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VOL. 20 ISSUE 23 APRIL 17-23, 2013 • THEWEEKENDER.COM weekender NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS &
VOL. 20 ISSUE 23 APRIL 17-23, 2013 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
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PAULA COLE RETURNS WITH ‘RAV EN,’ P. 15

CRAFT FAIR USHERS IN SPRING, P. 42
CRAFT FAIR
USHERS IN
SPRING, P. 42
We are the
We are the
’ P. 15 CRAFT FAIR USHERS IN SPRING, P. 42 We are the Y: 24 AT
Y: 24 AT 8PM
Y:
24 AT 8PM

Champions

Champions
MEMBERS OF BREAKING BENJAMIN AND LIFER FORM STARDOG CHAMPION
MEMBERS OF BREAKING BENJAMIN AND LIFER FORM STARDOG CHAMPION

Weekender

AWARDS PART

WEDNESDAY APRIL

Readers’ Choice
Readers’ Choice

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC A 21+ EVENT

BREAKERS INSIDE THE MOHEGAN SUN CASINO

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staff

John Popko General Manager • 570.831.7349 jpopko@theweekender.com “Mourning Wood.”
John Popko
General Manager • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
“Mourning Wood.”
Amanda Dittmar Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401 adittmar@theweekender.com “The Company.”
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
“The Company.”
Mike Golubiewski Production Editor • 570.829.7209 mgolubiewski@theweekender.com “The Johnny Mayeskis.”
Mike Golubiewski
Production Editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
“The Johnny Mayeskis.”

If you were starting a new band, what would you call it?

Rich Howells Editor • 570.831.7322 rhowells@theweekender.com “Cosmic Groin Pull, for all the George Carlin fans
Rich Howells
Editor • 570.831.7322
rhowells@theweekender.com
“Cosmic Groin Pull, for all the
George Carlin fans out there.”
Kieran Inglis Media Consultant • 570.831.7321 kinglis@theweekender.com “No Good Necktie.”
Kieran Inglis
Media Consultant • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
“No Good Necktie.”
Sara Pokorny Staff Writer • 570.829.7132 spokorny@theweekender.com “Sans Pants.”
Sara Pokorny
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
spokorny@theweekender.com
“Sans Pants.”
Paul Shaw Digital Specialist • 570.829.7204 pshaw@theweekender.com “Vigo and The Scoleri Brothers Three Man
Paul Shaw
Digital Specialist • 570.829.7204
pshaw@theweekender.com
“Vigo and The Scoleri Brothers
Three Man Band.”

Te ll @wkdr what you would call your new band.

Contributors Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Nick Delorenzo, Tim Hlivia, Melissa Highes, Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Ryan O’Malley, Kacy Muir, Jason Riedmiller, Erin Rovin, Ned Russin, Chuck Shepherd, Jen Stevens, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Mark Uricheck, Robbie Vanderveken, Noelle Vetrosky, Bobby Walsh, Derek Warren Interns Karyn Montigney, Lisa Petz, Bill Rigotti Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703 Fax 570.831.7375 E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com Online theweekender.com • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Tw itter: @wkdr Circulation The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania. For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7349 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130 Editorial policy The Weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703. The opinions of independent contributors of the Weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff. Rating system WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable * Scarborough Research

letter from the editor

* Scarborough Research l etter from the editor I don’t mind working to get a story,

I don’t mind working to get a story, but it’s nice, and sometimes flattering, when your interview subjects come to you. When Breaking Benjamin and Lifer guitarist Aaron Fink felt his new band, Stardog Champion, was ready to announce their debut concert at Brews Brothers West in Luzerne, his first call was to The Weekender, and we were more than honored to conduct the group’s very first interview, meeting Fink and vocalist Nick Coyle at The Woodlands Inn for a casual hour-long chat. If you were

you’ll have many of your ques- tions answered. To hear the band for yourself, visit theweekender. com to download the first single “When We Fall” and watch the ac- companying music video. So why did they choose The Weekender? Just check out our interviews, photos, videos, and album and concert reviews – it’s an even mix of local, national, and international acts each and every week. Music is as important to us as the musicians who play it. If bands are recognizing that, we hope you will, too.

one of the many fans across the country wondering where these

-Rich Howells,

talented musicians ended up, now

Weekender Editor

talented musicians ended up, now Weekender Editor s ocial Online comment of the week. Ricky Gervais
talented musicians ended up, now Weekender Editor s ocial Online comment of the week. Ricky Gervais

social

Online comment of the week.

Ricky Gervais @rickygervais I agree with Justin Bieber. Anne Frank would’ve loved his stuff. It’s
Ricky Gervais @rickygervais
I agree with Justin Bieber.
Anne Frank would’ve loved
his stuff. It’s perfect for being
played really really quietly so
no one can hear it.
The Weekender has 11,769
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender

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PAGE

731790

3

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY , APRIL 17 , 20 13 PA GE 731790 3

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

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PAGE 6

April 17-23, 2013

index

COVER STORY

stardog champion

32-33

LISTINGS

thE w

7

LiVE EntErtainmEnt

20

concErts

concErts

18

26

thEatEr

thEatEr 34, 39

34, 39

agEnda spEaK & sEE

15

MUSIC

MUSIC

mocK sun

7

BrEaKing down thE waLLs … 10

touchpants

thE gLass prism aLBum rEViEws

charts

pauLa coLE

mindLEss sELf induLgEncE

nEon trEEs

13

12

15

36

14

14

27

STAGE & SCREEN

moViE rEViEw

23

infinitE improBaBiLitY … 28

raLphiE rEport starstrucK

40

40

ARTS

noVEL approach prosE in puBs craft fair

26

42

42

LIFESTYLE

show us somE sKin … 44 grEEn piEcE … 46

sEcurELY fashionEd … 46

town haLL tattoo modEL … 62 man … 63

49

HUMOR & FUN

wEEKEndEr night out at rox 52 happY hour … 27 puZZLE … 34 i’d tap that … 38 pEt of thE wEEK … 40

nEws of thE wEird

sorrY mom & dad … 47 VEsuVio’s 1 YEar anniVErsarY partY girL taLK … 49 sign LanguagE … 50

47

10

48

GAMES & TECH

gEt Your gamE on … 51 motorhEad … 51

ON THE COVER

dEsign BY amanda dittmar

VoLumE 20 issuE 23

12 TOUCHY-FEELY Phish drummer brings Touchpants to River Street
12
TOUCHY-FEELY
Phish drummer brings
Touchpants to River Street
49 TOWN MEETING Town Hall Tattoo sets up shop in Wyoming Valley Mall
49
TOWN MEETING
Town Hall Tattoo sets up
shop in Wyoming Valley Mall
only at www.theweekender.com DOWNLOAD STARDOG CHAMPION’S DEBUT SINGLE ‘WHEN WE FALL.’
only at www.theweekender.com
DOWNLOAD STARDOG CHAMPION’S DEBUT SINGLE ‘WHEN WE FALL.’

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE

7

Music

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY , APRIL 17 , 20 13 PA GE 7 M usic Mock Sun

Mock Sun burns bright in the dark

By Bill Thomas

Weekender Correspondent

The fringe is home for Mark Wohl and Jami Kali. Together, the self-described “dream folk” duo crafts ethereal, bohemian rock with a shadowy, psychedelic bite as Wilkes-Barre band Mock Sun. It’s a unique sound, shape-shifting from haunting to twee and back again. Though distinctive and dynamic, such idiosyncrasy has somewhat ostracized the pair from the local scene, dominated as it arguably is by more traditional indie, alternative, and hardcore music. “We don’t fit in anywhere, musically,” Wohl says. “There’s the (River Street Jazz Café) scene, which is really jammy, and there’s still remnants of the punk scene that was big at Café Metropolis. It’s hard for us to find people we can play with or even places we can do so comfortably.” Rather than let that get them down, though, Wohl and Kali said their outsider status has only emboldened their independent spirit and continually encourages them to remember why they play music in the first place. “I get a sense of satisfaction whenever someone finds something in what I’m trying to do creatively, when I can make that connection,” Kali, who also records tranced- out trip-hop music as a solo act in addition to writing poetry and self- publishing an annual creative writing zine called The Vein, says. “I love it when someone under- stands and enjoys what I’m going for, but that drive to do something creative, whatever it may be, is a drive to express ourselves. In the end, I’m doing it for myself.” That art-for-art’s sake attitude is foremost at the heart of Mock Sun’s first EP, “The Lucid Paper Palace Project.” Originally released in 2011, Wohl and Kali recently remixed, remastered, and, as of this week, re-released their seven-track debut album. In addition to a digital ver- sion being available online via the group’s Bandcamp page, physical copies will also be available when Mock Sun performs this Saturday as part of the Record Store Day festivi- ties at Musical Energi (59 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre), where Wohl, not far from a living embodiment of the

where Wohl, not far from a living embodiment of the Mock Sun and Astorian Stigmata: April

Mock Sun and Astorian Stigmata:

April 20, 7 p.m., Musical Energi (59 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre). Free. Info: mock-sun.bandcamp.com.

Main St., Wilkes-Barre). Free. Info: mock-sun.bandcamp.com. “record store geek,” just so happens to work. Viewing

“record store geek,” just so happens to work. Viewing Mock Sun as more of a “studio” project than a live band (quotes around “studio” because the band members record all their material themselves, with their own equipment, in classic do-it-yourself fashion), Kali says the reason for redoing the “The Lucid Palace Paper Project” was because the band is an ongoing process. It evolves along with the individuals within it and improves as they acquire new gear and skills. Hearing the richer, more polished production of the remastered E.P., it’s clear Mock Sun has indeed evolved quite a bit since its im- promptu origins. “It was a very spur-of-the-moment thing,” Kali said, a sly, sidewise smile tugging at the corner of her mouth as she recalls the night in question. “We’d gone for a long drive in the woods before coming back to Mark’s house. He was always look- ing for people to jam with and was playing with one of our friends, who was doing hand percussions. So I got a colander and some sticks and joined in and just started putting words to it, really stream of con- sciousness, making up a song about this creepy picture Mark had on his wall of a little girl standing in a barn with a look of fear on her face. That became ‘Black Eyed Susan,’ the first song we did together.” With colanders and creepy pictures squarely in the past, Mock Sun’s future includes the band’s first full-length album, due out this summer. Sure enough, the album promises to continue Mock’s Sun auditory evolution. “It has taken a different turn because we’re different people now. There’s more frustration fueling my writing, I think,” Kali says. “It’s very tribal. I wouldn’t use that phrase, ‘dream folk,’ anymore.” W

Who

…is the only guy that could get away with fluorescent duds and socks with sandals as his signature style? It’s area native Jay McCarroll, winner of the inaugural season of fashion competition “Project Runway.” The designer will be at Outrageous (Midtown Village, 41 S Main St., Wilkes-Barre) April 20 from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. The store was one of the first retailers to carry the Jay McCarroll label. McCarroll makes it a point to check in where his roots lie. “You can travel the world over, yet there’s nothing as refreshing as being with the ones who love and support you in the place where you grew up,” he said in a press release.

What

…is going on at Clam Diggers (1946 Rt. 6, Scranton/Carbondale Highway) on April

28 at 3 p.m.? It’s a benefit bash for Jessie and family, a woman who was injured

when struck by a drunk driver in November. The single mother of an autistic child, she is now unable to work for at least six months while she recovers. The $7 donation at the door will go towards paying medical expenses. The event is presented by Molten Management and hosted by Nikki Stone and Freddie Fabbri with lighting by To ny Va lvano. It is sponsored by Cold Case Beer Store (Exeter), 707 Auto (Avoca), Original White House Hoagies (Scranton), Nick of Time Printing (Dallas), Avenue Auto Sales & Service (Exeter), Calabria Pizzaria (Dunmore), The Last DJs (Scranton), Serge’s Barber Shop (Scranton), and Fundraising USA (Wilkes-Barre). Live entertainment will be provided by Rock Box, The Fallen, Ashleys Attik, Skin-n-Bones, Sucker, Pissed and Mizerable, Tightly Wound, and special guest Oz. Designated drivers get free admission.

Where

…is Weezy? Not in the hospital, thankfully. Hip- hop artist Lil Wa yne is coming to the To yota Pavilion at Montage Mountain with T. I. and Future on July 21. Tickets go on sale April 19 at

T. I. and Future on July 21. Tickets go on sale April 19 at 10 a.m.
T. I. and Future on July 21. Tickets go on sale April 19 at 10 a.m.
T. I. and Future on July 21. Tickets go on sale April 19 at 10 a.m.

10 a.m.

W

“There’s nothing as refreshing as being

with the ones who love and support

you in the place where you grew up.”

-Jay McCarroll

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 8

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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 2013
PAGE 10 WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 2013 B reaking Down the Walls LocaL music with

Breaking Down the Walls

LocaL music with titLe Fight’s Ned Russin | Special to the Weekender

Support record stores Saturday, and every day

It seems silly to devote only day

Store Day and my thoughts go from

a year to certain holidays. Obvious-

ly, you should love your mother and father every day, you should respect the Earth and all its inhabitants ev- ery day, and yes, you should support your local record store every day. Record Store Day has been one of my favorite holidays for the last couple of years. For one Saturday in April every year, bands and labels do something special just to cel- ebrate one of the greatest American institutions of them all – the local record store. We have limited color 7-inches and LPs, reissues, splits, new records, B-sides – you name it, and it will be available on Record Store Day. RSD not only happens locally but reaches all around the globe. People come together to sup- port one thing, and that “thing” is

buying records and supporting local record stores. We are extremely fortunate to have a chain of local record stores

in our area. I can’t count the amount of places I have traveled to on tour where kids have to resort to buying records at large chains that cannot stock the special interests of its minority customers. Not that there is anything wrong with buying a re- cord where you also buy your toilet paper, but it just seems right to buy

a record from a shop that specializes

in bringing the joy of music right to you. The great thing about Record Store Day is not only are you able to buy releases from the likes of Bob Dylan and Ringo Starr, but that you can also find releases from smaller and even local bands. Last year, Scranton natives The Menz- ingers’ album “Chamberlain Waits” was released on sn ice-cool blue

vinyl, and this year, Title Fight has a Petal playing throughout the day.

split 7-inch coming out just in time for the holiday on limited red vinyl. At times, I think about Record

CD – they can just download the

excitement to worry. Roughly a de- cade ago, digital music changed the face of the music industry. Today, when someone hears a song, they

don’t have to buy a tape, record, or

song (legally or illegally, your pick)

and never set foot in a record store.

Ye s, this is conve nient , but he or

she won’t have the opportunity to

peruse the aisles looking for other

records that may peak their interest or even meet people interested in

the same music as them.

While the thoughts of an ever- changing music world are more than enough to get my head spin- ning, something like Record Store Day keeps me grounded. Maybe things will never go back to the way they used to be, but that doesn’t

mean that we have to prepare for

the death of the music industry.

Instead, we should find joy in days

like Record Store Day, which cel-

ebrates the past, present, and future of music. If you need any recommenda- tions, I would suggest one of the Revelation Records RSD releases of the year: the Slipknot 7-inch on orange. Not that Slipknot, but an older band of the same name. This Slipknot is from New York City and

formed five years before the famed Iowa metal act. This is a very odd selection from the Rev catalog, but nonetheless an integral part of the label’s discography. And for those who want to sup- port the occasion but don’t own a record player or collect records, there’s good news. Gallery of Sound (186 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre) is having great local bands such as Grey Zine, These Elk Forever, and

Support Record Store Day 2013. W

Not only is Record Store Day a wonderful thing on its own, it’s even better
Not only is Record Store Day a wonderful thing on its own,
it’s even better in this area, where we have several local
establishments that participate in it.
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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013
PAGE
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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12 , 2013
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798474

The To uchpants experience

By Ryan O’Malley

Weekender Correspondent

“Why didn’t we have a naked group Skype interview?” drum- mer Jon Fishman asked during a conference call to talk about his band Touchpants, who will be at the River Street Jazz Café on Thursday, April 18. “That should be the new policy: if you want to do a conference interview with Touchpants, it’s going to be a naked group Skype interview.” While the suggestion may seem unorthodox, it perfectly illustrates the dysfunctional family feel- ing that is Touchpants. Formed in 2002, the comedy-rock troupe – Fishman, guitarists/vocalists Colby Dix and Chris Friday, and bassist Aram Bedrosian – has been infesting clubs in the Northeast region with its penchant for shocking, vulgar, and downright offensive lyrics and stage banter, yet still deliver some tight rock grooves in the midst of all the craziness. The band’s approach to things should certainly be taken with a grain of salt, espe- cially considering the way it was formed. “This has actually been going on for over a decade, for some reason,” Dix said. “For the (2002) Jazz Mandolin Project tour (which Fishman was a part of), I was do- ing sound, and Friday was the tour manager. We would take those little handbills and write poems to each other where we pick on any Wookie-looking tramp in the room, and they were basically ‘odes’ to them. We were like two giggly little schoolgirls in the back of a van, drinking while someone else is driving and passing notes back and forth to each other –

when we weren’t passing the Game Boy back to each other, or gay porn; either one.” Since those days, Touchpants has recorded a few albums worth of songs and “poems” – high- lights include “Penis Slap” among several other unprintable names – and, at the urging of Fishman, has been starting to play more live shows. “It developed slowly as we basically played once a year, every year,” Friday said before Fishman quipped, “Now that we’ve got about 15 gigs under our belt.” “We’re really dialing it in now that we’re at gig 15. The fans are really coming together,” Dix added. Although the comedy is a major part of its live shows, Touchpants is a group of musicians who are fully capable of sounding like a rock band should, even with the offensive humor that comes as an added treat. “Once it gets going, there’s actually a good rock band behind it,” Dix said. “In all seriousness, I like the fearlessness of the band,” Fishman continued. “We get around our instruments well enough and we listen to each other well enough… Yo u’re forced to connect with people. Sometimes it can be slow- going, but then you hit a vein and then when it’s off and running. It’s fun as hell.” While the music keeps the ener- gy of the night going, Touchpants is a band that plays its own mate- rial and is not trying to associate itself with Fishman’s other band, Phish, which is part of the attrac- tion for the famed drummer. “In all honesty, what would be the point of me being in an- other band that was anything like

Touchpants and Sonic Spank:

April 18, 9 p.m., River Street Jazz Cafe (667 N. River St., Plains). $20.

m., River Street Jazz Cafe (667 N. River St., Plains). $20. Phish?” Fishman asked. “There would

Phish?” Fishman asked. “There would be no point to that… Try to have readers imagine it being the farthest thing from Phish, and if they think they want to go see it, they should.” If one could get a feel for the Touchpants experience, it’s no surprise that the band’s shows live up to whatever (moral?) standards it has been practicing for the last decade. They drink, they offend, they insult, but most importantly, they have a fun time doing the tongue-in-cheek humor that keeps both them and the crowd in high spirits. “We do write a set list, but it tends to deviate wildly from night to night based on the sheer amount of alcohol we intake and the crowd,” Dix said. “There’s a good amount of crowd interaction where essentially we’ll just kind of pick on any random female in the crowd. Regardless of what she looks like, we’ll call her ‘fat.’” Having an open-mind to humor is a key ingredient for its fans, and if one needs proof, have a look at the stage setup. “Put it this way – we’re sitting on toilets on stage,” Friday said. “Put that in your article; if you want to get close to Jon, think about sitting on a toilet.” “It’s childish s—t, but it’s a childish catharsis,” Fishman added. “We can just get together, have a good time, drink a little and are just idiots on f——-g stage, and every once in a while, the music is actually good.”

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Courtesy Photo To uchpants is a comedy-rock troupe that breaks the boundaries when it comes
Courtesy Photo
To uchpants is a comedy-rock troupe that breaks the boundaries when it comes to being vulgar
and offensive.

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

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13

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Misericordia University 10:05PM *Price is subject to change. www.martzgroup.com Glass Prism ‘Rock On’ By Sara
Misericordia University 10:05PM *Price is subject to change. www.martzgroup.com Glass Prism ‘Rock On’ By Sara

www.martzgroup.com

Glass Prism ‘Rock On’

By Sara Pokorny

Weekender Staff Writer

The words of Edgar Allan Poe are timeless, haunting, and undeniable beautiful, so it’s no wonder that The Glass Prism had no problem making a career out of being a band whose songs are based on those very works. The Glass Prism, now made up of core members Rick Richards, Tom Varano, and Lou Cossa with the addition of Fran Festa, Mike Mercuri, and Nancy Granziano for the April 27 album release party in Dickson City, originally hit the scene in the early 1960s. Poe was of interest to the group members, but they never knew it would turn into what it did. “We just came up with an idea to do the poem ‘The Raven,’ and we would play that song live with eight verses every night. It took forever, but people asked us to play it again,” Varano said. Interest was peaked and the band found themselves locked into a two- record deal with RCA. They put out “Poe Through the Glass Prism” and “On Joy and Sorrow,” the former of which featured “The Raven.” The single hit the Billboard, Cashbox, and Record World charts in 1969, a part of one of the very first concept albums ever made. The guys recorded the album at the studio of Les Paul, a man known not only for inventing the electric guitar, but for creating many of the concepts used in recording studios today, such as double and quadruple tracking, to start. The experience was one that Varano said would be hard to duplicate in this day and age. “The song ‘The Raven’ was recorded in one take at 5 o’clock in the morning; nothing happens like that any more, and that’s how it was with the whole album. We didn’t have things like pitch control, where you can make the person sound good even when they’re not. You either had it or you didn’t.” The Glass Prism had it, especially in a time when the music scene was being infiltrated by acts hailing from England. The guys went along great until a series of unfortunate events unfolded quickly, including the unraveling of the personal life of the band’s manager Mort Lewis,

“Rock On” dinner dance and CD release party with The Glass Prism: April 27, 5 p.m., Genetti Manor (1505 Main St., Dickson City). Buffet dinner 5-7 p.m. $39, VIP seating; $29, general admission. All tickets advance only and available through Genetti Manor (570.383.0206), Plotkin’s (570.343.2429 or 800.830.7463), Joe Tutino (570.457.2808), or Gallery of Sound (570.829.3603).

Tu tino (570.457.2808), or Gallery of Sound (570.829.3603). his subsequent disappearance from the industry, and the

his subsequent disappearance from the industry, and the loss of an opportunity to tour with Blood, Sweat and Tears when the tour fell through. Once poised for success, Prism disbanded in 1971 after the recording of the second album, which never netted the same success of the previous one. It was through another series of events, this time incredibly fortunate ones, that The Glass Prism found its way back together to make music again. Fans began to rediscover the group’s music through the Internet, and this soon snowballed into interest coming in from all angles, even so far as Asia. The group has been signed to a regional label called Debra Records and they just released a new album, “Resurrection,” which comes in a double packaging alongside the recording “Shenandoah – Sessions ‘73.” There have been reunion shows at the Mellow Theater, Scranton Culture Center, and Edgar Allan Poe National Historical Site in Philadelphia. Much of this renewed interest also stems from the airing of the documentary “On Joy and Sorrow: The Glass Prism Story,” which was shown on WVIA and Metrocast in September and October of 2012. It’s been quite the ride for the members of The Glass Prism, one that Varano recounts fondly and with verve. He said he is often quite stunned when thinking about it.

“It’s neat that people are still aware of a group that never became The Beatles or The Rolling Stones,” he said of his thought process when he looks back on the group’s career. “It’s been an amazing experience, and we’re happy to be back doing what we do.”

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back on the group’s career. “It’s been an amazing experience, and we’re happy to be back
back on the group’s career. “It’s been an amazing experience, and we’re happy to be back

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 14

album reviews

‘Losers’ a winner

Sometimes the most interesting listening experiences are provided by artists that you can’t quite put your finger on. Kyle Morgan is one such artist. Upon first listen, the Harrisburg-raised songwriter lays down not-so-subtle shades of Electric Light Orchestra’s Jeff Lynne – the brand of rootsy, Beatle- tinged arrangements and production Lynne brought to Fab Four offshoot projects like George Harrison’s solo work and The Traveling Wilburys. Morgan then proceeds to weave in and out of a Bob Dylan/The Band- inspired sage Americana evangelist vibe – dark, dirt road wisdom. What binds the consistency on Morgan’s “Starcrossed Losers,” though, is his unflinching ability

to dig within himself to not only reconcile past afflictions, no matter how painful, but provide a tentative peace with his tortured soul. When he tries hard enough, things even manage to come up pretty darn rosy. Best viewed through folk-colored lenses, the record is flavored with mandolin, fiddle, sax, and even banjo. Morgan succeeds in never sounding dated, due to his brilliant infusion of jangly power pop into his brand of Mississippi-strewn mud. Tracks like “Sorry” can pass as Delta power pop, with a big chorus amid subdued horns and a cotton field stomp a mile wide. “And I Wept” is a gorgeous McCartney- esque acoustic serenade with hints

of Everly Brothers influence, while “How They’re Rolling,” also of passive acoustic persuasion, is much darker – almost a classic Southern murder ballad feel with eerily placed vocal phrasing. “Dealing Twenties” displays Morgan’s brighter side, the open-chorded garage rock strum belies Morgan’s repetitious, “Any day now, we’ll see the truth.” Though there are nine preceding tracks filled with various degrees of heart spillage, one gets the feeling the essence of the album’s musical statement can be summed up in 1:24 of the album’s final cut, “Out of My Reach.” Morgan, through succinct solo acoustic guitar and voice, offers but two lines: “I’ve learned to see, some things are out of my reach / I’ve learned to keep, some things out of my reach,” – a learned sense of introspection, grounded expecta- tion, and musical preservation that rises far above Morgan’s 20-some- thing years. -Mark Uricheck, Weekender Cor- respondent

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Rating Kyle Morgan ‘Starcrossed Losers’ WWWW
Rating
Kyle Morgan
‘Starcrossed Losers’
WWWW
W Rating Kyle Morgan ‘Starcrossed Losers’ WWWW Fall Out Boy ‘Save Rock and Roll’ Rating W
Fall Out Boy ‘Save Rock and Roll’ Rating W W W V
Fall Out Boy
‘Save Rock and Roll’
Rating W W W V

Falling out of ‘Rock and Roll’

There is a weird twist of a fate in the title of Fall Out Boy’s latest record, “Save Rock and Roll,” that was released this week, in that it’s the band’s least “rock and roll” album yet. As the group is well-known for breaking through as a punk act, this latest release makes rock feel more like an idea than anything else. It does bring Fall Out Boy back to the pop music scene after a five-year hiatus that led to various side projects. It starts off with the

album’s second single and the most impres- sive track of the bunch, “The Phoenix.” It hits you hard with dramatic severity, almost like an

orchestra led by driving violins, and every two beats, big percussive thuds explode. Then, as singer Patrick Stump starts belting the vocals,

a fist-pumping kick drum starts to pulse; the

album kicks off with a battle cry. The next track, first single “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark (Light Em Up),” follows well in line. “Alone Together” is

carried at first solely by Stump’s defined voice and light pianos in the back, feeling ready for a down-tempo stadium sing-along before breaking into the full band and easily echoed backing vocals. The rest of the album rolls with consis- tency, though it is top-heavy with the three aforementioned tracks. “Young Volcanoes” may be the unsung hero that carries the album, as it is catchy enough for pop radio, yet still somewhat true to FOB’s roots. One thing that almost everyone expects

is the unique lyrics FOB brings to the table.

Juvenile in nature, lines like, “We are the jack- o’-lanterns in July, setting fire to the sky,” and “Cross walks and crossed hearts hope to die,” soak up the album. In the end, Fall Out Boy have created very little rock and roll with this album, let alone saved it. Instead of sticking to their reliable formula, the group decided to go in a different direction, which may not sit well with fans, but neither did taking five years off. In the end, with a new sound, Fall Out Boy may have instead saved themselves from a dud comeback. -Matt Morgis, We ekender Correspondent W

Yeah Yeah Yeahs ‘Mosquito’ Rating W V
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
‘Mosquito’
Rating W V

No No No to ‘Mosquito’

With its attention-grabbing cover art and incendiary lead single, “Mosquito,” seemed well poised to be the Ye ah Ye ah Ye ahs’ big compromise: a fluid mix of their pop song instincts and their undeniable rock chops that haven’t been seen since the days of “Fever to Tell.” The result, however, isn’t anything like that. In fact, “Mosquito” is without question the single worst album the band has ever released.

“Mosquito’s” flaws are numerous, but the root of the band’s problem is actually quite simple: amidst the Ye ahs’ excessive explora - tion of color and texture they neglected to tie any of these discoveries into any cohesive forms. From a production standpoint, “Mos- quito’s” tracks are expansive and big-sounding in a way that their previous songs haven’t been, but rarely does this flex of stadium mus- cle seem to be backed by any sort of intention

or motive; at its worse, “Mosquito” feels like a slapdash collection of songs for songs’ sake. Although the title track is flooded with tribal drumming (bringing back immediate echoes of …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead’s “Wasted State of Mind”) and

a nice little chorus riff, Karen O’s lyrics are

remarkably indistinctive: “Mosquito sing / Mosquito cry / Mosquito live / Mosquito die / Mosquito drink / Most anything / Whatever’s left / Mosquito scream,” all before launching into a chorus that consists of nothing but the line, “I’ll suck your blood!” It’s a weak meta- phor, no matter how amusingly O manages to imitate a mosquito sound post-chorus. They very well could’ve taken the pop music mastercourse that was “Blitz!” and tossed it in the mud and wrestled around with

it a bit, but the Ye ahs’ curiosity ultimately got

the better of them, and what we’re left with is an album that bears a lot of attributes with the creature it’s named after: it doesn’t follow a

set path, makes a lot of noise in your ears, but it’s ultimately something you’ll want to swat away and get rid of because of just how badly

it annoys you.

-Evan Sawdey, PopMatters

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charts

how badly it annoys you. -Evan Sawdey, PopMatters W c harts Top 8 at 8 with
how badly it annoys you. -Evan Sawdey, PopMatters W c harts Top 8 at 8 with

Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa

8.

Olly Murs/Flo Rida:

4.

Maroon 5: ‘Daylight’

‘Troublemaker’

3.

Bruno Mars: ‘ When I

7.

6.

The Lumineers: ‘Ho Hey’

Imagine Dragons: ‘It’s

Time’

5. Calvin Harris/Florence

Welch: ‘Sweet Nothing’

Was Your Man’

2.

Justin Timberlake/Jay-Z:

‘Suit & Tie’

1. P!nk/Nate Ruess: ‘Just

Give Me a Reason’

& Tie’ 1. P!nk/Nate Ruess: ‘Just Give Me a Reason’ Top 10 Albums at Gallery of
& Tie’ 1. P!nk/Nate Ruess: ‘Just Give Me a Reason’ Top 10 Albums at Gallery of

Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound

1. Volbeat: ‘Outlaw Gentlemen

Human Being’

& Shady Ladies’

2. Farley: ‘Squaring Circles’

3. Stone Sour: ‘House Of Gold

& Bones’

4. Device: ‘Device’

5. Lil Wayne: ‘V.II I Am Not A

6. Paramore: ‘Paramore’

7. Brad Paisley: ‘Wheelhouse

8. Pink: ‘Truth About Love’

9. Fun: ‘Some Nights’

10. Rihanna: ‘Unapologetic’

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

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15

speak and see

POETIC Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga ST., Tunkhannock:

570.996.1500)

• Creative CharaCters from PaPer to

PuPPets: ages 5-12. aPril 23, 30, may 7, 4-5 P.m.

Everhart Museum (1901 mulberry st., sCranton, Pa, 570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum. org)

• everhart reads book Club: aPril 18. to register Call 570.346.7186. The Osterhout Free Library

(71 s. franklin st., wilkes-barre, www. osterhout.info, 570.821.1959)

• franklin street sleuths: aPril 18, 6:30 P.m.

VISUAL AFA Gallery (514 laCkawanna ave., sCranton:

570.969.1040 or artistsforart.org)

gallery hours thurs.-sat., 12-5 P.m.

• keystone College senior exhibition:

through aPril 27

• time and landsCaPe by kathe frantz:

through aPril 27 ArtWorks Gallery (502 laCkawanna ave., sCranton. 570.207.1815, artworksnePa.Com)

gallery hours: tues.-fri., 11 a.m.-5 P.m., sat., noon-3 P.m., or by aPPointment.

• keystone College senior exhibition:

through aPril 27. B & B Art Gallery

(222 northern blvd., s. abington town- shiP)

• anna ostaPiw exhibit: oPening reCeP-

tion aPril 19, 5-8 P.m. art talk aPril 28, 2 P.m.

Converge Gallery (140 w. fourth st., williamsPort, 570.435.7080, Convergegallery. Com)

• “susPended in time,” featuring tradi-

tional, landsCaPe and CitysCaPe Paint- ings with a twist: through aPril 27. Everhart Museum (1901 mulberry st., sCranton, Pa, 570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum. org) admission $5 adults; $3 students/se-

niors; $2 Children 6-12; members free.

• “the blood is the life: vamPires in art & nature:” through July 2.

• “what’s in the Cloud? bats on the

atlantiC Coast:” on disPlay through July 2.

• va mPires at the afa g allery, showing of “the hunger,” may 22, 6-8 P.m. ages 18 and uP.

• dark shadows: silhouette work-

shoP: may 29-6-8 P.m. $25, museum members; $30, non-members. Pre- registration required. The Linder Gallery at Keystone College

(570.945.8335, keystone.edu/linder- gallery)

• “kellesimone waits: antithesis:” through aPril 28. Marquis Art & Frame (122 s. main st., wilkes-barre,

570.823.0518)

Send your listings to WB- Wnews@civitasmedia.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-

Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Print listings occur up until three weeks from publication date.

“the tv show:” aPril 5-may 1. oPening

reCePtion aPril 5, 6-8:30 P.m. Moscow Clayworks northeast Pennsylvania Professors of CeramiC arts exhibit: runs through end of June.

New Visions Studio & Gallery (201 vine st., sCranton, www.newvi- sionstudio.Com, 570.878.3970) gallery hours: tues.-sun., noon-6 P.m. and by aPPointment.

• “under the sea:” through aPril 26. Pauly Friedman Art Gallery

(miseriCordia university, 570.674.6250,

miseriCordia.edu/art)

gallery hours: mon. Closed, tue.-

thurs. 10 a.m.-8 P.m., fri. 10 a.m.-5 P.m., sat.-sun. 1-5 P.m.

• “reCent landsCaPes,” a thomas

staPleton exhibit: oPening reCePtion

aPril 6, 5-8 P.m. runs aPril 6 to June 7.

• “Pennsylvania from above,” aerial

PhotograPhy: oPening reCePtion aPril

6, 5-8 P.m. runs through June 2. Sordoni Art Gallery (150 s. river st., wilkes-barre, 570.408.4325) gallery hours: tues.-

sun., noon-4:30 P.m.

• “flow,” a gallery that exPlores the

many meanings assoCiated with water through a seleCtion of twenty-nine works drawn from the ColleCtion of the sheldon museum of art at the university of nebraska-linColn. Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of lCCC CamPus Center, 1333 s. ProsPeCt st., nantiCoke, www.luzerne.edu/sChulmangallery,

570.740.0727)

gallery hours: mon.-fri., 9 a.m.-5 P.m.

• a ColleCtion of two masters, Pho-

tograPhy by miChael molnar and sam Cramer: aPril 5-may 2.

Weinberg Memorial Library

(university of sCranton)

• “Penmen, artists and eduCators: 125 years of thezaner-bloser PenmanshiP ComPany:” through aPril 14.

• earth week environmental art show:

aPril 18-25 Widmann Gallery

(loCated in king’s College’s sheehy- farmer CamPus Center between north franklin and north main streets, wilkes-barre, 570.208.5900, ext. 5328) gallery hours: mon. through fri. 9

a.m. to 4:30 P.m., sat. and sun. as ar- ranged. free and oPen to the PubliC.

• 25th annual king’s student exhibi-

tion: aPril 15-may 4. oPening reCePtion aPril 17, 6-8 P.m.

ExPANDED LISTINGS AT ThEWEEKENDEr.COM. W

Cole’s comeback

By Sara Pokorny

Weekender Staff Writer

“Where have all the cowboys gone?” It’s a simple inquiry that im- mediately conjures up a catchy tune and the powerful vocals that belong to Paula Cole. Cou- ple that 1997 hit with another chart-topping tune, “Dawson’s Creek” theme song “I Don’t Want to Wait,” and you’ve got a singer/songwriter who rocketed up the charts in no time. However, Cole’s flame quick- ly went out in 1999 when she stepped out of the industry to care for some personal matters, leaving her on the sidelines until

her comeback studio album, aptly named “Courage,” in 2007. The Grammy winner and seven-time Grammy nominee has put out several bodies of work since then and just recently

forayed into independent territo-

ry with her self-produced album “Raven,” due out April 23.

We caught up with Cole as she

was days away from embark- ing on a tour in support of the album, a string of shows that will land her at Mauch Chunk Opera House (14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe) on April 20.

THE WEEKENDER: “Ra- ven” is the first time you’ve released something indepen- dently. Why did you choose that route and how has that experience been? PAULA COLE: I wanted to do it my way, even if that was a smaller way. It would be freeing to be a primary decision maker, and it involved all aspects, whether it deals with the cover

or even if photo shoots weren’t so fashion-y. I can really let the album content flow; I don’t have any record company influence in the control room. I’m spinning more plates, of course, and it involves more entrepreneurial skill, but I should be able to handle that now. I’m so happy about it, and it makes sense with the paradigm shift of record companies folding, merging, collapsing. There’s a real op- portunity for artists to go their own way. Some have been doing it for a while, and I wish I had done it sooner. W: How does the sound of “Raven” differ from your previous works? PC: I’m so inside my own head that it’s hard for me to say exactly, but the feedback I’m getting from fans is that it reminds them a lot of “This Fire” (released in 1996), and I understand why because there’s storytelling and that rock ele- ment, and it’s also self-produced and not overproduced; it’s very organic. W: Where do you draw inspiration from when writing songs? PC: I keep it very diverse so that I keep songwriting fresh. I liken it to a conversation be- tween the left brain and the right brain hemispheres. Ye s, there are flashes of inspiration that are largely right-brained and fabu- lous, but not all writing is like that. Sometimes you do need the organizational left brain to come in and help you, start you down a different path of your writing inspiration. Sometimes it’s journaling, life experience, a homework assignment, or even

Paula Cole: April 20, 8 p.m., Mauch Chunk Opera House (14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe). $32.

Chunk Opera House (14 W. Broadway , Jim Thorpe). $32. just fingers on the keyboard or

just fingers on the keyboard or guitar. It’s random, and I like that it’s diverse. W: You took quite a bit of time off. Did you know you were going to come back to the music scene eventually, or was that a decision you would go back and forth on? PC: I was always bouncing

it back and forth in my head.

There were immediate needs that needed to be addressed, like my little daughter who was sick, an unhappy marriage that I need- ed to get out of, and a couple of moves; all these things were put ahead of my career. I missed music terribly. I would make it in the home; I tried making an album a couple times, but that

didn’t fly. I think I was scared

about going back in public. I had so many mixed feelings about my first career. It happened too quickly and it became a thing

I didn’t’ like. As a thoughtful

introvert, I was uncomfortable

with the quick escalation and the falling down. All of it was just mean and harsh and I always saw myself as more of a dark horse with a long ramp-up and

a slow build and a nice long

career. I feel like the whole thing was traumatic and ill-fitted to who I really was. W: So what finally gave you that push to give it another shot? PC: I realized my life isn’t complete without music. I was making music at home, but that wasn’t enough without it reach- ing people. If you’re sitting on

a gift, a talent, a proclivity that

gives you joy and gives other people joy, that gives your life meaning, and then it becomes this evil, torturous puppet head inside of you, causing you great depression, well, you just need to use it. Yo u need to use your gifts in this world or else you go crazy. My life wasn’t full and music makes me strong: forming it, writing it, being in front of people, meeting people – all of this makes me a more empow- ered me, and then other aspects of my life go well. If that’s alive and well and in harmony with my personal life, it’s wonderful.

W

Courtesy Photo Singer/songwriter Paula Cole, who rose to fame in the late ‘90s, feels more
Courtesy Photo
Singer/songwriter Paula Cole, who rose to fame in the late
‘90s, feels more comfortable with the second go-round of
her musical career, relaunched in 2007.

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 16

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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 17 812582
WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013
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17
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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 18

concerts

, WEDNESD AY , APRIL 17 , 20 13 PA GE 18 c oncerts ALICE C.

ALICE C. WILTSIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (700 N. WyomiNg St., HazletoN)

570.861.0510, WiltSieceNter.org

• Fiddler on the rooF: April 17, 7 p.m., $27-$52 16TH ANNUAL BRIGGS FARM BLUESFEST (88 old Berwick hwy., nescopeck) 570.379.3342, BriggsFArm.com

• FeAturing lurrie Bell, more: July 12-13, $28-$90 BREWS BROTHERS WEST 75 mAin st., luzerne

570.283.1300

tickets At ticketFly. com, venue or pittston locAtion At 1705 river st. stArdog chAmpion: April 27, 8 p.m.

$10.

AAron cArter: June 1, 8 p.m. $18, AdvAnce. $20, dAy oF show. Queensryche: June 11, 8 p.m., $21, AdvAnce. $23, dAy oF show. 10 yeArs: mAy 19, 6 p.m $13, Ad- vAnce; $15, dAy oF show. FACTORY THEATER

(school And Apple streets, nurem- Berg)

570.384.3648, nuremBergplAyers.org

• 70’s FlAshBAck: April 20, 7:30 p.m., $15, purchAse tickets At FAirwAy mo- torS, HazletoN F. M. KIRBY CENTER (71 puBlic sQuAre, wilkes-BArre) 570.826.1100, kirBycenter.org

• scotty mccreery: April 20, 8 p.m.,

$49-$99

• nepA philhArmonic: “symphonie

FAntAstiQue:” April 26, 8 p.m., $34-$65

• JoAn rivers: April 27, 8 p.m., $39-$47

• steve mArtin & the steep cAnyon rAngers: July 2, 8 p.m., $59-$95 MAUCH CHUNK OPERA HOUSE (14 w. BroAdwAy, Jim thorpe) 570.325.0249, mAuchchunkoperA- house.com

• willy porter: April 19, 8:30 p.m., $23

pAulA cole BAnd: April 20, 8 p.m.,

$32

• kAloB griFFin BAnd: April 26, 8:30 p.m., $18

ley: April 26-28, times vAry, $33-93

• shinedown / Bush: April 30, 8 p.m.,

$25-$40

MOUNT AIRY CASINO RESORT

(44 woodlAnd rd., mount pocono) 877.682.4791, mountAirycAsino.com

wAr: April 20, 8 p.m., $30-40

• sugAr heAt: mAy 4, 8 p.m., $10

pArrot BeAch: mAy 26, 7 p.m. NEW VISIONS STUDIO & GALLERY (201 vine st., scrAnton) 570.878.3970, newvisionsstudio.com

• eye on AttrAction / AtlAs Arrows /

stAtic in the Attic / in writing: April 19, 8 p.m., $7.

• shAyFer JAmes / wiccA phAse /

AstoriAn stigmAtA / stereo cliQue:

April 26, 8 p.m., $7.

• where horizons meet / As we whis-

per / silhouette lies / oFF the coAst:

April 27, 8 p.m., $7. PENN’S PEAK (325 mAury rd., Jim thorpe) 866.605.7325, pennspeAk.com

• southside Johnny & the AsBury

Jukes: April 19, 8 p.m., $22

• rAgdoll: triBute to FrAnkie vAlli

And the Four seAsons: April 24-25,

1 p.m.

• JAmey Johnson: April 26, 8 p.m.,

$30-$35

• tommy dorsey orchestrA: mAy 1-2,

1 p.m.

tAnyA tucker: mAy 4, 8 p.m., $29-$44

• BrAnson Fever: country roots show: mAy 7-9, 1 p.m.

• eddie money with speciAl guest

gAry u.s. Bonds: mAy 10, 8 p.m.

• king henry And the showmen: mAy

14-16, 1 p.m.

• dArk stAr orchestrA, mAy 17, 8 p.m.

• lee Brice: mAy 30, 8 p.m.

• skid row with guests sAlivA And l.A. guns: mAy 31, 8 p.m.

• rockApellA: June 7, 8 p.m.

• the FAB Four: BeAtles triBute: June

14, 8 p.m., $29

• the zomBies: June 20, 8 p.m., $27

• hAppy together tour: June 27, 8 p.m., $39-$44

• kAshmir: the ultimAte led zeppelin

dooBie Brothers: July 7, 8 p.m.

show: April 27, 8 p.m., $23

7 Bridges: July 12, 8 p.m., $22

• cAst oF BeAtlemAniA: mAy 4, 8 p.m.,

ArrivAl, the music oF ABBA: July 14,

$27

8

p.m.

• lindsAy lou And the FlAtBellys:

george Jones: Aug. 22, 8 p.m., $55-

mAy 10, 8:30 p.m., $17

$65

• stArt mAking sense: mAy 11, 8 p.m.,

$17

• commAnder cody / proFessor

louie And the crowmAtix: mAy 18, 8 p.m., $25

• childhood’s end: pink Floyd triB- ute: mAy 25, 8 p.m., $23

• crAig thAtcher’s sAlute to the Filmore: June 15, 8 p.m., $23

• kAshmir: the ultimAte led zeppelin show: July 13, 8 p.m.

• incendio: July 20, 8 p.m., $23 MOHEGAN SUN ARENA

(255 highlAnd pArk Blvd., wilkes- BArre) 800.745.3000, mohegAnsunArenApA. com

• ringling Bros. And BArnum & BAi-

• glenn miller orchestrA: sept.

17-19, 1 p.m.

• the swing dolls: triBute to An-

drews sisters And mcguire sisters:

oct. 1-3, 1 p.m.

• king henry And the showmen: oct. 15-17, 12 p.m.

• reAl diAmond: neil diAmond triB-

ute: oct. 23-24, 1 p.m.

• gordon lightFoot: oct. 26, 8 p.m. PENNSYLVANIA BLUES FESTIVAL

(Blue mountAin ski AreA, pAlmerton) 610.826.7700, skiBluemt.com

• FeAturing roBert rAndolph &

the FAmily BAnd, more: July 26-28,

$30-$449

RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE

(667 n. river st., plAins)

570.822.2992, riverstreetJAzzcAFe.

com5

• touchpAnts: April 18, 10 p.m., $20

• ol’ cABBAge: “An evening oF phish”:

April 19, 10 p.m., $5

• Bernie worrell orchestrA: April 20, 10 p.m., $8

• spAce Jesus / greenhouse lounge:

April 25, 10 p.m., $8

• stArt mAking sense: tAlking heAds

triBute: April 27, 10 p.m., $8

• lAunch pAd: mAy 2, 10 p.m., $8

• consider the source / mystery

Fyre: mAy 3, 10 p.m., $10

• leroy Justice: mAy 4, 10 p.m., $10

• AstoriAn stigmAtA / grips oF god /

the ends oF eArth: mAy 11, 10 p.m., $8

• exodus: “A Journey through BoB

mArley’s music”: mAy 18, 10 p.m., $10

• BoB dylAn BirthdAy BAsh: nAthyn

knott / BeFore the Flood: mAy 24, 10 p.m., $10

• keystone revisited: merl sAunders

/ Jerry gArciA: mAy 26, 8 p.m., $18

• clArence spAdy All stAr BAnd:

triBute to prince: June 1, 10 p.m., $12

• royAl scAm: steely dAn triBute:

June 8, 10 p.m., $8

• keller williAms: June 14, 10 p.m.,

$25

• the kinsey report: July 11, 10 p.m.

$10

• the AristocrAts: July 31, 8 p.m., $20 SCRANTON COMMUNITY CONCERTS

(mellow theAter, 501 vine st.,

ScraNtoN)

570.955.1455, lAckAwAnnA.edu, etix.

com prices vAry, student And group

rAtes AvAilABle

• the Four Freshmen: April 20, 8 p.m.,

$25-$30, $15 students SCRANTON CULTURAL CENTER

(420 n. wAshington Ave., scrAnton)

888.669.8966, scrAntonculturAlcen- ter.org

• “the view” with A scrAnton At-

titude: April 26, 7 p.m., $6

• listen locAl FeAturing A sociAl

stAte: mAy 3, 8 p.m., $10

• the FrAnklin institute series: mAy 6-10, 10 A.m.

• “dreAmgirls:” mAy 10-12, times

vAry, $37-57

• nepA philhArmonic: “mAestro At

the movies:” June 8, 8 p.m., $34-$65 SHERMAN THEATER (524 mAin st., stroudsBurg)

570.420.2808, shermAntheAter.com

• three dAys grAce / pop evil: April

19, 8 p.m., $25

• chris young: April 20, 8 p.m., $25-

$35

• steel pAnther: April 26, 8 p.m., $20

• opeth / kAtAtoniA: April 27, 7 p.m.,

$23

• volBeAt / All thAt remAins / eye

empire: mAy 6, 7 p.m., $28

• Asking AlexAndriA: mAy 8, 6 p.m., $33

• tim decker live: A rock n roll Art experience: mAy 10, 8 p.m., $15

• stephen lynch: mAy 17, 8 p.m., $30

• Bullet For my vAlentine / hAlestorm: mAy 19, 8 p.m., $30

• hollywood undeAd: mAy 22, 7 p.m.,

$23

Scotty McCr eery will take the stage at the F. M. Kirby Cen- ter (71
Scotty McCr eery will take the stage at the F. M. Kirby Cen-
ter (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre) come April 20 at 8 p.m.
Tickets are between $49 and $99. For more information,
contact 570.826.1100 or visit kirbycenter.org.

• dropkick murphys: June 11, 8 p.m.,

$30

• electric hot tunA: July 25, 8 p.m. TOYOTA PAVILION AT MONTAGE MOUNTAIN

1000 montAge mountAin roAd, ScraNtoN

• old FArmers BAll FeAturing cABi- net: mAy 11. $25.50; $64, vip.

• dAve mAtthews BAnd: mAy 29.

$40.50-$75.

• steAmtown Beer And music Festi- vAl: June 15.

• rockstAr energy drink mAyhem

FestivAl: July 13. $31.50-$60.50

• vAns wArped tour: July 16. $35.

• victoriA Justice: Aug. 2. $45-$80.

• peAch music FestivAl: Aug. 15. $35.

• JAson AldeAn: Aug. 25. $31.50-

$61.25.

VINTAGE THEATER (326 spruce st., scrAnton)

570.589.0271, scrAntonsvintAgeth- eater.com

• A Fire with Friends ep releAse, with speciAl guests eww yABoo And leFt & right: April 20, 8 p.m. $8.

• the greAt pArty / useless BeAuty:

April 26, 7 p.m., $8

PHILADELPHIA ELECTRIC FACTORY (3421 willow st., philAdelphiA)

215.love.222, electricFActory. inFo

• sevendust / coAl chAmBer: April

18, 7 p.m.

• suicidAl tendencies / sick oF it All

/ d.r.i. / wAking the deAd: April 19, 8:30 p.m.

• All time low / pierce the veil: April 21-22, 6:30 p.m.

• the hooters / good old wAr: April

27, 8:30 p.m.

• BAssnector: mAy 1-2, 8 p.m.

• FoAls / surFer Blood / BlondFire:

mAy 4, 8:30 p.m.

• Bullet For my vAlentine /

hAlestorm / young guns / stArs in stereo: April 5, 6 p.m.

• needtoBreAthe / drew holcomB

And the neighBors: mAy 8, 8:30 p.m.

• clutch / the sword / lionize: mAy

17, 8 p.m.

• soJA: mAy 18, 8:30 p.m.

• AlkAline trio: mAy 23, 8 p.m.

FAll out Boy: mAy 30, 8 p.m.

• the dAndy wArhols: June 1, 8:30

p.m.

tAme impAlA: June 19, 8 p.m.

• evercleAr / live / Filter / sponge:

June 20, 9 p.m.

THE FILLMORE AT THE TLA (334 south st., philAdelphiA) 215.922.1011, tlAphilly. com

• steel pAnther: April 16, 8 p.m.

• AnthrAx: April 18, 6 p.m.

• collie Buddz “light it up” tour:

April 19, 9 p.m.

• keller williAms with more thAn A little: April 20, 8 p.m.

• gogo morrow: April 24, 8 p.m. KESWICK THEATRE

(291 north keswick Ave., glenside) 215.572.7650, keswicktheAtre.com

• B.B. king: April 17, 7:30 p.m.

• greAt Big seA: April 18, 7:30 p.m.

• steve wilson oF porcupine tree:

April 19, 8 p.m.

• Billy BrAgg: April 20, 8 p.m.

• JAke shimABukuro / leo kottke:

April 21, 7:30 p.m.

• Boney JAmes: April 24, 8 p.m.

• tower oF power / AverAge white

BAnd: April 26, 8 p.m.

• motown meets rock & roll: April 28, 3 p.m.

• the BAcon Brothers: mAy 3, 8 p.m.

• the temptAtions & the Four tops:

mAy 10, 8 p.m.

• storm lArge: mAy 11, 8 p.m.

• the B-52s: June 7, 8 p.m.

• hot tunA (Acoustic): June 14, 8 p.m.

• the turtles FeAturing Flo & eddie,

chuck negron, gAry puckett & the union gAp, more: June 19, 7:30 p.m.

• dAvid sAnBorn & BoB JAmes: June 28, 8 p.m.

• steve hAckett: genesis revisited:

oct. 11, 8 p.m. TOWER THEATER

(19 south 69th st., upper dArBy) 610.352.2887, tower-theAtre.com

• chris tucker: mAy 10, 8 p.m.

TROCADERO THEATRE (1003 Arch st., philAdelphiA)

215.336.2000, thetroc.com

• the legwArmers: April 27, 9 p.m.

• Johnny mArr: April 30, 8 p.m.

• the Breeders: mAy 5, 8 p.m.

• the dArkness: mAy 15, 8 p.m.

• Josh ritter / Felice Brothers: mAy 16, 7:30 p.m.

• JuAnes: June 21, 8 p.m.

• luciAno: July 20, 9 p.m.

• the mission uk: sept. 4, 8 p.m.

ExPANDED LISTINGS AT

THEWEEKENDER.COM. W

810637

812137

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COME PARTY W/ ONE OF THE AREA’S BEST CLASSIC ROCK BANDS AND A CHANCE TO WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS TO SEE KID ROCK AT THE TOYOTA PAVILION AT MONTAGE FROM THE WEEKENDER

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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 19 Sun The JEANNE ZANO Band CheckCheck outout
WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013
PAGE
19
Sun
The
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CheckCheck outout NEPNEPA’sA’s tripletriple threatthreat partyparty bandband —— ToTopp 4040 CountryCountry,, ROCKROCK andand Pop.Pop.
PlayingPlaying everythingeverything fromfrom Sugarland,Sugarland, LadyLady Antebellum,Antebellum, andand ZacZac BrownBrown BandBand toto
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Sat. April 20 - Chicken Coop, Wilkes-Barre - 9:00pm
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Fri. May 3 - The Metro Bar & Grille, Dallas - 9:00pm
Sat. May 4 - Opening West Pittston Cherry Blossom Festival - Susquehanna
River Bank, West Pittston - 12:00 noon
Sat. May 11- My Lower End Bar & Restaurant, Larksville - 9:00pm
Fri. May 17 - PA LIVE!! WBRE-TV Channel 28 ~ 4:00-5:00pm
Fri. May 17 - Private Party, Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre
SATURDAY, MAY 18 - JZB 4th ANNIVERSARY BASH - COOPER’S CABANA &
TIKI BAR - with special guest “No Vacancy” Special NO COVER night in
thanks to our JZB fans, drink specials and JZB giveaways!! 7:00-11:00pm
Fri. May 24 - Exaltation of Holy Cross Church Big Tent Bazaar - Buttonwood,
Hanover Twp. - with Sweet Pepper & The Long Hots - JZB from 6:30-8:30pm
DOWNLOADDOWNLOAD OUROUR APPS:APPS:
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CALLCALL JEANNEJEANNE 570-905-1946570-905-1946 oror
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Jeanne’sJeanne’s CDCD “Here“Here II Am”Am” availableavailable atat allall JoeJoe
NardoneNardone GalleryGallery ofof SoundSound andand WaWayne’syne’s WoWorldrld
locationslocations asas wellwell asas allall herher performancesperformances andand
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812581
810005

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 20

Saturday: Wednesday: Arturo’s: Alibi Bar on Oak: Line Dancing Bar on Oak: 3 Imaginary Boys
Saturday:
Wednesday:
Arturo’s: Alibi
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Bar on Oak: 3 Imaginary Boys
Bart and Urby’s: Musicians Showcase w/ A.J. Jump
Bart and Urby’s: The Bomb
Hops and Barley’s: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Stealing Neil @ 9:30
Liam’s: Karaoke with A&B Karaoke
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Two of a Kind
L ower End: Free Jukebox
Chacko’s: Cool Ride
Metro: Karaoke w/ Joe 8
-12
Charlie B’s: 3 rd Degree @9
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
The Green Frog: 80’s Prom
Ruth’s Chris: Live music in the lounge
Liam’s: Cody Albert from Standoff, The Red Barons, Bet
ty Harlot Duo, Queeftpnes &
Thirst T’s: Open Mic w/ Graces Downfall 9
-12
Badtown Rude
Thursday:
Lower End: Rusty Nutz
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Metro: Slap & Tickle 9
-1
Bart and Urby’s: Trivia Night
Plymouth Rock Bar: Sister Esther
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: The Bomb @8
Puzzles: The Switch
Carey’s Pub: Pat Hanlon & Eric Hoffman w/ dance music
River Street Jazz Caféé: Bernie Worrell Orchestra
Chacko’s: Kartune
Rox 52: 40lb Head
Huns’ Caféé West: What’s Going On Duo
Senunas’: DJ Hersh
Liam’s: DJ Ricky David
Stan’s Caféé: Karl Metzger w/ Special Guest Bill Space from The Great Rock Scare
L ower End: Tracey Dee/Cee
9:30
-1:30
Metro: College Night w/ DJ RKH 9
-1
Screwballz: Weekender Night Out w/ Mr. Echo
River Street Jazz Caféé: Touchpants ft Jon Fishman of Phish
Thirst T’s: Farley 9:30
-1:30
with opening act Sonic Spank @10
Tommy Boys: DJ Johnny Holiday
Thirst T’s: Acoustic Night w/ Ron from the Wannabees 8
-12
Woodlands: Club H
D inside Evolution Nightclub w/ DJ DATA. Streamside bandstand
- The Warehouse at Twentyfiveeight Studios: Farley cd release party w/ special guests
DJ KEV
- Hosted by 9
7 BHT
Graces Downfall, A Fire w/ Friends and The Push
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub
- DJ Davey B & DJ Kev the Rev playing Top 40 & Club
Friday:
Music w/ Host “Fishboy” of 98.5 KRZ & Into The Spin Streamside Bandstand &
Arturo’s: Time Machine
Executive Lounge
Bar on Oak: All Mixed Up
Vesuvio’s: Upper Echelon
Bart and Urby’s: Jazz with Stingray at 6:30p/ Dustin Lemongelli
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Mr. Echo@ 9:30
Sunday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: DJ Ooh Wee 90’s Night
Carey’s Pub: Karaoke w/ DJ Santiago
Chacko’s: F
laxy Morgan
The Getaway Lounge: Mr. Echo
Charlie B’s: Country Outlaw Jesse Wade @9
The Green Frog: Model Search 2p
The Green Frog: Karaoke
Metro: Strawberry Jam 8
-?
Grot
to, Harveys Lake: Strawberry Jam
Grot
to, Wyoming Valley Mall: Sperazzo Duo
Woodlands: 40 Something w/ DJ Mike “The Godfather”
Liam’s: Zayre Mountain
L ower End: Tracey Dee/Cee
Monday:
Metro: Big Daddy Dex 6
-9/ I am Buffalo 9
-1
The Green Frog: Beer Pong Tournament
Plymouth Rock Bar: DJ EFX
Plymouth Rock Bar: NEPA Beer Pong
River Street Jazz Caféé: Ol’ Cabbage ‘an evening of Phish’
Senunas’: Audio Affair Duo
Tuesday:
Stan’s Caféé: Stingray 9:30
-1:30
The Green Frog: DJ Rek’d
Thirst T’s: Friend of the Gypsy 9
-1
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Tommy Boys: Iron Cowboy
Jim McCarthy’s: Wanna B’s Karaoke
Woodlands: The NEPA Black & Blue Ball to Benefit Muscular Dystrophy Assoc. ft the
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band Into The Spin. Evolution Nightclub
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Starwood, MSI have weird, wild evening By Rich Howells Weekender Editor REVIEW “Let’s just get
Starwood, MSI have
weird, wild evening
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
REVIEW
“Let’s just get this opening band
over with!” an impatient Mindless
Self Indulgence fan complained
from the front row of the Electric
Factory stage in Philadelphia on
Sunday, April 14.
Once the otherworldly mem-
bers of Starwood took the stage
at 8 p.m., however, this cry was
quickly silenced and replaced with
awe. Opening acts, even locals,
are often met with indifference
or derision, but the Philly-based
quintet won the early crowd over
with their theatrical cyber art rock
that “stole the show” even before
the rest of it began, in another
fan’s words.
The band has roots in Scranton,
but one wouldn’t know it when its
members are in character, dressed
in black and silver with shiny,
reflective mirrors adorning their
futuristic gear. All hidden behind
masks or visors, only frontman
Gabriel Starwood removed his
sparkling helmet to reveal a hu-
man face, though he claimed to
be a cyborg from the planet Vitrus
merely mimicking human emotion
through an avatar before breaking
into “The Dig.”
The tongue-in-cheek story of
saving their planet told through
their music in songs like “Plea
from a Tailgunner” and “God
of the Drones” connected to the
largely young goth and raver
crowd, many dressed in distinc-
tive outfits of their own. Having
only played small bars and clubs
up until now, Starwood didn’t
waste their first big break in front
of self-aware MSI fans by keeping
things light yet dramatic through
Gabriel’s peculiar mix of robotic
banter with the audience and con-
vulsive dancing.
Culminating their six-song set
with “Dr. Robespierre’s Cure for
the Lonely,” which is to lob off the
Photo by Rich Howells
Space-centric Starwood was
just one fraction of the wild fes-
tivities at the Electric Factory.
heads of those with no one to love,
and “Love Your Lawnmower,”
which asks you to care for the ma-
chines that may one day be used to
build your own cybernetic parts,
the laughs gave way to apprecia-
tion for the melody and musician-
ship behind these tunes that had
many buzzing even after the show.
This stood in stark contrast to
the subsequent performance by
Death Spells, an electronic hard-
core duo formed by ex-My Chemi-
cal Romance guitarist/backup vo-
calist Frank Iero along with punk
and hardcore multi-instrumentalist
James Dewees. With only a guitar
and laptop in front of a screen dis-
playing random projected images,
the silhouetted pair’s odd mix of
floor-rumbling beats and pierc-
ing screeches confused and bored
onlookers coming off the high of a
much more engaging and harmoni-
ous set.
It took a matter of seconds
for Mindless Self Indulgence to
correct this, exploding on stage
with “Witness” and “Shut Me
Up.” Singer Jimmy Urine, dressed
in black and white from head to
toe, seemed to absorb every bit
of energy in the room and push it
right back onto the crowd, though
his colorful bandmates – guitarist
Steve, Righ?, bassist Lyn-Z, and
drummer Kitty – helped keep up
the dizzying pace.
As flamboyant and irrever-
ent as his lyrics, Urine cracked
unpredictable jokes (“I’m not the
devil – I’m just a very smart goat!”
he said as he donned a pair of
red horns) as he bounced around
through 20 songs with little time to
breathe, though the first few verses
of an a capella version of Method
Man’s “Bring the Pain” from 1999
debut “Tight” was the perfect way
to do so.
Despite the official release date
of the next Kickstarter-funded
album, “How I Learned to Stop
Giving a S—t and Love Mindless
Self Indulgence,” being May 14,
many already knew the lyrics to
the six new songs, which blended
well with an even mix of selec-
tions from the last three records.
Turning the floor into equal parts
dance party and mosh pit, the
synthpunkers ended with “F——t”
and “Bitches” before an encore of
“Straight to Video.”
Urine stayed long after to sign
autographs and take pictures right
along with Starwood, showing that
you’re never too big to hang with
the little (but hopefully soon to be
big) guy.
W
PAGE 22
WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013
too big to hang with the little (but hopefully soon to be big) guy. W PAGE

WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE

23

movie review

Forced inspiration

By Pete Croatto

Weekender Correspondent Rating: W W

In “42,” Jackie Robinson gets the performance he deserves from Chadwick Boseman, who exudes quiet strength and dignity, the char- acteristics that defined Robinson’s success (and survival) as the first African American in major league baseball. What a shame that “42” uses Robinson’s historical impact as a springboard for queasy melo- drama and hollow apologies about the past. The year is 1945. World War II has ended and Brooklyn Dodgers’ general manager Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) is eager to use Af- rican American baseball talent. His reasons are not quite humanitarian. There’s a black group of fans the team is neglecting and “every dollar is green.” Once Rickey’s associates pick up their jaws from the floor, they help him pore over candidates

for this grand experiment. Robinson has the talent and the real world background. As a multi- sports star at UCLA, he played with and against whites. Integrity isn’t an issue. Robinson refused to sit in the back of an Army bus in Texas, an act that led to his court mar- tial. “He’s a troublemaker,” a wag says. “If he were white,” Rickey responds, “we’d call that ‘spirit.’” Whatever you call it allows Rob- inson to endure every shade of rac- ism in the minors before making the majors in 1947. Tolerance still lags far behind. Robinson must win over opponents, his teammates, fans, and practically any other white person. And he has to play well while ignoring the remarks of skeptics and bigots who see him as an affront to the national pastime. Director/writer Brian Helgeland (“A Knight’s Tale”) rightly paints Robinson as a hero, but it’s the only color in his repertoire. When he captures the human side of Rob- inson, it’s purely accidental. The movie is an assembly of veneered

anecdotes – Remember the time Jackie stood up to the gas station attendant? Or how about when he scored without touching the ball? – passed off as an intimate portrait. When Helgeland isn’t bothering to peer into Robinson’s soul, we’re repeatedly patronized. He presents the trailblazer’s travails with an I-can’t-believe-I have-to-educate- these-rubes smugness. Robinson cannot catch a bus without it being accompanied by an orchestra‘s dra- matic swelling. Ben Chapman (Alan Tudyk), the Philadelphia Phillies’ manager, barrages Robinson during his at-bats with language that would have embarrassed a Klansman. In case you don’t comprehend Chap- man’s epic loathsomeness, don’t worry: you’ll get two more scenes confirming that fact. Legendary sportswriter Wendell Smith (Andre Holland), Robinson’s chronicler, represents the common man, a gim- mick that punctures Robinson’s epic resiliency. That trait is something anyone can aspire to summon. Since African Americans domi- nate today’s professional sports, we don’t need a saccharine aside of how Robinson touched an athlete’s life. We don’t need golden rays of light permeating Rickey’s office, making it look like Socrates’ work- space. We don’t need a son mimick- ing his father’s racist language,

Though Robinson is portrayed perfectly, the rest of the movie fails to inspire the way
Though Robinson is portrayed perfectly, the rest of the
movie fails to inspire the way the real man and his story did.

the dialogue of the PSA. We don’t need so many inspirational speeches that they require an index – further turning Robinson into an animate commemorative stamp. Our country’s homogenous Mayflower heritage fades with each passing day. That we have an Afri- can American president no longer feels historic. Is “42,” obvious and condescending, the best cinematic tribute for Jackie Robinson we can fashion in 2013? Some viewers will be insulted. More will be bored. The worst part, I fear, is that few will leave inspired.

-To read more of Pete’s cinematic musings, visit WhatPetesWatching. blogpsot.com or follow him on Twit- ter, @PeteCroatto.

W

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• The Lords of Salem
• In the House
• Herman’s House
DVDs released April 16:
• Django Unchained
• The Haunting in Connecticut
• The Repo Man
• Disneynature:
Wings of Life
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PAGE 24

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WEEKENDER , WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013

PAGE 26

theater

, WEDNESD AY , APRIL 17 , 20 13 PA GE 26 t heater Dietrich Theatre

Dietrich Theatre

(60 E. Tioga STrEET, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500, diETrichThEaTEr. com)

• “Auntie MAMe:” April. 24-27, 7 p.M.; April 28, 3 p.M.

• toM Knight puppet Show: April 17, 1:30 p.M.

Jason Miller Playwrights Project

(570.591.1378, nepAplAywrightS@ live.coM)

• DrAMAtiStS Support group:

thirD thurSDAy of eAch Month, 7

p.M., the olDe BricK theAtre (126 w. MArKet St., ScrAnton).

• SuBMiSSionS for DyoniSiA ’13:

the thirD AnnuAl JASon Miller plAywrightS’ proJect invitAtionAl Being AccepteD through MAy 15.

Music Box Players (196 hugheS St., SwoyerSville:

570.283.2195 or 800.698.plAy or MuSicBox.org)

• “loving you hAS MADe Me BA-

nAnAS!: 50 ShADeS of love SongS:”

April 12-13, 19-20, 8 p.M.; April 14, 21, 3 p.M. $34, Dinner AnD Show; $16, Show only.

• AuDitionS: leS MiSerABleS: MAy

20, 22, 7 p.M. thoSe AuDitioning ShoulD Sing A Song of hiS/her choice. MuSt Bring Sheet MuSic. Show DAteS Are July 19-21, 25-28, Aug. 1-4.

Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire AuDitionS for the 33rD SeASon, MAnSion At Mount hope eStAte, route 72. cAllBAcKS will Be helD in the Afternoon AnD will StreSS MoveMent. thoSe AuDition- ing ShoulD weAr looSe fitting or coMfortABle clothing. By AppointMent only, 717.665.7021, ext. 120.

The Phoenix Performing Arts Centre (409-411 MAin St., DuryeA,

SAturDAy, 6:30 p. M. Dinner, 8 p. M. Show. $48.50.

Scranton Cultural Center

(420 n. wAShington Ave., ScrAn- ton, 570.346.7369)

BroADwAy ScrAnton (BroADwAy- ScrAnton.coM) preSentS:

• “hAir:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.M.

• “DreAMgirlS:” MAy 10-12, fri., 8

p.M., SAt., 2 & 8 p.M., Sun., 1 & 6 p.M.

Scranton Prep Players

(1000 wyoMing Ave., ScrAnton.

570.914.7737)

• “DiSney’S BeAuty AnD the BeASt:”

April 19, 20, 7:30 p.M.; April 21, 2

p.M., BellArMine theAter, ScrAn- ton prepArAtory School.

Shawnee Playhouse (570.421.5093, theShAwneeplAy- houSE.com)

• “the reAl thing:” April 19, 20, 26,

27, 8 p.M.; April 21, 28, 2 p.M. $18, ADultS; $15, SeniorS over 55, AAA

MeMBerS, AnD MilitAry.

Stage Directions Performing Arts Academy July 28-Aug. 3, 9 A.M.-5 p. M. DAily,

ferrwooD MuSic cAMp (257 MiDDle roAD, DruMS). co-eD , AgeS 6-18.

Theatre at the Grove (5177 nuAngolA roAD, nuAn- golA. nuAngolAgrove.coM, 570.868.8212, groveticKetS@ frontier.coM) ticKet pricing: $18, plAyS; $20,

MuSicAlS; $86, SuMMer pASS, firSt five ShowS; $120, SeASon pASS. All ShowS Are ByoB AnD feAture cABAret SeAting.

• “ring of fire: the MuSic of

Johnny cASh:” April 19, 20, 26, 27,

8 p.M.; April 14, 21, 28, 3 p.M.

• “neil SiMon’S Brighton BeAch

MeMoirS:” MAy 10, 11, 16-18, 8 p.M.; MAy 12, 19, 3 p.M.

• “Annie get your gun:” June 14,

15, 21, 22, 28, 29, 8 p.M.; June 16, 23, 30, 3 p.M.

570.457.3589, phoenixpAc.vpweB.

“cAtS:” July 26, 27, Aug. 2, 3, 8-10,

coM, phoenixpAc08@Aol.coM)

8

p.M.; July 28, Aug. 4, 11, 3 p.M.

• “Annie:” April 19-28. friDAy/

SAturDAy ShowS, 7 p.M.; SAturDAy/ SunDAy MAtineeS, 2 p.M. $12; $10.

Pines Dinner Theatre (448 north 17th St., Allentown.

610.433.2333. pineSDinnertheAtre. com)

• “i love A piAno:” through June

2. thurSDAy AnD SunDAy, 12:30 p. M. Dinner, 2 p.M. Show; friDAy AnD

Send your listings to WB- Wnews@civitasmedia.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes- Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Print listings occur up until three weeks from publication date.

• “the MouSetrAp:” Sept. 13, 14, 19-21, 8 p.M.; Sept. 15, 22, 3 p.M.

• “Sweeney toDD: the DeMon

BArBer of fleet Street:” oct. 18,

19, 25, 26, nov. 1, 2, 8 p.M.; oct. 20, 27, nov. 3, 3 p.M.

• “it’S A wonDerful life:” nov. 29,

30, Dec. 6, 7, 12-14, 8 p.M.; Dec. 1, 8,

15, 3 p.M.

The Wyoming County Players (whipple perforMing ArtS StuDio, rt. 29S, tunKhAnnocK, 570.836.6986, wyoMingcounty- plAyerS.coM)

“little MerMAiD, Jr.:” MAy 17, 18,

7

p.M.; MAy 18, 2 p.M.

ExPAnDED liSTinGS AT ThEWEEkEnDER.CoM. W

MAy 18, 2 p. M. ExPAnDED liSTinGS AT ThEWEEkEnDER.CoM. W N ovel approach Book reviews and

Novel approach

Book reviews and literary insight

kacy Muir | Weekender Correspondent

Sedaris is a hoot

The title of the work is textbook David Sedaris. A bit uncanny and preposterous, his upcoming col- lection of narrative essays, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls,” evokes a scathing seriousness that readers cannot help but love. As a writer and humorist, Sedaris is not reticent to discuss particular issues. In fact, he gives his opinion on nearly everything, ranging from socialized medicine to the slightly less trivial topic of crocheted owls. In linear fashion, the title of the collection then becomes a culmination of those explorations. Each of the essays incorporates Sedaris’s personal experience with the subject or how the particular matter affected those around him. As a result, the work becomes overtly private in many ways. In particular, readers are given a deeply detailed glimpse into Sedaris’s first colonoscopy as well as his memories of family dinners:

“From the tabletop up, he was business casual – the ironed shirt, the loosened tie – but from there on down it was just briefs and bare legs.” Most of the work is strictly Se- daris – a bit absurd at first, much of the content progresses into painstakingly accurate observa- tions. It is, however, important to note that the “etcetera” portion of Sedaris’s work includes six mono- logues all told in divergent voices. Here, Sedaris gives readers a commingled collection of memoir and fiction. Throughout our journey to the far realm of the disturbingly weird, we enter an area of cyni- cism. Of course, what separates Sedaris from being jaded is wit and charm. There are many standout essays throughout the book, including “If I Ruled the World,” “Author, Author,” “I Break for Traditional Marriage,” “Understanding, Understanding

‘let’s Explore Diabetes with owls’ David Sedaris Rating: W W W W V
‘let’s Explore Diabetes
with owls’
David Sedaris
Rating: W W W W V

Owls,” and “Now Hiring Friendly People.” In the very sarcastic “If I Ruled the World,” Sedaris dis- cusses the concession of all power to Jesus Christ. “And all the other evil people […] who want to take away our freedom or raise my taxes, they shall know our fury, Jesus’s and mine, and burn forever.” While the essay is brief, it man- ages to reflect on many contro- versial topics that currently divide our society. Like so many of his dazzling essays, Sedaris discusses the illogicality of particular radi- cal viewpoints by stripping down and investigating some of the most fascinating and challenging topics that are America’s current events. Often unexpected and unapologetic, the material can be coarse and mature. Overall, while the collection is satirical, there are poignant aspects that transport readers back to memories of both innocence and humor. Sedaris then con- cludes the work just as he begins – with a punch.

W

Books released the week of April 22:

• ‘Wedding Night: A Novel’ by Sophie Kinsella

• ‘Vader’s Little Princess’ by Jeffrey Brown

• ‘Start: Punch Fear in the Face, Escape Average and Do Work that Mat- ters’ by Jon Acuff

• ‘Fly Away’ by Kristin Hannah

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PAGE 28

WEEKENDER , WEDNESD AY , APRIL 17 , 20 13 PA GE 28 I nfinite Improbability

Infinite Improbability

Geek Culture & more

rich Howells | Weekender Editor

Wonderful women

Superheroines,” the latest epi-

sode of PBS’ “Independent Lens” the stories of real-life women

this fictional character in with

that served as a mini-documenta- ry about popular representations of women in media and how they mirror society’s issues with gen- der. It wasn’t as term paper-ish as it sounds, cleverly using the history of the most popular and

(and one openly gay man) who were touched or inspired by her adventures, and that is where the central theme of the documentary comes in. Whether it’s a fourth grader standing up to bullies or a Brazilian immigrant searching

recognizable superheroine of all time to structure the film. Introduced in “All Star Com- ics” No. 8 in 1941, Wonder Woman, like the X-Women, has embodied both sides of women’s representation in entertain- ment and media, which may be

for better opportunities in another country, women can look past the minor faults in Wonder Woman’s inconsistent writing and see the greater good beneath – a tough, independent woman who stands up for what she believes in and doesn’t need a man to make posi-

due, in part, to creator William

tive

changes in the world around

Moulton Marston, a psychologist

her.

and inventor of the blood pres-

Seeing these women accept

sure component of the modern

and

embrace that made me real-

polygraph. On one hand, he was a staunch feminist who fought for women’s rights, though on the other, he was a bit of a fetishist who often used bondage throughout his Wonder Woman

ize that I should do the very same thing – I love the X-Women be- cause of those characters’ shining moments, so why be embarrassed by those revealing costumes or sometimes silly subplots? No

stories. This is not to say that

one, fictional or otherwise, is go-

she couldn’t still be a feminist, but while she was strong and brave, she was also a sexualized princess who wore a skirt from her very first appearance. She broke some of the rules, but not all of them. As World War II ended and other writers took over, Wonder Women became less about wom- en’s lib and more about romance, fashion, and other

stereotypical themes that watered her down. It took feminists like Gloria Steinem, who recognized Diana as an icon worth saving, to force DC Comics to rethink these changes, though it was the ‘70s live-action TV series starring Lynda Carter that truly rescued this character and solidified her place in American culture. She hasn’t had a starring role in any mainstream media since, yet many non-comic collectors still know who she is and what she means to women. “Wonder Women!” weaves the tale of

ing to be a perfect role model, so

as long as I’m finding something constructive amongst those

pages, it’s still a worthwhile read. What the episode didn’t cover

was that Wonder Woman most

recently made headlines for making out with Superman in the comics and starring in a 2011 TV

pilot that was so awful that NBC wouldn’t even air it – neither inspire all that aforementioned bravery and hope stuff. While blockbusters starring male superheroes continue to rake in billions, a big budget Wonder Woman film continues to stall as her comic counterpart sends mixed messages. Maybe a few

DC

executives need to sit down

and

watch some PBS – women

(and men) want more from our superheroines than a pretty face and a fit body. We want a woman who makes us wonder just how far we can go

if we believe in ourselves. That’s

the

genre I’ve come to appreci-

ate.

-Rich Howells is a lifelong Marvel Comics collector, wan- nabe Jedi master, and cult film fan. E-mail him at rhowells@ theweekende r. com. W

The dual nature of super- heroines – it tears my love of the genre apart. As a young kid, I always got along better with women, mainly because all the boys I knew at the time were competitive jocks, and to this day, most of my best friends are female. I grew up on the animated “X-Men” series in the ‘90s, which introduced me to the comic books, and I always found it fascinating that the X- Women were stronger and had better powers than the X-Men. I wanted to believe that this was some sort of feminist statement, and maybe, in a way, it was. But this was the ‘90s, and if there was anything bigger than their superpowers, it was…well…you know… All the women were drawn with tiny wastes and dispropor- tionate chests – it was the artistic style at the time. (To be fair, the men were also drawn with muscles upon muscles that no geek like me could possibly live up to.) “X-Men” had plenty of great, shining moments for its women, but at the end of the day, the guys didn’t have to suffer from so much oversexualization – it was a battle the ladies would have to fight alone. This was one of many topics covered in “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American

covered in “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American PBS’s ‘Independent Lens’ series re- cently celebrated
covered in “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American PBS’s ‘Independent Lens’ series re- cently celebrated

PBS’s ‘Independent Lens’ series re- cently celebrated a comic book icon, a heroine that many women of all ages look up to.

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PAGE 32

Courtesy photo The stars have realigned for Stardog Champion, reuniting members of Lifer and Breaking
Courtesy photo
The stars have realigned for Stardog Champion, reuniting members of Lifer and Breaking Benjamin to form a whole new group.
Heavy-hitting
champs
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
B reaking Benjamin
and Lifer are two
household names
in hard rock,
particularly in Northeastern
Pennsylvania. But with
the newly formed Stardog
Champion, some of their former
members are looking to tour –
and take over – the world.
Aaron Fink started playing
guitar when he was 13. His
father was an “avid music
fan” with a huge great record
collection, so he was raised on
classic rock and doo-wop, but
the moment he changed from
casual listener to dedicated
player was when his older
brother gave him his first listen
of Metallica’s “For Whom the
Bell Tolls.”
Nick Coyle’s father was a
musician, and when his dad’s
band practiced in the basement,
six-year-old Coyle would play
along on his keyboard. As a
teenager, he wanted to learn
how to play guitar like Slash
from Guns N’ Roses, but at 13,
he landed a singing gig with
Conspiracy, who asked him to
enter a recording studio five
days later to cut a five-song EP.
In 1999, the two became
founding members of Strangers
With Candy, a Wilkes-Barre nu
metal group who became better
known as Lif