SPRING STREET BICYCLE COUNT 2012 / 2013

PARKLET STUDIES for LADOT and LACBC APRIL 2013

      CONTENTS    
  List  of  Figures......................................................................................................... 3     Background............................................................................................................ 4     Executive  Summary ...............................................................................................6     Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Ratios ................................................................................8     Bicycle  Volumes .................................................................................................... 11     Bicycling  Behavior.................................................................................................13     Bicyclist  Gender ....................................................................................................14     Bicycle  Parking..................................................................................................... 16     Methodological  Summary................................................................................... 19     About  Parklet  Studies.......................................................................................... 20  

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

LIST  OF  FIGURES  
    Figure  1:  Downtown  Bicycle  Facilities,  Existing  and  Proposed.......................................... 5   Figure  2:  Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Peak  Hours  2012  and  2013 ................................... 8   Figure  3:  Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekday  Peak  Hours  2012.................................. 9   Figure  4:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekday  2013 .................................................... 9   Figure  5:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekend  Peak  Hours  2012................................10   Figure  6:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekend  2013 ...................................................10   Figure  7:    Cyclist  Volumes,  Weekday  2012/2013 ................................................................. 11   Figure  8:  Cyclist  Volumes,  Weekend  2012/2013 ................................................................. 11   Figure  9:    Percent  Change,  Weekday  Peak  Hour  Cyclist  Volumes  2012/2013 ................... 12   Figure  10:    Percent  Change,  Weekend  Peak  Hour  Cyclist  Volumes  2012/2013 ................. 12   Figure  11:  Bicycling  Behavior  2013 ...................................................................................... 13   Figure  12:  Cyclist  Gender  2013 ............................................................................................14   Figure  13:    Cyclist  Gender,  Weekday  2013 ..........................................................................15   Figure  14:    Cyclist  Gender,  Weekend  2013..........................................................................15   Figure  15:  Bicycle  Parking,  Formal  and  Informal  Percentages,  2012.................................16   Figure  16:    Bicycle  Parking,  Formal  and  Informal  Counts,  2012.........................................16   Figure  17:    Bicycle  Parking  between  6th  and  7th  Streets,  Percentages,  2012 .................. 17   Figure  18:    Bicycle  Parking  between  6th  and  7th  Streets,  Percentages,  2013.................. 17   Figure  19:    Bicycle  Parking  between  6th  and  7th,  Counts  2012.........................................18   Figure  20:    Bicycle  Parking  between  6th  and  7th  Streets,  Counts  2013 ...........................18  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

  BACKGROUND  
In   November   2011,   LADOT   installed   Los   Angeles’   first   green   Class-­‐II   bicycle   lane   on   Spring   Street   between   Cesar   Chavez   Avenue   and   9th   Street.   The   Downtown   Los   Angeles   Neighborhood  Council’s  Complete  Streets  Working  Group  and  the  LACBC,  in  coordination  with   LADOT,  partnered  with  Councilmembers  Perry  (District  9)  and  Huizar  (District  14)  to  implement   this  landmark  infrastructure  (Figure  1).     In  April  2011  the  FHWA  issued  an  interim  approval  for  the  use  of  green  colored  pavement  as  a   traffic   control   device   in   response   to   multiple   inquiries   by   traffic   agencies   across   the   United   States.   1     According   to   the   FHWA,   research   from   various   jurisdictions   show   green   bike   lanes   have   demonstrable   performance   for   increasing   cyclist   safety   including   accurate   bicyclist   positioning   when   traveling   through   intersections   and   conflict   areas.     Bicyclists   are   also   more   likely   to   be   positioned   within   a   green   bike   lane   when   riding.   The   FHWA   found   green   bike   lanes   increase   visibility   and   perceived   safety   of   bicyclists   while   improving   motorist   awareness   of   non-­‐vehicular  road  users.     The   2011   L.A.   Bicycle   Count,   conducted   in   September   2011,   shows   there   has   been   significant   increase   in   the   number   of   people   who   bicycle   in   Los   Angeles.   Additionally,   bicycle   infrastructure   has   a   positive   effect   on   overall   rate   of   bicycle   ridership   with   the   highest   numbers   of   riders   observed   on   streets   with   bicycle   infrastructure.2     The   study   demonstrates   the  preponderance  of  bicycle  infrastructure  in  encouraging  bicycle  ridership.       The  Spring  Street  bike  lane  was  implemented  two  months  after  data  was  gathered  for  the  2011   L.A.   Bicycle   Count.   As   a   result   its   impact   was   not   evaluated   in   LACBC’s   final   report.   Information   provided   by   the   2012/2013   Spring   Street   Public   Life   Surveys   augments   existing   bicycle   count   datasets   by   presenting   primary   research   of   cyclist   behavior   on   Spring   Street   subsequent   to   green  bike  lane  implementation.     The   March   2012   Spring   Street   Public   Life   Survey   –   coordinated   by   Parklet   Studies   with   the   support  of  the  DLANC  Complete  Streets  Working  Group  and  the  USC  School  of  Architecture  –   recorded  the  volume  of  cyclists  passing  through  Spring  Street  between  4th  and  8th  Streets.    The   2012   Public   Life   Survey   also   recorded   bicycle   parking   along   the   Spring   Street   corridor,   distinguishing   between   bicycles   secured   to   LADOT-­‐installed   bike   racks   (“Formal”),   or   other   fixtures  such  as  signposts,  fences,  or  parking  meters  (“Informal).    One  year  later  in  March  2013,   another   Public   Life   Survey   –   coordinated   by   Parklet   Studies   with   additional   support   from   the   UCLA  Lewis  Center  –  again  recorded  the  volume  of  cyclists  and  bicycle  parking  in  the  corridor.         This   report   compares   findings   from   both   the   2012   and   2013   Spring   Street   Public   Life   Surveys.    This   report   is   being   presented   to   the   Los   Angeles   County   Bicycle   Coalition,   Los   Angeles   Department   of   Transportation   Bicycle   Program,   and   the   Downtown   Los   Angeles   Neighborhood  Council.    
1  U.S.  Department  of  Transportation  Federal  Highway  Administration,  15  April  2011.  “Interim  Approval  for  Optional  Use  of   Green  Colored  Pavement  for  Bike  Lanes  (IA-­‐14).    Manual  on  Uniform  Traffic  Control  Devices.   2  Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011.  

                                                                                                               

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

  Figure  1:  Downtown  Bicycle  Facilities,  Existing  and  Proposed.    This  map  synthesizes  information  from  the   LADOT  Bicycle  Services  online  bicycle  map;  the  2010  Bicycle  Plan  (Los  Angeles  Department  of  City   Planning  2010);  and  the  2011  L.A.  Bike  Count  (Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition  2011).  

 

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY    
The   2012/2013   counts   indicate   a   marked   increase   in   bicycle   ridership   in   the   Spring   Street   corridor  during  the  year  subsequent  to  bike  lane  installation.       PEDESTRIAN  to  CYCLIST  RATIOS   While   the   number   of   peak-­‐hour   pedestrians   on   Spring   Street   remained   relatively   constant   between  2012  and  2013,  the  number  of  cyclists  increased  from  320  to  450  (Figure  2).    This  40%   increase  underscores  the  importance  of  Spring  Street  as  a  bicycle  corridor,  and  surpasses  the   32%  overall  increase  measured  by  the  2009/2011  L.A.  Bike  Count  for  seventeen  other  locations   throughout   the   City.3       Figure   1   illustrates   how   a   1/18   cyclist-­‐pedestrian   ratio   shifted   to   1/13   in   2013.       In  general  across  all  peak  hours,  the  ratio  of  cyclists  to  pedestrians  in  the  right-­‐of-­‐way  changed   between  2012  and  2013,  showing  greater  proportions  of  cyclists  (Figures  3  –  6).    The  greatest   proportion   of   cyclists   (88/564)   was   observed   during   the   11   am   weekend   hour,   while   the   smallest  proportion  during  the  weekend  8am  hour  (8/172,  Figure  6).         CYCLIST  VOLUMES   In   general,   weekday   cyclist   volumes   on   Spring   Street   are   highest   during   morning   peak   hours   and  lowest  during  the  midafternoon  (Figures  7  and  8).    Weekends  see  an  inverse  pattern,  with   cyclist   activity   peaking   at   the   midday.       Both   weekday   and   weekend   days   saw   dramatic   increases  in  bicycle  ridership  on  Spring  Street,  with  changes  exceeding  one  hundred  percent.     Whereas   in   2012,   total   ridership   between   the   weekday   and   weekend   day   was   fairly   balanced   (156/164),  in  2013  the  weekend  day  saw  a  significantly  greater  proportion  of  cyclists  (300/452).     Cyclist  volumes  increased  dramatically  between  March  2012  and  March  2013  (Figures  8  and  9).     Five  out  of  six  peak  hour  periods  saw  increases  ranging  from  7%  to  122%.    Weekday  mornings   saw   the   largest   increase,   up   122%   (from   an   average   of   eighteen   to   forty   cyclists)   in   the   8am   hour;  followed  by  an  increase  of  100%    (from  an  average  of  twenty-­‐two  to  forty-­‐four  cyclists)  in   the   9am   weekday   hour.     Weekends   also   see   significant   jumps;   for   example   100%   during   the   9am  hour  (twenty-­‐eight  to  fifty-­‐six  riders)  and  82%  in  the  1pm  hour  (forty-­‐four  to  eighty  riders).       BICYCLING  BEHAVIOR   A  significant  proportion  of  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  were  observed  traveling  the  ‘wrong  way’   (Figure   11),   or     northbound   against   traffic   (as   Spring   Street   is   a   one-­‐way   street).     This   percentage   is   significantly   higher   than   the   four-­‐percent   citywide   figure   captured   by   the   2011   L.A.  Bike  Count.4      

     

                                                                                                               
3 4

 Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  Page  24    Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  Page  26    6     Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

 

EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  (cont’d)  

BICYCLING  BEHAVIOR  (cont’d)   A   small   minority   (approximately   5   –   7%)   of   cyclists   were   observed   travelling   in   other   traffic   lanes  besides  the  bike  lane  itself.     Twenty-­‐seven   to   twenty-­‐eight   percent   of   cyclists   were   observed   riding   on   Spring   Street   sidewalks,  which  roughly  concurs  with  the  same  behavior  recorded  by  the  2011  L.A.  Bike  Count   in  other  locations  throughout  the  City.       Helmet  use  of  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  is  somewhat  lower  than  documented  levels  elsewhere   in  the  City.    The  2011  L.A.  Bike  Count  saw  forty-­‐seven  percent  helmet  usage  by  cyclists,  whereas   on  Spring  Street,  only  thirty-­‐five  percent  of  cyclists  were  observed  using  a  helmet.       CYCLIST  GENDER   Of  all  cyclists  observed  on  Spring  Street  during  the  March  2013  counts,  approximately  fourteen   percent   appeared   to   be   female   (Figure   12).     This   falls   below   the   citywide   percentage   of   fifteen   percent   recorded   in   the   2011   L.A.   Bike   Count;   and   even   further   behind   the   2009   L.A.   Bike   Count.5     The  highest  proportion  of  female  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  was  observed  during  the  weekend   midday   peak,   accounting   for   approximately   thirty-­‐six   percent   of   riders   (32/89)   in   the   eleven   o’clock  hour.    The  next  largest  proportion  was  observed  during  the  weekend  midday  peak,  at   approximately  twenty  percent  (16/80,  Figure  14).         BICYCLE  PARKING   Bicycle   parking   was   systematically   counted   on   Spring   Street   sidewalks   between   4th   and   8th   Streets  during  peak  weekday  and  weekend  hours  in  March  2012.  These  counts  reveal  that  forty   percent   of   bicycles   parked   in   the   right-­‐of-­‐way   are   secured   to   fixtures   other   than   LADOT-­‐ installed   bicycle   racks.     These   fixtures   include   signposts,   parking   meters,   fences,   and   other   elements  in  the  streetscape.     In   March   2013,   bike   parking   was   counted   only   on   the   sidewalks   between   6th   and   7th   streets.     Overall,   the   documentation   shows   how   this   particular   block   is   highly   impacted   in   terms   of   bicycle   parking,   with   higher   percentages   of   Informal   occurrences   than   in   the   rest   of   the   corridor   (compare   Figures   17   and   18   with   Figure   15).   Although   the   Informal   proportion   of   parked   bikes   decreased   in   2013   (Figures   17   and   18),   raw   counts   (Figures   19   and   20)   show   a   much   higher   number   of   bicycles   parked   on   the   block.     This   greater   number   of   Informal   occurrences  in  2013  demonstrate  the  escalating  demand  for  bicycle  parking  in  the  corridor.    

                                                                                                               
5

 Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  page  25.       7   Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

CYCLIST  and  PEDESTRIAN  RATIOS:    2012-­‐2013    
While   the   number   of   peak-­‐hour   pedestrians   on   Spring   Street   remained   relatively   constant   between  2012  and  2013,  the  number  of  cyclists  increased  from  320  to  450  (Figure  2).    This  40%   increase  underscores  the  importance  of  Spring  Street  as  a  bicycle  corridor,  and  surpasses  the   32%  overall  increase  measured  by  the  2009/2011  L.A.  Bike  Count  for  seventeen  other  locations   throughout  the  City.6      Figure  1  illustrates  how  a  1/18  cyclist-­‐pedestrian  ratio    shifted  to  1/13  in   2013.      
 

Figure  2:  Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Peak  Hours  2012  and  2013  

 

  In  general  across  all  peak  hours,  the  ratio  of  cyclists  to  pedestrians  in  the  right-­‐of-­‐way  changed   between  2012  and  2013,  showing  greater  proportions  of  cyclists  (Figures  3  –  6).    The  greatest   proportion   of   cyclists   (88/564)   was   observed   during   the   11   am   weekend   hour,   while   the   smallest  proportion  during  the  weekend  8am  hour  (8/172,  Figure  6).    
 

   
     

                                                                                                               
6

 Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  Page  24    8     Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

Figure  3:  Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekday  Peak  Hours  2012  

 

     

Figure  4:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekday  2013  

 

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Figure  5:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekend  Peak  Hours  2012  

 

     

Figure  6:    Cyclist  and  Pedestrian  Totals,  Weekend  2013  

 

     

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

CYCLIST  VOLUMES    
In   general,   weekday   cyclist   volumes   on   Spring   Street   are   highest   during   morning   peak   hours   and  lowest  during  the  midafternoon  (Figures  7  and  8).    Weekends  see  an  inverse  pattern,  with   cyclist   activity   peaking   at   the   midday.       Both   weekday   and   weekend   days   saw   dramatic   increases  in  bicycle  ridership  on  Spring  Street,  with  changes  exceeding  one  hundred  percent.     Whereas   in   2012,   total   ridership   between   the   weekday   and   weekend   day   was   fairly   balanced   (156/164),  in  2013  the  weekend  day  saw  a  significantly  greater  proportion  of  cyclists  (300/452).      

Figure  7:    Cyclist  Volumes,  Weekday  2012/2013  

 

 

Figure  8:  Cyclist  Volumes,  Weekend  2012/2013  
Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013    11    

 

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

BICYCLE  VOLUME  CHANGES:    2013-­‐2013    
Cyclist  volumes  increased  dramatically  between  March  2012  and  March  2013  (Figures  8  and  9).     Five  out  of  six  peak  hour  periods  saw  increases  ranging  from  7%  to  122%.    Weekday  mornings   saw  the  largest  increase,  up  122%  (from  an  average  of  eighteen  to  forty  cyclists)  in  the  8am   hour;  followed  by  an  increase  of  100%    (from  an  average  of  twenty-­‐two  to  forty-­‐four  cyclists)  in   the  9am  weekday  hour.    Weekends  also  see  significant  jumps;  for  example  100%  during  the   9am  hour  (twenty-­‐eight  to  fifty-­‐six  riders)  and  82%  in  the  1pm  hour  (forty-­‐four  to  eighty  riders).    

Figure  9:    Percent  Change,  Weekday  Peak  Hour  Cyclist  Volumes  2012/2013  

 

   

Figure  10:    Percent  Change,  Weekend  Peak  Hour  Cyclist  Volumes  2012/2013
 12    

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

BICYCLING  BEHAVIOR    
A  significant  proportion  of  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  were  observed  traveling  the  ‘wrong  way’   (Figure   11),   or     northbound   against   traffic   (as   Spring   Street   is   a   one-­‐way   street).     This   percentage   is   significantly   higher   than   the   four-­‐percent   citywide   figure   captured   by   the   2011   L.A.  Bike  Count.7     A   small   minority   (approximately   5   –   7%)   of   cyclists   were   observed   travelling   in   other   traffic   lanes  besides  the  bike  lane  itself.     Twenty-­‐seven   to   twenty-­‐eight   percent   of   cyclists   were   observed   riding   on   Spring   Street   sidewalks,  which  roughly  concurs  with  the  same  behavior  recorded  by  the  2011  L.A.  Bike  Count   in  other  locations  throughout  the  City.       Helmet  use  of  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  is  somewhat  lower  than  documented  levels  elsewhere   in  the  City.    The  2011  L.A.  Bike  Count  saw  forty-­‐seven  percent  helmet  usage  by  cyclists,  whereas   on  Spring  Street,  only  thirty-­‐five  percent  of  cyclists  were  observed  using  a  helmet.      

Figure  11:  Bicycling  Behavior  2013  

 

 

                                                                                                               
7

 Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  Page  26    13     Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

CYCLIST  GENDER    
Of  all  cyclists  observed  on  Spring  Street  during  the  March  2013  counts,  approximately  fourteen   percent   appeared   to   be   female   (Figure   12).     This   falls   below   the   citywide   percentage   of   fifteen   percent   recorded   in   the   2011   L.A.   Bike   Count;   and   even   further   behind   the   2009   L.A.   Bike   Count.8      

Figure  12:  Cyclist  Gender  2013  

 

 

The  highest  proportion  of  female  cyclists  on  Spring  Street  was  observed  during  the  weekend   midday   peak,   accounting   for   approximately   thirty-­‐six   percent   of   riders   (32/89)   in   the   eleven   o’clock  hour.    The  next  largest  proportion  was  observed  during  the  weekend  midday  peak,  at   approximately  twenty  percent  (16/80,  Figure  14).    

                                                                                                               
8

 Los  Angeles  County  Bicycle  Coalition,  2011.    L.A.  Bike  Count  2011,  page  25.         14 Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

Figure  13:    Cyclist  Gender,  Weekday  2013  

 

   

Figure  14:    Cyclist  Gender,  Weekend  2013  

 

         

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

 15    

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

BIYCLE  PARKING    
Bicycle   parking   was   systematically   counted   on   Spring   Street   sidewalks   between   4th   and   8th   Streets  during  peak  weekday  and  weekend  hours  in  March  2012.  These  counts  reveal  that  forty   percent   of   bicycles   parked   in   the   right-­‐of-­‐way   are   secured   to   fixtures   other   than   LADOT-­‐ installed   bicycle   racks.     These   fixtures   include   signposts,   parking   meters,   fences,   and   other   elements  in  the  streetscape.      

Figure  15:  Bicycle  Parking,  Formal  and  Informal  Percentages,  2012  

 

 
 

Figure  16:    Bicycle  Parking,  Formal  and  Informal  Counts,  2012  
Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013         16

 

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

In   March   2013,   bike   parking   was   counted   only   on   the   sidewalks   between   6th   and   7th   streets.     Overall,   the   documentation   shows   how   this   particular   block   is   highly   impacted   in   terms   of   bicycle   parking,   with   higher   percentages   of   Informal   occurrences   than   in   the   rest   of   the   corridor  (compare  Figures  17  and  18  with  Figure  15).      

 

Figure  17:    Bicycle  Parking  on  Spring  Street  between  6th  and  7th  Streets,  Formal  and  Informal   Percentages,  2012  

 

 

Figure  18:    Bicycle  Parking  on  Spring  Street  between  6th  and  7th  Streets,  Formal  and  Informal   Percentages,  2013  

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

 17    

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

Although   the   Informal   proportion   of   parked   bikes   decreased   in   2013   (Figures   17   and   18),   raw   counts  (Figures  19  and  20)  show  a  much  higher  number  of  bicycles  parked  on  the  block.    This   greater   number   of   Informal   occurrences   in   2013   demonstrate   the   escalating   demand   for   bicycle  parking  in  the  corridor.      

Figure  19:    Bicycle  Parking  on  Spring  Street  between  6th  and  7th,  Formal  and  Informal  Counts,  2012  

 

   

Figure  20:    Bicycle  Parking  on  Spring  Street  between  6th  and  7th,  Formal  and  Informal  Counts,  2013

 

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

      18

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

METHODOLOGICAL  SUMMARY    
Screenline   Counts   were   conducted   on   the   600   block   of   Spring   Street   (between   6th   and   7th   Streets)  in  March  2012  and  March  2013  (Figure  1).     Counts  were  conducted  on  two  weekdays  and  one  weekend  day.    In  March  2012,  counts  were   conducted   on   Tuesday   the   6th,   Wednesday   the   7th,   and   Saturday   the   10th.       In   March   2013,   counts   were   conducted   on   Sunday   the   24th,   Tuesday   the   25th,   and   Wednesday   the   26th.       For   each  year,  the  two  raw  weekday  counts  were  averaged  to  arrive  at  a  single  weekday  figure.     The   2012   counts   were   conducted   during   peak   hours:   8am,   9am;   12pm,   2pm;   5pm,   and   6pm   (six   hours  total).         The  2013  counts  were  conducted  at  the  top  of  each  hour  between  8am  and  7pm  (eleven  hours   total).     Fifteen-­‐minute  count  intervals  were  conducted  at  the  top  of  each  hour.    A  formula  is  used  to   extrapolate   the   average   hourly   volumes   presented   here.     Unless   otherwise   noted,   all   values   presented  in  this  report  are  average  hourly  volumes  extrapolated  from  the  15-­‐minute  counts.     The   2013   counts   also   recorded   the   ‘Bicycling   Behavior’   categories   (whereas   2012   counts   did   not):       • Direction  of  Travel  (Southbound:  with  traffic,  or  Northbound:  against-­‐traffic)   • In  Bike  Facility  (green  bike  lane)  vs.  Out  of  Bike  Facility  (other  traffic  lane)   • On  Sidewalk   • Helmet  Usage   • Gender   • Age  (Under  16  or  Over  65)     Both   the   2012   and   2013   surveys   included   hourly   surveys   of   bicycles   parked   on   Spring   Street   sidewalks.     The   2012   surveys   were   conducted   on   the   corridor   between   4th   and   8th   Streets.     The   2013  surveys  were  conducted  between  6th  and  7th  Streets  only.  

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

      19

Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

     

ABOUT  PARKLET  STUDIES  
  ‘Parklet   Studies’   has   been   in   operation   since   September   2011.     The   collaborative   focuses   on   evaluating   experimental   urban   interventions   in   the   public   right-­‐of-­‐way.    As   of   April   2013,   its   range  of  involvements  include:  the  2012   Parklet   Impact   Study  with  the  Downtown  Los  Angeles   Neighborhood   Council   (DLANC);   design   and   implementation   of   the   Lewis   Center   Pilot   Parklet   Evaluation   with   UCLA   (also   for   Spring   Street);   a   partnership   with   Streets   for   People   (S4P)   to   produce  the   Sunset  Triangle  Impact  Study;  and  a  contract  with  LADOT  to  author  site  selection   criteria  and  project  evaluation  methodologies  for  future  parklet  and  plaza  sites  throughout  the   City.         parkletstudies.carbonmade.com     dlanc.com/completestreets     livingstreetsla.org/streets-­‐for-­‐people      

Spring  Street  Bicycle  Counts  2012  /  2013  

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Parklet  Studies  for  LACBC  and  LADOT,  April  2012  

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