STRATEGIES IN HANDLING PEER CONFLICTS AMONG BSN 3C AND 3D STUDENTS IN WEST VISAYAS STATE UNIVERSITY

A Research Paper Presented to Miss Joy Hondrade Instructor for ENG 103 West Visayas State University

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for ENG 103: Writing in the Discipline

Maria Jeanette L. Villanuz Mary Kaye C. Tacuel Ira Hope D. Salonga Richie Sazon October 2007

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study Statement of the Problem Significance of the Study Scope and Delimitation of the Study 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Peers Conflicts Conflict Strategies Summary 3 METHODOLOGY The Respondents Materials and Instrumentation 4 RESULT DISCUSSION Presentation of the Results Analysis, Insight and Summary of the Problem, Methods and Findings Conclusion REFERENCES APPENDICES

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List of Tables

Table 1 2 Distribution of the respondents Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University

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List of Figure

Figure 1 Variables that may affect strategies in handling peer conflicts

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Communications Table of Specifications Research Instrument Statistical Computations Pictorials Page .List of Appendices Appendix A B. E. C. D.

Significance of the Study. subjects and research instrument used. . Part Two. and (4) Scope and Delimitation of the Study. describes the purpose in conducting the study and enumerates the specific objectives of the research. variables. presents the introduction to the study and discusses the rationale for choosing the problem. identifies the coverage of the investigation in terms of purpose. Salonga Richie Sazon Chapter 1 Introduction of the Study Chapter 1 is divided into four parts: (1) Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study. Statement of the Problem. (2) Statement of the Problem. Delimitation of the Study. Part Three. Part One. Part Four. states the benefits that could be derived from the findings of the study. Background of the Study.Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University Maria Jeanette L. (3) Significance of the Study. Villanuz Mary Kaye C. Tacuel Ira Hope D.

teenagers have been exposed to a lot of changes in dealing with other people. Unresolved conflicts can cause arguments. there will always be conflicts among people. Some teenagers are more likely to take risks than adults are. there . Because of this. According to the Theory of Adolescence. disagreements and misunderstandings may occur. No two people are alike. Some people may think the same about something but no two people think samely about everything. In most instances. teenagers cannot avoid to have conflicts with other teenagers. older or younger than them. However with the rapid acceleration program implemented in academic institutions.Background and Theoretical Framework of the Study Every person needs to communicate with other people and because of this. Those areas that are undergoing drastic change mirrors cognitive change. they differ on how they think. Thus. Nowadays. the most dramatic shifts around puberty is on the are believed crucial for advance mental function such as reasoning. Teenage years have always been the most difficult stage in life because teenagers learn to discover new things. It is because of this that a person tries to find ways to understand and handle conflicts. fights. where they try to experiment with their feelings. reason. and make judgements resulting to conflicts. making judgement and self-control. Conflict is both natural and inevitable in human interactions. and “scapegoating” if they are not understood and handled wisely. This is the stage of curiosity.

it sought answers to the following questions: 1. Furthermore. Variables that may affect strategies in handling peer conflicts. students are bombarded with pressures from instructors. What is the prevalent strategy of students in handling peer conflicts? 2.has been significant increase in incidents of violent conflicts in schools. and (b) section? Significance of the Study . in College of Nursing. For instance. our interest to conduct this research. Thus. Independent Variables Sex Section Dependent Variable Strategies in handling peer conflicts Figure 1. their peers too could be at times against each other. Statement of the Problem This study aimed to determine the prevalent strategies in handling conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University. clinical exposures as well as their peers. What are the prevalent strategies in handling peer conflicts when students are grouped according to (a) sex. Although their peers may help in resolving school-related challenges.

Guidance counselors may also profit from this study since students with conflicts are most likely to seek help from them. It may help them deal with student conflicts better. future researchers will get handy insights from the results that could be beneficial to them. and (b) section. The parents may also benefit from this study.The results of this study may be beneficial to the following: The teenagers will benefit most from the outcome of this research. The knowledge gained may be useful in guiding their children towards applying the best strategy in solving conflicts. And lastly. The results of the study may enable them to understand their children. . The outcome will serve as springboard in conducting studies similar or related to this study. Knowing the different strategies in handling conflicts may help improve themselves and their relationships. with the additional knowledge from this study. Scope and Delimitation of the Study This study aimed to determine the prevalent strategies in handling conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University. may learn to understand and deal with students with conflicts better. It likewise aimed to determine the prevalent strategies in handling peer conflicts when students are grouped according to (a) sex. Teachers.

Chapter 2 Review of Related Literature .The respondents of this investigation were the 70 out 99 students of BSN 3D and 3D in West Visayas State University. Data needed for this study were gathered through a researcher-made instrument. the mean and standard deviation were used. All statistical computations were processed through the use of the Microsoft Excel Program. This survey research focused on the strategies in handling conflicts as dependent variable and sex and section as independent variables. To describe the data gathered.

and the desire to get together with others or to do things with others. and (4) Summary. . Part Two.Chapter 2 is divided into four parts: (1) Peers. Peers The peer is a small. Part Four. It is a struggle for mastery. special aptitudes. presents the conflicts among teenagers. a combat to overcome. Conflict Strategies. defines what peers are and discusses what predispose them to conflicts. Part Three. informal and somewhat exclusive affiliation of individuals in a face-to-face group. active opposition. (2) Conflicts. Members are of approximately of the same age. Basis of peer group formation are interests. states the different strategies in handling conflicts. Part One. gives the gist of important points presented in this chapter. (3) Conflict Strategies. Conflicts Conflict is difficult to define. strife and involves opposing forces and differing objectives. Conflicts. Peers. what causes these and some of the outcomes of conflict.

understanding. there are also dangers of excessive conflicts. stop communication. Where conflicts may bring in positive payoffs. They may come as a blessing in disguise. However. What is essential is their consequence. Conflicts are usually about friendship.Conflict may be defined as a disagreement resulting from incompatible elements between or among two parties. and minor infractions of pushing. Conflicts by itself cannot be labeled good or bad. The absence of conflict may reflect the situation of high dependency. Conflict does not happen by chance. joint planning. It is caused. Conflicts may bring in positive payoffs. Conflicts may distort perceptions. such as depression. misunderstanding. or other school or social relationships. Not all conflict is destructive. . usually tends teenagers to attempt suicide. and produce violence. Absence of love. sabotage and chaos. It is inevitable in all facets of life. yesmanism. shoving. privacy. narrow visioning and excessive conformity. Although conflict is perceived as a negative phenomenon by most people. conflict is not really that bad. And some of these suicides are due to poor communication or poor relations with others. it is far better to encourage and stimulate them. trust. Unresolved conflicts sometimes gave students a mood disorders. responsibility. and friendships usually results to conflicts. it can be productive and valuable source of creativity.

shortcomings. and how you feel about the impact of the conflict issue on your relationship. others shrink away from it. (4) a mutually agreed-on solution achieved through bargaining. It may be that the conflict created distrust that will take time to heal. It is important to restate the worth of the relationship. compromising. or finding alternate activities. Conflict Strategies When individuals encounter conflict. (3) the submission of one individual to another. others are designed to keep conflict from disrupting relationships. Conflict has the potential to harm relationships if they are not handled properly. the other person. Some people thrive on conflict. Therefore. Expressing the strong closeness or gratitude for sharing that took place in the conflict is also very important. and shortages are the part of everyday reality. they orient to the conflict in differing ways. independent of the goals of others. Managing conflicts is one of the important functions of modern day management. It is also very possible that the relationship feels stronger immediately after a conflict. But no .Perfection is rare while pitfalls. as when simply drop the issue. (2) an adult-imposed solution. conflicts are inevitable. The outcomes of a conflict may be (1) an unresolved situation. Some ways of orienting to conflict are well-designed to help an individual serve his or her goals. The best approach to deal with conflicts is to successfully manage them.

Those employing this style simply do not face the conflict and do not care about each other’s needs and concerns. denying that it exists. This can be done by ignoring it. overuse of the style leads to others walking over them. or may not even stay for the final decision. but ignored. Avoiding is characterized by both uncooperative and unassertive behavior by both parties. Avoiding. The particular strategy used in any situation depends on how important goals and relationships are to an individual. When a conflict situation arises that does not seem important in terms of participant’s personal goals or their relationships with others. refuse to discuss the situation. or simply withdrawing from the situation. Avoiding may help maintain relationships that would be hurt by conflict resolution but conflicts remain unresolved. An individual has choices and styles to be learned. they may choose to avoid a conflict completely. avoiding the circumstances that may cause it to arise. one should be skilled in all five strategies. . The conflict is not dealt with directly in this case.matter how we react. This strategy produces unwillingness to cooperate with a problem. To be skilled in conflict management. or withdrawing from the situation itself. it is important that we understand our conflict-related behavior – and learn to manage it more successfully. They evade the issue. This approach has a low degree of focus on the personal relationships and feelings of the people involved.

Whenever conflict arises. when time constraints demand a delay. Assertion prevents smoothing from becoming a compromise or a “sellout”. . when confrontation will hurt a working relationship. Protecting requires individuals to actively engage in keeping conflict from surfacing in groups. Smoothing involves the maximum use of both cooperation and assertion. individuals who are engaged in withdrawal might address parts of the conflict while trying to avoid other aspects of the conflict.It is appropriate to use avoiding strategy when the stakes are not high or issue is trivial. the individual engaged in protecting will not acknowledge that the conflict exists. Two forms of avoidance Protecting. Smoothing. Withdrawal. when conflicts do arise. Smoothing is dialectic between these seemingly contradictory approaches. when gathering information is more important than an immediate decision. when others can more effectively resolve the conflict. Those using a smoothing style aim to satisfy the needs and concerns of both parties to the conflict. when disruption outweighs benefit of conflict resolution. however. It is when individuals try to avoid the conflict and keep it from surfacing. Cooperation prevents it from being a competitive struggle with winners and losers. It is when individuals are “determined to avoid conflicts at all costs”.

Smoothing is the opposite of competition. and high focus on the personal relationships and feelings of the people involved. Instead of forcing one's own point. They are afraid that would ruin the relationship. the carer feels empathy for the person. smoothing produces agreement with the other side. This approach has a low degree of focus and on the task at hand. This appeases others. Instead of arguing for or maintaining their position. They try to smooth over the conflict in fear of harming the relationship. They say. and sympathizing it is possible to create a relationship with the other person and calm the situation.In this strategy. ”I'll give up my goals and let you have what you want in order for you to like me”. They think that conflict should be avoided in favor of harmony and believed that conflicts cannot be discussed without damaging relationships. In order to maintain relationships with others or the ability of the group to function. This style may be used in situations where relationships with other individuals or the well-being of the group as unit are more important than taskrelated goals. a member may give in on a point or avoid voicing a position on a controversial issue. By encouraging the full verbal expression of negative feelings. While their own goals are of little importance. and limits the conflicts. . an accommodating style/person is usually willing to yield their viewpoint to the other side. This strategy to conflict is characterized by attempts to appease other people. they want to be accepted and liked by other people.

Forcing. They may be forceful and assertive in the situation. This strategy assumes that there is a best way to handle the conflict and impose the method. either their viewpoint prevails and they win. When employing a forcing strategy to conflict. A forcing conflict strategy is often taken when a person involved is focused on his or her own personal goals. It achieves goals at all costs and is not concerned with the needs of others. or else they lose.Two forms of smoothing Yielding. rather than on relationships with other people in the group or the well being of the group as a unit. Conceding is when an individual is more engaged in the conflict but still relents to other's positions in the end. Yielding accommodates entirely and without resistance. Forcing means placing one's own needs ad concerns above others. This strategy has a high degree of focus on the . They see their own view or opinion as right and try to use argumentation and evidence to persuade other group members to accept their view point. Yielding occurs when the individual is not engaged in a conversation and shows a little concern over the solution. people commonly view the conflict as a win-lose situation. Compromises and concessions are not acceptable. The forcing strategy to conflict is an attempt to force one side's opinions on another side. Forcing is characterized by assertive behavior. Yielding is where an individual accepts another's solution without expressing their own beliefs and concerns. Conceding.

Participants ay give in on one point in order to gain an advantage on another. The compromising strategy involves negotiation. it is not possible for the goals of al members to be met. but may not agree with the finished result and/or products. Although compromise requires a loss of specific elements of each person's position. In some cases. and a high degree of flexibility. and little focus on the personal relationships and feelings of the people. often view compromise as "losing". A compromise is characterized by give-and-take on the parts of all members. The needs of the group and the task-related goals of the members may both be important. This strategy has a medium degree of focus on the task at hand. compromise is the best a group can expect to achieveespecially if individuals are more committed to their own ideas than the group’s greater good. . trade-offs. Compromising. Often. Thus in order to get what you want. a compromise is one way in which the conflict can be resolved. to the participants. People. you have to give something up in the process. and medium focus on the personal relationships and feelings of the people. At other times.task at hand. In such situations. but not vital. a compromised solution can still closely resemble a large portion of an individual's original proposal. compromise produces an outcome that is less than ideal for the group. The people in a compromised situation each get a little bit of what they want.

combat to overcome. Personal goals are very important while relationships are not.Moderate amounts of cooperativeness and assertiveness are required to make a compromise. . concerns. Smoothing strategy is by giving up what they want to maintain the relationship. They give up personal goals and relationships and see conflicts as helpless and hopeless. Forcing strategy is convincing others to accept their solution to the conflict. The person compromising expects that the outcome will be a partial fulfillment of the needs. Conflict is difficult to define: a struggle for mastery. It involves opposing forces and different objectives. meets one’s goals and maintaining an appropriate relationship with the other person are concerns that affect the strategy chosen by the individual. and goals of both parties to the conflict. Summary Everyday experience suggests that conflict cannot be avoided in interaction with others. The different conflict strategies are: Avoiding strategy means staying away from the conflict physically and psychologically. An agreement that satisfies one’s needs. They achieve goals at all cost and are not concerned with the needs of others. partially satisfying solution. active opposition and strife. Both search for a mutually acceptable. Personal goals are not very important and believe that conflicts harm relationships.

It is a give and take.Compromising strategy is by giving up some of personal goals and persuading others to give up some of theirs too. Confronting strategy is by viewing conflicts as problems to be resolves. They seek solutions that meet personal and other’s goals and believe that conflict can improve relationships. It has moderate concern for personal goals and needs. .

35 (50%) are from section C and 35 (50%) are from section D. and as to section.7% of the total population.Chapter 3 Methodology This chapter consists of two parts: (1) The Respondents and (2) Materials and Instrumentation. discusses the data gathering instrument employed in the study. Part Two. Of the 70 students categorized according to sex. The Respondents The respondents of the study were 70 students of BSN 3C and 3D in West Visayas State University. which represents 70. 19 (27. and as to section. Part One. The participants were classified to sex and section. the 70 sample was drawn without replacement. delineates the subjects of the study. the participants were grouped as male and female. Then. Materials and Instrumentation. Pieces of paper with the same size and color on which the participant’s assigned number is written was placed in a container and mixed.14%) are male and 51 (72. To identify the final respondents. As to sex. . The Respondents. the simple random sampling technique was used.86%) are females. they were grouped as C and D.

sex and section. compromising and confronting. . Sex Male Female 19 51 27. Sometimes. forcing. Four items were allotted for each conflict strategy respectively.86 f 70 % l 100 C. A brief information sheet was provided to gather data about the respondent’s name.Table 1 presents the data. Conflict Strategies Questionnaire was utilized to determine the peer conflict strategies of the students. Table 1 Distribution of the Respondents ________________________________________________________________ Categories A.14 72. The categories were the different conflict strategies: avoiding. smoothing. Section Section C 35 50 Section D 35 50 ________________________________________________________________ Materials and Instrumentation A researcher-made instrument was used for data gathering. Entire Group B. and Never. Often. This instrumentation is composed of 20 items. Each statement was provided with four alternative responses as follows: Always.

the greater the probability that it is the prevalent strategy of BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University in handling peer conflicts. the less frequent the students use this conflict strategy. The lower the mean. each response was given an equivalent as follows: Response Always Often Sometimes Never Weight 4 3 2 1 To interpret the mean. the higher the mean for each conflict strategy. .For computation purposes.

Part Three. and (3) Conclusion. Analysis. Presentation of the Results. Part Two. presents the mean and standard deviation computations of the prevalent strategies in handling peer conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University. presents the conclusions drawn from the results of the study. Insight and Summary. Conclusion. . discusses the significant points and findings of the study. Presentation of the Results Differences on the Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 2C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University The prevalent strategy in handling peer conflicts among BSN 2C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University was determined in this investigation.Chapter 4 Result Discussion This chapter presents the results and corresponding analyses of this investigation. It is divided into three parts: (1) Presentation of the Results. Insight and Summary. The mean and standard deviation were used to describe the data. The results revealed that the prevalent strategy in handling conflict was “confronting” when the respondents were taken as an entire group. (2) Analysis. Part One.

When grouped according to section. (M= 2. Table 2 Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University Category A.44 0.91 SD 0. showing a narrow dispersion of scores. Entire Group B.When grouped according to sex. The standard deviations ranged from 0.96 2.96) and section D.88) and female. (M = 2.91).49 Description Confronting Confronting Confronting Confronting Confronting . showing a narrow dispersion of scores.50 0. (M = 2.50 0. Results are shown in Table 2. “confronting was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflict.52. Section Section C Section D M 2. (M = 2.50. The standard deviations ranged from 0.96). 95 2.52 0. The mean scores among section C.88 2.49 to 0.44 to 0. The mean scores among male. “confronting” was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflicts. Sex Male Female C.96 2.

Specifically. Both males and females utilize the “confronting” strategy when dealing with a peer conflict. Insight Summary of the Problem.Analysis. Insight and Summary Analysis The results revealed that the prevalent strategy in handling conflict was “confronting” when the respondents were taken as an entire group. the students use the “confronting” strategy when faced with a peer conflict. this investigation sought answers to the following questions: . When grouped according to sex. When grouped according to section. In both sections. “confronting” was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflicts. It likewise aimed to determine how sex and section would affect the prevalent strategies in handling conflicts. “confronting was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflict. Methods and Findings The main purpose of this study was to determine the prevalent strategies in handling peer conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University.

The respondents were selected through simple random sampling technique and 70 students were the sample size. The findings of the study showed that: 1. When grouped according to sex. When taken as an entire group. which were computer processed through the Microsoft Excel Program. Conclusion From the preceding findings. They were classified according to sex and section. The data needed for the study were gathered through the use of a researcher-made questionnaire. “confronting” was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflicts. the students use the “confronting” strategy when faced with a peer conflict. “confronting was the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflict. 2. In both sections. When grouped according to section. the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflict was “confronting”. the following conclusions were drawn: . and (b) section? This study was conducted on September 2007. Both males and females utilize the “confronting” strategy when dealing with a peer conflict.1. What is the prevalent strategy of students in handling peer conflicts? 2. What are the prevalent strategies in handling peer conflicts when students are grouped according to (a) sex. Descriptive statistics employed were the mean and standard deviation.

Based on the results. . third year nursing students employ the “confronting” strategy when dealing with a peer conflict. the prevalent strategy in handling peer conflicts among third year nursing students was “confronting”. Thus. when taken as an entire group. regardless of the sex or section. When grouped according to sex and section respectively. “confronting” strategy was still prevalent.

REFERENCES .

APPENDICES .

Appendix A Communications .

Appendix B Table of Specifications .

Appendix C Research Instrument .

Appendix D Statistical Computations .

Appendix E Pictorials .

Your full cooperation will be highly appreciated. please supply the needed information honestly and do not leave any item unanswered. RICHIE SAZON IRA HOPE SALONGA MARY KAYE TACUEL MARIA JEANETTE VILLANUZ Researchers Noted: MISS JOY HONRADE English Instructor .West Visayas State University COLLEGE OF NURSING La Paz. To successfully carry out this study. Thank you very much! Sincerely yours. Iloilo City September 28. 2007 Dear Respondent: Greetings! We are presently conducting a research entitled “Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University – College of Nursing” as a requirement in Eng 103: Writing in the Discipline.

4 3 2 Never 1 4 3 2 1 .Always 3 . PERSONA L INFORMATION Name (optional) : __________________________________ Section: ___ Sex: Male ___ Female ___ QUESTIONNAIRE PROPER Instruction: Complete the following questionnaire by encircling the answer that best describes your feelings about each statement. Please do not leave any item unanswered. You are in the best position to supply the needed data for the purpose.Often 2 .Sometimes 1 . kindly answer the. I refrain from raising my voice. I believe that soft words can mellow a hard heart. 2. I require my friends to believe in me even though they don’t agree with me.Never Always 1. so every time my friends and I disagree. by supplying the information on the space provided. as sincerely and as truthfully as you can. 4 . In this connection.Strategies in Handling Peer Conflicts among BSN 3C and 3D Students in West Visayas State University This research instrument is intended to gather data from BSN 3C and 3D students in West Visayas State University.

) because I believe that it will patch things up between us. I politely and honestly tell my friends about my opinion. I refrain from thinking about a disagreement with my friends because I believe that it will just pass. I offer them something (gift. I bring my conflicts into the open and face them directly. 4 3 2 Never 1 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 . food. I try to stay away from them. Every time I feel that friends have mood swings.Always 3. I try to talk in a soft and calm manner because I don’t want my friends to get irritated. I try to talk in a soft and calm manner because I don’t want my friends to get irritated. 12. 8. 13. I usually walk away before hearing the final decision. 11. I continue to do what my friends are doing even though it is wrong. As much as possible. I still convince my friends that I am right. 14. To avoid disagreements. As much as possible. 6. When my friends and I disagree. 4. Even though I don’t have the final decision. Getting part of what I want is better than getting nothing at all. etc. 9. During reconciliation about a disagreement. I say what I think and how I feel without trying to understand what my friends’ think and feel. 5. Even though I am wrong. I still tell my friends on what I think about the situation. 7. 10.

19. I only say good things about my friends. If I can’t talk to my friends directly.Always 15. To stop the argument. I want my friends to put themselves in my place so they will understand why I think the way I do. 20. 4 3 2 Never 1 4 3 2 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 4 3 2 1 Table of Specifications . I let my friends win even though I am right. I text or call them as soon as I can to discuss the problem. 16. 17. Conflicts will just go away if I avoid them. I volunteer myself to patch up things between my friends and me as long as they are also willing to give their support. 18.

8. 15 5.Categories Avoiding Smoothing Forcing Compromising Confronting Total Item Nos. 12. 18 2. 11. 20 1. 4. 10. 16 Total No. 7. 13. 19 3. 6. 9. of Items 4 4 4 4 4 20 Percentage 20 % 20 % 20 % 20 % 20 % 100% Statistical Computations Entire Group . 14. 17.

42 0.571 2.48 2.118 2.58 0.46 0.132 2.00 2.956 2.154 According to Sex f Male Forcing Smoothing Compromising Confronting Avoiding Female Forcing Smoothing Compromising Confronting Avoiding 51 0.34 0.44 0.5 1.44 0.35 0.936 2.316 SD Mean According to Section f SD Mean .42 0.171 2.f Entire Group Forcing Smoothing Compromising Confronting Avoiding 70 SD Mean 0.658 2.319 2.32 0.539 2.53 2.355 2.882 2.093 19 0.41 0.329 2.52 0.

543 35 2.509 0.914 2.279 2.379 2.193 Forcing Smoothing Compromising Confronting Avoiding 0.418 0.502 0.114 .571 2.380 0.571 2.46 0.467 2.342 0.490 0.340 0.071 2.193 2.Section C Forcing Smoothing Compromising Confronting Avoiding Section D 35 0.957 2.