and flood plain management and to preserve areas subject to significant development pressures. These areas have been preserved through Green Acres funding, partnerships with other agencies and non-profit organizations as well as fee simple purchases.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Goals and Policies Brick Township has a tradition of the protection of natural resources as a means for providing a better quality of life for its residents. To that end, we have continued to pursue the preservation of sensitive areas and the acquisition of appropriate recreational areas into the 21st century. Goals The main goals and policies of the Open Space and Recreation Plan have been designed to reflect this philosophy. They include the following: To enhance, preserve or restore unique natural areas or land types Protect the natural and historic resources for the maintenance and enhancement of the quality of life in Brick Township Preserve land and natural areas in order to provide an aesthetically pleasing environment To reduce potential of inappropriate development and protect environmentally sensitive areas from land use shifts To reduce the future impacts of development in inappropriate areas on traffic congestion, stormwater management and floodplain protection To maintain recreational and conservation areas to be useable and enjoyed by all citizens To protect potable water supply sources and the drainage areas that supply them To provide open space and recreation opportunities on an equal and accessible basis for all citizens To protect stream corridors with adequate buffers Acquire environmentally sensitive properties threatened by inappropriate development. Acquire lands to fill in areas where some preservation exists. This will provide contiguous preservation areas along stream corridors for floodplain management, water quality protection, non-point source pollution control, and stream buffering and wildlife corridors. We also recognize that conserving open space makes great economic sense. The economic benefits of conservation include: Enhanced quality of life in the vicinity of the protected area Enhanced property values in the vicinity of the protected area Avoidance of costs that accompany development that are ultimately paid by the taxpayer for schools, police, fire, emergency services, sewage, trash collection and roads Relatively low costs of maintaining public lands, particularly passive recreation Potential enhancement of outdoor recreation and ecotourism Improved bond ratings for communities having a conservation plan Policies Provide accurate, current information on the supply, demand and need for outdoor recreation facilities and open space in Brick Township To encourage designated conservation areas in development applications, where appropriate To foster partnerships with other government agencies and non-profit groups towards the preservation of open spaces To utilize a consistent funding source for the preservation, acquisition and maintenance of recreational and conserved areas through an Open Space Tax To provide consistency between the Master Plan and all other planning documents for conservation and preservation purposes To preserve properties in an orderly, planned, contiguous fashion to create protected greenways To provide adequate walking and bicycling trails along greenways for citizen recreation and utilization of preserved areas To protect water supply sources so that they may be continued to be used as a potable water supply source Inventory Through GIS mapping, all existing conservation and recreation properties were identified in the Township. These areas were used as a basis for identifying available properties adjacent to or in the vicinity of the existing preserved areas. These available properties were then prioritized by size, existence of structures, zoning, ecological value and current development pressures.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Other public and private land and waters maintained as conservation areas dedicated to the preservation of natural and cultural resources are currently maintained by the municipality in numerous locations. Over the past ten years, many of these areas have been the target of preservation initiatives. Parcels have been preserved, as funding became available, resulting in a puzzle piece effect. It is the goal of this plan to include those areas still available for preservation to fill in those missing preservation areas. Specific planning areas have been identified in this plan to include all areas worthy of preservation to provide contiguous, preservation areas akin to a greenway plan.

Preservation Goals The Township, through various partnerships, has successfully preserved over 3,000 acres of recreational and open space lands. Although this is a very impressive fact, more still needs to be accomplished. Through the Open Space and Recreation Plan submitted to the Green Acres program and additional funding sought at the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust, approximately 2,000 acres of additional lands are planned for preservation over the next five years. These areas include those planned preservation areas identified above in addition to infill areas where preservation efforts can provide contiguous areas for wetland, habitat and floodplain protection. (See MAP G Conservation) In reviewing the abovementioned plan for the purpose of this document, it is important to note that the amount of acreage identified for preservation includes all environmentally sensitive lands that may not be developable due to current environmental regulation such as CAFRA, the NJ Freshwater Wetlands Act or current zoning laws.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Water Quality Protection The Townships drinking water supply is provided through wells and surface water from the Metedeconk River. These water supplies must be protected from non-point source pollution through the process of education and land conservation. Preserving properties that drain to the river will ensure the quality of the water supply source for future generations. Preservation of these areas will act as filtration buffers for pollution sources, aquifer recharge areas for well supply sources and floodplain protection from eroding shorelines. Conservation Vacant, privately owned and privately owned, underutilized parcels were identified in the plan inventory. These parcels have been identified as potential preservation areas depending on their proximity to preserved areas and the intensity of the development on the individual parcel. Some of the parcels are appropriate for subdivision to provide for consistency with zoning. These parcels will also provide additional acreage to existing conservation areas. Other vacant, privately owned parcels may add to already preserved areas to provide contiguous areas for water supply, wildlife, and water quality protection. In addition, those areas identified, as proposed conservation areas will support community objectives for buffers along stream corridors, stormwater protection, contiguous greenways, floodplain protection and areas of passive recreation through the use of walking and biking trails.

Parcels of two acres or more with small residential structures and accessory structures on them were identified as Privately Owned, Underutilized and parcels of two acres or more with no structures on them were identified as Privately Owned, Vacant. After these parcels were identified, they were prioritized by ecological value and vicinity to other preserved areas. Those parcels, which were identified as having preservation potential, were added to the Proposed Conservation category to provide a more generalized plan. Areas located along stream corridors including the North and South Branches of Beaver Dam Creek, Kettle Creek, Reedy Creek and the South Branch of the Metedeconk River will provide potential areas of access to inland and coastal waters for passive recreation purposes. These areas will also protect associated inland and coastal wetlands from surrounding developments through providing significant stream buffer areas. These buffer areas will also provide wildlife mobility corridors and protection from non-point source pollution to the receiving waters.

10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Zoning Zoning regulation is a tool used by local governments to provide direction for the orderly and coordinate execution of development. Zoning can also be used to protect environmentally sensitive areas. The Township of Brick has zoned many of the parcels targeted for development as R-R 1 zone. R-R Zoning specifies rural-residential, low density, large lot development. Areas along stream corridors within the township have been zoned as Rural Residential development for many years. This large lot zoning restricts densely developed areas within these zones and provides for buffers to waterways. In addition, many of these areas have wetland areas associated with them, providing for wildlife and water quality protection. The yard, area and building requirements in the R-R Zones allow for a minimum of 40,000 square foot per building lot or approximately one acre. Permitted uses in the R-R-1 zone include: A. B. C. D. Customary and conventional farming operations One-family dwellings Public and accredited private schools and institutions which may be conducted as a business Municipal parks, playgrounds and other such municipally owned buildings and uses as are deemed appropriate and necessary by the Township Council or the Township of Brick.

In a densely populated municipality such as Brick Township, one-acre zoning serves to discourage large tract developers from attempting to sub-divide these areas for more dense housing developments. It would be necessary for developers to seek variances to increase the density on these parcels through the Zoning Board of Adjustment, making development potential more speculative. Thus, these areas have remained undeveloped and still available for open space acquisition. To continue protection of conservation lands, all areas currently deed restricted through the Green Acres or New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust program and all Federal and State owned properties should be designated as Conservation on the Official Tax Map of the Township of Brick. This will prohibit any publicly owned properties from any future development potential and will more accurately reflect land uses in the Township. In addition, it will provide for the establishment of standards for development of adjacent properties regarding buffer requirements and setbacks. These standards will help to protect against encroachment of surrounding uses and development upon these preserved areas.

11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conservation and Open Space Plan Element

Funding Brick Township has been very successful in working with local groups towards the betterment of the community. The local government has a very close relationship with local environmental groups including the Izzack Walton League - Save Barnegat Bay to preserve lands. These partnerships have shared the responsibility of purchasing and maintaining these lands. In addition, the Township has partnered with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Green Acres Program, the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust, the Department of the Interior, Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife and the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry and the Ocean County Natural Lands Trust to preserve lands. Brick Township has accomplished its portion of the funding for preservation through floating bonds and using taxpayer funds for fee simple purchases. The municipality has also taken advantage of acquiring conservation easements to protect sensitive areas. These financial strategies have worked in the past; however, due to the increased need to preserve lands at a more rapid pace, the municipality overwhelmingly passed an Open Space Tax during the general election in November 2000. This tax now will provide the municipality with a steady source of funding for open space and recreational acquisitions. However, the municipality will continue to foster its partnering relationship with other groups to lessen the burden of open space purchases. Priority Acquisition Plan The municipality has benefited from the relationships developed with NJDEP, Green Acres program, Ocean County Freeholders, the Izzack Walton League Save Barnegat Bay and the Department of Interior, Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Refuge program. It will continue to foster these relationships and looks forward to the preservation of remaining critical environmental areas in the Township. The Priority Acquisition goals include the continued fostering partnerships to achieve acquisition of the properties identified in the Open Space and Recreation Plan in addition to utilizing the Open Space tax to purchase lands.

Analysis The preservation of the additional acres of open space identified by the Township will have numerous benefits including;

contiguous areas of wildlife habitat, floodplain protection, aquifer protection, surface, ground and drinking water quality and quantity protection, watershed protection, more recreational areas buffers for non-point source pollution controls

In addition, the preservation of these areas will reduce the amount of developable land that when developed, place a drain on the local tax base, contribute to traffic congestion and increase non-point source pollution.

12

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Element

Table of Contents

Goals Policies Land Availability Land Use Demographics Community Needs Transportation National Standards Bicycle Trails Waterfront Access Fig. 1 - Private Marinas and Boat Basins in Brick Township Recent Recreation Accomplishments Proposed Park Facilities and Improvements Recommendations Fig. 2 - Township of Brick Recreational Facilities and Amenities Map A Bicycle Trails

1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 4 4 5 5

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Plan Element

Recreation Element
The Township of Brick boasts some of the best recreational facilities in Ocean County. There are two ocean swimming beaches and one fishing beach located on the Barrier Island on Route 35 North. Concession facilities are available at the swimming beaches. In addition to being the host site of SummerFest events, Windward Beach Park offers a sandy beach on the Metedeconk River, playground and picnic areas and a large fishing dock. There are numerous athletic field complexes including the Drum Point Sports Complex at the corner of Brick Boulevard and Drum Point Road, the Pinewood Soccer Complex located off Route 88, and Edmund Hibbard Little League Complex located off of Cherry Quay Road. Located throughout the community are numerous neighborhood parks such as Colorado Avenue Park, Frede Park, Bay Harbor Beach Park, Lake Riviera Park, Norman J. Sherman Park and Hank Waltonowski Park. In addition to these active parks, many passive recreational activities are available at the various Open Space preservation areas located around town. Many of these facilities have walking or bicycling trails or areas just for exploring. The Recreation Department sponsors programs for people of all ages. There are a wide variety of programs such as, tennis and softball, arts and crafts, dance and performing arts. There are programs for all skill levels and many instructional classes as well. Recreational programs also change to reflect the season. Brick Township employs a philosophy that believes in providing state of the art recreation facilities and opportunities as a means for providing a better quality of life for its residents. To that end, we have continued to pursue the acquisition of appropriate recreational areas into the 21st century. We also recognize that removing these properties from residential development compliments the Township Open Space Plan and Conservation Element and makes great economic sense. The main goals and policies of the Recreation Plan Element have been designed to reflect this philosophy. They include the following: Goals To serve multiple recreation and conservation purposes, such as active and passive recreation, cultural and ecological interpretation and information To meet the recreational needs of a wide variety of citizens To provide recreational needs such as outdoor games and sports facilities, bicycle trails, picnic areas, hiking and walking trails, and boating facilities To maintain recreational and conservation areas to be useable and enjoyed by all citizens To provide open space and recreation opportunities on an equal and accessible basis for all citizens To preserve additional open space for recreation Policies To provide accurate, current information on the supply, demand and need for outdoor recreation facilities and open space in Brick Township To foster partnerships with other government agencies and non-profit groups towards the development and acquisition of recreational areas To create a consistent funding source for the preservation, acquisition and maintenance of recreational and conserved areas through an Open Space Tax To provide consistency between the Master Plan and all other planning documents for recreation purposes To develop recreational properties in an orderly, planned and contiguous fashion To provide adequate walking and bicycling trails Land Availability Currently, the Township of Brick has more than 15 percent of its land set aside for recreation and/or conservation. However, due to the suburban nature of the Township and the demographics of its population, more recreational and open space facilities are still needed. Presently, most of the Township is developed, although infill developments are continually occurring, creating more traffic congestion and a greater need for the preservation of the remaining open space.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Plan Element

Land Use Areas targeted for open space acquisition for recreation or preservation have been zoned for large lot, low density residential, making them less attractive to large tract developers. Many of these parcels are located adjacent to or near other preserved areas and will further the goal for providing contiguous preserved or recreational areas. The preservation of these areas will also minimize the impacts suburban infill and sprawling developments have on the community. Specifically, improperly planned development of the remaining vacant parcels can contribute to traffic congestion, water pollution, stress on school systems and municipal services. Demographics According to the 2000 Census, Brick Townships 2000 population was 76,119. The population density was 2,526.2 per square mile. The estimated age distribution is 24% of the population under the age of 18 and 22% of the population over the age of 60. This age distribution puts an additional strain on the recreational facilities in the Township since these groups have more leisure time to partake in recreational activities. Community Needs Most of the recreational activities available to children under the age of 18 are through the recreation department, private organizations and the school system. Due to the large number of children, many sports groups compete for practice and play sites. Currently, some Little League and Pop Warner leagues practice outside of the Township because of the shortage of play space. The most recent addition to the recreational properties in the Township at Drum Point Sports Complex has alleviated some of these problems; however, more space is still needed for the growing 18 and under population. The senior population also takes advantage of the various recreational opportunities available to them. Seniors are the most frequent users of the passive recreation parks and open spaces as well as the most loyal attendees at the various concerts and special events held throughout the year. This group also has the leisure time to participate in the recreational activities throughout the Township.

Drum Point Sports Complex, ca. 2003

Transportation The Township provides transportation from a number of centers throughout the municipality. Buses bring concert and special event attendees to the Windward Beach. Busing is also available for daily trips to the Ocean Beaches. There is no fee associated with this transportation as it alleviates traffic congestion and the need for additional parking on-site. National Standards The National Recreation and Park Association recognize an accepted standard for the amount of recreational area needed to serve a given population. Portions of Recreation, Park, and Open Space Standards and Guidelines. Lancaster, R.A. (Ed.). (1990). Ashburn, VA: National Recreation and Park Association are excerpted below to provide an analysis of the measure of the Townships recreational facilities in relationship to nationally recognized standards.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Plan Element

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) recognizes the importance of establishing and using park and recreation standards as: 1. A national expression of minimum acceptable facilities for the citizens of urban and rural communities. 2. A guideline to determine land requirements for various kinds of park and recreation areas and facilities 3. A basis for relating recreational needs to spatial analysis within a community-wide system of parks and open space areas. 4. One of the major structuring elements that can be used to guide and assist regional development. 5. A means to justify the need for parks and open space within the overall land-use pattern of a region or community. The purpose of these guidelines is to present park and recreation space standards that are applicable nationwide for planning, acquisition, and development of park, recreation, and open space lands, primarily at the community level. These standards should be viewed as a guide. They address minimum, not maximum, goals to be achieved. The standards are interpreted according to the particular situation to which they are applied and specific local needs. A variety of standards have been developed by professional and trade associations which are used throughout the country. The standard derived from early studies of park acreages located within metropolitan areas was the expression of acres of park land per unit of population. Over time, the figure of 10 acres per 1,000 population came to be the commonly accepted standard used by a majority of communities. Parks are for people. Park, recreation, and planning professionals must integrate the art and science of park management in order to balance such park and open space resource values as water supply, air quality and habitat protection. Given Brick Townships 2000 population of 76,119 and utilizing the above general standard, the Township presently should have 750 acres of recreational facilities. With approximately 3,000 acres of recreation and conservation facilities, the Township exceeds this requirement and provides a variety of recreational amenities for its residents. Currently, the Township of Brick has 675 acres of active recreational lands, including all school recreational facilities. These recreational lands provide the Township citizens with waterfront access, walking trails, bicycle trails, soccer, football, softball, baseball and multi-purpose fields, roller skating and blading facilities, playgrounds, and bathing beaches. In addition, the Township provides for more passive recreational opportunities through large areas of natural conservation areas. A detailed matrix of parks, open space and conservation areas and their amenities is included in the document. See Fig. 2. Bicycle Trails In 2000, the Township acquired a grant from the Department of Transportation to build bicycle trails throughout the Township. The trails were constructed in multiple phases to provide inter-linkages between recreational facilities, conservation areas and community activity centers. These trails are located in the Airport Tract and Sawmill Pond Tract and through the Reedy Creek preservation area. These trails have been constructed of solid surfaces for walking or bicycling. Access to these trails is provided through gravel parking areas located along local roadways. Amenities have been provided in these trail ways for user convenience. A map of the Saw Mill Pond and Airport Tract bicycle trails are enclosed in this plan. See Map A.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Plan Element

Waterfront Access In 2006, the Township of Brick purchased its first marina, Traders Cove Marina located at the foot of the Mantoloking Bridge. This marina was purchased through partnerships with Ocean County, Save Barnegat Bay, and NJDEP Green Acres program to provide waterfront access to the public. The current plan for the property is to continue the operation of limited marina services limited to rental of boat slips in addition to providing for a public park and Boat Museum with additional meeting facilities. In addition to Traders Cove Marina, many private areas of waterfront access are available for active and passive recreation. The majority of the access points are private marinas and boat slips. The Township has approximately 25 private marinas that provide recreational boating and fishing access. The Township does provide for other water-related recreational activities including canoeing, swimming, fishing and crabbing at various parks and beaches throughout the municipality. The Township of Brick boasts 1.79 miles of oceanfront, 39.5 miles of river (excluding lagoons), creek and 11.93 miles of bay front, making recreational opportunities for water-related activities attainable for most residents. Private Marinas and Boat Basins in Brick Township Marina Slips Bay Island Marina 202 Baywood Marina 200 Blue Lagoon Marina 21 Brennan Boat Company 80 Cassidys Brenton Woods 180 Clipper Marina * Comstock Boat Works 100 Cove Haven Marina 185 Cranberry Cove Marina 29 Drum Point Marina 35 Forge Landing Marina, Inc. 200 Green Cove Marina 283 Harbor Yacht Club & Marina 136 Hibbard Boat Works 120 Johnsons Boat Basin 175 Lightning Jacks Marina 60 Manasquan River Club 200 Mentor Marine 100 Metedeconk River Yacht Club * Petersons Riviera Inn-Marina 65 Sails Aweigh 40 Shermanss Boat Basin 35 Shore Acres Yacht Club * Starcks Landing 17 Suburban Boatworks 240 Weherlen Brothers Marina 197 Winter Yacht Basin, Inc. 110
Fig. 1

Recent Recreation Accomplishments The Township developed an Open Space and Recreation Plan in 2000 to identify proposed conservation and park locations within the Township of Brick. This plan was prepared to qualify for the Planning Incentive Grant Program through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Green Acres Unit. This plan identifies areas suitable for proposed park and conservation sites. The expansion of the Drum Point Sports Complex was identified on this plan and completed in 2004. These parcels were developed to meet the need for more soccer, football and softball fields and the addition of a walking track around the facility. Bicycle and walking trails have been constructed the Sawmill Pond Tract and Airport Tract. These trails provide recreational opportunities to the public while raising awareness for the protection of these sensitive areas. Perhaps the most notable accomplishment is the purchase of the Traders Cove Marina in 2006 to provide for public waterfront access for both passive recreation at the proposed park facility and waterfront access through a public boat ramp and boat slips available for lease.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Recreation Plan Element

Proposed Park Facilities & Improvements The Township of Brick is currently working towards identifying an area suitable to support a centralized Recreation Center to provide amenities including indoor soccer facilities, swimming pools, a theatre and ice hockey rinks. A number of potential sites are within the Townships land inventory; however, funding for the improvements is still in the planning stage. The Township has identified a number of potential areas for park development on the Open Space & Recreation Plan including but not limited to a six acre area located on Van Zile Road for multi-purpose fields and play areas and a six acre parcel located on Cherry Quay Road that will potentially support additional baseball and multi-purpose fields. In the spring of 2006, the Township submitted a four million dollar grant proposal to the NJDEP Green Acres program for improvements to Frede Park, VFW Park, Drum Point Sports Complex, Bernie Cook Memorial Park and Angela Hibbard Park. These parks are all planned to receive improvements including landscaping, lighting, upgrade of play equipment, a possible dog run, ADA compliant surfaces and Astroturf resurfacing. Recommendations It is recommended that all publicly owned park facilities be re-zoned as Recreation on the official Township of Brick Zoning Map. This will help to establish development criteria for neighboring properties located in other zones such as buffers and setbacks. The establishment of buffers and setbacks will help to prevent encroachment of recreational activities into developed residential and commercial areas. It will also provide for added protection and security for the park facilities by providing a visual barrier between other uses and parks.

Township of Brick Recreational Facilities and Amenities


Acreage Concession Soccer Fields Undeveloped Swimming/Beaches Basketball Baseball Diamonds Drinking Water Tennis Courts Tot Lot Fishing Crabbing Physical Fitness Track Picnic Tables Rest Rooms Volleyball Ice Skating Roller Hockey Golf Barbecue Grills Bicycle/Walking Trails Historic/cultural activities

Facilities and Activities

Bayside Park (Sunset) Bay Harbor Beach Bernard J. Cooke Memorial Playground Waltonowski Brick Beach I Brick Beach II Brick Beach III Brick Lake Cherry Quay Beach Dock Road Beach Drum Point Sports Complex Angela Hibbard Park Edmund Hibbard Park Forge Pond Golf Course Frede Drive Playground Herbertsville Playground Lake Riviera Community Park Norman J. Sherman Park Pinewood Acres Complex Veterans Memorial Complex Windward Beach Saw Mill Pond Airport Tract Cross Cove Riverside Woods Reedy Creek Havens Cove Van Ness Park Bay Harbor Conservation Mudhole Branch Drum Point Woods Pinewood Preserve Midstreams Greenway Beaver Dam Creek Greenway South Avis Drive Princeton Avenue (Harding Manor) Evergreen Park Midstream Park Laurel Park Crescent Park Beaver Dam Creek Greenway North Sprial Cedars Neri Preserve Sudbury Road Kettle Creek Milano Park (P.A.L.) Mallard Point Beach Park Cedar Bridge Manor Park Municipal Tennis Courts Havens Farm McCormick Field Boland Field Beaver Dam Creek Greenway South Avis Drive Princeton Avenue (Harding Manor) Evergreen Park

5.5 0.75 6.5 2 2.5 2 7 4 1 0.2 55 3.5 12 250 1.25 3.75 7.5 3.25 19 43 24 175 275 2.4 7.5 1.5 3.2 2.11 6.1 4.5 17 3 33 13.3 2.5 0.8 0.8 1 1 2.1 55.5 6.8 2 0.43 0.33 8.92 0.5 0.81 2.77 25 14.8 6.29 13.3 2.5 0.8 0.8

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

Table of Contents
Introduction Map A Historic Settlements Native Americans Early Settlers Industry and Commerce Development Housing Settlements of Brick Township Cedar Bridge Herbertsville Lake Riviera Laurelton Osbornville Adamston West Mantoloking Peninsula Area Historic Places Historic Structures Preservation Recommendations HISTORIC SITES OF BRICK TOWNSHIP NEW JERSEY - GENE DONATIELLO 2000 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 6 6 6 6 7 8

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

Historic Element
Introduction Brick Township is rich in culture and history. The first inhabitants in the area were Native Americans called the Lenni Lenape. The Lenape lived along the banks of the Manasquan, Metedeconk, Kettle Creek and Barnegat Bay for centuries. They hunted the lands and fished the waters until European settlers arrived in the area in the 18th century. The European settlers brought with them trade and commerce including the timber, iron, shipping and retail businesses. The success of these industries helped to shape the further development of the area through attracting vacationers to the beautiful shores of the Township. These resort areas flourished and led to the year round developments, which now bring the population of the Township to nearly 75,000. Native Americans Prior to the arrival of European settlers, Native Americans inhabited the area now known as Brick Township. The Lenni Lenape are thought to have been descendants of a people who arrived during the Paleo-Indian Period over 10,000 years ago. The Lenni Lenape lived in the area year-round, thriving off of the abundance of fish and shellfish in the Metedeconk and Manasquan Rivers and hunted the dense pine forests for small game. Women of the tribes gathered wild berries and herbs and tended to their children. The arrival of the European settlers led to the reduction of the Native American population by the late 1700s. However, Brick Township residents live with pleasant reminders of the former inhabitants through names of neighborhoods and various landmarks throughout

Map A

Township. Early Settlers In 1850, the New Jersey State Legislature created Ocean County from parts of Monmouth and Burlington Counties. At the same time they created Brick Township, naming it after the late Joseph W. Brick who had been its most prominent citizen.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

The people of Brick Township made their living off the land. They were subsistence farmers growing their own food and trading off the surplus. There were a few dairy herds and milk routes. The local people fished and hunted the rivers, bay and ocean, where there was an abundance of striped bass, perch, herring, crabs and clams along with geese and ducks. The woodlands provided deer, rabbits, pheasant and grouse. There were general stores on Mantoloking Road, in Burrsville, and Herbertsville. The township also boasted a shoe factory, and many docks for sea going vessels. Industry and Commerce The history of industry and commerce in Brick Township dates back to the arrival of the saw mill industry, when between 1742 and 1757 settlers were attracted to the virgin woodlands of southern Monmouth County. The saw mill industry was the first of a number of economies that would depend upon the natural resources of this area. Other economies were the pinewood (charcoal), turpentine and bog iron industries. There were two forges located in what was later to become Brick Township. In 1808, John Lippencott built an iron forge on the upper Metedeconk River, which was later purchased by Banajah Butcher and Barizzilla Burr, and called Butchers Forge, then Burrs Forge. The area around the forge was called Burrsville and then Laurelton. In 1848, the pond at Burrs Forge was considered to be the largest in the state. The second forge, Bergen Iron Works, further up the south branch of the Metedeconk River in present day Lakewood was run by Joseph W. Brick from whom the town was named. By the late 1800s, a new business had arrived, the cranberry industry. There were cranberry bogs in most sections of town. At the turn of the century, Brick Township led Ocean County in the production of cranberries. The cranberry industry was devastated when the Point Pleasant Canal opened, introducing salt water into the upper Barnegat Bay and the Metedeconk River. The 1900s brought new economies to the area. The poultry industry started by the Park and Tilford Poultry Company peaked in the 1950s when refugees from World War II entered the business. The summer tourism industry began when land developers arrived promoting the area as a resort for swimming, boating, salt-water bathing, crabbing, fishing and just getting away. Newspapers purchased tracts of land and promoted its sale by allowing weekly payments with your newspaper subscription. The Hudson Dispatch of Union City in 1928 promoted Cedarwood Park by selling lots 20 feet by 100 feet to be paid off with a weekly subscription. Harris and Company of East Orange developed Mandalay on the Bay. In 1934, the Van Ness Corporation of Newark developed Brenton Woods selling a plot 40 feet by 100 feet with an 18-foot by 34-foot cabin starting at $685.00. The area became popular with Philadelphia gunning and fishing clubs who built lodges on the banks of the Metedeconk River and named them for streets in Philadelphia. Camps for children began to spring up: Camp Eagle, Princeton Camp, Camp Freedom, New Jersey Episcopal Choir Camp (NEJECHO), and the Cedars run by Saint Edmunds Home for Crippled Children. Development Brick Township continued to be a quiet rural-resort area into the 1950s, when the Garden State Parkway opened. Travelers exiting the Garden state Parkway were soon to discover this was an area where property was inexpensive, taxes were low, and they were about an hour drive from their jobs. Land development again dominated the economy. Due to the rapid building of homes in the area, residents needed areas to shop and work close to home. This spurred the commercial building and redevelopment of the Township. Presently, the Township boasts 1500 commercial businesses, making service and retail commercial business the dominant economy. Between the years 1960-1990, major residential and commercial development continued, along with the services needed for a growing population. Brick Township is presently a bedroom community made up of single family homes, apartment complexes, condominium developments and senior citizen villages, totaling 28,843 housing units. Of this number 2,864 units were built before 1950. The median value of a single family home is $133,100. According to the 1990 census, 17.3% of our population is over the age of sixty-five and 23.5% of our population is under the age of eighteen. The areas along the Atlantic Ocean, Barnegat Bay, Manasquan River, and Metedeconk River have a mixed resort-residential type population. Brick Townships population grew from 4,319 in 1950 to over 75,000 in 2000, making Brick Township one of the largest communities in New Jersey today.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

Housing During the late nineteenth century, farmsteads and simple A-frame architecture dominated the landscape. At the beginning of the tourism boom, during the early twentieth century, bungalow style housing took over along the river and ocean front areas. When the area began to become suburbanized after World War II, large tract developments of simple three-bedroom California style ranches and split-levels were being built at a fast pace. These developments developed a cookie cutter effect, where all of the houses were the exact same floor plan and architectural style with minor differences in color and faade. These homes were sold very inexpensively and drew families from Northern New Jersey to live in these developing bedroom communities. After the construction of the Garden State Parkway in 1958, many of the housing developments began to take on a more colonial architectural style. These homes were built to be more distinguishable from one another and tend to be larger in square footage than their predecessors. This type of development is still occurring in the Township, at a much slower rate, as in fill developments on left over vacant tracts of property. Brick Township retained its rural character into the 1950s and since that time has steadily grown in population, commerce, industry and services. It is now a major suburban community in Ocean County as well as New Jersey. Settlements of Brick Township Present day Brick Township is made up of a collection of settlements and villages. These settlements sprang up as the first settlers arrived. Each settlement usually developed around a central store, place of worship or a privately owned industry. They occurred along roadways and usually were named after the most prominent family in the area. In some cases these areas were named after the geologic or landscape types found there. Some areas were developed as resort areas in the early twentieth century. These settlements include Metedeconk and Burrsville which are known as Laurelton, Cedar Bridge, Herbertsville, Osbornville including Adamston a 1900 postal designation, West Mantoloking, and the peninsula area of Chadwick or Normandy Beach as it is known today. Later housing developments which might be considered sections of town are Riviera Beach, which is included in the Herbertsville section and Lake Riviera, an 800 acre development of the 1950s. Today there are no clear-cut boundary lines that define each of the original villages. Over the years the names of the original settlements have come to encompass a greater area than they originally included. Also some of the later settlements fall within some of the earlier villages. For example Adamston, which gets it name from George Adams who owned a store and post office on Cedarbridge-Adamston-Mantoloking Road, falls with in the area sometimes called Osbornville. A later postal address using the designation Breton Woods will cloud the issue further. West Mantoloking east of Osbornville on Metedeconk Neck had a school to identify it; over the years the name has come into disuse. Within these villages and settlements lies the history, culture, historic structures and places that are important to the development of Brick Township. Cedar Bridge Dating back before the American Revolutionary War the Village of Cedar Bridge was located on the Cedar Bridge Branch of the Metedeconk River and the Road to Toms River. The village was a commercial center with docks for sea going vessels; a Methodist-Episcopal Church incorporated on March 14, 1854, a shoe shop, a black smith shop, two or three general stores, and more than twenty homes. A school built around 1864 housed grades one through eight. In 1914 the school was closed and consolidated with the Osbornville School into a new Union school. In 1928, the Hudson Dispatch, a Union City, Hudson County newspaper mapped out the summer resort of Cedarwood Park and through a circulation promotion offered each new subscriber a 20 x 100 foot lot at Cedarwood Park. OF course to meet building requirements two lots were needed and the publisher would gladly sell the subscriber a second lot. Herbertsville Edwin Salter in his History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, (1890) describes Herbertsville as a village situated in Brick Township, about a mile west of the Manasquan River and four and a half miles from the Atlantic Ocean. The population is about three hundred, mostly employed in farming. There is a Methodist Church, a public school, with seventy pupils, two saw mills, one steam and one water and two brickyards. Its chief attractions are the fertility of the soil and handsome farms by which it is surrounded, its fine elevation situated near the banks of the beautiful Manasquan and its wholesome air. 3

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

The Herberts were not the first family to settle in Herbertsville, but they were the most numerous. Iassac and Sarah Morris Herbert were the first Herberts to settle here; they had thirteen children all born in Herbertsville. There were two general stores, which carried everything from eggs to hardware. A post office first operated out of Gants store and later Sidney Herberts store. Merchants were not opposed to bartering. When Herbertvillians could not purchase what they needed locally, a trip to Manasquan was called for. By the turn of the twentieth century it became fashionable to take a train trip to the big cities of Asbury Park or Newark. Most of the buildings that lined Herbertsville Road were scattered homes and farms located off roads including Winding River Road, Turkey Point Road, Herbert Lane, Brushy Neck Drive, and Cedar Lane. In the 1920s south of the village of Herbertsville, along the Manasquan, two early resorts were developed, Beverly Beach developed by Beverly Beach, Inc. of New Brunswick and Riviera Beach developed by Coast Finance Company, Newark, New Jersey. Herbertsville remained semi-rural until the 1960s when residential development began with single family homes and condominiums. Lake Riviera Lake Riviera (a twentieth century name) for the southwestern section of Brick Township traces its history back to John Allen, when in 1755 he established a grist and saw mill on the North Branch of Kettle Creek. In 1855, the mills and meadows were sold to John C., Reuben, and Eden Irons, who also purchased the land of William and Stephen Patterson. For years the road from Forge Pond to the mills was called Old Irons Mill Road. The Irons tract was sold to A.O.S. Havens in 1873 and in 1906 was purchased from Havens by Charles and William Wheeler who also acquired other properties in the area. The Wheeler property was passed on to Charles daughter Ethel. Ethel married Alan Kissock, a mining engineer from Ironton, Ohio. In 1947, the Kissocks granted right-of-way for the construction of Moore Road (Brick Boulevard) and donated land on the corners of Moore Road and Cedar Bridge Road for the Construction of Town Hall. In the 1950s Theodore and Benjamin Smith acquired 800 acres of land including a man made lake in order to develop a residential-resort to be called Lake Riviera. The smiths had previously been involved in the development of the Riviera Beach section. Building a second dam by Moore Road created a second lake on their property. With the knowledge that the railroads aided the growth of the other communities by bringing in homeowners, Theodore Smith became very active in promoting the construction of the Garden State Parkway. The campaign worked and the Garden State Parkway was built with an entrance and exit in Brick Township and this led to a boom in housing construction in Brick Township. On March 1, 1954, lots seventy five by one hundred feet at Lake Riviera went on sale. Houses twenty-four feet by thirty-two feet with a plot of land sold for one hundred dollars down with payments of twenty dollars a month. As was popular at the time a clubhouse with a lakeside swimming beach, Olympic size pool, two tennis courts, and two basketball courts were included for a membership fee of twenty dollars a year. The Lake Riviera section of Brick Township has kept its neighborhood character as it changed from a residentialresort to an all year round residential community. A commercial district has developed along the western edge of the community along Brick Boulevard and the Township has taken over operation of the Lake Beach and community center. Laurelton Where State Highway 88 and State Highway 70 intersect was once located the Village of Metedeconk. In 1808, John Lippencott began to construct a mill and iron forge there. By 1810 he sold the mill and forge to Benajah Butcher and Barzillia Burr and proprietorship of the forge the village became known as Burrsville. In the early 1900s when the Park and Tilford Poultry Company opened Laurelton Farms, the village became known as Laurelton. The name changed and the village grew during those years with little change to the village lifestyle, but in the 1900s there would be a major change that would bring an end to the rural village atmosphere of Laurelton.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

The village had always been a rural, residential and commercial center. In 1904, the Ocean County Freeholders constructed the first gravel road in the county. Running from Lakewood to Point Pleasant the road passed through Laurelton. In 1923 the road was topped with concrete. In the 1930s the Federal Government, looking to put people to work, created the Works Progress Administration. One of the local projects of the WPA was to eliminate a dangerous intersection in Brick Township. That intersection was where the roads to Toms River, Lakewood and Point Pleasant met, and was located in Laurelton. The intersection had not changed from the days when horse and wagons plied the roads, however it was now carrying automobiles around what had become known as dead mans curve, and was to be replaced by a traffic circle and so was born the Laurelton Circle. Many of the homes and businesses were moved and saved from destruction only to be lost years later to the construction of shopping centers and the present highway interchange. Traffic moved too quickly to notice that there was once a forge at Forge Pond. The bridges that cross the Metedeconk River identify the road as once being called Route 40 and was constructed in 1937. Nor do people notice the First Baptist Church of Laurelton was constructed in 1857 and that the Laurelton School dates back to 1934, or that one of the buildings occupied by Jersey Paddler was once Walter Havens gas station. Osbornville Adamston West Mantoloking Osbornville, Adamston, and West Mantoloking are all located on Metedeconk Neck between the Metedeconk River on the north, Kettle Creek to the South and Barnegat Bay to the east. Today there is no clear dividing line where one begins and the other ends. The center of early settlement of Osbornville was along the easterly end of Drum Point Road. The area gets its name from Isaac Osborn an early settler, the area was first forested by pine, oak, holly and cedar trees, and irrigated by an abundance of fresh water streams. Along the bay area, which was fresh water at the time, were meadows of field grass. The people who settled here made their living off the land and waterways. In 1796, when John Havens Jr. purchased land on the Metedeconk Neck his deed stipulated that a plot be set aside for a cemetery. It was on the land that Kettle Creek Baptist Church was built in 1836. It was through the efforts of Anner Osborn Havens, Johns wife that a branch of the Manasquan Baptist church was formed here to become known as the Kettle Creek Baptist Church and is known today as the Osbornville Baptist Church. Though the church was relocated the responsibility of the cemetery was turned over to the Osbornville Cemetery Association in 1976 which continues to run it today. Around 1850, another group formed the Osbornville Protestant Church, with its cemetery on Mantoloking Road. The beginning of the twentieth century saw a decline in the prosperity of Brick Township. The railroads had bypassed the area. The proposed trolley line never materialized. The opening of the Point Pleasant Canal introduced salt water into the upper Barnegat Bay and into the Metedeconk River and Kettle Creek destroying the inexpensive bottomland used for cranberry production. And the highly valued cultivated uplands were too expensive compared to the vast undeveloped ocean front property of other communities to compete for the lucrative resort industry. However, a turn around began to take place; the national economy had been good and people were looking to spend their new found wealth on vacation homes. The idea of building resort communities was catching on. Resort communities provided beaches, docks for boats, clubhouses and other amenities for the purchaser and Brick Township especially along the Metedeconk River and Kettle Creek was an ideal location for this type of development, with its ample land and pristine forests and waterways. In 1938, Bert Wards Vanard Corporation developed Shore Acres, dredging lagoons for what Ward called the Venice of the Jersey Shore. Adamston takes its name from George Adams who operated a general store and post office, around 1900, on Cedarbridge-Adamston Road (Mantoloking Road) in the vicinity of Breton Woods. Howard Van Ness a sales agent for Riviera Beach on the Manasquan River formed his own company and in the 1930s began to purchase land on the south shore of the Metedeconk River, eventually developing Breton Woods, Cape Breton and Vanada Woods and later Breton Harbor, Mariners Harbor and the Baywood section along with Harris & company of East Orange, New Jersey. West Mantoloking at the easterly end of Metedeconk Neck is crossed by Mantoloking Road. A one-room schoolhouse existed here until it was closed and incorporated into the Osbornville School. The land of West Mantoloking was flat and treed with meadow lands out to the bay. It too had resort developments including 5

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

NEJECHO which was originally an Episcopal Choir Camp and later a community. Today we find the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Preserve there. The resort communities were very selective as to who purchased and lived in their community. Advertised as selective communities, sales agents required each prospective buyer to fill out an application to be reviewed by a board, which would either accept or reject the applicant. Resort community construction continued on a smaller scale into the 1950s. The return of the GI from World War II created a demand for housing and many of the summer homes built during the resort community era were converted for all year round living. The opening of the Garden State Parkway in the 1950s ushered in a new era of construction, the all year round development. Peninsula Area The peninsula area of Brick Township which lies along the Atlantic Ocean and was once a part of Dover Township. When Brick Township was created in 1850 the area was divided between Brick Township and Dover Township. Divided also in the process was the Village of Chadwick, the oldest settlement along the beachfront. Chadwick a nineteenth century gunning and fishing club takes its name from Captain William P. Chadwick the owner of the club. In 1852 the Pennsylvania Railroad Company included Chadwick as a stop on its rail line making Chadwick easily accessible to visitors. Fishing remained a major economic activity. In the early 1900s a major north-south road was constructed (Highway 35) opening Chadwick to more visitors. This also brought in Normandy Beach Realty Company of Camden, New Jersey, which purchased land and mapped out proposed development which it called Normandy Beach. The Normandy Beach Company went out of business in 1921, however the Coast and Inland Company continued the development. Just north of Normandy Beach two twentieth century resorts developed. Sea Bay Park Bathing Pavilion served daytrippers with bathhouses, beach front and parking for camper trailers and cars. The other resort Camp Osborne was made up of four streets of bungalows also called the Conny and Piela Cottages. The remaining area north to the Mantoloking border saw major development in the latter part of the twentieth century with names like Mantoloking Shores, South Mantoloking, Dutchmans Point, and Curtis Point Historic Places There are many historic places located in the Township of Brick. However, there is only one historic place listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places. This registered site is the Orient Baptist Church or the First Baptist Church of Laurelton located on Route 88. This church was moved to Burrsville in 1843 and is the oldest church structure in Brick Township today. It was constructed in 1857. Many other historically significant places exist within the Township. Archeological sites where Paleo-Indian artifacts were discovered exist along the Herbertsville Road area as well as Indian burial grounds in the Princeton Avenue vicinity. In addition, places of worship, burial and homesteads are all evident in the Township. An extensive inventory of these areas is located in the appendix. Historic Structures Most of the historic structures located within the Township of Brick are of simple farmstead type architecture. Some examples of colonial or Federalist style architecture remain. An extensive inventory of these structures is located within the appendix. Preservation The Township of Brick has been somewhat successful at preserving some of the Townships historic buildings and sites. However, due to the rate of development and private ownership over many of the historic structures in the Township, many have been lost over the years. The Township has recently acquired a number of homes in the unofficial Herbertsville Historic District including: Havens Homestead, the Lizzy Herbert House, Haliday House, and the Hulse House. The Havens homestead dates back to 1927. The Brick Township historical society restored and recreated the 1850s farmhouse and operates the house as a museum for the public. The museum and the adjoining Delaman Farm property are currently used as a cultural arts center for Township residents. The remaining homes are being considered to house other community and Township organizations after renovation and minor repairs to be completed by the Historical Commission and Historical Society. 6

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

Recommendations The Historic Preservation Commission was created by the Township to encourage the preservation of the heritage of the Township of Brick. The commission is charged with the following advisory powers: Recommend to the Planning Board and the Township Council sites to be designated as historic landmarks Recommend to the Township Council criteria and standards to be made applicable to any designated historic landmark or district If the Township is certified under the states Certified Local Government Program (CLG), the commission shall, in accordance with the State CLG Guidelines, review and comment on all State and National Register nominations for the historic landmarks within the Township of Brick. Advise the Planning and Zoning Boards on developments that affect historic landmarks Assist and advise other municipal agencies and public bodies in the understanding of historic landmark significance and techniques for achieving the same Report at least annually to the Planning Board and the Township Council on the state of historic preservation in the Township and recommend measures to improve the same The scope of powers for the Commission, are quite limited, however, recommendations to further the protection of historic areas of the Township through the commission are discussed herewith in. It is recommended that the powers of the Historical Preservation Commission be expanded to: Review and prepare reports for the Planning and/or Zoning Boards on any applications for development that may affect any historic places listed in the Historic Sites of Brick Township Requests for variances on any development proposal affecting any historic places listed on the Historic Sites of Brick Township should be referred to the Historic Preservation Commission for comment and report submittal to the governing board. Construction permits for any activity affecting any historic places listed on the Historic Sites of Brick Township should be referred to the Historic Preservation Commission through the permit application process. It is further recommended that the Herbertsville area be designated as a Historic Preservation Zone from the intersection of Maple Avenue, south of the crossing of Saw Mill Creek, northward to the Ocean/Monmouth County Line, encompassing those properties fronting along Herbertsville Road.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

HISTORIC SITES OF BRICK TOWNSHIP NEW JERSEY GENE DONATIELLO 2000 History provides the sources of memories for people. Tucked away among the housing developments and shopping centers of Brick Township are many historic sites. The following are is a list of sites around towns that provide some of those memories. 1. Van Wickle Pottery Factory 1828-1850, Highway 70 & Riviera Drive. Between 1824 & 1838, Nicholas Van Wickles Pottery was on both sides of the road to Squan Village (First Ave.) and along the west shore of the Manasquan River. Van Wickle supplied the local population and general stores with gray and blue jugs, crocks, bowls, mugs, etc. Van Wickle also served as a Monmouth County Freeholder and as a New Jersey Assemblyman. 2. Havens Homestead Museum (C.1827) 521 Herbertsville Road. Purchased by Curtis Havens on September 25, 1827, from the Allens of Howell Township. The property remained in the Havens family until 1993, when they turned the building over to the Brick Township Historical Society to operate as a museum. An 1846 addition accommodated a growing family and an inn. 3. Sidney Herberts General Store, 589 Herbertsville Road. The Herbert store sold dry goods, provided mail order service and served as a post office until 1959. It was not uncommon to hear politics discussed around the store sin e Sidney served on the Township Committee from 1882 to 1893. The original rustic building had been converted into a multi family dwelling. 4. Herbertsville Church (C.1875) 621 Herbertsville Road In 1830, a Methodist church was formed, and in 1875, the Herbertsville Church was dedicated. About 1890 a parsonage was built across from the church at 2304 Lanes Mill Road. The building was sold to Sons of Norway Lodge and in 1998 Epiphany Roman Catholic Church purchased the building for a parish hall. 5. The Old Herbertsville School, (C.1858) 705 Herbertsville Road. Herbertsville School was built in 1858 as a one room school on land donated by the Herbert Family. A second room was added around 1910. The school was heated by a wood burning stove. Kerosene lamps were replaced by electricity in the 1920s. The school served the community until 1949, when a new four-room school was built on Lanes Mill Road. The old school has been converted to a home. 6. The Burr House (C.1810) 1581 Burrsville Road Built about 1810, this quaint farmhouse, with its brick lined walls (nogging), frequently served as a meeting place for the township committee in the 1850s. The Burr family was known for its operation of the iron forge at Forge Pond. 7. Goble/Daisy House (C.1830) 1666 Route 88 West. This federal style building was built around 1830 for Jonathan Goble. The name Daisy came from a twentieth century owner of the house. The building has been added to and successfully converted to an office building. 8. Native American Sites Native American artifacts dating back to the Paleo-Indian era, have been found scattered throughout the Township of Brick. Indian Stage, a ceremonial ground was located on a rise overlooking Forge Pond on State Highway 70 West. An archeological dig in 1940 uncovered a settlement on the Havens Farm near Saw Mill Creek. 9. Forge Pond 1808-1849 Highway West (one quarter west of the Laurelton intersection) A forge, established by John Lippencott in 1808, and later owned by Benajah Butcher and Barzarallai Burr produced water pipes here. The community surrounding the forge became known as Burrsville for the Burr family. The pond formed by damming the upper Metedeconk River was the largest mill pond in the state. The village around the forge included a gristmill, a tavern, two stores and fifteen to twenty houses. 10. Havens & Havens General Store, 6 Princeton Avenue This building was moved to its present location when the Laurelton Circle was constructed (Intersection of Route 88 and 70) in the 1930s. The Havens brothers sold the usual supplies found in a general store. They also provided mail order service and old a vegetable tonic good for any ailment. 8

Township of Brick, Master Plan Historic Element

11. Enoch Robbins house (C.1861) 1845 Route 88 East Enoch Robbins was a sea captain who brought back many exotic items with which to decorate his home. Today the building serves as an office, but still retains the many original out buildings, including its original privy. 12. First Baptist Church of Laurelton (C. 1857) 1824 Route 88 East The Orient Baptist Church or First Baptist Church of Laurelton, as it is presently known, was a continuation of the Old Church of the Pines. The present building, the oldest church building in Brick Township today was constructed by James L. Dorsett in 1857and is listed in the State and National Register of Historic Places. The cemetery behind the church was expanded in 1893, when plots sold for $10.00 each. In 1903, the parsonage was built east of the church. 13. George Peabody Woolley House (C. 1875) 100 Jack Martin Boulevard Once located on Route 88 East the Woolley House was moved to make way for the construction of Jack Martin Boulevard. The original building was a Georgian Style home with a center door and symmetrically arranged windows and is now used as an office building. 14. Gravelly Graveyard/Old Woolley Cemetery, Fairview Avenue off Princeton Avenue Gravelly Graveyard/Old Woolley Cemetery is located on a rise above the north bank of the Metedeconk River. Enoch Jones purchased about eight acres of land from the estate of Adam Woolley. Enoch in turn, deeded the land to Jessie Jones, setting aside less than one half acre for a public cemetery. Among those buried there are Enoch Jones, who served with George Washington in the American Revolutionary War and who helped defend Toms River during a battle with British forces; Isaac Elmer, Township overseer and a veteran of the War 1812; and William S. Johnson, a member of the first township committee 1850. 15. Trolley Line 1903-1923 Runs diagonally across the northern part of town. On March 4, 1903, George O. Vanderbilt filed papers to build the Trenton, Lakewood and Atlantic Railway, an electric railway to run from Point Pleasant to Trenton. He had purchased the right-of way passing through Brick Township. The right of way was cleared and graded, streams were bridged and rails laid as far as Coolidge Drive in Brick when money ran out. Sold at auction on January 3, 923, the right of way eventually came under the ownership of Central Jersey Power & light Co. (General Public Utilities) 16. Osbornville Protestant church (C.1920) 588 Mantoloking Road Established in 1850 as the Methodist Protestant church, the original building was disassembled, moved by wagon in 1855 and reconstructed at its present location. The original building burned down in 1915. The present structure was built on the old foundation in the same year as a cemetery adjacent to the church. 17. NEJECHO, New Jersey Episcopal Choir Mantoloking Rd., east of Adamston Rd. Located on the south shore of the Metedeconk River and on the north side of Mantoloking Road in the Adamston section of Brick Township, Camp NEJECHO operated from 1907 to 1940. The camp provided a summer getaway for children from city areas of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania 18. John & Mutah Van Note Patterson House, 203 Drum Point Road. Situated on the corners of Drum Point Road and Cherry Quay Roads, Mutah Van Note Patterson and her husband John Patterson operated a very successful cranberry business in Cedar Bridge, Osbornville and Laurelton. Brick Township was well known for its production of cranberries at the turn of the century. Local people used cranberries as a spread on sandwiches for salads, in muffins and over ice cream. 19. Kettle Creek Cemetery, Birch Drive The Kettle Creek Cemetery was a part of the Kettle Creek Baptist Church, which was organized on August 18, 1835. In 1901 the church building was moved to a new location on Drum Point Road. 20. Normandy Beach, Highway 35, North & South Normandy Beach in the ocean front section of Brick Township was settled as a fishing and hunting community. The ocean front section runs from the southern boundary of Mantoloking to the northern boundary of Dover Township at Fifth Avenue Located on Mantoloking to the northern boundary of Dover Township at Fifth Avenue. Located on the peninsula area were the summer resorts of Camp Osborne and Sea Bay Park. The Normandy Corner Store (C.1930 is on Route 35 North) 9

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Table of Contents

Introduction Scope Mission Statement Goals and Objectives Liability Statement Community Overview The History of Brick Township The History of Brick Township's Shade Tree Management Program Community Forestry Program Administration Tree Service Request Process Training Plan Current Training Goals and Objectives Public Education, Awareness and Outreach Statement of Tree Budget In Kind Budget Shade Tree Management Plan Implementation Tree Assessment and Inventory Goals 2003-2007 Objectives Tree Hazard Identification and Management Goals 2003-2007 Objectives Tree Planting Goals 2003-2007 Objectives Tree Maintenance and Care Goals 2003-2007 Objectives Shade Tree Management Plan Implementation Timeline for the years 2003 - 2007 Year 1, 2003 Year 2, 2004 Year 3, 2005 Year 4, 2006 Year 5, 2007 Some ideas for goals for the next 5 year plan Community Stewardship Incentive Program (CSIP) CSIP #1 Plan Preparation CSIP #2 Training CSIP #3 Public Education and Awareness CSIP #4 Arbor Day Activities CSIP #5 Assessment and Inventory CSIP #6 Tree Hazard Identification Plan CSIP #7 Tree Planting CSIP #8 Tree Maintenance CSIP #9 Tree Recycling CSIP #10 Ordinance Establishment CSIP #11 Tree Care Disaster Plan CSIP #12 Insect and Disease Management CSIP #13 Other

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 4 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Community Forestry Management Plan


Introduction Scope This plan has been designed to demonstrate the manner in which Brick Township currently manages the community tree resources under its jurisdiction including trees along streets, in parks, rights-of-way and around township buildings and other holdings. This plan will also outline how Brick Township intends to further improve this system over the next five years. Mission Statement The Township of Brick desires to maintain and promote a healthy, sale and sustainable shade tree resource that will physically and aesthetically benefit the community and its residents in the most cost effective manner possible. Goals and Objectives The following is a list of goals of Brick Township's Community Forestry Management Plan: 1. Introduce a diversity of trees and shrubbery that will provide for long term coverage of public lands, parks and recreation areas. a. Develop a yearly planting program along local streets (municipal) and on recreation lands following the guidelines of an established list of trees developed with consideration of the local climate and environment (sandy soil, urban, or wetland conditions). b. Develop a cooperative planting program along Ocean County and State rights-of-way in conjunction with the municipal efforts. c. Obtain Tree City USA designation and strive for growth awards. d. Establish a Memorial Tree Planting Program honoring residents and employees of the township. 2. Establish an ongoing maintenance program on a five year cycle for the trees along township rights-of-way and coordinate with county, state and utility company maintenance divisions to ensure that their procedures are compatible with ours. 3. Inventory tree resources on all local, county and state roads, lands and parks. a.) Identig2 maintenance deficiencies and propose corrective action. b. Establish a priority list for the implementation of corrective action. 4. Revise tree ordinances as necessary to define responsibility for maintenance, removal and replacement. a. Develop policies for the ongoing maintenance of community shade tree resources. Establish where the greatest liabilities lie and address these areas. b. Propose policies based on the need to promote the safety and welfare of the community. c.) Develop new ordinances dealing with landscape requirements for all commercial sites, regardless of how small, specifically cellular tower construction. 5. Educate the public about trees and their importance to the entire community. a.) Develop a map of community tree resources and locate important points of interest. b.) Establish an educational document updated yearly that reinforces the goals and objectives of the shade tree efforts in the community and develop a citizen stewardship program to encourage public participation in all events. c.) Develop educational programming to be used in Brick Township's Elementary and Intermediate Schools. 6. Develop Brick Township's shade tree resource and take a more proactive role in establishing the aforementioned goals. a.) Hire a part time forester or share a forester's services with another community. b.) Have inspections of commercial properties and major subdivisions performed by a qualified forester. 7. Identify hazardous trees, develop and implement a plan to remediate hazardous tree conditions. 8. Ensure that the goals of the Community Forestry Management Plan are compatible with the Master Plan and Open Space and Recreation Plan. 9. Expand the educational opportunities and training for Shade Tree Commission members and Public Works employees. a.) Send 1 to 2 members for CORE training annually. b.) Hold in house training for proper pruning, pesticide application, BLS training, etc. c.) Send volunteers or employees to classes at Rutgers, the Shade Tree Federation meeting or other suitable training opportunities.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Liability Statement Brick Township recognizes the benefits provided to the community by its tree resource. As trees are living entities, it is inevitable that as they mature they eventually require care, maintenance, removal and replacement. Brick Township must, however, work within a reasonable budget and may not be able to meet every demand. Therefore it is the intent of this plan to focus available resources to reduce tree hazards. Since it is impossible to predict or prevent all hazardous conditions that may arise, Brick Township is developing this plan to become more proactive in its tree maintenance. Proactive tree management should reduce the occurrence of unexpected events. Following this plan will demonstrate Brick Township's commitment to proper tree management within the Township's rights-of-way and public holdings. Community Overview The History of Brick Township In 1850, when the New Jersey Legislature created Ocean County from parts of Monmouth and Burlington Counties, they also created Brick Township. The new Township was named for its most prominent citizen Joseph W. Brick, the industrious and successful owner of Bergen Iron Works. At that time, Brick Township included all the land from the eastern boundary of Jackson Township to the Atlantic Ocean. The area included the villages of Adamston, Bricksburg (Lakewood), Bay [lead, Burrsville (Laurelton), Cedarbridge, Herbertsville, Osbornville, Point Pleasant, West Point Pleasant, Mantoloking and a portion of Normandy Beach. The people of Brick Township made their living off the land, bay and rivers. They were substance farmers growing their own food and trading off the surplus. There were dairy herds and milk routes. They fished and hunted the rivers, bay, ocean and forest; there was an abundance of stripe bass, perch, herring crabs and clams along with rabbits, pheasants and grouse. There were cranberry bogs in most sections of town and at the turn of the century, Brick Township lead Ocean County in the production of cranberries. The 1900's brought new economies to the area; the poultry industry started with Park and Tilford' s Laurelton Farms and peaked when refugees from World War II entered the business. Summer camps for children began to spring up, Camp Eagle, Camp Burton, Princeton Camp; New Jersey Episcopal Choir Camp (NEJECHO) and the Cedars. Land developers arrived promoting the area as a resort, for swimming, boating, salt water bathing, crabbing, fishing and for just getting away. In 1934, the Van Ness Corporation developed Breton Woods, selling a plot 40 feet by 100 feet with a cabin for $685.00. Shore Acres was advertised as "The Venice of the Jersey Shore." The Hudson Dispatch, a newspaper out of Hudson County offered a plot of land in Cedarwood Park with a subscription to their newspaper (a subscriber had to buy an additional lot in order to build a house.) Brick Township continued to be a quiet rural-resort community into the 1950's with a population of about 5,000 people, when the Garden State Parkway opened. Travelers exiting the Parkway were soon to discover this area where property was inexpensive, taxes were low, they were about an hours drive from their jobs and they could move away from crowded cities. Land development dominated the economy bringing about a dramatic growth in population. As more and more people moved into Brick Township there became a need for retail stores, better roads, a police department, additional emergency needs and more city services. The postal designation of Brick Township became an issue in 1959 when the U.S. Postal Service consolidated the local post offices into one central post office on Princeton Ave. At that time the postal designation "Brick Town" was created. The local citizenry objected, but to no avail. Through out the 1960's and 70's people interpreted the postal designation to be the name of the Township, when in fact it wasn't. In 1978 with the insistence of the Brick Township Historical Society the postal service corrected the misnomer and designated Brick as the mailing address for Brick Township.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Since 1850 Brick Township has evolved from the virgin woodlands to the thriving suburban community it is today. Present day Brick Township is made up of a collection of villages, settlements and developments, including Metedeconk and Burrsville which are known as Laurelton, Cedar Bridge, Herbertsville, Osbornville, Adamston, West Mantoloking and the Peninsula area of resort communities and Normandy Beach. Later developments which might be considered sections of town are Riviera Beach and Lake Riviera. Within these villages and settlements lies the history, culture, historic structures and places that are important to the development of Brick Township. The History of Brick Township's Shade Tree Management Program This once quiet, shore community of mainly summer cottages has become a bustling suburban community, but preservation of its native woodlands and tree cover have helped maintain its village feel. Just off the highways and into the neighborhoods you will find much of the quiet, rural charm has been preserved along with its native oak and pine forests. As is the case with other townships of this size, most of the tree resources lie on private property. The township does have a large public tree resource in its parks, along woodlines adjacent to the roadways, and in formal street tree planting as well as at other public facilities. The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission was established in 1972 by ordinance to aid in protecting and establishing trees throughout the township. Currently tree care management needs are met by outside contractors and the Department of Public Works crews. Parks and Recreations crews also assist with tree planting and follow up care along with some brush clean up in parks and at other public facilities. One of the major goals of this plan is to develop a hazardous tree inventory and remediation plan to help beautify the community and reduce potential risks to Brick Township's residents. A complete inventory would cover 360 miles of roadway plus all parks and public buildings. A preliminary windshield survey performed in June of 2002 covering 62 miles of roadways determined that approximately 3.91% of the trees in the sampled area, which was 17.2% of the road miles in town, posed a better than average risk of structural failure due to defective or dead limbs, trunks or root flares. The species diversity in the surveyed area was comprised of 6 Quercus, 4 Acer, and 2 Pinus species along with 10 other notable species along the roadway covered. There is a lack of age and species diversity throughout the township in comparison to towns of similar size and configuration. The largest notable tree problem aside from the aforementioned structural dejects above are the after effects of the past few years of drought stress, and the impact that it is having on tree health, especially the more shallow rooted species. Improper pruning throughout the township is another issue to be dealt with by educating the public and fostering a more cooperative effort with the local utility companies. Also there is a need to strengthen the current tree ordinances to help preserve trees during the construction process wherever new construction takes place. There are most certainly other insect, disease and cultural problems present, but none of these are at an intolerable level or worthy of note at this time. Despite the list of maladies listed above, 80 - 85% of trees in the surveyed area are in fair to good condition or better. The remaining trees are in poor to fair condition, including the 3.91% that have been identified as dead or structurally unsound and in need of removal or remediation. Ideally, this Community Forestry Management Plan should be linked to the Township's Master Plan and Open Space Plan. It is the intent of this plan to establish goals and initiate objectives that will protect and enhance the tree resource of Brick Township through a program of planting and preservation that will benefit present and future generations of the community. The 2003 Master Plan is currently under review by the Township's Planning Board and is scheduled for adoption in the spring of 2003. The Community Forestry Management Plan will be incorporated as a new element at the time of adoption. 3

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Community Forestry Program Administration The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission is the entity charged with overseeing the care of the Township's tree resource. In reality, it is a cooperative effort of the Mayor and Council, Department of Public Works and many other boards and agencies working with the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission to achieve this goal. The following chart depicts those involved in the Shade Tree Management process as they pertain to township, county or state roadways.

Mayor and Council Township Administrator

Dept of Parks & Recreation

Dept of Land Use

Engineering Department

Dept of Public Works

Planning Board

Zoning Board

NJ D.O.T Tree Crews

Ocean Cty. Tree Crews

Utility Contractors

Environmental

Commission

Shade Tree Commission

Private Contractors

General Public

A. The Mayor and Council 1) The Mayor with consent of Council is responsible for appointing the members of the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission along with one liaison from the Township Council. 2) The Mayor and Council review the policies and plans of Brick Township Shade Tree Commission. 3) The Mayor and Council approve annual budgets for the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission and the Department of Public Works. B. Township Administrator 1) Reviews plans and policies submitted by the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission and makes recommendations to the Mayor and Council. 2) Recommends the annual budget of the Shade "Free Commission to the Mayor and Council. C. Brick Township Shade Tree Commission The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission is a five member volunteer board appointed by the Township Council. They are the advisory agency for all community trees on municipal streets, rights-of-way, parks, or other properties. Their duties include: 1) Provide advice regarding the planting, removal and general maintenance of township trees. 2) Develop and recommend the policies and goals that will preserve and develop Brick Township's tree resource. 3) Perform public outreach to foster better understanding and care for Brick's trees on both public and private properties. 4) Propose tree related items for inclusion in the annual township budget. 4

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

D. Department of Public Works l) Reviews any requests for tree planting, removal or maintenance and makes the necessary inspections. 2) Performs tree planting and smaller pruning and removal operations. 3) Inspects work performed by private contractors for the township. 4) Develops annual plans and budget requests for tree maintenance. 5) Maintains through public employees and private contractors all trees on public property. E. Department of Land Use 1) Advise the Township Administrator on tree issues. 2) Manage street tree planting program. 3) Serve as staff liaison to Shade 'Free Commission. 4) Inspect plantings for bond release. 5) Handle inquiries from the public regarding trees. 6) Write grants for tree purposes. F. Engineering Department 1) Oversee landscape plans and suggestions submitted by developers and the Shade Tree Commission. 2) Inspects all work performed by the utility contractors on Brick Township properties. 3) Helps review and revise all ordinances pertaining to township trees. G. Department of Parks and Recreation 1) Responsible for the upkeep of newly planted and young trees in township parks and at other public facilities, i.e.: watering, mulching, fertilizing and pruning. H. Planning Board 1) Reviews all landscape plans before the township. I. Zoning Board 1) Determines if landscape plans comply with current ordinances. J. Environmental Commission l) Cooperates with the Shade Tree Commission in tree related projects. K. Private Tree Contractors Generally, most tree care and maintenance activities are done in-house by Road Department and Parks and Recreation Tree Crews or by county tree crews but when difficult or large climbing jobs arise, private contractors may be deemed necessary on a case-by-case basis. Private contractors are responsible for the following: 1) Provide proof of appropriate insurance, certifications and licenses as necessary to the appropriate department heads. 2) Report prior to and following all work performed to the appropriate department supervisor. 3) Complete all work in a safe and timely manner according to all applicable safety standards set by OSHA or ANSI, as they pertain to tree care operations. 4) Follow all current arboricultural practices and recommendations. 5) Report all hazards or problems directly to appropriate department head immediately. L. Utility Contractors 1) Must notify the Brick Township Director of Public Works or Engineering Department prior to the start of any non-emergency work in the township. 2) Must follow all current arboricultural practices and recommendations. 3) May assist Public Works Department Tree Crews in clearing trees to a safe distance from their facilities when necessary. M. General Public 1) Continue to report all requests for planting, removal or maintenance to the Engineering Department, Department of Public Works, the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission or the Department of Land Use. 2) Assist in follow-up care to the newly planted trees on adjacent properties or in county or township rightsof-way. N. Ocean County Tree Crews 1) Responsible for maintaining trees on county roadways. O. NJ DOT Tree Crews 1) Responsible for maintaining trees on state roadways.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Tree Service Request Process Planting, removal, or pruning requests can be made by any department or individual residing in Brick Township so long as the property in question is one owned and maintained by Brick Township. All requests must follow this procedure. All requests must be mailed or called in to the Brick Township Department of Public Works, Engineering Department or Brick Township Shade Tree Commission. All information pertinent to the request should be sent to the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission prior to action, except in the ease of emergencies -which will be sent directly to the Director of Public Works to be handled in an expeditious manner. All non-emergency work will be inspected by the Engineering or Land Use Departments and then prioritized and referred to the appropriate department, Ocean County, State D.O.T. or private contractors. Work requests will be completed in the order in which they were received (excluding emergency or priority work) and will be completed in a reasonable time period. All property owners adjacent to the requested work and/or those making the request will be notified of any action to be taken, even if no action is deemed necessary at that time. Training Plan Since arboriculture is constantly changing with fast-paced technological and scientific innovations, Brick Township recognizes the need for a broad based and ongoing training program for individuals at all levels of the Community Forestry Management Program. From Public Works employees to Shade Tree Commission members and administrators, all need continued technical and managerial information to benefit Brick Township's tree resource. Current Training 1. The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission utilizes a portion of its budget for ongoing training of its members. 2. The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission encourages and provides for its members to participate in continuing education classes and CORE training as included in the New Jersey Shade Tree & Community Forestry Assistance Act. At the time of this writing, Brick Township has no CORE trained members in its Shade Tree Program, but has budgeted for two members to receive training in 2003. 3. Several members of the DPW tree crews have attended continuing education classes including Right to Know training, Work Zone Safety, Personal Protective Equipment, Lockout/Tagout training and EHAP training. 4. The above mentioned courses and others are available to all individuals involved in managing tree resources. Goals and Objectives 1. To have all individuals involved in the management of tree resources CORE trained. To accomplish this, one Commission member and one township employee will be sent each year to be CORE trained. 2. Increasing the quality of care given to Brick Township's trees by providing tree maintenance crews and Shade Tree Commission members with the most current technical arboricultural information. 3. Ensuring the safety of tree maintenance crews and residents by providing current and advanced training in hazard tree identification, equipment safety, and electrical hazard awareness. Public Education, Awareness and Outreach Since its beginnings in 1972, the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission has supported public education with regard to tree care. While this provides a valuable service to the community at large, it also encourages public support for the Shade Tree Commission. Upon acceptance of this management plan, the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission hopes to pursue a more aggressive outreach program. In the past, tile Shade Tree Commission has provided community forestry education through some of the following public outreach methods and hopes to expand this program to include each of these objectives. Working with Garden Clubs to help maintain and beautify public spaces and parks. Providing tree advice to residents at no charge. Providing seeds or seedlings to schools for Arbor Day plantings at an annual assembly program designed for second graders. Adhering to the Sunshine Law by notifying the public of all meetings. Notifying local newspapers of tree-related events when appropriate. Advising the Planning and Zoning Boards regarding trees proposed in development applications. Inviting Scouts and other youth groups to Arbor Day activities and getting schools more involved with the Shade Tree Program by establishing an annual program. 6

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Begin "Memorial" tree plantings upon request. Assisting youth groups, such as the Boy Scouts in tree related projects. Install an approved Community Forestry Management Plan on the township website and place a copy in the library and the Office of Land Use. Publish 2 tree related articles annually in the local newspaper. Achieve and maintain Tree City USA status on an annual basis. Hold an annual seminar with tree related topics for the public. Statement of Tree Budget The year 2002 budget for the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission is listed below, along with funds allocated for the Tree Management Program by the Department of Public Works, Parks and Recreation Department and Land Use Department. Shade Tree Commission Annual Budget allocated for the following: - Secretary's salary - Shade Tree Federation dues and publications - Other miscellaneous materials, printing and supplies - Conferences, meetings, education

$1,545.00 $ 160.00 $ 85.00 $ 500.00 $2,290.00

Department of Public Works Leaf and Christmas Tree Recycling Program Activities include curbside pick up of leaves and Christmas trees for recycling and chipping. 2002 Budget $300,000.00 Parks and Recreation Department Pruning and planting of trees, shrubs and ornamentals. 2002 Budget $50,000.00 Roads Department Pruning and tree maintenance 2002 Budget $50,000.00 Total 2002 budget for tree planting, recycling and maintenance activities $400,000.00 Approximate allowance of $5.00 per capita is dedicated towards tree related activities. In Kind Budget Shade Tree Commission 7 Members x 12 meetings x 2 hours = 168 hours at $15.39 per hour = $2,585.52 Earth Day Fair Land Use staff, Parks Department staff and Recreation Department staff. Planning and meetings Display preparation Flyer development Staffable time and public information 100 hours x $i5.39 per hour= $1,539.00 Arbor Day Public Works staff, Parks Department staff and Recreation Department staff. Planning and meetings Public information Distribution of trees Planting and maintenance 100 hours x $15.39 per hour = $1,539.00 Adopt-A-Spot program Public Works staff, Recreation Department staff and Administrative staff. Planning of Adopt-A-Spot locations Organization of volunteers Maintenance evaluation mid coordination 150 hours x $15.39 per hour = $2,308.50 Total number of hours = 518 hours on tree related issues @ $15.39 per hour = $7,972.02 In Kind Budget Total Shade Tree Budget Total Department of Public Works Total Total Tree Budget $ 7,972.02 $ 2,290.00 $400,00O.00 $410,262.02

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Shade Tree Management Plan Implementation Tree Assessment and Inventory Brick Township has a large tree resource, much of which consists of what was formerly native oak and pitch pine forest. Currently there is no formal street tree plan and no tree inventory. Potential plans for GIS mapping in Brick Township may lead to the eventual inventory of traditional street trees to be included in those maps. It is unclear at this time if GIS mapping will include woodland and native vegetation areas. A preliminary tree inventory, whether traditional or computerized, should begin with the most basic information within the next five years. Goals The current goals of the tree inventory are to: Determine the overall health of Brick Township's tree resource. Catalogue all planted trees along roadways in the township. Catalogue all trees in township parks and on township owned properties. Identify open planting spaces in the community. Identify possible tree or sidewalk conflicts. Develop maintenance cycles for systematic rotation pruning. Include inventory on new GIS map when this becomes available. 2003-2007 Objectives Seek volunteers to aid the Shade Tree Commission in compiling a complete tree inventory of all public trees along Township rights-of-way. Hire a consultant to train volunteers in tree identification and hazard tree identification. Perform annual survey to assess tree health and future needs. Train volunteers and Township employees to install information gathered into computer database. Catalogue all pertinent information gathered in survey. As a result of the information gathered in the inventory, set up systematic pruning cycles for newly planted and established trees. Implement action plan to prevent and remediate tree / sidewalk conflicts where applicable. Tree Hazard Identification and Management Brick Township is dedicated to providing a healthy and productive tree resource for its residents in the safest and most cost effective manner possible. Public safety is of the highest concern throughout every aspect of the tree management program from planting to removal. During the undertaking of this Community Forestry Plan, a preliminary hazard Tree Assessment has already been completed through a cursory windshield survey covering 62 miles of roadway. Information gathered in that survey has been forwarded to the appropriate departments for hazard abatement work. Goals To ensure public safety in relation to trees on all Brick Township properties and thoroughfares. To establish an ongoing comprehensive plan for Hazard Tree Assessment on all Township properties and thoroughfares. 2003-2007 Objectives Hazard tree evaluation training should be provided for Shade Tree Commission members and Public Works employees. Establish an annual Hazard Tree Assessment by windshield study. Encourage all members involved in the Tree Management Program to report all potential tree hazards to appropriate department heads. Have all recognized tree hazards discovered in the assessment remediated by pruning, removal or appropriate arboricultural actions.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Tree Planting The tree planting program as it exists now is designed to replace dead trees, fill open spaces located by the Department of Public Works or the Shade Tree Commission, meet the requests of residents, and add species diversity to Township parks, streets and other facilities. Builders are also responsible to plant 2 1/2 inch caliper trees on 50 foot centers for all new developments. Arbor Day has also been an integral part of Brick tree planting program. The Shade Tree Commission would like to begin a "Memorial" tree planting program in the near future. Brick recognizes the need for diversity and stability in its aging tree population and intends to develop a formal plan to integrate young trees into areas with aging and declining tree populations. Implementation of this program will not only beautify the town, but also by diversifying the species and age of the trees in Brick, it will benefit the community. Goals Improve species diversity throughout the township. Increase the number of ornamental tree species to increase the aesthetic appeal to the residents. Increase the number of smaller ornamental tree species in close proximity to overhead utilities, reducing future tree and utility conflicts. Develop plans for renovation and beautification of township parks. Seek better ways to maintain and help establish newly planted materials i.e., water, mulch and prevent mechanical damage from mowers. Develop signs and plantings for entrances welcoming residents and visitors into town. 2003-2007 Objectives With the cooperation of the utility company, start removing declining and poorly or over pruned trees and replace them with smaller species around overhead utilities. With the cooperation of the Ocean County Shade Tree Commission and Road Department develop an annual maintenance program along county roadways in Brick Township. Find suitable tree species not currently existing on township properties, and incorporate them into new plantings. Seek grants or donations to fund new plantings and beautification of township parks, including Adopt-a-Tree and memorial garden programs. Solicit help of the Public Works Department, Department of Parks and Recreation and the public in aftercare new tree plantings. Apply for Tree City USA status. Continue to apply for Tree City USA status and strive for growth awards. Tree Maintenance and Care Brick Township recognizes that trees need general wellness care and not just emergency care. A proactive plan of routine scheduled maintenance will ensure a healthy, aesthetically pleasing and cost effective urban forest with a reduced hazard potential. This management plan aims to provide a framework that will benefit and raise the level of care for all township owned trees and trees along township thoroughfares. Structural pruning schedules will be established to train young trees to reduce future potential liabilities and maintenance costs. Continued maintenance on established and mature trees should reduce the risk of hazardous situations and increase tree life spans, generating benefits to the community. Goals To install healthy, viable trees into the existing landscape and help them to reestablish themselves as quickly as possible to insure their longevity. Train and develop young trees with good structure. Maintain the health and extend the useful life span of existing trees. Promote public safety with regard to trees on township properties and rights-of-way. Maintain the maximum benefit of trees in the most cost effective manner. Review and revise all tree related ordinances as necessary. Educate the public with regards to trees and their benefits and care.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

2003-2007 Objectives Seek cooperation from Ocean County tree crews to begin a routine pruning cycle in Brick. Work with utility companies to develop a removal and replacement program to eliminate future hazards and tree line conflicts. Seek additional funds and grants for hiring of private contractors for general tree care needs beyond the scope of county and utility cooperation. Develop a rigorous training program for structural pruning of 20% of young trees on an annual basis, by dividing the Township into 5 zones and completing one zone annually until finished. Develop a quarterly news letter or newspaper column to inform the public of the Shade Tree Commission's progress and also general tree care tips. Establish an annual assembly seminar in the elementary school district. Submit an annual accomplishment report to the NJ Forest Service. Shade Tree Management Plan Implementation Timeline for the years 2003 - 2007 Year 1, 2003 Y Divide the township into five management zones and initiate a 5 year cycle of hazard pruning and maintenance. Begin this year by completing a simple windshield survey hazard tree assessment to identify existing hazards in all five zones. This hazard assessment will be carried out by the Public Works Department, Shade Tree Commission and a hired consultant. Y Continue already established tree planting projects. The Shade Tree Commission traditionally hires outside contractors to plant approximately 40 trees per year usually in the spring, plus incidental planting and special projects such as Arbor Day. Planting is also done by bonded requirements from developments. Apply for Tree Planting Grant or tree planting money from CSIP. Y Get the approved Community Forestry Management Plan on the Township web site and on reserve at the library and in the Land Use Department. Achieve Tree City USA status. Continue to hold Township Arbor Day celebration Have at least 2 articles published on tree related issues in the local paper Write one article for the townships quarterly newsletter. Continue to adhere to the sunshine law by publishing monthly meeting notices. Reach out to local schools and elementary schools for participation in Arbor Day. Have a booth at the Summerfest Concert Series to provide public outreach and education as well as gather information from residents requesting tree work or plantings. Y Send 1 - 2 people from the Shade Tree Commission and possible Public Works representatives as well to the New Jersey Shade Tree Federation Meeting for CORE training and CEU's. Continue a program of in-house training for the Public Works Department with the use of outside consultants and safety trainers. This year should focus on proper pruning, chain saw and equipment safety. Y Reach out to the local utility company to begin a proactive removal and replacement plan. Y Submit an Annual Accomplishment Report to NJ Forest Service. Y Continue monthly meetings with site plan reviews. Year 2, 2004 Y Using the assessment done in 2002, begin in the zone that was found to have the most hazardous situations and hire a contractor to prune or remove the hazardous trees in this first zone. (Apply for CSIP Grant to fund this project). Y Reach out to Ocean County to seek a routine pruning cycle in Brick Township along county roadways. Y Continue with regular tree planting. Consider applying for tree planting grant or some tree planting money from CSIP depending on the severity of the hazard problem identified above. Y Develop a plan to establish a comprehensive street tree inventory. Initiate a plan of action and determine what information should be included in the inventory. Y Meet with the Planning Board to review ordinances for compliance with the Municipal Master Plan and to discuss what's working and what isn't. Ordinance review should include an update of the Approved Species Planting List and a review of the existing permitting process and a fine structure for failure to comply with the ordinance. Also include a plan to deal with cellular tower construction and landscaping. Y Continue working with local utilities to begin removal of hazardous or troublesome and high maintenance trees under overhead conductors. 10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Y Continue yearly Public Relations activities, such as Tree City USA recertification, Arbor Day celebrations, 2 newspaper articles, quarterly newsletter, Sunshine Law notifications, and participation at the Summerfest Concert Series. Y Continue attendance at the New Jersey Shade Tree Federation Meeting (Shade Tree Commission and Department of Public Works). Continue in-house training of Public Works employees. The goal for this year is to hold tree identification and hazard tree identification courses. Y Look into the feasibility of hiring or sharing with another community a part time forester or consultant. Y Expand outreach into elementary schools with an educational program and Arbor Day celebration. Y Submit Annual Accomplishment Report to the New Jersey Forestry Service. Y Continue monthly meetings with site plan reviews. Year 3, 2005 Y Hazard tree removals / pruning should move on to the next priority zone as established in the windshield assessment. Y Tree planting goals remain the same as last year. Y Begin comprehensive street tree inventory. The goal for this year is to complete the first 2 zones. Y Initiate discussions with the planning board to gain recognition of the Community Forestry Management Plan in the new Master Plan and Open Space Plan for the municipality, which will be under review in 2006. Y Continue every year Public Relations activities: Tree City USA recertification, Arbor Day celebration, 2 articles in the local newspaper, participation at the Summerfest Concert Series, quarterly news letter and Sunshine Law notifications. Y Continue training program with attendance at the NJ Shade Tree Federation Meeting (keep up with CORE and CEU requirements). Continue in-house training with Public Works, address any training needs that may present themselves as we work through the plan or as other things happen. Perhaps training on how to recognize and deal with Bacterial Leaf Scorch and Asian Long Homed Beetle will be necessary. Y Continue working with Ocean County on a proactive pruning and removal cycle in Brick Township along county roadways. Y Continue working with utility companies to remove hazardous or high maintenance trees under the overhead conductors and begin replacing them with smaller ornamental varieties. Y Hire a part time forester or consultant to help oversee the Community Forestry Management Plans goals and move the program forward. This is the CSIP goal for this year. Y Submit Annual Accomplishment Report to NJ Forest Service. Y Begin "Memorial" tree planting program at annual Arbor Day celebration. Continue monthly Shade Y Tree Commission meetings with site plan reviews. Year 4, 2006 Y Hazard tree removals/pruning should move into the third priority zone. Y Continue the comprehensive street tree inventory. The goal for this year is to complete the next two zones. Y Tree planting goals should remain the same as in previous years, with possible adjustments considering the number of removals necessary as part of the hazard removal program and availability of grant money. Y Continue the trend of the "annual meeting" with the Planning Board, to keep them informed of our progress and to address any concerns. Push for the incorporation of the Community Forestry Management Plan into the Master Plan. Y Continue Public Relations activities: Tree City USA recertification, Arbor Day celebrations, Summerfest Concert Series, 2 articles in local newspaper, quarterly newsletter and Sunshine Law notifications. Initiate a training program for residents, a one day or evening seminar for residents on pertinent tree issues. Y Training program will continue as usual, with the addition of inviting members of the Planning Board or other departments to join the (Shade Tree Commission and Department of Public Works) at the Shade Tree Federation Meeting. Y Continue working with the utilities on the proactive removal and replacement project under the overhead utilities. Y Review the part time forester position and duties, apply for a CSIP grant again to fund this position. Y Continue working with Ocean County on a proactive pruning and removal cycle in Brick Township along county roadways. Y Submit annual accomplishment report to New Jersey Forest Service. Y Continue monthly Shade Tree Commission meetings with site plan reviews. 11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

Year 5, 2007 Y Hazard tree pruning and removals should move into the fourth zone. Y Comprehensive street tree inventory should move to the next 2 zones. Y Tree planting goals should remain the same. Y Meet with the Planning Board to involve them in the formation of the next 5 year Community Forestry Management Plan. Representatives of other committees and boards in Brick Township will be invited to this meeting as well. Y Public Relations activities will remain the same: Tree City USA recertification, Arbor Day celebration, involvement in Summerfest Concert Series, quarterly newsletters and Sunshine Law notification and 2 articles in local newspaper (one of these should be a review of accomplishments in following the Management Plan over the past 5 years. Based on the success of last year, plans will be made to have another resident seminar. Expand "Memorial" tree planting project. Y Training goals will also remain the same as last year, with a focus on any specific topics/problems that may have come up as a result of working through this management plan, or topics that may be seen as necessary to move forward through the next 5 year plan. Y Continue to work with local utilities in the removal and replacement project. Y Based on the outcome of previous years, look to expand the budget to include a part time forester position. Y Submit the Annual Accomplishment Report to the state. Y Continue working with Ocean County on a proactive pruning and removal cycle in Brick Township along county roadways. Y Continue monthly meetings with site plan review. Y Create and submit the next 5 year Community Forestry Management Plan. Apply for a CSIP grant to fund this project. Some ideas for goals for the next 5 year plan Y Continue to use the five zones established in this plan. Complete the fifth zone and begin this cycle again as a preventive maintenance pruning cycle, and consider also using the zones for planting plans. The tree inventory (comprehensive street tree inventory) should be complete. All data entry should be finished, and a system will be developed for working with the Department of Public Works to update the inventory and for use when tree service requests are received from residents. Update the comprehensive street tree inventory as maintenance is done and as new trees are planted. Continue to build the Shade Tree Commission's relationship with the Department of Public Works and with the Planning Board.

Community Stewardship Incentive Program (CSIP) The thirteen items listed below as a part of the Community Stewardship Incentive Program (CSIP) have been identified throughout this plan with current procedures or a recommended course of action. The following is a synopsis of the suggested practices. CSIP #1 Plan Preparation This Community Forestry Management Plan for Brick Township has been funded by a New Jersey Green Communities Challenge Grant and completed with the cooperation of the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission. Upon approval by the Community Forestry Council, implementation of the plan will begin and this plan will be reviewed and revised as necessary in the year 2007. CSIP #2 Training Currently Brick Township has no CORE trained personnel or volunteers, but training has been budgeted for in 2003 and beyond. It is expected that at least two people will be trained each year until all persons on the Commission and several Department of Public Works employees are trained. Training in tree care practices for Public Works crews will also be expanded, especially with regard to hazard tree identification, equipment safety and electrical hazard awareness. Further information can be found in the training section on page 6.

12

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

CSIP #3 Public Education and Awareness The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission would like to expand on all past public outreach and take a more proactive role in the community. The Shade Tree Commission will seek funding for a quarterly newsletter and mailings to all residents of the Township. The Commission recognizes that public education and support is vital to its success and intends to implement an outreach plan, which can be found in the Public Education, Awareness and Outreach section of this plan on page 6. CSIP #4 Arbor Day Activities Arbor Day has been celebrated by the local schools, with minimal support from the Shade Tree Commission. The Commission is hopeful that Arbor Day programs will be expanded to include: Continue having the mayor proclaim the last Friday in April as Arbor Day on an annual basis. Sponsoring tree planting programs in cooperation with the local schools. Seeking the involvement of local civic and youth organizations to participate in Arbor Day programs. Developing an Arbor Day assembly program for second graders. Achieving Tree City USA status over the next five years and beyond, striving for growth award achievements. CSIP #5 Assessment and Inventory The Township of Brick does not currently have a street tree inventory. Fieldwork should be initiated to record existing tree species, size, condition and location in the next 5 years provided funding is available. Potential planting sites should also be identified. This CSIP Program would follow the Shade Tree Management Plan Implementation guidelines on pages 8-12 using volunteers and paid consultants. CSIP #6 Tree Hazard Identification Plan Tree hazard identification is a major area of concern for Brick Township and has already been initiated with the preliminary windshield survey done during the writing of this plan. This CSIP practice is of the highest priority to Brick Township and will be the first section of the plan implemented in an effort to ensure public safety regarding Township owned or maintained trees. A windshield survey should be completed and reviewed annually to aid in the quick identification and remediation of potential hazards to the public. See Shade Tree Management Plan on pages 9-12. CSIP #7 Tree Planting All future tree planting projects undertaken or overseen by the Brick Township Shade Tree Commission will be guided by the goals and objectives outlined in Shade Tree Management Plan on pages 9-12 of this plan. CSIP #8 Tree Maintenance Brick Township is currently evaluating the Township's future needs for general tree care and future equipment purchases. Brick Township would like to establish a cost effective plan to care for its tree resource whether through conventional or innovative means to help newly planted materials as well as established and mature trees. Future plans to fund a part time forester or a tree crew could become a reality within the next five years. If Brick Township decides to employ a tree crew they will be seeking funding to purchase buckets, chippers, stump grinders, chainsaws and other necessary tree care equipment at that time. See Shade Tree Management Plan on pages 9-12. CSIP #9 Tree Recycling The Brick Township Recycling Program as it exists now consists of leaf clean ups in the spring and fall as well as chipping of Christmas trees. Some wood chips and leaves are hauled directly to an Ocean County facility in neighboring Lakewood Township. Leaves, wood, brush, and other organic materials are also taken to the Ridge Road Recycling Center, a Township facility, for further grinding and composting. All resulting materials are available to Township residents at no cost. No further additions are planned at this time. CSIP #10 Ordinance Establishment The Brick Township Shade Tree Commission was created by ordinance in 1972. The Shade Tree Commission would like to amend the current ordinance to gain better protection of the township's trees, and update the document to meet current arboricultural practices as necessary. This CSIP practice will be addressed in the next 5 years to meet current obligations, seek additional funding to revise all ordinances and to facilitate the Commissions goals outlined in this plan. See Shade Tree Management Plan on pages 9-12.

13

Township of Brick, Master Plan Community Forestry Element

CSIP #11 Tree Care Disaster Plan Brick Township does not currently have a Tree Care Disaster Plan. At present, tree emergencies are handled by county tree crews, utility tree crews or public works tree crews for downed trees. In case of any large-scale tree emergencies, Brick Township would follow plans developed by Ocean County or the Office of Emergency Management. No future plans are being considered at this time. CSIP #12 Insect and Disease Management No formal management plan exists for trees along township roads or on other properties. Any insect or disease outbreaks are handled on a case-by-case basis. Diagnosis and consultation would be sought from NJ State Department of Agriculture, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Service, or a Certified Tree Expert. In the event of an outbreak, State or Federal assistance would be requested. CSIP #13 Other No other management practices have been identified at the time of this writing.

14

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Table of Contents
Introduction and Background Goals & Objectives Fig. 1 Conceptual Intersection Plan Brick Blvd. & Rt. 70 Fig. 2 Conceptual Intersection Plan Chambers Bridge Rd. & Rt. 70 Fig. 3 Conceptual Intersection Plan Cedar Bridge Ave. & Rt. 70 Fig. 4 Conceptual Intersection Plan Duquesne & Rt. 70 The Functional Classification System Table No. 1 Functional Classification of Roads Fig. 5 - Overall Roadway Classification Map Fig. 6 Princeton Avenue Fig. 7 Jack Martin Blvd. Fig. 8 Duquesne Blvd. Fig. 9 Cherry Quay Road Intermodal Methods of Transportation Map A Bicycle Trails 1 2 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 21

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Circulation Plan Element


Introduction and Background The circulation system is a major element of any municipality. It includes the road network as well as bus routes, rail lines, bike paths and pedestrian paths. It influences the very character of land use and surrounding development. In accordance with the Municipal Land Use Law, A Circulation Plan Element showing the location and types of facilities for all modes of transportation required for the efficient movement of people and goods, into, about and through the municipality, taking into account the functional classification system of the Federal Highway administration and the types, locations, conditions, and availability of existing and proposed transportation facilities, including air, water, road, and rail is required. The main purpose of this Element of the Master plan is to establish a framework of how the Township of Brick intends to address its future transportation needs. It establishes the policies, strategies, and priorities for shortterm decisions in order to meet the goals and objectives as outlined hereafter. Bricks success in being a desirable place to live and work is reflected in its circulation system as much as its population, landscape, and overall development. The influx of residents, coupled by new businesses in the area, has resulted in an increase in the volume of vehicular traffic. As a result Brick Township is currently faced with heavy traffic volume on its roads. Brick experienced a significant population increase approximately twenty years ago. Similar to other towns in the vicinity, the construction boom of the 1980s resulted in a surplus of available housing. The introduction of new local roads servicing these developments have altered Brick vehicular circulation patterns. In addition, the Township has endured a tremendous demand for retail space in the last ten years, resulting in vast development and redevelopment of Bricks commercial and retails centers. The confluence of State Routes 88 and 70 and the Garden State Parkway have made the Township the focus of commercial and retail activity for northern Ocean County. Most notable are the concentration and size of shopping centers in a small area. At the time of the Census in 2000, the population was 76,119, and Brick was 95% developed. The majority of the remaining open parcels of land are severely constrained by environmental sensitivity, making transportation developments difficult at best. It is expected that the growth trend of the next ten years will mimic that of developed urban areas constituting infill developments, redevelopment, infill migration of a more diverse population will be the thrust of the development make up. It is important to recognize the rapid growth of the surrounding municipalities as well as the Township. The significant increase in population over the past 10 years is directly related to the dramatic increase in traffic flows on both the major and minor roadways. Population growth in the municipalities surrounding Brick Township will also contribute to the flow and volumes of traffic. The existing transportation system will require redevelopment as well as maintenance and expansion. The townships development as a commercial center is generating its own market draw. While consumers needs will vary, the general trade area where a traffic draw is generated can be defined by certain natural, political and manmade boundaries. The trade area for the retail market of Brick is bound to the north by the Manasquan, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west by the Downtown Lakewood shopping center, and to the south be the Ocean County Mall Regional Commercial Corridor (Hooper Avenue and Bay Boulevard Dover Township). As a result, the surrounding area must also be considered when analyzing Bricks circulation. Demographic changes as well as seasonal recreation changes also play a role in the changing circulation needs of as well as the transportation planning for the future. Brick Township is seeing an increase in the number of age restricted senior living developments in town and in adjacent towns, which has lead to more centralized traffic patterns for the immediate area. A generation of aging baby boomers will continue to influence transportation needs as they transcend middle-age, continue to drive more miles, and demand more transportation services. Seasonal residents and vacationers who choose to use Bricks recreational facilities or roadways as access to the beach, provide decentralized traffic patterns, resulting in numerous, longer trips during the spring and summer months. Seasonal traffic patterns on select arterials introduce high traffic volumes during peak times. Additionally, seasonal traffic patterns include drivers who are not familiar with the routes or the conditions of the roadways producing frustrations for motorists.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Goals & Objectives Transportation issues within Brick Township are numerous and far reaching. Like many other larger municipalities New Jersey, transportation issues in Brick have an affect on individuals (municipal employees, residents of Brick, and shoppers/visitors to the town) on a daily basis. As growth takes place within Brick as well as throughout within the state, the emphasis on transportation issues increases on many levels, including: Engineering: Increased planning/engineering efforts to maintain and adapt infrastructure. Education: Increased municipal, county and state programs; Increased community involvement, outreach and input in projects. Enforcement: Police involvement, patrols and outreach. The Township of Brick has establishes a series of Goals and Objectives for the Circulation Element of the Master Plan. These goals and objectives are broad based recommendations to be instituted in all future transportation related projects. Specific transportation improvements are discussed further in the recommendation section of the report. Brick Township has been proactive in addressing transportation issues and has employed some innovative approaches to obtain results and reach its goals. At this time it is important to list the townships circulation goals for the future. 1 - To provide improved traffic circulation and the reduction of hazardous traffic condition throughout the Township. 2 - Establishing minimum construction standards and programs for roadway construction and restoration 3 - Coordinate transportation related projects and concerns with surrounding municipalities, adjacent Counties and State agencies. 4 - To establish a unified circulation system by properly relating local roads to the 1990 State and County functional road classification system and provide a uniform system of way-finding, as well as directional signage for each route. 5 - To continue to seek funds from Federal, State & County resources for Township road improvement projects. 6 - To provide opportunities for alternative means of travel including but not limited to pedestrian walkways, bicycle paths, bus routes, air and rail transit and the utilization of the inland waterways. 7 - To provide an additional North-South means of crossing the Metedeconk River/Forge Pond and provide an additional means of connecting northern and southern Brick.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Goal No. 1 To provide improved traffic circulation and the reduction of hazardous traffic condition throughout the Township. One of the keys to understanding the circulation system is to accept that one cannot reduce the amount of traffic on our roadways. The solution is in efficient traffic management as opposed to traffic reduction. This can be achieved by methods as complex as providing alternate routes to overcrowded highways, or as simple as providing way-finding signage along seasonal or commercial routes. Brick has been diligent in its effort to conform to federal and state standards associated with traffic management. In effort to keep its existing facilities in a state of good repair, Brick has exercised aggressive annual capital improvement programs that address roadway and drainage maintenance. Through cooperative efforts of capital improvements, and the reviewing agencies such as the Planning Board and Board of Adjustment, the Township has been committed in its efforts of regulating traffic associated with new projects, public and private, in strict conformance with the Federal Highway Administrations Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The intent of the MUTCD is to establish uniformity in traffic control techniques throughout the country so that transportation situations are easily identifiable through familiar regulatory and warning devices. As a matter of law, devices installed must be in conformance with these standards, or they are not enforceable. Additionally, improvements associated with private commercial developments should be required to comply with subtitle Title 39 Statue (Motor Vehicles and Traffic Regulation) for their properties. These rights give Township police the right of enforcement of traffic violations on private properties and effectively manage the associated traffic. Various traffic calming elements/projects may be implemented throughout the township. Each element must be carefully selected to best fit with the existing neighborhood with minimal impact. All of Bricks Commercial development is located on state highways and county roads. In commercial developments, the Townships Planning Board and Board of Adjustment have been requiring adjacent commercial sites to provided cross access between the parking areas. This aids in reducing the number of vehicular trips on the state and county roads and promotes better through traffic. Goal No. 2 - Establishing minimum construction standards and programs for roadway construction and restoration Brick developed over an extensive time span. As a result, the roadway network is a assortment of various improvements that vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. In some ways, the construction and improvements. Brick Township is a sprawl community with its roadway network streets being a basic building block in the different character definitions of individual neighborhoods. And therefore, it is important that future roadway improvement projects do not infringe upon surrounding neighborhood character. At the same time, the Township recognizes the importance of establishing minimum standards for roadway construction and site improvements. To ensure the integrity and safety of the improvements as well as protect the individual characters of local neighborhoods and communities, it is recommended that the Council adopt ordinances to establish minimum improvement standards for roadway systems. These standards should incorporate standards as promulgated by the Residential Site Improvement Standards, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) "A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets", the New Jersey Department of Transportations Standards for Roadway Construction and the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. The Townships Planning Board and Board of Adjustment share responsibility with the Council, police department and engineering department to ensure that new developments adhere to regulatory statues, local statues as well as the Master Plan. It is recommended that a roadway moratorium be established in order to prohibit/limit roadway excavation in recently improved public streets. This will encourage developers as well as utility companies to work together with the Township in maintaining functional systems as well as prolonging the useful life of the individual roadway sections. Site improvements, public and private should be required to establish an existing level of service for the surrounding circulation system. All proposed improvements should be prohibited from substantially reducing predevelopment service levels. For consistency, all level of service calculations should be provided in accordance with the standards of the Transportation Research Boards Highway Capacity Manual and the NJDOT State Highway Access Management Plan.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Another method of effectively managing traffic is to limit the number of access points onto individual roadways. Driveways are frequently unmarked and unchannelized. Driveway standards that minimize the number of access points on major roads promote fewer interruptions in through traffic movements. Vehicular traffic exiting and entering the road capacitates congestion. By limiting the frequency of access point, there is an added benefit of beautification as well as safety to the traveled way. Consideration should be give to the development of ordinances mandating development on State Highways to be developed in accordance with the State Highway Access Management Plan for conformance with the Desirable Typical Section for that particular section of highway. Additionally, procedures for initializing traffic calming elements throughout the Township should be codified through the development of new ordinances. These procedures should include measures for managing citizens complaints and concerns, a standardized form, investigative steps through the Planning, Traffic Safety and Engineering Departments, public involvement, Council Endorsement and inclusion in Capital programs. Goal No. 3 - Coordinate transportation related projects and concerns with surrounding municipalities, adjacent Counties and State agencies. The townships roadway network is interlinked at the County as well as the States level. Brick Township is unique in that almost all of the Townships commercial land is located on County Roads and State highways. Action must be taken at the township level to coordinate with the County and the State to pursue and provide additional connectors and interchanges within and in close proximity to the Township. While township roads function at or near capacity, the majority of the County Roads and State Routes are over capacity and as a result, causing congestion and delay for area motorists. The lack of jurisdiction over the at-fault roadways limits the methods of remediation available for the Township. Based on the volume of traffic and the indicated growth, the previous master plan had suggested that a traffic study be undertaken of the major roads that exhibit these high volumes of growth in the Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT). Based on available traffic counts, it has been determined that the majority of roadways that exceed capacity are under the jurisdiction of the Ocean County, the State Department of Transportation, or the State Highway Authority. Brick has continued to work with the appropriate authorities in efforts to initiate studies that could serve as a -basis for petition to the respective levels of government to make improvements to the roads before they reach capacity. A third alternative would be to form a regional traffic agency that could address these problems from a regional viewpoint. Increased use of public transportation should also be advocated. The existing Traffic situations on NJSH Route 70 have become so problematic that in 2000, the Township Administration authorized a task force to study potential points of alleviation. Through the cooperative efforts of county, state, municipal and legislative help, the task force was created to evaluate the congestion issues along the commercial segments of Route 70, which is from the old Laurelton Circle, to the Lakewood Township border. This section is sometimes referred to as the missing mile indicating that it is the section of Route 70 missing from the States improvement plan. The expansion of Route 70 throughout the Missing Mile was conceptually developed through a corridor study developed by the task force. This expansion can be seen in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. Due to the magnitude of the expansion and the associated costs, the overall expansion is being divided into smaller projects. Some qualify as Pipeline 3 and Pipeline 4 projects at the NJDOT, which increases their viability potential for State funding.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 1

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 2

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 3

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 4

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

The annual progress meeting with County Officials provides Brick with the opportunity to discuss local issues that have a jurisdictional overlap due to County jurisdiction. It is where design and construction projects are discussed, and assistance and information on local issues. Bricks commitment toward interagency coordination has already begun within the various jurisdictions of the Township. Development/redevelopment is a reality in virtually all municipalities and arguably is a necessary part of the economic vitality of the township. The local Planning Board and Board of Adjustment have been instrumental in effecting the circulation patterns of new commercial sites. Development that is not sensitive to residential traffic concerns is problematic in that extensive off-site impacts on local roads directly affect area residents, increases in traffic operations on local roads degrade Quality of Life and design that is not sensitive to surrounding residents can affect property values. Brick Township has a unique hardship in that most (if not all) of the commercially zoned properties within the township front on non-municipal roads. The advantages to involvement at the Planning Board level is that we are able to evaluate planned development and advise the administration on capital improvements that are compatible with development, if needed. Additionally, we are able to work with the applicants to minimize impacts to local receptors (such as neighborhoods, roadways, or schools) that applicants may not otherwise be aware of. These agencies should continue to work with the applicants on the larger commercial applications to implement safety improvements; institute traffic calming measures on site and to configure circulation and access such that local impacts are minimized. Furthermore, these municipal intricacies facilitate coordination with county and state offices on regional impacts. Goal No. 4 To establish a unified circulation system by properly relating local roads to the 1990 State and County functional road classification system and provide a uniform system of way-finding, as well as directional signage for each route. The Functional Classification System All roads within Ocean County have been classified according to the Functional Classification System developed by the Federal Highway Administration. The Federal Highway Act sets forth a definition for each roadway designation according to its functional use, or according to the level of service that it is expected to provide. The classification procedure considers the highway or street as part of an overall travel network. The Functional Classification of Highways in Brick Township is shown on the original Master Plan and is in accordance with the classification system of the Ocean County Planning Board dated December 10, 1985. The functional classification system determines a roadways intended use as a function of access and movement and is also related to the proposed right-of-way and design standards for each particular road. As a subdivision or site plan occurs along a road, the required right-of-way and improvements can be uniformly established across the County when the functional classification system is used. It is traditional in highway and transportation planning to classify roads by their function as carriers of regional or local traffic. The functional classification system for Brick Township consists of four classes of roads as shown on the Master Plan. Ranked by hierarchy they are listed below. Freeways A freeway is an arterial roadway designed to provide a high level of service to its users and the communities it serves. Roadway access to abutting properties is limited and traffic movement is rapid. Freeways usually link the metropolitan centers of a region and/or serve as center-city bypass routes for through traffic. The design features of a freeway include separation of traffic by a center median, full access control and grade separation at intersections. The interchanges are generally widely spaced. Because of the limited access allowed both onto and crossing of, a freeway physically divides the land and forms a basic factor in land planning. With regard to Brick Township, the Garden State Parkway is placed in this designation and provides the major north-south access to the Township.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Principal Arterials Principal arterials perform a number of functions: A connector road having trip length and travel density characteristics indicative of substantial statewide or inter-county travel. An access road to freeways. Land service roads to abutting properties. However, service to abutting land should be subordinate to the provision of travel service to major travel movements. Arterials serve long distance trips and high volumes of traffic, and points of access should be discouraged along them. Minor Arterials Minor arterials form a middle link between the principal arterials and the collector roads. In this capacity, they serve the following functions: Connector roads between cities and towns and other traffic generators, such as major resort areas. Augment and provide access roads to the principal arterials and freeways. Link higher road classifications with local development considerations. Provide service for trips of moderate length with relatively high overall travel speeds, with minimum interference to thru movement. Places more emphasis on land access than higher road classifications and consequently a lower level of traffic mobility. Collector System Collector roads serve travel that is intra-county and travel trips that are shorter than those of arterial routes. Consequently, speeds are typically slower. Collector roads may enter developed areas in order to distribute traffic from the arterial or higher road systems to the ultimate destination on a local or collector system. Conversely, the collector roads serve to connect traffic from local streets to the arterial system. They have been subdivided into the following four categories. Major Collectors This road category functions in a mixed urban-rural area such as Brick to provide primary access to small developed areas, individual traffic generating land uses and to provide bypass or alternate connections to the larger concentrations. Minor Collectors Minor collectors function to carry traffic from local streets and major traffic generating land uses to the primary and secondary roads. They also serve as land access roads. Most roads in the Township service several residential sections and should be classified as minor collectors. Local Streets The local road system is generally characterized by streets that serve primarily as a means of access to adjacent lands, where thru traffic is generally discouraged. Local roads provide travel service over relatively short distances and act as connectors to the higher order systems. Paper Streets Brick Township has a significant number of paper streets. These are streets that have R.O.W. mapped on the tax maps but do not exist as travel ways. They are not improved or paved. However, they do represent a public right-of-way if one is needed. In other cases, they should be vacated.

10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Table No. 1 Functional Classification of Roads Township of Brick Freeways Principle Arterials The Garden State Parkway Route 70* Route 88 from Point Pleasant to Route 70 * Brick Boulevard** Chambers Bridge Road** Cedar Bridge Avenue** Mantoloking Road** Burnt Tavern Road** Burnt Tavern Road Extension** Herbertsville Road** Route 88 west from Route 70 to the Lakewood * Hooper Avenue** Drum Point Road** Adamston Road** Midstreams Road Jordan Road Van Zile Road Maple Avenue Lanes Mill Road** Sally Ike Road** Forge Pond Road * Indicates State of New Jersey jurisdiction ** Indicates Ocean County jurisdiction Note: All roads not otherwise indicated on the Functional Classification Map are considered local streets.

Minor Arterials

Minor Collectors

11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Overall Roadway Classification Map

Fig. 5

12

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Land Use and development are continuously altering the circulation patters of area roads. Based upon the current needs of the area motorist and their resulting demand on the local roadway network, the following roads are being recommended for reclassification. Burrsville Road Minor Collector Princeton Avenue Minor Collector Jack Martin Boulevard Minor Collector Duquesne Boulevard Minor Collector Cherry Quay Road Minor Collector

Fig. 6

13

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 7

14

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 8

15

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Fig. 9

16

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Goal No. 5 To continue to seek funds from Federal, State & County resources for Township road improvement projects. Capital funding has been the main resource for transportation improvement; however, other sources of funding have been utilized for specific projects. Grants are an excellent way of complementing the capital budget. The New Jersey Department of Transportation makes funds available through the Transportation Trust Fund for construction projects that enhance the quality of life for residents. Additionally monies are available through the Transportation Enhancement Act of the 21st Century. These grants are awarded to projects that enhance surface transportation. As the majority of the Townships congestion lies on roadways under County or State jurisdiction, Brick has been innovative in pooling resources and working with the various agencies at the County and State levels. The Township must maintain theses relationships to further enhance traffic management improvements along its major roads. Brick has been innovative in initiating improvements along the Route 70 Corridor, such as the Route 70 left turn lane extension onto Chambers Bridge Road. In July 2005, the NJDOT has approved a Municipal Aid Application to reimburse Brick Township for costs incurred with the extension of the eastbound left turn lane at Chambers Bridge Road. The NJDOT has approved reimbursement of $165,000 obtained through contributions paid to the NJDOT by developers on Route 70 for off-site impacts created by their projects. Brick initiated the design and construction of the extension, while funding for this project was obtained from the NJDOT from their collections of developers contributions. Goal No. 6 To provide opportunities for alternative means of travel including but not limited to pedestrian walkways, bicycle paths, bus routes, air and rail transit and the utilization of the inland waterways. Intermodal Methods of Transportation Bike Trails The Township goal is to link all of the various communities, shopping districts, recreation areas, beaches, and open space areas by means of a bicycle transportation system that can be accessed and enjoyed by all of the Townships residents. The overall Bicycle Path Network should be accessible throughout the entire municipality. Eventually, the trails should be consolidated with Ocean County Bikeway system wherever practical. Brick Township, through the course of the past ten years, has benefited from the infusion of a substantial amount of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Green Acres funding for open space and recreational area acquisitions. The bicycle trail network envisioned works hand in hand with that preservation of open space that has been fostered and nurtured by Township officials in the past. Many of the envisioned bicycle paths planned by the Township trail through recent open space acquisitions made possible by the Green Acres program. The various grant requests are being expanded to include bike paths for Green Acres sites and other substantial areas of open space throughout the Township. For the purposes of this grant request, the nature trail objective through the use of substantial areas of open space is maintained for the Airport Tract Path Phase II with the added benefit of acting in conjunction with other Bicycle Path Applications to begin the formation of a bicycle path network for users. The Township is developing two bicycle path networks. The bike trails are intended to interlink area schools, recreational facilities, historic sites, and public land. The northern trail, also known as the Sawmill Bike Trail, will ultimately connect to the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority reservoir, currently under construction. The southern trail, or Airport Bike Trail will terminate at the Barnegat Bay, where the County is constructing a public fishing pier that will be dedicated to Brick. Two major projects underway are the extension of the Airport Road bicycle trail, and the construction of the Seawood Harbor Bicycle Trail. See Map A Bicycle Trails New Jersey Transit Rail System The existing North Jersey Coast Line and the proposed Monmouth Ocean Middlesex offer transportation services to the Amtrak and New Jersey Transit northeast corridor. While neither service line offers a stop in Brick Township, its existence offers commuters an alternate to the overcrowded roadway system. Progress continues towards the operation of the Monmouth/Ocean/Middlesex rail system. It holds the potential to be a more viable means of travel.

17

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

The Intercostal Inland Waterway Brick Township is situated along the intercostal waterway, which provides inland passage for vessels from the Point Pleasant Inlet, to the Florida Keys. These waters are regulated and maintained by the United States Coast Guard, however, Brick Township is committed to providing its residents with access to the inland waterway. Capital projects such as lagoon dredging enable boaters to access channels. Dock, bulkhead, and shoreline stabilization projects typically occur where a Township right-of-way terminates at a water body. These projects protect the barrier between the roadways and waterways. As we look ahead, the Township should continue lagoon maintenance and shoreline stabilization/protection projects, as well as actively pursue acquiring public access points where the two systems of transportation can meet. Currently, there are no pubic facilities available for boaters to launch their craft. Buses Bus service is present through a variety of different companies that offer services for different needs in town. Bus Service reduces the dependence on personal automobiles. The existing bus services have been summarized below. The existing bus services in town concentrate on regional destinations. The improvements to the Parkway interchange 91 should encourage more community residents to utilize the North Jersey New Jersey Transit Bus services available. Commuter traffic is a phenomenon that transverse county and state boundaries into New York and Philadelphia. Brick has been and must continue to work with the surrounding municipalities, Ocean and Monmouth County, and the State Department of Transportation and the State Transportation authority to encourage the providers of mass transportation to propose and coordinate improvements and expansions to the existing services. 1) NJ Transit Route 1371 Route 3172 2) Academy Bus3 3) Ocean Ride4 4) Summerfest Shuttles5 5) Recreational Shuttles Senior Living Shuttles

Serving Island Beach State Park (seasonal), Seaside Park (seasonal), Seaside Heights (seasonal), Toms River, Dover Township, Brick Township, Lakewood, New York. Brick Township stops include CR 549 at Kettle Creek Road, CR 549 at Brick Plaza, the Park & Ride at CR 549 at Dorado Shopping Center, and the Brick Township Park & Ride Lot. (Effective 09/02/03) 2 Serving Philadelphia, Camden, Cherry Hill, Moorestown, Mt. Laurel, Mt. Holly, Pemberton, Burlington Co. College, Browns Mills, Fort Dix, McGuire AFB, Wrightstown, Cassville, Lakewood, Brick, Point Pleasant Beach, Belmar, Asbury Park. Brick Township stop is Brick Plaza on Brick Boulevard. (Effective 09/02/03). 3 Wall Street Express Garden State Parkway. Brick Township stops include Brick Park & Ride, Dorado Park & Ride, Brick Plaza on Brick Boulevard, CR 549 at Drumpoint Road, Bricktown Bay Harbor Mall, Silverton & Kettle Creek Road, Silverton A&P on Polhemus Road, Hooper Avenue & Fischer Boulevard. (Effective 09/09/02) 4 Ocean Ride is Ocean Countys Transportation system. Originally designed to serve seniors and people with disabilities, Ocean Ride has evolved into providing east/west service (to complement the NJTransit north/south service pattern) to the general public at nominal fares. The Brick Link Route begins at the Point Pleasant rail station, travels through Point Pleasant into Brick, continues along Cedar Bridge Road, links into the Lakewood Industrial Park, and terminates in downtown Lakewood. 5 The award-winning SummerFest is a series of summer concert series held every Thursday evening during July and August at Bricks Windward Beach Park. Shuttle buses leave from convenient locations throughout the Township beginning at 5PM and continuing until 8PM to transport audiences to the park. Return shuttles from the park begin at 9PM. 18

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

Goal No. 7 - To provide an additional North-South means of crossing the Metedeconk River/Forge Pond and provide an additional means of connecting northern and southern Brick. The Metedeconk River divides the Township of Brick. In order to travel north or south through Brick, you must cross the Metedeconk. Currently, the only way to cross the river is culvert, approximately 80 feet wide, located on State Highway Route 70. This further aggravates congestion on this highway. Providing another location to cross the river may alleviate a lot of the through traffic on Route 70. However, numerous water bodies in the Township limit the practical number of locations where north-south crossings can be constructed. The New Jersey Highway Authority is considering a proposal that will help to alleviate this congestion point. The plan calls for a full interchange to be constructed at Milepost 91. This interchange would interconnect with major local roads and thereby provide access to the Garden State Parkway both in a northbound and southbound direction. The preliminary plan, which is in the property acquisition phase, is a collaborated effort of the Highway Authority, Ocean County, and Brick Township. The Mayors Transportation Advisory Committee (MTAC) and the Route 70 Task Force have been focusing on the Missing Mile of Route 70. While grade separation is the most obvious way to reduce the traffic, construction of flyovers, overpasses, and tunnels are not practical in an area this developed. Route 70 bypass roads are also being analyzed. These bypass roads are conceptually service roads that would parallel the highway and provide access to other principal arterials in the center of Town such as, Chambers Bridge Road, Cedar Bridge Avenue, and Brick Boulevard. Road widening is the least complicated method of lessening the traffic, however, it would still be a monumental task. In March 2005, Brick Township presented a Concept Vision to the NJDOT for the segment between Brick Boulevard and the township line with Lakewood. The focus was to identify the extent of physical improvements necessary to achieve manageable operating conditions, and to increase awareness/priority of this area at the state level. In order to evaluate how to best manage the traffic on Route 70, the Township of Brick, in conjunction with the New Jersey Department of Transportation, has embarked on a traffic study project to analyze traffic congestion along Route 70 through Brick Township. Based on this study, intersection improvements and signalization designs are being developed to help alleviate the congestion at various intersections along Route 70. The following lists the areas of study and the findings and consideration given to each. Brick Boulevard Reconfigure jug handle to legalize left turn and extend westbound left storage Extend storage for southbound through/right turn or, provide right turn lane Three right turn lanes northbound on Route 70/3 eastbound and westbound lanes on Route 70 Double Northbound through into u-turn (currently Foodtown Entrance) Chambers Bridge Road Channelized Right turns 5-lane configuration 3 lanes eastbound/westbound Route 70 Extend left turn lane onto Chambers Bridge Road South Extend westbound left storage Extend northbound right turn lane from Route 70 west Cedarbridge Avenue Double left southbound/northbound on Cedar Bridge County jughandle from Route 70 westbound 3 lanes eastbound/westbound on Route 70 Dedicated right turn lane from Route 70 East to Cedar Bridge Avenue South Target/Duquesne Extend eastbound left storage length 3 lanes eastbound/westbound Route 70 LOWES Far side left jughandles Right turn sweeps north/south at signal on Route 70 3 lanes eastbound/westbound on Route 70 Brick Commuter Transportation Center Brick Township, in order to encourage commuter parking has also established one commuter parking lot. The existing lot is near the Dorado Shopping Center at the intersection of Lanes Mill Road and Chambers Bridge Avenue. A planned lot consisting of 6.25 acres is located north of Burnt Tavern Road near Parkway Entrance No. 91. It will have a capacity of 900 cars. 19

Township of Brick, Master Plan Circulation and Transportation Element

NJSH Route 88 In April 2005 the NJDOT and their consultant (Baker) presented a proposed schedule of pipeline Assignment Projects that were derived from the Route 88 Corridor Study completed in 2003. The intersections identified in Brick are:

1. Olden Street. Left turns were experiencing higher than average accident rates. Looking at installation of left turn lanes with protected turning capability. 2. Route 70: Problems identified include lack of adequate advance signage for lane assignment, the need for additional supplemental signal heads, and insufficient capacity through the intersection. 3. Post Road: Problems were identified with the lack of signage and sight distance, which were validated with higher than average accident experience associated with left-turn and rear end accidents. 4. Roadway segment near access driveways to Pathmark shopping center 5. Van Zile Road: The lack of turn lanes were identified as the principal factors in the higher than average angle and rear end accidents occurring at this location. 6. Road segment between Old Squan Road and Folsom Drive: The acute angle of the Old Squan Road intersection alignment has been determined to be the principal factor in the over represented crash rates for this segment of roadway. 7. Segment at Jordan Road near Point Pleasant Border: The narrowing roadway, offset to fixed-object obstructions and limited sight distance are contributing to higher accident experience. For intersections in the corridor, 4 of the top 10 were Brick Township intersections based on safety/operations. For roadway segments in the corridor, 4 of the top 5 locations were in Brick

20

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element and Fair Share Plan

Table of Contents Introduction Housing Fig. 1 - Total Housing Units 1980 2000 Fig. 2 - Average Household Size Households Fig. 3 - Household size groups Projection of Housing Stock Demographics Fig .4 - 50 year Population Growth Fig. 5 - Population Growth Fig. 6 - Comparative Population Growth Fig. 7 Percent Population Growth Fig. 8 - Comparative Population Growth Fig. 9 - Comparative Percent Population Growth Density Age Fig. 10 Median Age Fig. 11 Senior Citizen Population Fig 12 - Change in Population Population Projection Population and Employment Projections Employment Characteristics Race Available Land for Development Residential Building Permits Fig. 13 - Residential Building Permits Income Fig 14 Median Family Income Poverty Conclusion Profile of General Demographic Characteristics for 2000 Fair Share Compliance Program Growth Share Calculation 2005 Fair Share Plan Summary Municipal Growth Share Obligation Residential Table R-1 MPO Residential Growth Projection Table R- 2 Historic Trend of Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits Table R-3 Anticipated Developments & Number of Residential Units by the Year that COs are Anticipated to be Issued Table R-4 Projected Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits Table R-5 Total Net Residential Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) Table R-6 Affordable Housing Unit Growth Projections Commercial Table NR-1 MPO Non-Residential Growth Projection Table NR-2 Ten-year Historic Trend of Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits of Commercial Development by Square Feet . Table NR-3 Use Group Actual Developments 2004 Table NR-4 Developments & Anticipated Developments by year that COs are Anticipated to be Issued Full Build-Out & Know Development Approvals

1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 12 13 13 14 16 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 16 17

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element and Fair Share Plan

Table NR-5 Total Net Projected Employment Growth, Total Net Non-Residential (Employment) Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) & Affordable Housing Unit Obligation Generated by Non-Residential Development Table T-1 Total Projected Affordable Housing Obligation Generated by Residential and Non-Residential Development 2004-2014 COAH Third Round Petition Requirements Growth Share Methodology Fair Share Compliance Details Expanded Crediting Opportunities (N.J.A.C. 5:94-4.15) Zoning Analysis Justification Conclusion

18 18 18 18 19 21 22 23 23 23

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

HOUSING ELEMENT & FAIR SHARE PLAN


Introduction Under the Municipal Land Use Law(C. 52:27D-310), A municipalitys housing element shall be designed to achieve the goal of access to affordable housing to meet present and prospective housing needs, with particular attention to low and moderate income housing. Brick Township has historically provided a variety of housing types and opportunities. While many communities enacted zoning regulations designed to exclude housing which might be affordable to low and moderate income households, Brick has always been open to housing for these families. Brick Township, in fact, embodies the antithesis of what the Mount Laurel doctrine is all about. In Mount Laurel II, the Supreme Court Stated: But if the sound planning of an area allows the rich and middle class to live there, it must also realistically and practically allow the poor. And if the area will accommodate factories, it must also find space for the workers. Brick Township never adopted exclusionary zoning or regulatory practices and its housing continues to be affordable to most of those in the housing market. The Townships zoning allows for very small lots of 5,000 to 7,500 square feet for single family homes. It also provides for a variety of affordable housing types such as apartments, manufactured housing, town houses, condominiums and retirement communities. In addition to its inclusionary zoning practices, the Township actively took steps to improve housing conditions and to provide affordable units for its needy residents. For senior citizens, the Township has built low and moderate income public housing. For the handicapped, it has increased housing opportunities through rehabilitation of public housing & new construction. For low and moderate income families, it has reduced substandard conditions in housing units through an assisted housing rehabilitation program. For others, it has zoned land for the development of housing, affordable at market rates and now occupied by low and moderate income families. The ability of Brick Township to absorb new housing development is limited by the diminishing amount of vacant developable land within its borders. Most of the remaining vacant parcels are generally small and scattered, limiting their potential for intensive development. The amount of vacant developable land in Brick Township decreased significantly as a result of Federal and State freshwater wetlands, coastal zone and surface water environmental regulations. These laws include the New Jersey Coastal Wetlands Act of 1970, the Coastal Area Facility Review Act of 1973, the Waterfront Development Act and the Freshwater Wetlands Act of 1987, the Federal Emergency Management Agency floodplain regulations and the New Jersey Surface Water Quality Standards, C-1 designation for the Metedeconk River. Updates of these and other State and Federal regulations further restrict development in environmentally sensitive areas such as floodplains, wetlands, and habitat areas of threatened and endangered wildlife species. The majority of large vacant tracts of land remaining in the Township are considered mostly un-developable since the enactment of these regulations. The amount of available land has been reduced further by the expansion of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. This conservation area extends along portions of the Barnegat Bay in Ocean County. Large tracts of coastal land in Brick, known as the Reedy Creek Additions were designated in 1990 for inclusion in the Forsythe Refuge. Approximately 2,400 acres of land in the southeastern portion of the Township are being acquired in accordance with an approved Federal acquisition program. To date, over close to 3,000 acres have been acquired through Federal, State, County, Municipal and Non-profit acquisition programs. Green Acres Funding for the acquisition of open space in Brick Township has been approved in accordance with the Townships Master Plan and Recreation and Open Space Plan. In the northern half of the Township the one hundred seventy-five (175) acre SawMill Pond tract has been acquired. In addition, the Township has acquired a twenty-five (25) acre tract know as Dealaman/Havens Farm in the Herberstville neighborhood. A two hundred seventy-five (275) acre parcel known as the Airport Tract, and a seventeen (17) acre site known as the Drum Point Road conservation area have been acquired in the southern portion of the Township, along with several acquisitions of sites less than ten (10) acres. In a continuing effort to promote its affordable housing goals, the Township developed a Housing and Fair Share Plan submitted to the Council on Affordable Housing in January 1987. Since that time, an Appellate Court has ruled that a municipality should be credited for its efforts to house the poor. Pursuant to that decision, Brick Township

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

worked with the Council on Affordable Housing to develop standards to credit municipalities for its past efforts to provide for the development of affordable housing. These standards came to be known as credits without controls. The Townships examination of its post-1980 housing stock based upon this new credit standard confirmed that Brick Township has always been a community which provided housing opportunities to persons of all incomes. With these new credits, the Township developed a compliance plan to meet its constitutional obligation. Therefore, while COAH regulations require that all credits be subtracted from the pre-credit number of 1,035, the Township has already satisfied most of its obligation, and was credited with providing 697 units through new construction and rehabilitation after April 1, 1980, leaving 338 additional units to be provided through the Housing Plan for the Townships initial (1987-1993) calculated obligation. Since the 1993 COAH certification, the Township has been moving forward with the implementation of its Fair Share Plan and has provided affordable housing units in accordance with that plan as described subsequently in this document. The initial phase of the COAH mandate, which covered the time periods from 1987-1993 required the Township to provide 1,035 affordable housings units. The second phase covering the time period 1993-1999 requires the provision of 1,022 units by 2006 based on the COAH methodology. It should be noted that the Township Second Phase COAH obligation does not constitute a requirement to provide an additional 1,022 affordable units within the Township but rather constitutes a revision of the Townships initial obligation. The Affordable Housing credits received toward the reduction of the Townships First Phase obligation will be reapplied toward the Second Phase obligation, in addition to credits received for Affordable Housing units produced by the Township prior to February, 1999. The Township of Brick received second round substantive certification from COAH on August 4, 1999. The Township submitted an amendment to the second round substantive certification on May 9, 2002 and has continued to provide for its affordable housing obligation by providing a total of 1,075 credits, a surplus of fifty-three (53) units over the 1,022 second round obligation. The Township proposes to satisfy its obligation for the Third Round by other than the methodology provided through the COAH regulations. Through the Third Round, COAH has proposed an obligation of 601 units for the Township, where the Township is contesting the methodology utilized to calculate this obligation. The Township has conducted a build-out analysis with detailed information regarding actual land left for development and the yield of new housing and commercial development based on zoning. As a result of this exercise and the implementation of the Growth Share methodology, the Township of Brick has proposed a Growth Share obligation of 169 units. A detailed summary of the Fair Share Plan utilizing the Growth Share obligation is contained later in this report. Housing The majority of the Townships housing stock consists of singlefamily residential units accounting for approximately 32,689 residential properties according to the 2000 Census. This is an increase of 3,846 housing units between 1990 and 2000, an 11.7% increase in housing stock as shown in Fig. 1. The Township of Brick was ranked third in New Jersey for the biggest rise in owner occupied homes, representing more than 75% of the total housing units in the Township. The Township of Brick also ranked in the top ten municipalities in New Jersey for the biggest drop in vacant housing units, Fig. 1 a decrease of 700 vacant units, which are now occupied. This statistic may have occurred due to the fact that many of the municipalities vacation summer homes have been converted to year-round residences.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Households In 1990, there were 25,023 households, an increase of 6,155 from 1980. In 2000, the number of households was 29,511. This was an increase of 4,488 households. The average household size and percent change is shown in Fig. 2. Township of Brick Average Household Size 1990 2000 2.65 2.56 6.6% Change 1980-1990 3.3% Change 1990-2000
Fig. 2

1980 2.84

Household size continued to decrease, however, at a slower rate than between 1980 and 1990. The decrease in average household size between 1990 and 2000 was 3.3 %, half of the rate of decrease between 1980 and 1990 of 6.6%. This may be attributed to the fact that much of the senior housing, in the Township of Brick was built between the years of 1980 and 2000. The types of families and other households residing within the Township are diverse with no one type dominating. Several important types were found in large numbers in 2000. Single persons accounted for 8,643 households while, married couples without children accounted for another 9,051 households. Most large families fell into two categories. The first, nuclear families (couples with children), formed 7,705 households. The second, single parent families made up another 2,210 households. The largest number of households contained only two persons. This group was almost twice as large as any other household size with the exception of single person households. Single person households increased from 5,298 in 1990 to 7,367 in 2000. Household size groups were distributed as follows: TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS Single Person Household 7,367 Two Person Household 9,821 Three Person Household 4,948 Four Person Household 4,541 Five Person Household 1,996 Six or More Person Household 838 PERCENT 25.0 33.3 16.8 15.4 6.8 2.9
Fig. 3

Older households make up a large part of Bricks population. Older households, households headed by persons aged 65 or more made up 8,161 or 27.6 percent of the total in 2000. Single older persons headed 3,848 households, while older married couples formed 4,313 households. Few gender or race differences exist within the Township. A total of 3,021 female headed households were identified in the 2000 Census. Only 1,737 minority headed households were counted, the largest group being Hispanic with 824. Household incomes within Brick were typical for the Monmouth-Ocean County Housing Region. It is estimated that the 7,291 low income households residing in the Township in 1990 made up 29 percent of the total households. The estimated 3,772 moderate income households, made up 15.1 percent of the total. There are a total of 14 apartment properties in the Township. The median age of residential structures within the Township is 35 years with an average built date of 1970. The condition of the majority of the housing stock within the Township is in reasonably good condition. According to the 2000 Census, owner-occupied units greatly out numbered rental units when owner occupied units accounted for 83.4% of the total housing stock. Rental units in the Township accounted for approximately 16.6 % of all residential units. According to the 2002 Amendment to the Housing Element and Fair Share Plan, the Township has a total of 987 affordable units. The Growth Share Plan, proposed within this document will propose a total of 169 more affordable units to bring the Townships Fair Share obligation number through the year 2015 to 1,156 units of affordable housing.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

As a part of the Third Round Growth Share, the municipality is required to rehabilitate approximately 8 more units under its rehabilitation program. However, the Township plans to rehabilitate in excess of these 8 required units to continue the policy of providing acceptable housing opportunities for its residents. Details of the Rehabilitation program are provided in the Fair Share Plan. Projection of Housing Stock A projection of the municipalitys housing stock, including the probable future construction of low and moderate income housing, for the next six years, taking into account, but not necessarily limited to, construction permits issued, approvals of applications for development and probable residential development of lands is provided herein; The Townships current housing stock consists primarily of residential single family and multi-family residential structures in good condition. The construction of low and moderate income housing over the next nine years, through 2014 will be closely planned and monitored under the Housing Element and Fair Share Plan. In 2005, two new ordinances were passed and enacted to address our affordable housing obligation. The first was a Development Fee Ordinance passed to provide for all new developments within the township, including commercial and residential homes and improvements to be assessed an affordable housing fee. This fee is collected to be utilized to provide for affordability assistance, new affordable unit construction and administration of the affordable housing program. In addition, a second ordinance was passed that required the Planning Board and Zoning Board of Adjustment to include in any development approval, either a fee in lieu of development, or development of affordable units as a result of any subdivision or site plan approval. As a result of these new ordinances, all developments within the Township are now considered to be inclusionary. The ordinances and the Council on Affordable Housing Round Three rules will enact controls on all new construction projects to ensure that affordable units are built or provided for through alternate means such as funding to meet the municipalities Growth Share. For every eight (8) new residential units approved, one (1) new unit will be provided for under the affordable housing criteria. Due to the built-out nature of the municipality, approximately 169 units of affordable housing are anticipated to be needed to meet the Third Round criteria. This Growth Share number was calculated based upon a build out analysis of the municipality. This data set created through manipulation of the GIS parcel layer coverage, tax assessor data and inspection of all tax maps for the Township calculates the amount of vacant land in the Township at 340 acres. The 340 acres excludes our environmentally sensitive properties that are tidally influenced or subjected to wetland preservation and buffers. The total developable land of 340 acres does not take into consideration 20% of land area for development of roads and infrastructure, lot layout and land irregularities. This 20% was subtracted out to determine build-able area per each zone within the Township along with permitted building coverage to arrive at the numbers included in the Growth Share calculations identified in the Fair Share Compliance Program. Demographics An analysis of the municipalitys demographic characteristics, including but not necessarily limited to housing size, income level and age is provided herein; Population growth in the Township of Brick over the past fifty years was strongly influenced by the effects of suburbanization and the impact of the proximity of the Garden State Parkway. Since 1950, the population of the Township of Brick has grown exponentially from 4,319 in 1950 to 76,119 in 2000. Fig. 4 shows the fifty-year population growth for the Township. Township of Brick 50 year Population Growth Year Population Number % Change Change 1950 4,319 1960 16,299 11,980 73.5 1970 35,057 18,758 53.5 1980 53,629 18,572 34.6 1990 66,473 12,844 19.3 2000 76,119 9,646 12.6 2004 Estimate 78,474 2,355 3.00
Fig. 4

The percent of population growth has been declining over the past few decades. Total population growth between 1990 and 2000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census was approximately, 9,646 people, 12.67 %.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Fig. 5 shows that, the population for the Township of Brick has climbed upward since 1950. The largest population increase occurred during the decades of the 1960s and 1970s in terms of total number of persons. The growth trend has slowed due to the diminishing supply of available land for development. The growth in population is leveling off and as demonstrated by the 2004 Census Estimate, if growth continues at the current pace, it will not even reach one half of the previous decades rate of growth at 12 percent.

Fig.5

The Township of Brick is the second most populous municipality in Ocean County, following Dover Township. The 2000 Census reported a total population of 76,119 in the Township of Brick. Dover Townships population was reported to be 89,706 and Lakewood Townships population was 60, 352. Fig. 6 shows comparative population growth for the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey.

Comparative Population Growth 1950 4319 Brick Ocean County 56586 4835329 New Jersey 1960 16299 108192 6066782 1970 35057 208270 7171112 1980 53629 346038 7364823 1990 66473 433203 7730188 2000 76119 474933 8414350
Fig.6

The percent population growth for the Township of Brick for the years 1970 through 2000 is shown in Fig. 7. The percent population growth has been declining since the 1950s. The large percent growth occurred in post World War II 1950s and 1960s when families were moving out of the cities into suburbanized communities. The population growth in the Township of Brick between 1960 and 1980 saw the most significant increase. This 20-year span saw an increase of 37,510 persons. This growth occurred as the Garden State Parkway (GSP) made daily travel to points north more convenient for the working class. The GSP allowed people to work in the northern cities while living in the developing suburban, seashore community. In response, major suburban, residential developments

Fig. 7

were constructed to provide ample housing.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

The comparative population growth for the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey for the years 1950 through 2000 are show in Fig. 8 and the Comparative Percent of Population Growth is shown in Fig. 9.

Fig. 8

Density The number of persons per square mile is the measure of population density. In 1990, the population density of the Fig. 9 Township of Brick was 2,529 persons per square mile. Population density increased to 2,896 persons per square mile according to the U.S. Census 2000. The Township of Brick is ranked the 12th most densely populated municipality in Ocean County. Age The age distribution of the population of the Township of Brick, Ocean County and the State of New Jersey is shown in Fig. 10. The residents of the Township are generally younger than the population of the County and generally older than the population of the State of New Jersey based on the comparison of median age.

Fig. 10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

The population of the Township of Brick has been aging as shown in Fig. 9. A closer look at the growing senior citizen population, shown in Fig. 11, demonstrates the upward trend of the 62+ age group over the past twenty years. This increase is most probably due to the new senior citizen developments, the increased life expectancy and the overall aging population.

Fig. 11

As shown in Fig. 12, the increase in population occurred in nearly all age group categories except the under 5, 2024, 25-34 and 65-74 age groups. These age groups experienced minor reductions in population, where the remaining age groups experienced significant increases. The largest numerical population growth occurred in the 45-54, baby boomer age group. This group saw an increase of 3,912 persons with a percent change of 37.04 %. The largest percent increase occurred in the 85+ age group. This age group almost doubled with an increase of 821 individuals and a 49.13% increase. Township of Brick Change in Population 1990 2000 Subject Under 5 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-59 60-64 65-74 75-84 85+ 1990 Population 4,734 4,315 4,214 4,065 3,813 11,369 10,092 6,738 2,733 2,905 6,676 3,969 850 2000 Population 4,721 5,331 5,249 4,336 3,359 9,372 13,078 10,650 3,920 3,140 6,242 5,050 1,671 Change(number) -13 +1,016 +1,035 +271 -454 -1,997 +2,986 +3,912 +1,187 +235 -434 +1,081 +821 Change (percent) -0.27 +19.0 +19.7 +6.25 -11.9 -17.56 +22.83 +37.04 +30.28 +7.48 -6.5 +21.4 +49.13
Fig. 12

The 2000 Census Data indicates that the population cohort, under the age of 5, has shown a decrease in growth from that indicated in the 1990 Census Data and a substantial decrease in the same cohorts growth rate from 1980 to 1990. In 1980, the population cohort under 5 years of age totaled 3,901. In 1990, the under 5 cohort increased to 4,734. A significant shift in the growth trend occurred from 1990 to 2000, as the under 5 age cohort actually decreased from 4,734 to 4,721. What makes the above numbers significant is that the Baby-Boom generation (generally considered to be those individuals born from 1946 to 1964) was at ages 26 to 44 in 1990. That age span would place the Baby-Boomers at primary child bearing age. Even though the Baby-Boom Generation was at primary child bearing age during the decade of the 90s, Bricks population under age 5 decreased in number from the prior decade.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Also curtailing additional growth in the Township is the fact that the Baby-Bust Generation (a period of a low number of births following the Baby-Boom generally considered to include those individuals born between 1965 and 1979) will be at primary child bearing age from 2000 to 2015. A lower number of couples at child bearing age equal lower birth rates. Of course, the development in the 1990s has also left the Township with even less developable land. The rate of population growth within the Township of Brick has been decreasing significantly due to the lack of developable land and increasing environmental regulations affecting the density of new developments. Therefore, the projected population growth between 2000 and 2015 should reflect a similar, if not more significant, decline in growth due to the lack of available land for development and factors associated with the Baby Boom/ Bust age groups. Population Projection Population projections were prepared by the NJ Department of Labor, Division of Labor Market and Demographic Research and took into account the 1990 Census and estimates as of 1998. The population of each county was projected out to 2015. The population projections for New Jersey and Ocean County are shown in the table below. Population and Employment Projections Based on the above information, the Township of Brick strongly disagrees with the population projection numbers that are provided from 2000 through 2015 by the US Census, NJTPA Draft Forecast (9/15/04). The rate of population growth within the Township of Brick has been decreasing significantly due to the lack of developable land and increasing environmental regulations affecting the density of new developments. Therefore, the projected population growth between 2000 and 2015 should reflect a similar, if not more significant, decline in growth due to the lack of available land for development and factors associated with the Baby Boom/ Bust age groups. Also, building permits issued in 2003 for new residential and commercial developments reflect the decline in available land for development. In 2003, approximately 17 acres was approved for residential development by the Planning Board. The 17 acres includes major and minor subdivisions, some of which involved two lot subdivisions where homes were already located on one lot. In some cases, the application only included adjustments to lot lines with no new structures planned for development. The net number of new homes constructed in Brick Township in 2003 was only 80. Employment Characteristics An analysis of the existing and probable future employment characteristics of the municipality is provided herein; The amount of commercial land available for development is also severely limited due to the fact that most of the commercially zoned property has already been developed, redeveloped or approved for development. In addition, our industrial park is nearing build out and is relatively small, totaling less than twenty acres. The major employers within the Township include the Ocean Medical Center, Board of Education, and the Township itself. These three entities do not have any plans for further expansion and will not be significantly adding to their work force as it presently exists. Therefore, the future employment characteristics for the municipality consist of the majority of the employers to be a variety of commercial and retail businesses with the associated educational, medical and public sector providing for the balance of jobs available within the Township. Race The 2000 Census data indicates that almost 99% of Bricks population is White, while the other 1% is occupied by Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, or a combination of two or more of these races. The population of the Township of Brick is less racially mixed than that of Ocean County, where the data indicates that almost 96% of the total population of the County is White and the remaining 4% is comprised of Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander or a combination of two or more of these races. Available Land for Development The Township of Brick has concerns regarding the amount of developable land assumed in Measuring Urban Growth in New Jersey: A report on recent land development patterns utilizing the 1986 1995 NJDEP land use/land cover data set, by Hasse & Lathrop CRSSA, Rutgers University, 2001. This report approximated 2,509 acres of developable land as of 1995 in the Township of Brick. Our concern relative to the report is that it is our understanding that under the new COAH rules, the employment and population projections have been utilized to determine the Townships 3rd round COAH obligation.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

However, regarding population and development projections, the Township of Brick, Office of Land Use and the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority have been utilizing a much more reliable and up-to-date geographic information system data set based on vacant and underdeveloped parcels in the Township. This parcel data is based on tax maps and filed sub-division maps and is continually updated by Township and BTMUA staff. This data serves as the basis for all planning and land use analysis as well as open space preservation. In 2000, the Township prepared an inventory of all property of one-acre or more that remained undeveloped or underutilized to determine a priority system for open space preservation and park development. The data set created through manipulation of the parcel layer coverage calculates the amount of vacant land in the Township at just below 400 acres. The 400 acres includes our environmentally sensitive properties that are tidally influenced or subjected to wetland preservation and buffers. When subtracting the environmentally sensitive areas from the total acreage of vacant land, the net developable area is substantially less than 400 acres. Therefore, the Township of Brick does not accept the data prepared in the Rutgers report as being the most up-to-date reliable data and we have not utilized this data in the preparation of our population and employment projections for the Township. Furthermore, in 2005, the Township updated this build-out analysis to identify all properties within the Township available for development, regardless of size and identified 340 acres available for development. Residential Building Permits A good indicator of a municipalities growth is the number of building permits issued annually. According to the Ocean County Planning Department, between the years 1990-2000, 4,000 new construction - building permits were issued in the Township of Brick as shown in Fig. 13.
Fig. 13

Building permits issued in 2003 for new residential and commercial developments reflect the decline in available land for development. In 2003, approximately 17 acres was approved for residential development by the Planning Board. The 17 acres includes major and minor subdivisions, some of which involved two lot subdivisions where homes were already located on one lot. In some cases, the application only included adjustments to lot lines with no new structures planned for development. The net number of new homes constructed in Brick Township in 2003 was only 80. In 2004, 155 housing units were certified, and a total of 71 demolition permits were issued for residential units, with a net new development of 84 units. This demonstrates that the building occurring in the Township is primarily in-fill or the replacement of older, smaller homes with new more modern housing for single families. Due to the lack of available land for development and the declining baby boom population, building permits are expected to continue to decline. Income At present, the 2000 Census money income data ranks the Township of Brick at 353rd for the State of New Jersey. The Township of Brick exceeds Ocean Countys Per Capita Income average by more than $1,000. The Township of Brick continues to have higher than average income levels than Ocean County, but slightly lower than the New Jersey average as shown in Fig. 14.

Fig. 14

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Poverty Ocean County s poverty levels were determined for 502,712 persons and reported in the 2000 census that 7.0 percent of those individuals, or 34,945 persons were below the poverty level. In the Township of Brick, the percentage of persons below the poverty level are significantly less than the County average. Only 4.5 % or 3,411 persons out of 75,440 persons were determined to be below the poverty level. Conclusion In 2005, the Township prepared an inventory of all available developable property for the Growth Share Calculation. The data set created through manipulation of the parcel layer coverage calculates the amount of vacant land in the Township at 340 acres. Considering that the total acreage of the Township is 16,768, this only leaves 2.3% of the land area of the township available for development, or 97.7% built-out. Most of the only remaining parcels of undeveloped land are severely constrained by environmental sensitivity, making development, at large scales, difficult at best. The current policy of the administration to purchase undeveloped parcels of land for conservation and development controls will have a significant impact on the future population growth. It is expected that the growth trend over the next ten years will be more like that of more developed urban areas, where in-fill developments, re-development of already built areas, in-migration of a more diverse ethnic population and the cyclic pattern of birth and death of persons will be the main thrust of the population make-up.

Township of Brick Profile of General Demographic Characteristics for 2000 Subject Total Population SEX AND AGE Male Female Under 5 years 5-9 years 10-14 years 15-19 years 20-24 years 25-34 years 35-44 years 45-54 years 55-59 years 60-64 years 65-74 years 75-84 years 85 years and over Median age (years) 18 years and over Male Female 21 years and over 62 years and over 65 years and over Male Female RACE One race White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Asian Indian Number 76,119 36,155 39,964 4,721 5,331 5,249 4,336 3,359 9,372 13,078 10,650 3,920 3,140 6,242 5,050 1,671 39.4 57,965 26,935 31,030 55,790 14,802 12,963 5,103 7,860 75,325 72,932 751 76 904 217 Percent 100.0 47.5 52.5 6.2 7.0 6.9 5.7 4.4 12.3 17.2 14.0 5.1 4.1 8.2 6.6 2.2 (X) 76.2 35.4 40.8 73.3 19.4 17.0 6.7 10.3 99.0 95.8 1.0 0.1 1.2 0.3

10

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian 1 Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian Guamanian or Chamorrow Samoan Other Pacific Islander2 Some other race Two or more races Race alone or in combination with one or more races White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Some other race HISPANIC OR LATINO AND RACE Total Population Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Mexican Subject Puerto Rican Cuban Other Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic or Latino White alone RELATIONSHIP Total Population In households Householder Spouse Child Own child under 18 years Other relatives Under 18 years Non-relatives Unmarried partner In group quarters Institutionalized population Non-institutionalized population HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE Total Households Family households (families) With own children under 18 years Married-couple family With own children under 18 years Female householder, no husband present With own children under 18 years Non-family households Householder living alone Householder 65 years and over Households with individuals under 18 years Households with individuals 65 years and

188 254 21 122 45 57 12 1 1 1 9 650 794 3 73,643 948 281 1,083 33 968 76,119 2,930 491 Number 1,229 200 1,010 73,189 70,860 76,119 75,431 29,511 16,756 23,039 16,932 3,324 1,001 2,801 1,412 688 538 150 29,511 20,788 9,318 16,756 7,407 3,021 1,647 8,723 7,367 3,735 9,995 9,081

0.2 0.3 0.0 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.9 1.0 96.7 1.2 0.4 1.4 0.0 1.3 100.0 3.8 0.6 Percent 1.6 0.3 1.3 96.2 93.1 100.0 99.1 38.8 22.0 30.3 22.2 4.4 1.3 3.7 1.9 0.9 0.7 0.2 100.0 70.4 31.6 56.8 25.1 10.2 5.0 29.6 25.0 12.7 33.9 30.8

11

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

over Average household size Average family size HOUSING OCCUPANCY Total housing units Occupied housing units Vacant hosing units For seasonal, recreational or occasional use Homeowner vacancy rate (percent) Rental vacancy rate (percent) HOUSING TENURE Occupied housing units Owner-occupied housing units Renter-occupied housing units Average household size of owner-occupied unit Average household size of renter-occupied unit

2.56 3.07 32,689 29,511 3,178 2,137 0.9 4.4 29,511 24,605 4,906 2.60 2.32

(X) (X) 100.0 90.3 9.7 6.5 (X) (X) 100.0 83.4 16.6 (X) (X)

(X) Not applicable 1 Other Asian alone, or two or more Asian categories 2 Other Pacific Islander alone, or two or more Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander categories. 3 In combination with one or more other races listed. The six numbers may add to more than the total population and the six percentages may add to more than 100 percent because individuals may report more than one race. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 1.

Fair Share Compliance Program On May 9, 2002 Brick Township adopted an Amendment to the Housing Element and Fair Share Plan. This document was submitted to COAH for review and certification; however, COAH has never acted on the document. The purpose of the Amendment was to eliminate three (3) sites from the plan that would have produced a total of eight-seven (87) units; Bundoran site (29 units), Hills A (50 units), and Hills B (8 units). To replace the lost credits, the Township proposed five (5) alternate credit sources that provided eighty-eight (88) additional credits for a total of 1,075 credits, consisting of 987 units and 88 rental bonus credits. This created a total of fifty-three (53) surplus units over the 1,022 Second Round Obligation. Units 92 412 125 41 160 16 12 29 19 36 12 8 25 987 Bonus Credits 0 0 0 0 51 16 0 0 0 13 0 8 0 88 Total Credits 92 412 125 41 211 32 12 29 19 49 12 16 25 1,075

Rehabilitation Credits without Controls George J. Conway Apartments David M. Fried Apartments Forge Pond (Chambers Bridge Residence) Kentwood Victorian Gardens Timber Ridge Waterside Gardens Scattered Site Units Homes Now Inc. (Bancroft) Homes Now Inc. (Arc Pier Ave.) Homes Now Inc. (Dotties House 1) Alternative Living Facilities (Group Homes 5)

12

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Brick Township has been addressing its previous post-credited fair share through a combination of rehabilitation of additional substandard dwelling units, zoning for the private construction of low and moderate income dwelling units and construction of public & private housing for low and moderate income families in accordance with COAH regulations for price controls, bedroom mix and age limitations. A Summary of the Affordable Housing Compliance Program is presented on the following pages. Additional details, support documentation and ordinances to implement this program have been submitted as an attachment to this document as part of the Townships Petition for Substantive Certification. A determination of the municipalitys present and prospective fair share for low and moderate income housing and its capacity to accommodate its present and prospective housing needs, including its fair share for low and moderate income housing is provided in the following summary: Growth Share Calculation 2005 169 Growth Share Calculation -53 Surplus from previous Round -20 Excess credit from Senior Cap from Previous Round (Chambers Bridge Residence) 96 Total Fair Share Plan Summary Dotties House Expansion Block 195, Lot 30 2.5 Acres Expansion of Alternative Living Facility Dotties House Transitional To be determined Municipal Conversions to Rentals To be determined Minimum 25% - Rental = 24 Units 9

-4 - 11

Maximum 50% Senior Age Restricted 48 New Visions At Chambers Bridge Block 701, Lot 9 27 Acres Senior Townhouse Development Pulte Homes Block 685, Lot 7.02 35.9 Acres Senior Condominium Development Scattered Site Affordable To be determined To be determined Total Fair Share Plan Rehabilitation = 96 Units 8 Units - 38

- 10

- 18 Growth Share Development Ordinance -6

Since April 1, 1990, seventy-four (74) units of COAH eligible housing rehabilitation has been completed of the total 92 units, an additional 18 units of rehabilitation were completed as of 2005.

13

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Municipal Growth Share Obligation Provided herein is the methodology utilized to determine the Township of Bricks residential and commercial growth share obligation as outlined in the Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005.

Residential Table R-1 MPO Residential Growth Projection Township of Brick 2005 MPO Population 2000 Household Size Population Change 77,122 = (-)2,040 /2.56

2015 MPO Population 75,082

Household Growth =(-)796.875

Historic Trend of 96 268 COs Issued Demolition 9 s 259 Net

Table R- 2 Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits Township of Brick 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 478 351 505 343 338 148 131 153 23 455 29 322 32 473 27 316 41 297 52 96 29 102 40 113

Table R-3 Anticipated Developments & Number of Residential Units by the Year that COs are Anticipated to be Issued Township of Brick 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Total Approved Development Applications Township of Brick 6 6 Lighthouse Court Township of Brick New 300 300 Visions Eleventh Venture 124 124 Pending Development Applications Anticipated Development Applications Other Projected 64 57 57 52 52 35 35 18 18 388 Development (Build-out Analysis) Total 70 181 357 52 52 35 35 18 18 818 Table R-4 Projected Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits Township of Brick 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Total Total COs Issued (from 70 181 357 52 52 35 35 18 18 818 table R-3) Demolitions 20 16 16 20 20 15 15 10 10 -142 Net 50 165 341 32 32 20 20 8 8 676

14

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Table R-5 Total Net Residential Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) Township of Brick Actual_ Projected 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Total COs Issued (from 153 70 181 357 52 52 35 35 18 18 Table R-3) Demolitions 40 20 16 16 20 20 15 15 10 10 Net 113 50 165 341 32 32 20 20 8 8

Total 971 -182 789

Note 1: Table R-6 and R-7 as shown in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005, include (Table R-6 - Second Round Affordable and Market-Rate Units in Inclusionary Developments to be excluded from Growth Projections, by Year that COs are anticipated to be issued) and (Table R-7 Net Residential Growth Projections after Subtracting Second Round Affordable and Inclusionary Market Rate Units). At this time, the Township of Brick does not have any units to exclude, therefore these tables were not included in our calculation. Table R-6 of the Township of Bricks calculation addresses Table R-8 Affordable Housing Unit Growth Projections as shown in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005.

Table R-6 Affordable Housing Unit Growth Projections Township of Brick 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 Table R-5 Total 113 50 165 341 32 32 20 20 8 Divide by Nine 12.55 5.55 18.33 37.88 3.55 3.55 2.22 2.22 0.88

13 8 0.88

Total 789 87.66

Note 2: As described in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005, net projected residential growth is divided by nine (9). The reason you divide by nine (9) is that affordable units that will meet a third round obligation are assumed to be included in these projections, rather than generating additional growth over and above these projections.

Commercial Table NR-1 MPO Non-Residential Growth Projection Township of Brick Employment 2015 2005 MPO Change MPO 19,673 14,888 4,785

Table NR-2 Ten-year Historic Trend of Certificates of Occupancy and Demolition Permits of Commercial Development by Square Feet Township of Brick 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 COs Issued B-Office 14,759 100,016 21,794 12,855 2,778 1,756 86,450 COs Issued M-Retail 2,400 149,93 35,614 896 41,055 106 5 COs Issued SWarehouse COs Issued A1 44,784 COs Issued A21,250 Resturant COs Issued A36,717 384 13,770 2,000 COs Issued A43,250 10,274 COs Issued A5 856 COs Issued Multi11,921 19,793 10,544 156,13 70,320 35,828 1,584 Family/Dormitory 6 COs Issued Education 5,340 7,962 3,000 COs Issued Industrial 23,553

03 7,189 185,468

11,870

52,074

15

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Table NR-3 Use Group Actual Developments 2004 Township of Brick Square Jobs/square feet per use Jobs feet group COs Issued B16,021 3/1,000 s.f. 48.063 Office COs Issued M39,524 1/1,000 s.f. 39.524 Retail COs Issued S37,620 0.2/1,000 s.f. 7.524 Warehouse COs Issued A32,389 3/1,000 7.167 COs Issued A414,757 3/1,000 44.271 COs Issued 29,576 1/1,000 29.576 Education COs Issued 109,258 2/1,000 218.516 Institutional Total 394.641
Note 3: Table NR-3 Use Group Actual Developments 2004 Township of Brick compiled Tables NR-3 & NR-4 as shown in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005. Note 4: Municipalities must use the job generator calculations provided in Appendix E, which were determined by COAH after reviewing state and national job creation data of a variety of non-residential development types. See Attached TABLE NR-4

16

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Table NR-4 Developments & Anticipated Developments by year that COs are Anticipated to be Issued Township of Brick Full Build-Out & Know Development Approvals 07 07 Jobs 08 08 Jobs 09 09 Jobs 10 10 Jobs 11 11 Jobs 12 12 Jobs 13 13 Jobs Total Job Yield

Use Group

05

05 Jobs

06

06 Jobs

M1/1,000 11.24 36.741 59.038 43.838 2.555 0 153.412 131,497 153.412 131,497 153.412 131,497 153.412 131,497 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153.412 2,555 2.555 2,555 2.555 2,555 2.555 2,555 2.555 21,919 43.838 21,919 43.838 21,919 43.838 21,919 43.838 59,038 59.038 59,038 59.038 59,038 59.038 59,038 59.038 59,038 21,919 2,555 0 131,497 36,741 36.741 36,741 36.741 36,741 36.741 36,741 36.741 36,741 11,244 11.24 11,244 11.24 11,244 11.24 11,244 11.24 11,244 11.24 36.741 59.038 43.838 2.555 0 153.412

290,446

290.446

290.446

11,244

11.24

11,244

11.24

11,244

11,244 36,741 59,038 21,919 2,555 0 131,497

11.24 36.741 59.038 43.838 2.555 0 153.412

101.16 330.669 531.342 394.542 22.995 0 1671.154

36,741

36.741

36,741

36.741

36,741

59,038

59.038

59,038

59.038

59,038

21,919

43.838

21,919

43.838

21,919

M 1/1,000 M 1/1,000 M 1/1,000 I2/1,000 F 2/1,000 0

2,555

2.555

2,555

2.555

2,555

Anticipated New Commercial Development in Square Feet of Building Area at Build-out JSM @ 290,446 Brick (B-4 Zone) (B-1 101,198 Zone) (B-2 330,672 Zone) (B-3 531,344 Zone) (HS 197,274 Zone) (M-1 22,999 Zone) (O-P & 0 OPT Zones)

B3/1,000

Total

131,497

153.412

421,943

443.858

131,497

17

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Note 5: Table NR-4 Developments & Anticipated Developments by year that COs are anticipated to be issued Township of Brick - Full BuildOut and Anticipated Development Approvals consolidates Table NR-5, NR-6 & NR-7 as shown in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005.

Table NR-5 Total Net Projected Employment Growth, Total Net Non-Residential (Employment) Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) & Affordable Housing Unit Obligation Generated by Non-Residential Development Township of Brick 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Total Total New 394.6 153.4 443.8 153.4 153.4 153.4 153.4 153.4 153. 153.41 2065.795 Development 41 12 58 12 12 12 12 12 412 2 Total Demolitions -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -20 Total Net Employment 392.6 151.4 441.8 151.4 151.4 151.4 151.4 151.4 151. 151.41 2045.795 Growth 41 12 58 12 12 12 12 12 412 2 Divide by 25 15.70 6.05 17.67 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 81.77
Note 6: Table NR-5 Total Net Projected Employment Growth, Total Net Non-Residential (Employment) Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) & Affordable Housing Unit Obligation Generated by Non-Residential Development - Township of Brick consolidates Table NR-8 Net Projected Employment Growth Jobs, Table NR-9 Total Net Non-Residential (Employment) Growth (Sum of Actual and Projected Growth) and Table NR-10 Affordable Housing Unit Obligation Generated by Non-Residential Development as shown in Council on Affordable Housing, Projecting Your Municipal Growth Share Obligation, Revised May 23, 2005. Note 7: As promulgated in N.J.A.C. 5:94 & N.J.A.C. 5:95, The non-residential component of growth share requires that one unit of affordable housing be provided for every 25 jobs that are created as measured by square feet of new or expanded non-residential construction according to use group.

Table T-1 Total Projected Affordable Housing Obligation Generated by Residential and Non-Residential Development 2004-2014 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 Table R-8 Residential 12.55 5.55 18.33 37.88 3.55 3.55 2.22 2.22 0.88 0.88 Table R-5 Non15.70 6.05 17.67 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 6.05 Residential Total 28.25 11.6 36.00 43.93 9.60 9.60 8.27 8.27 6.93 6.93

Total 87.66 81.77 169.43

COAH Third Round Petition Requirements The Townships population, household and employment growth projections used to determine the municipal growth share obligations are not consistent with the State Plans Projections for 2015 as determined by the MPO, therefore we offer the following information to justify the utilization of the proposed Townships Growth Share obligation number. Growth Share Methodology In preparation for the Cross Acceptance Process and compliance with the COAH Round Three requirements, the Township of Brick conducted a build-out analysis including all of all tax assessor, GIS and tax mapping data to develop a Growth Share calculation. The Methodology is provided herein: An excel spreadsheet of all of the privately owned, property class #1 (vacant) parcels within the township was provided by the Tax Assessor. This is the most up-to-date data available. The following properties were excluded from the acreage calculation: Green Areas these areas, although privately owned, are usually deed restricted to remain undeveloped in senior communities or as conditions in sub-division approvals. Beaches and Islands these areas were excluded due to the fact that they were located on dune areas and in areas that are currently shown on our tax maps as mostly coastal wetlands or are privately owned by homeowner associations as recreational properties. Known wetland areas of parcels or entire parcels that are shown on the Townships tax maps as wetlands or on the NJDEPs Freshwater Wetlands Map. Parcels that have been dedicated to the Township as open space areas since the last update of the tax assessor data. 18

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

These areas were then double checked by the secretaries of the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Adjustment and the Assistant Zoning Officer to ensure accuracy. GIS was then utilized to create overlay mapping to confirm the data provided by the Tax Assessor. Each property was grouped by zone. Then each parcel was reviewed for development potential from reviewing tax maps, GIS data and in some cases, site inspections. The total amount of acreage for each zone was then calculated. The net build-able area for each zone was calculated based upon the schedule of building requirements including land needed for infrastructure, building coverage and setbacks. This acreage calculation was then utilized to determine a growth share calculation for projected residential and commercial developments. Those calculations are shown in the series of tables above. Fair Share Compliance Details Minimum 25% - Rental = 24 Units Rental Housing (N.J.A.C. 5:94-4.20) Dotties House Expansion - 9 Owner Homes Now, Inc. Dotties House Block 195, Lot 30 2.5 Acres Homes Now Inc., a nonprofit corporation has constructed and operates Shelter Support Housing rental units on a vacant site located on the East Side of Adamston Road in the R-R-1 Rural Residential Zone. The property provides housing to victims of domestic abuse. An expansion of this 8 unit Alternative Living Facility has been approved to provide nine (9) additional apartment units for low and very low income families. This site has been extremely successful and has experienced a need to expand to meet a waiting list of potential residents. This site has received approval from the Zoning Board of Adjustment to expand the facility to provide a mix of apartment units consisting of 4 new two bedroom units, 4 new three bedroom units and 1 new one bedroom unit. A copy of the resolution of approval is attached hereto. Municipally Sponsored Rental Program (N.J.A.C. 5:94-4.11) The Township will seek 15 rental credits for a municipally sponsored rental program. The Township will use a mix of properties in its current inventory, as well as existing properties within the Township that it will acquire through donation, purchase of existing market rate units, and possible foreclosure, condemnation or purchase of properties failing to meet property maintenance codes. A list of properties in the Township inventory as well as a list of properties currently available for sale in the Township is attached hereto. The cost of acquisition, construction and renovation will exceed $25,000 per unit. COAH regulations state that a municipally sponsored rental program is limited to 10 units until the viability of the program is documented. The Township will seek a waiver from the 10-unit limit based upon the experience and success of its existing scattered site program. The program will be funded through fees collected through the Growth Share and Development Fee ordinances. In the event that the fees collected through these ordinances are insufficient to fund the program, the Township shall appropriate sufficient funds to fulfill its obligation and cover the cost of the program. Dotties House Transitional Housing - 4 The Township of Brick currently has a number of property holdings that are available for use in the creation of transitional housing for residents that previously resided in Dotties House. The properties will be constructed and/or renovated by Homes Now, Inc. which will also administer the occupancy of the property to ensure compliance with COAHs regulations pertaining to marketing and affordability. Current residents of Dotties House will move to the transitional housing units until they are ready to obtain their own housing. The properties the Township anticipates utilizing are vacant lots or open space properties that are in residentially zoned areas or currently occupied by a single-family home. The Township anticipates being capable of providing a minimum of four units for utilization under this category. Two properties that are being identified for this housing include:

19

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

1.

Block 340, Lot 88 344 Cherry Quay Road 1.24 Acres Zoned as R-R-1 Rural Residential Occupied by a Single Family Residential Unit available for occupancy after renovation Anticipated occupancy in early 2007 Block 321, Lot 4.02 425 Drum Point Road 1.17 Acres Zoned as B-2 & R-R-1 Occupied by a Single Family Residential Unit available for occupancy after Renovation Anticipated occupancy in early 2007

2.

Municipal Conversions to Rentals - 11 Brick Township has a history of completing scattered-site construction of affordable housing units. Prior to the receiving certification of its second round plan, the Township had completed the construction of 12 scattered site properties which were purchased by low and moderate income families. Subsequent to certification, the Township completed the construction of 6 additional units on municipally owned scattered sites located throughout the Township. All 18 units are occupied by COAH qualified families consisting of seven (7) low income and eleven (11) moderate income families. In addition, a three (3) bedroom low income unit is anticipated for occupancy in 2005. The Township will continue this program to satisfy its rental obligation. The Township anticipates acquisition of additional property through donation, purchase of existing market rate units, and possible foreclosure, condemnation or purchase of properties failing to meet property maintenance codes for construction of rental units. The Township will use the properties currently within its inventory as well as other properties that it will acquire. The Township is currently reviewing properties originally purchased for open space and recreation that have buildings or homes located on the properties. These homes will be converted to affordable housing rental units. The majority of these properties are located in residentially zoned areas. The administration of marketing and affordability controls will be done by Rehabco, an experienced administrator of affordable units. Maximum 50% Senior Age Restricted - 48 New Visions @ Chambers Bridge 38 Owner Township of Brick Block 701, Lot 9 23 Acres Inclusionary Age Restricted Townhouse Development The Township of Brick obtained Planning Board approval for the construction of eight (8) four-story buildings with a total of 300 age-restricted residential units, with approximately two hundred four (204) units represented as 2 (two) bedroom units and the remaining ninety-six (96) units as having one (1) bedroom. The approval for 300 units includes thirty-eight (38) low and moderate income age-restricted residential units. The project site is located in the PMRRC (Planned Multi-family Residential Retirement Community Zone). The site will meet COAHs requirements for phasing, income and bedroom distribution and marketing. The property consists of 23.78 acres, with a total of 2.35 acres of wetlands. The site was granted CAFRA approval in July of 2001. Infrastructure is available to the site for all major utilities including sanitary sewer and water supply. The Township currently has title to the property but will make the property available for public bid. The successful bidder will take title to the property and construct the project.

20

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Expanded Crediting Opportunities (N.J.A.C. 5:94-4.15) Scattered Site Single-Family Affordable Housing - 18 As set forth above, the Township has had success completing scattered-site construction of low and moderate income housing. The Township will continue that program to construct 18 new units over the next ten (10) years. The Townships Division of Land Use & Planning is engaged in the ongoing process of reviewing potential scattered sites to determine site suitability. The Township has fostered partnerships with the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority and Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity to identify properties in public or non-profit holdings that may be appropriate for a scattered site affordable housing construction program. The factors considered include the size of the site and its topography, availability of utilities, and environmental constraints, current zone, lot configuration, street access and compatibility with surrounding land uses. The Township anticipates future acquisitions via foreclosure, property donations, growth share from future developments, Federal or State grants, or use of Affordable Housing Trust Fund monies for any additional sites required to assist the municipality in meeting its Fair Share obligations. The scattered site program is administered by the Brick Township Office of Affordable Housing under the general direction of the Program Administrator in cooperation with Homes Now Inc. Housing units are sold to qualified affordable household applicants chosen through a lottery system. Housing units are subject to deed restrictions which would restrict resale of the units for 20 years to income-qualified homebuyers. The Township utilizes existing personnel & Homes Now Inc. to administer the program and public works employees for any site work other than actual building construction; therefore, the Township anticipates that the program can continue to be implemented with minimal cost to the Township. The Township anticipates that any required off-site improvements will use available Community Development Block Grant monies. Program expenditures associated with the development of the units is replenished upon the sale of the unit, thus providing revolving funding for subsequent scattered site units. Properties that are potentially available for development as scattered site single-family affordable include properties held by the Township or are currently being deeded to the Township for development of affordable housing by the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority and are provided herein; Block 199.21 194.04 646.17 1416.13 321.10 Lot 1 11 7 31 1 Acreage 0.10 0.90 0.22 0.36 0.36 Zone R-7.5 R-7.5 R-7.5 R-7.5 R-10

The Township of Brick reserves the right to utilize these properties for development of affordable housing for singlefamily scattered sites in addition to any other expanded crediting opportunities in order to meet its obligation. Some of the properties listed above may be sub-divided or developed as multiple units to provide more than one unit of affordable housing per lot. A tax map of each property is included at the end of this report. In the event the use of the scattered site program is not approved to meet the Townships third round obligation, the Township will seek the credits identified in this section through its Growth Share Ordinance. Growth Share Development Ordinance 16U The Township of Brick anticipates meeting the balance of its Fair Share Plan obligation through implementation of the Growth Share Ordinance. The Growth Share Ordinance was adopted on April 19, 2005. It requires each development to provide one affordable unit for every eight (8) housing units and one (1) affordable unit for every twenty-five (25) jobs generated by non-residential development. The ordinance permits developers to provide money in lieu of housing, a development fee or construction of housing off-site. The following site is anticipated to be developed: Pulte Homes Block 685, Lot 7.02 35.9 Acres Age Restricted Condominium Development 21

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Pulte Homes has made application to the Zoning Board of Adjustment to pursue a use variance and site plan to construct a four-hundred (400) unit senior condominium development. It is anticipated that 10 units of low and moderate income age-restricted units will be created through this development. The balance of the growth share requirement from this development will be met through other crediting opportunities. The applicant has indicated that it will work with the municipality to provide for the growth share obligation that will be created if this development is approved by the board. After application of 10 units toward the age-restricted cap, the applicant has stated that it will be willing provide for its growth share by other means such as off site construction or fees in lieu of construction. This application is anticipated to be heard in the first half of 2006. Total Fair Share Plan = 96 Units Rehabilitation Program 2000 Rehabilitation Obligation - 8 Brick Townships housing rehabilitation program provides home improvements funds to families who either own and occupy or are owners of rental housing units occupied by households which: 1.) meet family income criteria as established by the Township, State and Federal regulations, 2.) have a demonstrable need to make home improvements to correct eligible serious housing deficiencies, 3.) comply with Township application procedures and provide required personal and financial information, and 4.) agree to use the money in accordance with established Township procedures and stated Federal regulations regarding such expenditures. Brick Township has established a priority system to ensure that families with seriously substandard units will receive housing rehabilitation program home improvement funds since requests for rehabilitation have historically exceeded the Townships funding capability. The program is administered by the Townships Housing Consultant, Rehab Co. The Township proposes to continue its very active rehabilitation program to meet the 8 units required in the Rehabilitation obligation. Zoning The State Plan Projections provided by the NJTPA or MPO, cannot be accommodated as the Township has no viable capacity through our existing available land to accommodate these projections. If the zoning were changed to attempt accommodation of these projections, the Township would still fall severely short of the number provided as there are only 340 acres of developable land left in which the Township to provide housing and commercial businesses. Currently, 122 acres of commercially zoned properties, and 218 acres of residentially zoned properties are available for development. If the Township were to consider re-zoning those commercial properties to provide for residential development, we would not be able to accommodate the MPO Growth Share number. In addition, to meet the MPO number, the Township would have to re-zone properties to be inconsistent with the Master Plan and the suburban nature of the municipality. A more urban and densely populated area of the municipality would have to be created. This would cause many difficulties and stresses on the existing roadway infrastructure, as it would not have the capacity to meet the demands of the increased density and development. Currently, the Townships zoning and land use ordinances provide for small lot residential development and allow for cluster provisions on larger lot residential tracts to provide for affordable units on planned developments. In addition, as of 2005, all properties in the Township that receive development approvals from either reviewing board are included as inclusionary developments under our new Affordable Housing Ordinances. (Ordinance attached). Therefore, there is not possible accommodation to meet the MPO numbers based on our current zoning. The Townships existing zoning provides adequate capacity to accommodate residential and non-residential growth projections consistent with our municipal growth projections due to the fact that our build-out analysis provided the data in which to establish our growth share projection. Therefore, based on our current zoning, and available land for development, we do not foresee any difficulty in providing for a growth share projection of 169 units. We have included a detailed Growth Share Plan in this document to address this prospective need.

22

Township of Brick, Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan

Analysis It appears that the reasons for the difference between the municipal growth projections and the Plan Projections lie in the fact that the projections are based upon the Rutgers report Measuring Urban Growth in New Jersey: A report on recent land development patterns utilizing the 1986 1995 NJDEP land use/land cover data set, by Hasse & Lathrop CRSSA, Rutgers University, 2001. This report approximated 2,509 acres of developable land as of 1995 in the Township of Brick. The Township of Brick, Office of Land Use and the Brick Township Municipal Utility Authority have been utilizing a much more reliable and up-to-date geographic information system data set based on vacant and underdeveloped parcels in the Township. This parcel data is based on tax maps and filed sub-division maps and is continually updated by Township and BTMUA staff. This data serves as the basis for all planning and land use analysis as well as open space preservation. The utilization of antiquated data taken from the 1995 report characterizes land development patterns that are more than likely built since that time and does not provide a realistic picture of what is available for development in the year 2005. Our data projections are based on real time data of available land as of 2005, with consideration given to zoning, environmental constraints and infrastructure needed to accomplish development. Justification COAH should accept our alternate projections based upon the following; 1. Our build-out analysis is a real-time assessment of the availability of developable land within our municipality created from GIS information, tax assessor data and in depth analysis of each developable parcel. 2. Our current zoning and Housing Element and Fair Share Plan provide for an appropriate amount of affordable housing based on our zoning ordinances, zone plan, master plan and affordable housing ordinances. 3. Our Affordable housing ordinances provide for inclusionary zoning and development fees that serve to ensure that our growth share obligation will be met in a realistic and achievable manner. Conclusion Through a municipal build-out analysis and review of current affordable housing policies, the Township proposes that our Growth Share number be assigned at 169. The Fair Share Plan outlines how the Township proposes to achieve the Growth Share obligation in a fair and achievable manner, taking into consideration that there are only 340 acres of developable land left in which to locate new residential and commercial developments.

23

Township of Brick, Master Plan Relation of Master Plan to Other Plans

Relation of Master Plan to Other Plans


Contiguous Municipalities In compliance with the New Jersey Municipal Land Use Law, the Master Plan must contain a statement relative to consistency with neighboring communities plans and documents. The following is presented to meet this requirement; Wall Township Wall Township shares land boundaries with the following municipalities: Colts Neck Township, Tinton Falls Borough, Neptune Township, Belmar Borough, Howell Township, south Belmar Borough, Spring Lake Heights Borough, Sea Girt Borough, Manasquan Borough, Brielle Borough, and Brick Township. All of the above municipalities are in Monmouth County except Brick Township, which is located in Ocean County. The proposed Land Use Plan is consistent with Brick Townships planning since most of the abutting lands are part of the Manasquan Wildlife Management Area and the balance is designated for low and moderate density single family residences similar to Wall Township. Lakewood Brick Township directly abuts Lakewood Township to the east. Beyond or due east of the Garden State Parkway, Lakewood Township is zoned for primarily low density residential development, however, there is an undeveloped OP, Office Professional, zone and a commercially developed B-5 zone (Home Depot) in this area. In addition, the Township has proposed to rezone a large portion of property in this area to open space, permitting active and passive recreation. The residential zones in Brick Township permit higher densities than the R-40 and R-20 zones in Lakewood, although these zones have seen senior single family housing developments that are consistent with the zoning in Brick Township. The commercial zone along Route 70 along Route 70 in Brick is developed consistent with the commercial zoning in Lakewood. Howell Township The zoning and land use in Brick Township is consistent with the Howell Township Master Plan. The land bordering Howell in Brick is zoned R-R-1 Rural Residential, R-7.5 single family residential and R-M, Multi Family Residential. The R-R-1 zone permits single family detached residences on minimum 20,000 square foot lots. The R-M zone permits multi family residences at a maximum density of 6 units per acre. The adjacent property in Howell is designated Medium Density 3, which is consistent with the zoning in Brick. Point Pleasant Borough Brick Township adopted a Master Plan in 1997 consisting of a Land Use Plan Element, housing Element, Goals and Objectives and the Relation to Other Plans. A review of the most current Brick Township zoning map indicates that the types of zone districts and the minimum lot areas in the residential zone districts are compatible with the Borough of Point Pleasant. For example, the contiguous residential zones, north of Route 88, establish minimum 7,500 square feet and 10,000 square feet lot areas whereas the contiguous Point Pleasant zone, R-1A requires a minimum of 9,000 square feet. In addition Brick has a commercial area along Route 88 and along the Manasquan River, as does the Borough. Much of the land in Brick is separated from the Borough by Beaver Dam Creek and Barnegat Bay. The areas where land use regulations are important from a compatible perspective lie along both sides of Route 88 and extent to the north to the Manasquan River. On Route 88, the zoning calls for general commercial, that is compatible with the Borough. Extending to the north and the Bridge Avenue area, the borough has C-1 Retail zoning adjoining R-10 and office professional zones on the south side of the Bridge Avenue in Brick. The R-10 would appear to be incompatible, except that the land lying in the borough is scheduled for a Green Acres park. The office professional designation in Brick is not incompatible with the C-1 zone in the borough.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Relation of Master Plan to Other Plans

To the north of Bridge Avenue, Brick has highway commercial zoning with limited contact with the borough since it has provided 7,500 square foot residential zoning along most of the border area, compatible in all respects with the R-2 district. The commercial use along the waterfront is zoned compatibly in both the borough and the township. Brielle The zoning in Brielle has no real effect on zoning decisions in the borough since the broad expanse of the Manasquan and the lack of road contact between the two communities provides a sufficient separation from a planning perspective. Toms River The zoning in the Township of Toms River is consistent with the zoning in the Township of Brick in density and use considerations. The Zoning in Toms River Township along Hooper Avenue at the intersection of Yorktown Boulevard is general business that is consistent with the B-3 Zoning along Brick Boulevard. Ocean County Master Plan The County last adopted a Comprehensive Master Plan in December of 1988. Included in said Master Plan is a General Development Plan which forecasts future land use in all Ocean County municipalities. Land Use patterns in Lakewood Township have evolved somewhat differently than what the County plan had envisioned. For example, the southwestern quadrant of the Townships is shown as being Industrial or Utilities and is the recently built Fairways at Lake Ridge adult community projects. Further, the County Plan identifies significant land areas developing as Rural Residential at a density of one (1) unit to the acre. In actuality, many of the residential communities in Lakewood are developed at a higher density than (1) one unit to the acre. Essentially, the General Development Plan found in the County Master Plan is dated and inconsistent with the pattern of development that has evolved to date in Lakewood Township. The remainder of the Plan does, however, accurately reflect areas identified for preservation in accordance with the recommendations of the Greenways Commission and areas of development within Dover Township (Toms River) and Point Pleasant Borough. New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan The Township of Brick has completed the Plan Endorsement process by which the Townships planning documents are reviewed, revised and adopted to be consistent with the main goals and policies of the NJ State Plan. The Township completed this process on February 28, 2007 and is awaiting endorsement from the Office of Smart Growth and the State Planning Commission that is scheduled to occur on June 20, 2007. The Township of Bricks Plan Endorsement marks a significant time in the history of the Township relative to development and redevelopment of the Townships commercial areas. The endorsement of the Townships plans by the State Planning Commission validates the Townships visions and goals for the future development of the Township as well as the designation of the Brick Town Center as a CAFRA Coastal Town Center.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Conclusion

Conclusion
The Township of Brick Master Plan has been a long awaited document that updates the current state of development and character of the Township. The Township of Brick is described throughout the document as a coastal community with a mix of densely populated suburban neighborhoods and commercial corridors with ample recreational and open space opportunities. With guidance and vision, these areas have the potential to redevelop into traditional Town Center developments. Neighborhood and regional commercial areas that serve resident and pass through populations will be improved to include better circulation, cross access between commercial sites, aesthetically pleasing architecture with design themes tied to the history of Brick Township, increased pedestrian connections and amenities and more accessible transit opportunities. The Master Plan, when considered in development and review of applications before both the Planning and Zoning Board of Adjustment, will serve to guide the future development and redevelopment of Brick Township to be consistent with the State Plan and improve the quality of life for all of Brick Townships residents.

Township of Brick, Master Plan Assumptions

Assumptions
That the population of Brick Township will continue to increase, but at a substantially slower rate due to the limited availability of vacant land without environmental constraints which prevent or inhibit development. That the Planning Board and the Board of Education will work together to plan for the Educational and Recreational needs of the student population. That due to the rate of population growth over the last 30 years in Brick and surrounding communities, new commercial development will continue, but at a lesser pace. The focus is now on redevelopment of existing commercial centers, conforming to upgraded improvement standards and construction of mixed use developments to encourage growth into the Brick Town Center. That continued road improvements will be required due to past population growth and development. That infrastructure will require expansion and improvement. Recurring drought conditions have made apparent the need to protect the current potable water supply, while investigating additional resources such as desalinization, improving groundwater recharge and grey water recycling. Recent innovations in energy efficiency and green building technologies make the employment of environmentally sensitive and energy efficient building practices more feasible. That major portions of the remaining vacant land include areas of tidal wetlands and freshwater wetlands which will restrict and limit the amount of land that can be developed. That traffic congestion in Brick Township will be eased through the anticipated improvements to the Garden State Parkway, N.J. State Highways ,Ocean County Road system, and public transportation. That public transportation may become a more viable means of travel as progress continues toward the opening of the Monmouth/Ocean/Middlesex rail system. That the Township will meet its housing objectives through the continued implementation of the Townships Affordable Housing Program, Housing Element & Fair Share Plan; the continuation of zoning which permits various types of housing opportunities; and housing rehabilitation through the Community Development Block Grant Program.