The responsibility for the consequences of your use of any suggestion or procedure described hereafter lies not with

the authors, publisher or distributors of this book. This book is not intended as medical or health advice. We recommend consulting with a licensed health professional before changing your diet. Except for personal use, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without prior written permission from the publisher. If you enjoy the information in this program, Raw Mom would like to encourage you to show your support by sharing your testimonial with us, sharing our website with your friends and family, signing up to our free newsletter, or supporting our continued work by considering our other programs and products. Text copyright Joanne Newell Illustration copyright Jason Botkin Designed & formatted by Amanda Taylor-Snelson Published by Tera Warner & The Raw Divas Inc. Raw Mom www.rawmom.com

2

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Table of Contents

Introduction

5

Smoothies, Milkshakes, & Juices 29 Salads & Dressings 59 Sweet Snacks 81 Savory Snacks 99 Desserts & Puddings 115 Recipe Worksheets 135 Index 141

Joanne Newell

3

Acknowledgements
I love making recipe books for kids. It’s so much fun! But I don’t do it all on my own – I have a whole team of people who support me. My amazing daughters, Arabella and Evangeline, are wonderful. They help come up with ideas for recipes, and then they help test each recipe, giving it their seals of approval. One day I’m sure they’ll have their own recipe TV show. My special husband, Darren, puts up with me taking over the kitchen and making him taste-test all kinds of wonderful concoctions. He also looks after Evie and Bella while I spend some weekends writing my books. My mum, Valerie Newell, has given me all sorts of really useful feedback for this book, and my sister Andrea Newell, and nephew James, have let themselves be guinea pigs for many of my recipe ideas. Thank you for your help! Thank you also to my home-base support team – my grandparents (Sybil and Les Storey) and my aunt (Lindsey Storey), along with green-smoothie-taste-tester-extraordinaire, my two-yearold cousin, Mitchell Storey. Lots of mums have helped me out – Danielle Storey , Leah Shadbolt, Fiona Kaufman, Joy Mackey and Martine Castro, to name but a few. Some amazing kids have also given me so much help – Xara Storey, Luke, Olivia, and Chelsea Shadbolt, Josh and Abby Kaufman, and Xavier and Zahara Mackey. Viv Johnston has also given me so much support, and huge thanks to Renée Otmar, Bryan Hodge, Shannon Leone, and Jimmy Gilker. Thank you so much, too, to Tera Warner for giving me the opportunity to create such a special book – and thank you to Jason Botkin for his fantastic illustrations, and to Amanda Taylor-Snelson for making the pages look so beautiful. This book is dedicated to my girls, Evangeline and Arabella – I love you both so much!

4

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

For the Grown-Ups
“No, I don’t like spinach! Yuk!” “Please, please can I have some ice cream for dessert?” If you’re like many parents or childminders, you may have trouble convincing your munchkins to “eat their greens”, or they may constantly crave candy or other processed foods. You may also have children who suffer milk or gluten allergies or intolerances. It could be that you’re trying to increase your own intake of fresh, raw fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, and you want your children to join you on the path to health. Or you may be a family that follows a high-raw diet, and you want a recipe book that your children can use to help maintain their excitement about healthy raw foods, and so that they become skilled in raw food preparation. If any of the above situations apply to you, then this book has the answer! You’ve probably noticed that when your children are engaged in the process of food creation, it’s more likely they’ll try, and even enjoy, the food they’ve been preparing. This book offers 36 fantastic recipes that will inspire them to get into the kitchen and experiment with nature’s bounty! Now is the time to switch your children on to healthy habits – it’s really up to you to
Joanne Newell

Giving your children the gift of your time and guidance, and your confidence in their abilities, w ill repay itself over and over again, in so many ways...

5

encourage them to set up habits that will serve them for their lifetime. The recipes in this book feature raw fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, which are flavor- and vitamin-packed and contain a “life force” that can be compromised by cooking. I’m not saying that your diet should consist only of raw foods, but most children (and grown-ups) could do with a boost of these foods, so encouraging children to make healthy, tasty drinks, salads, snacks and desserts can only be a good thing. You won’t find any recipes here calling for refined sugars or flours, and you won’t need to switch on an oven. Imagine being thrilled that your children want to make healthy Chunky Monkey Ice Cream; Apple-Raisin Boats; Squiggly Zucchini Pasta & Cherry-Tom Sauce; or a Froggy Delight Green Smoothie? The concept of green smoothies is introduced in this book (see the article on page 46) – if your kids abhor eating greens, these vividly colored, delicious smoothies (which combine fruits and greens in a drinkable form) will help them get their daily dose of greens, without fuss. Instead of coercing them into eating their greens, they may be asking YOU for a green smoothie! Even better, they’ll want to make the Inspiring, fun, easysmoothies themselves! to-follow recipes, All recipes are very clearly explained, along w ith raw-food and are suitable for children aged knowledge – all in a seven to 12 years. Recipes range colorful book that’s from super-easy to somewhat more challenging – you are the best judge just for them! of your child’s level of ability in the

6

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

kitchen, so all you’ll have to do is provide guidance whenever you feel it’s needed. There’s no cooking involved, so there’s no risk of nasty burns or scalding – however, most recipes require the use of a sharp knife, and some recipes use electrical equipment such as a food processor, blender or juicer. So it’s best if you’re in the kitchen while any child is preparing food, even if they’re older and are more kitchen-savvy.

But wait – there’s more! Fun, healthy-food activities, games and

features are dotted throughout the book, making this a perfect resource for homeschoolers. Among other things, your children will learn about the importance of sharing food with others, about table manners, and about why eating local, organic produce is so important. They’ll gain valuable kitchen skills that will stand them in good stead, and, by reading and following written instructions, they’ll be flexing their “concentration” muscles. So, you’ve got it all here. Your children’s health is in your hands, and, once you print out this book, it’s also in theirs! Let ’em loose in the kitchen!

Joanne Newell

7

Raw Food Resources For Grown-Ups
If you’re interested in more information on the benefits of increasing the amount of raw, unprocessed foods in your family’s diet, there are plenty of inspiring, information-packed resources available. The following provide a variety of approaches and opinions. If you’re considering transitioning your family to a high-raw, or even an all-raw diet, it’s important that you read broadly and arm yourself with as much knowledge as possible, so that you’re able to ensure your family’s nutritional needs are well taken care of. So grab yourself a glass of green smoothie (if you can wrestle one away from your little ’un), and fill up on some very interesting “food for thought”. Printed Books Baby Greens: A Live-Food Approach for Children of All Ages by Michaela Lynn & Michael Chrisemer, N.C. – a practical, inspiring guide with a focus on babies and young children. Evie’s Kitchen by Shazzie – a gorgeous, full-color, “how-to” book for raising a raw vegan child. Features well-researched nutritional info, Shazzie’s journey through motherhood, and a gazillion mouthwatering recipes. Green for Life by Victoria Boutenko – solid, practical information on green smoothies, from the inventor!

8

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

E-Books The Healthy Lunchbox: Nutritious Meals Your Kids Won’t T rade for a Lollipop by Shannon Leone (http://www.rawmom.com/ HealthyLunchbox/) – wow! Over 50 high-raw, kid-friendly recipes, and heaps of detailed tips from an experienced raw mom. Websites Raw Mom (www.rawmom.com) – inspiring, broad-ranging advice for attentive parenting, including raw-food guidance and ideas. The Garden Diet (www.thegardendiet.com) – devoted to one family’s raw-vegan journey, with great recipe e-books (available through the site).

Joanne Newell

9

your Very Own Recipe Book!
Hey there, junior chef! I’m Monkey Mike and I love making yummy food in the kitchen. Do you, too? Yes? Then you’ll love this book – it’s packed with fun recipes, written just for you. Why not try creamy Cherry-Banana Ice Cream (see the recipe on page 120)? You can probably guess that I love bananas, so that’s one of my favourite recipes. Or what about Kiwi Eggcups (page 84)? Or tangy Orange-Choc Bliss Balls (page 90)? Or a smoothie that’s a really cool color – green!? (Yep, you can make green smoothies, which look gross but taste so good – read more about them on page 46).

10

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

All the recipes in the book taste fantastic, but they’re also good for you! Isn’t that great? Eating fresh, uncooked fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds will help your body grow to be strong and healthy. There aren’t just recipes in this book – there are also fun activities, from a word search (page 58) to learning how to grow a little garden in your kitchen (page 76). Why not print out the entire book and place the pages in plastic sleeves (to keep the pages from getting soggy or splattered while you’re preparing food)? You could then put the sleeves in a ringbinder, with dividers for the different sections of recipes. Or, you could just print out the pages you need. So, pick a recipe that sounds great, ask a grown-up if you can make it, and then join me in the kitchen for a tasty adventure!

Joanne Newell

11

Feeling Great!
Have you ever felt soooo good that you just wanted to jump up and down with happiness? And have you ever felt so horrible and unwell that you just wanted to curl up in a ball on your bed and do nothing? Do you know what things you can do to make you feel really, really good more often? • Get enough sleep (kids your age need about 10 or 11 hours’ Move your body by sleep a night). running up stairs, kicking a ball • Move your body a lot, with around at lunchtime, lots of activity (try to move vigorously for at least 30 and grooving to your minutes a day). favorite music! Or head w ith me to the • Drink enough water (a few monkey bars... glasses a day). • Get plenty of fresh air and sunshine (at least 10 minutes of sunlight a day, but not in the hottest part of the day). • Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables (at least two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables a day). It’s so important to eat lots of uncooked fruits and veggies, because they contain heaps of vitamins and minerals, and living energy, which your body loves! Have you ever noticed that wild animals don’t cook their food, and that they rarely get sick? Well, we’re animals too, so it makes sense to eat fresh food to make sure we stay healthy.

12

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

This book will help you eat more raw fruits and vegetables, because the recipes are just so delicious. So, you’ll be eating yummy food and making yourself feel good because the food is good for you! Good for You, Good for the Planet

The very best fruits and vegetables are grown “organically”. Have you heard about organic food? It just means that when a farmer decides to grow a plant, he or she uses good soil that contains compost (or animal poop) to help the plants grow, and uses natural sprays to keep bugs and pests from eating all the food as it grows. However, some farmers use strong, man-made chemicals to help make the plant grow and to keep pests away, and these chemicals are not very good for your body. It’s also believed that food grown in the “conventional way”, with lots of chemicals, has fewer vitamins and minerals than food that’s grown organically. So, always try to eat organic food, whenever you can!
Joanne Newell

13

Feeling Great! cont...
Eating organic food is also good for the environment, because the chemicals used in conventional farming get into the soil, the waterways and the air we breathe. Organic gardening is much kinder to the earth, water and air, and is in harmony with nature. This planet is going to be your home for the rest of your life, so eating organically is a way of helping keep the planet a healthy place to live. Gardening Fun The best way to get the freshest, local, in-season, organic food – is to grow it yourself! Ask the grown-ups at your home to let you have a small corner of the garden, or a few pots, and try your hand at growing tasty fresh tomatoes, juicy strawberries and crunchy lettuces (you can pick off the leaves you want to eat while the lettuce is still in the ground or pot, and then the lettuce keeps growing!). You could even use your home-grown food to make some of the recipes in this book – you can get started on page 76, growing sprouts in an indoor kitchen garden!

14

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Grown it? Eat it! If you’ve already grown a few tasty fruits and veggies, why not try them in these recipes? Bell pepper (capsicum) Walnut Creek Dip (page 102) Butter lettuce Simple Garden Salad (page 68) Carrots Bunny Juice (page 40) Cherry tomatoes Squiggly Zucchini Pasta & Cherry-Tom Sauce (page 108) Cucumber Mrs. Mac’s Veggie Face (page 100) Oranges Smiley-Face Frozen Orange Wedges (page 82) Passionfruit Summer Days Fruit Salad (page 60) Raspberries Cat’s Meow Choc Pudding (page 126) Spinach Froggy Delight Green Smoothie (page 52) Strawberries Strawberry Patch Ice Lollies (page 116) Swiss chard (silverbeet) Alien Slime Smoothie (page 48) Tomatoes Mini Burritos (page 106)
Joanne Newell

15

Introduction to the Kitchen
The kitchen is a pretty special place. Magic happens there. You take a few fresh ingredients, chop them, mash them, juice them or blend them, and – alacazam! – a tasty treat emerges before your very eyes. So what do you need to do before making some magic in the kitchen? • Choose a recipe that you think would be delicious, and check that you have the ingredients and equipment needed to make it. • Ask a grown-up for permission to use the kitchen (and you might need them to stay and help). • Pop on an apron, or wear old clothes. • If you have long hair, tie it back. • Wash your hands thoroughly (with soap!). Once you’ve chosen a recipe, and you know you have everything needed to make it, you can begin! Follow the recipe exactly as it appears in the book the first time; when you make it again, you’ll know whether you want to change anything in the recipe (maybe using some different ingredients). Even better, why not try making your very own creation? At the back of this book you’ll find worksheets so that you can write down your own recipes!

16

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Remember to: • Wipe clean all kitchen benches before getting out ingredients and equipment for each recipe. • Give all fruits and vegetables a good scrub clean before you use them (wash them in a sink with warm water and a splash of vinegar – even if you’re going to be removing the skins or peels. Germs from the outside of fruit and vegetables can transfer to the chopping board if they’re not washed away first). • Always cut on a chopping board, and always hold the knife by the handle; never pick it up by the blade. If you haven’t used a knife before, ask a grown-up to show you how (and see page 26 for more information). • Try to use the freshest fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts available. They will have heaps of vitamins and minerals, and taste so much better than food that isn’t as fresh. • Have a blast in the kitchen!

Joanne Newell

17

Glossary
Here’s a list of some words you might come across in the recipes in this book. Chop To cut a food into small pieces – to chop roughly is to cut into chunky pieces; to chop finely is to chop into very small pieces. Grate To move food down over the blades of a grater, creating shredded pieces of food. Mash To squash a food until it is soft and creamy. Peel To take off the peel from a fruit or vegetable. Scoop To use a spoon to lift food. Slice To use a knife to cut an ingredient into thin or thick slices. Soak To cover food (usually chopped nuts or dates) with liquid, leaving it until the food is fairly soft.

18

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Mike’s Kitchen

Giggles

I love food jokes– hope you like I love food jokes – these! I hope you like these!

What do you call two banana peels? A pair of slippers! How do you make an orange laugh? Tickle its navel!

What do ghosts eat for dessert? Boo-berry ice cream! Why did the apple stop in the middle of the road? He ran out of juice! Why are frogs always so happy? They eat whatever bugs them!

How do you make a walnut laugh? Crack it up!

What do all vegetables wish for? Peas (peace) on earth!

If twins could choose their favorite fruit, what would it be? Pears!

Joanne Newell

19

Equipment
Raw (uncooked) foods are usually quick and easy to make. The following pieces of equipment make things even quicker and easier! They don’t have to cost a lot of money, either. Blender Blenders help you to make creamy smoothies and milkshakes. If you have a super-duper, whizz-bang blender, then you may not need to chop ingredients as much as the recipes say to do. But if your blender isn’t very strong, you might need to blend food or drinks for longer than stated in the recipes. You can also blend liquids in a tall glass jug, using a handheld “stick” blender. Chopping Board A really good, solid chopping board is all you’ll need. However, you might want a separate board for chopping smelly foods like onion and garlic… Always make sure your boards are very, very clean. Electric Juicer You can use any kind of electric juicer for the recipes in this book. You’ll also need a citrus juicer for some recipes – this could be electric or manual. Food Processor This is a really useful piece of equipment for making all sorts of exciting food. You’ll need a food processor with a 9-cup (2-litre) bowl for some of the recipes in this book.

20 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Grater A “box”-type grater is best, with a “fine” grating side and a “coarse” grating side. Be really careful using a grater, especially when your fingers are close to the blades. Nut-Milk Bag This bag is used for making almond milk (see the recipe on page 34) and green juices (page 44) – it separates pulp from liquid. If you don’t have a nut-milk bag or a fine sieve, try using a clean knee-high stocking instead! Sharp Knife It is really important to have a good-quality sharp knife (at a size that fits your hand), so that you can chop through all sorts of fruits, vegetables and nuts. However, always make sure that a grown-up is around when you’re using it. See page 26 for how to use a knife. Spiralizer Ever wanted to turn your vegies into crazy spaghetti? When you push vegetables through a spiralizer, tasty long strands come out! See page 108 for a great “pasta” recipe that uses the spiralizer. Extra note: All recipes use US cup and spoon measurements, which are: 1 cup – 236 ml; 1 teaspoon – 5ml; 1 tablespoon – 15ml.

Joanne Newell

21

Ingredients
You’ll know most of the fruit, vegetable, nut and seed ingredients in this book. However, there may be a few ingredients you haven’t heard of. Find out more about them below. Whenever you can, try to buy organic ingredients. Some of the below ingredients come in “raw” (unheated) versions, so if you’re able to buy those, then that’s great! Because fruit and vegetables are natural, they can vary in size and flavor each time you buy or grow them. So, it’s possible that the recipes in this book may taste different each time you make them. That’s all part of the fun! All recipes in this book assume that you’re using medium-sized fruit and vegetables. Please make sure that you wash all fruit and vegetables before use (for more about this, see page 17). Agave Nectar This nectar is made from the middle part of the agave plant, and is a natural liquid sweetener. It shouldn’t be used too often, because it’s better to eat sugar with its natural fiber – like when you eat a piece of fruit. You can buy light or dark agave, and either type is fine for the recipes in this book. Almond Butter This is just like peanut butter except that it’s made from almonds! The nuts are crushed into a yummy paste. All sorts of nuts can be used to make nut butters. Cacao Powder This is chocolate powder. It makes food taste so chocolatey and delicious, but it’s a “treat” food and is best eaten only sometimes. You can always use carob powder instead of cacao powder. 22 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Celtic Sea Salt This tasty salt has lots of minerals in it. If you can’t find this salt in your local stores then you can use regular sea salt. Coconut Oil This is also known as coconut butter – when the weather is warm, the coconut oil is soft and sometimes runny, and when the weather is cold (or if you keep it in the fridge), it becomes hard and solid. If you’re preparing a recipe in winter, sit the sealed jar in a large bowl of very warm water until you can see that the butter has become runny. Medjool Dates These dates are larger than normal dates, but they taste yummy and add sweetness to many recipes. If you don’t have Medjool dates in the house, you can use 2 regular, smaller dates in place of 1 Medjool date. Vanilla Extract This extract is made from the vanilla bean – vanilla adds a really lovely flavor to food and drinks. If you can’t find pure vanilla extract, you can use vanilla beans (if the recipe uses a blender). You’ll need about one-third of a vanilla bean when a recipe asks for 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract. Wakame Have you ever eaten a sea vegetable before? Wakame grows in “forests” in the sea, but we are lucky enough to be able to eat it – it’s full of vitamins and minerals, it’s chewy, and it tastes great!

Joanne Newell

23

How Can I Tell if It’s Ripe?
Below are some common fruits and vegetables, and ways of telling when they are ripe. Avocado These should be slightly soft when you press them gently. Banana The skin of the banana should be a deep yellow color, and have dark speckles. If you buy a non-organic banana, you should wash the skin before peeling it – this helps wash away chemicals that could get on your hands and onto food. Cantaloupe Also known as rockmelon, a cantaloupe is ripe if it feels slightly soft when you press your thumb on the “stem” end (the base). The stem area should also smell sweet. Mango The stem area of the mango should smell fruity, and the same area should feel only slightly soft when you press it. Papaya The papaya should smell sweet at the stem, and when you gently press the skin it should feel slightly soft. Passionfruit The uglier the passionfruit looks, the better! When ripe, it should have a dark, wrinkly skin.

24

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Peach If you are buying the yellow variety of peach, they should have a rich yellow (or rosy-red) color. They should also smell sweet and, well, peachy! Always buy organic peaches. Pear To tell whether a pear is ripe, squeeze the stem area gently – it should feel slightly soft. Persimmon The most common type of persimmon – Fuyu – will be slightly firm when ripe, and is a deep orangey-red color. Pineapple Your pineapple is ripe if it’s a golden color and smells sweet and fragrant. Strawberry These little beauties are ripe when they are a rich red color, and when you can smell their aroma. Tomato Look for bright red tomatoes that are just a teensy bit soft when you give them a gentle squeeze. Always buy organic tomatoes.

Joanne Newell

25

Chop, Chop! How to Use a Knife
You’ll need a knife to make most of the recipes in this book, and it’s a good idea to get lots of practice chopping different ingredients. It’s up to the grown-ups in your family to decide whether or not they think you’re ready to use a knife – when you are ready, this handy little guide will get you started. A chef’s knife is the best type to use, and it really has to be sharp so that it will cut easily through food. You can use a smaller, serrated edge knife, but you will need to use a “sawing” motion rather than the “rolling” motion that we describe below. Safety Always pick up a knife by the handle, never by the blade. If you need to walk across a room with a knife, point the blade downwards and walk slowly across the room. The safest way to hold a knife is by gripping it around the handle with your thumb on the inside (no fingers near or on top of the blade). There’s no need to chop quickly like the chefs on TV do – at first, take it really slowly so that you can see where the blade is at all times. One more thing – always, always, always make sure an adult is in the kitchen when you’re using a knife. Let’s Get Chopping! For general chopping of most vegetables and fruits, with a chef’s knife, the “rolling” technique is the best one to use. This means that the knife “rolls” up and down over the food – the area near the tip of the knife should always stay in contact with 26 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

the chopping board, while the lower third of the blade is the part that does all the cutting – see the picture to the right. If you move the handle gently up and down, the part near the tip stays on the chopping board. The other hand holds the food steady on the chopping board. Keep your fingertips curled under, with the knuckle of your middle finger facing (but not necessarily touching) the blade of the knife. This means you won’t chop off your fingers! Sometimes you’ll need to stop chopping so that you can move the unchopped food closer to the blade. Your wrist will move up and down as you chop, and will go in the direction of a backwards circle. If you need to chop through something very hard, you can push down on the top of the knife with your hand – but make sure that your fingers are stretched out on that hand, so that they aren’t near the blade. Push down with the lower edge of your palm. Try to make sure that the knife stays upright and doesn’t wobble as you push down. Remember, practice really does make perfect! Start out by chopping pieces of celery, because these are long and easy to slice. Before you know it, you’ll be chopping for your whole family!
Joanne Newell

27

Life’s a Bowl of Cherries
Coloring Fun & Jigsaw Y’know, life really is a bowl of cherries! When you eat scrumptious fruit like cherries, you feel great! Grab your pencils, pens or crayons and color in this drawing – then carefully cut jigsawpattern lines, and use the picture as a jigsaw puzzle. If you like, you could glue your colored work onto thin cardboard before cutting it out as a puzzle.

28

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Smoothies, Milkshakes, & Juices
Whip up a storm in the kitchen with these thirst-quenchers!

29

Cantaloupe Cruiser

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
This easy, breezy, yummy smoothie is sometimes called cantaloupe (rockmelon) milk, because it is so creamy. Whatever you decide to call it, why don’t you give it a try this weekend, to share with a good friend?

Ingredients

1 cantaloupe (rockmelon), cold from the fridge

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

dessert spoon

blender

2 tall glasses

30 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the cantaloupe in half (a grown-up may need to do this for you). 2. Use the dessertspoon to scoop out the seeds from the middle of the 2 cantaloupe halves. 3. Cut the cantaloupe in half again, and cut the peel off the cantaloupe. (Throw the seeds and peel into your compost!) 4. Cut the cantaloupe into 1-inch (2.5cm) chunks, and drop the chunks into the blender. 5. Put the lid on the blender, and turn the blender on for at least 20 seconds. The smoothie should be creamy and have no chunks in it. 6. Pour the smoothie into the glasses, and enjoy!

Top tip: Make sure you drink this at least 20 minutes before or after eating anything else, because melons don’t digest well w ith other foods.

Joanne Newell

31

Monkey Mike’s Banana Smoothie
Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
I go “ape” for this creamy banana smoothie! Before starting the recipe, you might want to help me find the bananas I’ll need – see the maze on page 80. I love making this for Joanne’s children, Evie and Bella. This is their most favorite smoothie in the whole world!

Ingredients

3 bananas

1 cup water, for blending

2 Medjool dates

cup water, for soaking

1 ⁄4

teaspoon vanilla extract ( 2 ⁄ 3 vanilla bean)

2 ⁄3

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large freezer bag

blender

measuring cups

measuring spoons

tea cup

2 tall glasses

32

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchenn

How to make it
1. The night before you want to make this smoothie, chop 2 of the bananas into little pieces and pop the pieces into the freezer bag. Spread out the banana pieces inside the bag, seal the bag, and then put it into the freezer. 2. The next day, take the bag out of the freezer and, while the bag is still sealed, use your hands to break up some of the chunks of frozen banana. Then open the freezer bag and tip the banana pieces into the blender. Add the 1 cup blending water to the blender and leave the bananas to start thawing slightly. 3. Chop the Medjool dates in half and remove the pit. Chop each date finely, and put the pieces into the tea cup. Pour the 1 ⁄ 4 cup water into the tea cup, on top of the date pieces, and leave to soak (soaking the dates will make them a bit easier to blend up). 4. Chop the extra (room-temperature) banana, and add this to the blender. 5. Add the vanilla extract to the blender. 6. Add the dates to the blender, along with their soaking water. 7. Blend the ingredients for at least 15–20 seconds, or until the mixture is smooth. 8. Pour the smoothie into the glasses, and enjoy!

Top tip: If you don’t have time to freeze bananas, you can still make this a cool drink – just roughly chop the 3 room-temperature bananas, and add only 3 / 4 cup of water to the blender (instead of 1 cup). Then add the vanilla and dates to the blender, and about 6 ice cubes.

Joanne Newell

33

Creamy Almond Milk

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
If you can’t drink cow’s milk, or just don’t like the taste, try this delicious sweet almond milk instead. It’s so much fun to make! You can drink it straight, or use it on muesli. Your hands are going to get a little wet – curious? Read on… (Remember, if you have a really powerful blender, you may not need to chop the almonds first.)

Ingredients

2 Medjool dates

cup water, for soaking

1 ⁄4

1 cup almonds

2 1 ⁄ 2 cups water, for blending

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

tea cup

measuring cups

blender

nut milk bag (or fine sieve)

medium bowl

glass jug (optional)

2 tall glasses

34 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the dates in half and remove the pit. Chop each date finely and put the pieces into the tea cup. Pour the 1 ⁄ 4 cup water into the tea cup, on top of the date pieces, and leave to soak while you prepare the rest of the milk. 2. Roughly chop the almonds into 2 or 3 pieces each (tip: to make this easier, chop half a cup at a time). Pop the chopped almonds into the blender. 3. Add the 2 1 ⁄ 2 cups water to the blender, and put the lid on. Blend on full power for at least 20 seconds, until the mix looks all milky and frothy. 4. Put the nut-milk bag or fine sieve into the medium bowl, and carefully pour the almond and water mix into the bag or sieve. 5. Use your hands to gently squeeze the liquid out of the nut-milk bag (pretend you’re milking a cow!), or to push the liquid through the sieve. 6. Carefully pour the milk back into the blender. You can throw away the leftover pulp, or, if you have a dehydrator, use it to make dehydrated cookies. 7. Add the chopped dates, and their soaking water, to the blender and blend for at least 20 seconds. For chilled milk, pour the mixture into the glass jug and refrigerate for at least 2 hours (it’s best to use this milk within a day). 8. Pour the milk into the glasses, and enjoy!

Top tip: If you don’t have time to chill the milk for a couple of hours, add only 2 cups of water at step 3, and add about 8 ice cubes before blending at step 7. Then you’ll have cool, creamy milk – instantly.

Joanne Newell

35

Merry Berry Milkshake

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
Sweet, milky, refreshing and full of berry flavor. What more could you ask for on a hot summer’s day? Whip up one of these milkshakes and invite around a few friends. Soon you’ll be the most popular kid in your street!

Ingredients

cup cashews

1 ⁄2

1 3 ⁄ 4 cups cold water

10 strawberries

1 banana

1 cup frozen blueberries

1 tablespoon honey

handful of blueberries (fresh or frozen)

Equipment

measuring cups

sharp knife

chopping board

blender

measuring spoons

2 tall glasses

36 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Roughly chop the cashews and place them in the blender. Add the water to the blender, and blend for about 20 seconds, until you have a milky foam. 2. Chop off the green tops of the strawberries, and chop each strawberry in half. Roughly chop the banana. 3. Add the strawberries, banana, frozen blueberries and honey to the blender. Blend the milkshake for at least 15 seconds, or until it is completely blended. 4. Pour the milkshake into the glasses, and pop a few extra blueberries into each glass (these make a nice chunky, chewy treat). Serve!

Top tip: If you haven’t grown any strawberry plants in your garden this summer, find out whether there’s a U-Pick strawberry farm near your town or city. They’re great fun, and you get to eat fresh, juicy strawberries that you’ve picked yourself!

Joanne Newell

37

Vanilla-Cashew Milkshake

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
If you love creamy vanilla milkshakes, then you’ll love this recipe. Pour the milkshake into glasses and sip it up through colorful, twisty straws. The perfect milkshake for rainy, windy Saturday afternoons.

Ingredients

2 bananas

2 cups water, for blending

2 Medjool dates

1 ⁄ 4 cup

water, for soaking

cashews

3 ⁄ 4 cup

1 tablespoon vanilla extract (or 1 vanilla bean)

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large freezer bag

measuring cups

blender

measuring spoons

teaspoon, for taste-testing

2 tall glasses

38

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. The night before you want to make this milkshake, chop the bananas into little pieces and pop the pieces into the freezer bag. Spread out the banana pieces inside the bag, seal the bag, and then put it into the freezer. 2. The next day, take the bag out of the freezer and, while the bag is still sealed, use your hands to break up some of the chunks of frozen banana. Then open the freezer bag and tip the banana pieces into the blender. Add the 2 cups blending water to the blender and leave the bananas to start thawing slightly. 3. Chop the dates in half and remove the pit. Chop each date finely, and put the pieces into the tea cup. Pour the ¼ cup water into the tea cup, on top of the date pieces, and leave to soak (soaking the dates will make them a bit easier to blend up). 4. Roughly chop the cashews and put these into the blender. 5. Add the vanilla extract and dates (including soaking water) to the blender and blend for at least 20 seconds. 6. Unplug the blender, and dip in the teaspoon to test the milkshake. If it’s not sweet enough, add another chopped date, turn on the blender, and blend until the extra date is completely combined. 7. When it’s sweet enough, pour the milkshake into the glasses, and serve.

Did you know? That Medjool dates, which make this milkshake sweet, are known as the “king of dates”? They came originally from Morocco, where they were once eaten only by Moroccan royalty.

Joanne Newell

39

Bunny juice

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
I’ve heard that rabbits love carrots. And so will you, in this sweet, vitamin-packed juice! It’s best for kids to have diluted juice, so we’ve included water in this recipe.

Ingredients

6 carrots

2 sticks celery

3 apples

water

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

medium bowl

electric juicer

2 tall glasses

dessert spoon

40 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the carrots into pieces that are about 3 inches (7.5cm) long. Then chop these pieces to be about 1 inch (2.5cm) thick. Put these pieces into the bowl. 2. Chop the celery into pieces that are 3 inches (7.5cm) long, and add these to the bowl. 3. Chop the apples in half, and in half again, so that you have 4 pieces. Then chop each apple in half again, so that you have 8 pieces, and add these to the bowl. 4. Turn on the juicer, and put in a piece of carrot, then a piece of celery, and finally a piece of apple. 5. Keep putting pieces of carrot, celery, and apple into the juicer until they are all used up. 6. Pour the juice into the 2 glasses, so that there is an equal amount of juice in each glass. 7. Add water to the juice until the glasses are filled up. Stir the juice and water together with the dessert spoon. 8. Serve!

Did you know? That carrots weren’t originally orange? Until the 16th century, there were only purple, red, white and yellow carrots – to make orange carrots, Dutch growers combined yellow carrots and red carrots!

Joanne Newell

41

pine-mango splash

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
This juice has lots of vitamins to give your body a big energy boost. It’s tasty and zingy – give it a try! It’s best for kids to have diluted juice, so we’ve included water in this recipe.

Ingredients

pineapple (4 cups, chopped)

3 ⁄4

2 mangos

water

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

medium bowl

electric juicer

2 tall glasses

dessert spoon

42 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the pineapple into 1-inch (2.5cm) slices, cutting across the shortest part of the pineapple, so that you are creating “rings”. Chopping pineapple can be pretty tough, so a grown-up may need to do this for you. 2. Use the knife to carefully slice off the tough skin from each ring. 3. Chop the pineapple rings into 1-inch (2.5cm) chunks. You don’t need to throw away the hard core from the middle of each ring, because the core can be juiced. Put the pieces in the bowl. 4. Starting at the top of the mango, carefully cut a large piece off one side (try not to hit the large seed that is in the middle of the fruit). Then cut another large piece off the other side. There should be 2 smaller pieces on either side of the seed – carefully slice these pieces off the seed. 5. Make 1-inch (2.5cm) criss-cross patterns across the flesh of each piece of mango, making sure you don’t cut through the skin on each piece (a grown-up may need to help). Then push the skin inside-out, so that the criss-cross pieces are sticking out. Pull the criss-cross pieces off the skin, and pop the pieces into the bowl. 6. Turn on the juicer, and put in a piece of pineapple, then a piece of mango, and keep putting pieces of fruit into the juicer until all the fruit is used up. 7. Pour the juice into the 2 glasses, so that there is an equal amount of juice in each glass. 8. Add water to the juice until the glasses are filled up. Stir the juice and water together with the dessertspoon. 9. Serve!

Top tip: If you want to make this a cold, refreshing drink, use cold water to top up the juice, or add ice cubes at the end. You could also chill the pineapple before chopping it, but your fingers w ill become pretty cold during chopping! (Avoid chopping the pineapple and then chilling the pieces, because you might lose some vitamins.)

Joanne Newell

43

Green Light for Go! Juice

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
Have you ever tried a green juice? They’re usually a beautiful color, and they taste fantastic – sweet, but savory as well. This vitaminpacked green juice is so easy and fun to make. We mix everything up in a blender, and then strain the mix through a nut-milk bag.

Ingredients

1 1 ⁄ 2 continental cucumbers (each 25cm)

4 pears

Equipment

2 cups spinach leaves, rinsed (pack lightly into cup)

1 ⁄ 2 cup

water

sharp knife

chopping board

blender

medium bowl

nut-milk bag (or fine sieve)

funnel

2 tall glasses

44 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the cucumbers in half lengthways and chop these into 1-inch chunks. Put the chunks into the blender. 2. Add the spinach leaves to the blender. 3. Starting at the top of the pear, chop each pear into 4 pieces. Cut these pieces into 1-inch (2.5cm) chunks. Add these chunks to the blender. 4. Add the water to the blender, and blend for at least 20 seconds, or until all ingredients are completely blended. 5. Put the blender jug beside the bowl on the kitchen bench. Place the nut-milk bag inside the bowl. Hold the bag open slightly with 1 hand, and, with your other hand, lift the blender jug and pour the mixture into the bag. 6. Put down the jug, and begin to squeeze the juice out of the bag, into the bowl. 7. When most of the juice has been squeezed from the bag, there will be pulp left in the bag – this can be thrown away (if you have a compost bin, pop it in there!). 8. Place the funnel on top of 1 of the glasses, and carefully pour the juice into the glass. Repeat this with the other glass. 9. Serve, and enjoy. Vrroooooom!

Top tip: If you only have a small blender, make 2 batches (halve the amount of ingredients for each batch), so that you don’t overload your blender.

Joanne Newell

45

Green smoothies are Great!
You’ve probably had one or two delicious, thick, milky smoothies in your life. Maybe they were flavored with strawberry, banana, mango, or blueberry… but have you ever had a GREEN smoothie? No? Well, to make our bodies as healthy as possible, we need to eat a LOT of dark leafy greens. “Yuk!”, I hear you say? Yes, it can be hard to eat a lot of greens, because some don’t taste great. A few years ago, a clever lady called Victoria Boutenko came up with a great idea. She tried blending together greens and sweet fruits (and a bit of water) – and guess what? The fruits made the greens taste much nicer! Have you ever seen my cousin, the chimpanzee, eat a banana in the wild? Sometimes he rolls leaves around the banana before he eats it – those chimps know it’s great to blend sweet fruits with their greens. Any wonder green smoothies taste so great…even if they are a funny color. Victoria spread the news about her discovery, and since then, people all over the world have been making green smoothies. Nearly everyone who tries them loves them! Most green smoothies are made of more than half fruit (about 60% of the drink), with greens making up the rest, along with a little bit of water, juice or coconut water. So you really only taste the sweetness and flavor of the fruit.

46 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

But here’s the great bit – you get all the vitamins and minerals of the greens as well! Even though you can’t taste them! And blending greens makes them easier for your tummy to digest, so your body gets to make the most of all the good stuff. To get you started, there are three green smoothie recipes on the following pages. Why don’t you give them a try? Having one green smoothie a day will make you feel amazing! It’s important that you change around the types of greens that you put in smoothies, so make sure you use different greens from time to time. You could also try putting more greens into the smoothies each time, making them more green than ever – how green can you go? These are great in green smoothies: • Arugula (rocket) • Dandelion greens • Kale • Parsley • Romaine lettuce (cos lettuce) • Spinach • Swiss chard (silverbeet) You can also make savory green smoothies, using vegetables instead of fruits, but most people prefer the taste of sweeter smoothies. Once you’ve tried the recipes in this book, why don’t you have a go at creating your own green smoothie recipes? From page 136 you’ll find worksheets for you to use to record your creations. Go green!

Joanne Newell

47

alien slime smoothie

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
Trust me – this is one smoothie that you will just love. Aliens sure do! It has sweet bananas and blueberries as the main flavors, but we add a bit of “green” – Swiss chard (silverbeet) and celery – to add vitamins. The purply green color might look a little strange, but this smoothie sure tastes good!

Ingredients

3 bananas

2 sticks celery (optional)

2 Swiss chard (silverbeet) leaves

1 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)

1 cup water

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large freezer bag

blender

measuring cups

measuring jug

2 tall glasses

48 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. The night before you want to make this smoothie, chop the bananas into little pieces and pop the pieces into the freezer bag. Spread out the banana pieces inside the bag, seal the bag, and then put it into the freezer. 2. The next day, take the bag out of the freezer and, while the bag is still sealed, use your hands to break up some of the chunks of frozen banana. Then open the bag and tip the banana pieces into the blender, leaving them to thaw while you prepare the other ingredients. (Note: if you don’t have time to freeze bananas, just roughly chop room-temperature bananas and add 6 crushed ice cubes to the blender.) 3. Rinse clean the celery, and chop it into small pieces. Rinse the Swiss chard leaves, and chop off the hard white stem from the bottom of the leaves. Chop the leaves roughly. 4. Add the blueberries and water to the blender, and blend for 15–20 seconds. 5. Add the celery and Swiss chard to the blender, and blend for another 20 seconds, or until the smoothie is completely smooth. 6. Pour the smoothie into the glasses, and enjoy!

Did you know? That blueberries contain vitaminC, and that Sw iss chard contains iron? Blueberries and Sw iss chard are a great combination, because the vitamin C helps your body absorb iron – and iron is really important for keeping our blood healthy.

Joanne Newell

49

Groovy Green monster

Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
How about inviting a groovy green monster into your kitchen for breakfast tomorrow morning? He’s really very friendly – and tasty!

Ingredients

2 Medjool dates

1 ⁄ 4 cup

water, for soaking

1 ⁄ 2 papaya

(2 cups, chopped), chilled

2 small persimmons, chilled

3 ⁄ 4 cup water, 1 cup spinach leaves (pack for blending tightly into cup)

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

tea cup

measuring cups

dessert spoon

blender

2 tall glasses

50 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the dates in half and remove the pit. Chop each date finely, and put the pieces into the tea cup. Pour the 1 ⁄ 4 cup water into the tea cup, on top of the date pieces, and leave to soak (soaking the dates will make them a bit easier to blend up). 2. Use the dessertspoon to scoop out the black seeds from the inside of the papaya. 3. Chop the papaya half down the middle, and carefully slice off the skin from the back of each piece of papaya (you can throw the skin and black seeds into your compost). 4. Chop the papaya into 1-inch (2.5cm)-square pieces. Put these in the blender. 5. Starting at the top of each persimmon, slice each persimmon into 4 pieces, and carefully slice the skin from the outside of each piece. Chop the persimmon into 1-inch square pieces, and add these to the blender. 6. Add the dates (including soaking water) and 3 ⁄ 4 cup water to the blender, and blend for about 15–20 seconds, or until the dates are completely blended into the papaya and persimmon. 7. Switch off and unplug the blender, and add the spinach. Push the spinach down into the mix, switch on and blend again for another 15–20 seconds, or until the spinach is completely blended. 8. Pour the smoothie into the glasses, and enjoy!

Top tip: Add a little bit more spinach each time you make this smoothie – if you’ve invited friends over for a “Green Smoothie Slurp-Up”, see if you can gross them out by making it really green! (For party ideas, see “Kitchen Party at Your House” on page 128.)

Joanne Newell

51

Froggy delight Green smoothie
Makes enough for 2 tall glasses (or 3 small glasses)
Nope, you don’t need frogs for this recipe – whew! This tangy smoothie is a vibrant tree-froggy-green color, and is so yummy. It’s perfect to make in summer, when peaches and mangos are at their best. If you have a powerful blender, you can leave the skins on the peaches; if your blender isn’t very powerful, carefully slice off the skins before Step 2 of the recipe.

Ingredients

2 Medjool dates

1 ⁄ 4 cup water, for soaking

4 peaches, rinsed

1 mango, rinsed

3 ⁄ 4 cup

water, for blending

Equipment

1 cup spinach leaves, rinsed (pack lightly into cup)

sharp knife

chopping board

tea cup

measuring cups

blender

2 tall glasses

52

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the dates in half and remove the pit. Chop each date finely, and put the pieces into the tea cup. Pour the 1 ⁄ 4 cup water into the tea cup, on top of the date pieces, and leave to soak (soaking the dates will make them a bit easier to blend up). 2. Carefully slice the peach in half, from the top of the stem all the way around. Twist the halves apart and remove the large stone. Chop the peaches roughly and pop the pieces into the blender. 3. Starting at the top of the mango, carefully cut a large piece off one side (try not to hit the large seed that is in the middle of the fruit). Then cut another large piece off the other side. There should be 2 smaller pieces on either side of the seed – carefully slice these pieces off the seed. 4. Make criss-cross patterns across the flesh of each piece of mango, making sure you don’t cut through the skin on each piece (this is tricky – a grown-up may need to help you with this). Then push the skin inside-out, so that the criss-cross pieces are sticking out. Pull the criss-cross pieces off the skin, and pop the pieces into the blender. Did you know? This can be a messy job! 5. Wash and dry your hands, and add the dates (including soaking water) and 3 ⁄ 4 cup water to the blender. Blend for about 15–20 seconds. 6. Switch off and unplug the blender, and add the spinach. Push the spinach down into the mix, switch on and blend again for another 15–20 seconds, or until the spinach is completely blended. 7. Pour the smoothie into the glasses, and enjoy!

That peaches can be yellow or white? The yellow peaches are the ones you see most often, and they have yellow flesh inside and taste sweet but a little tangy. White peaches have white flesh and are really sweet. See if you can try both types this summer!

Joanne Newell

53

making mom Breakfast in Bed
Who kisses our knees better when we scrape them while playing outside? Who makes most of our tasty meals? Who drives us to our activities? Who listens to us when we have an exciting story to tell? Who is always there for us, no matter what? Usually, it’s our moms! It’s important to show our moms how much we love them. One way you can do this for your mom is to give her a “morning off”, and to make her a very special breakfast that you can serve to her in bed. The first step is to tell Mom that you’d like to do this for her – I bet she doesn’t say “no!”. It’s best to plan Mom’s breakfast in bed for a quiet weekend morning, so that she can really relax. The next step is to decide what you’re going to make her, and to check that you have all the ingredients. You might need to make a shopping list and make a trip to the shops with a grown-up.

54 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

The Menu Fruit is a great food to eat in the morning, so plan on making Mom a fruit-filled feast. Following is a menu plan for a summer breakfast. The night before, make sure you tell Mom what time you plan on serving breakfast, so that she knows what time to wake up. You could follow this menu plan, or you could make your own. Either way, why not draw up a small menu card that you can put on the serving tray with Mom’s breakfast, so that she feels that she’s at a hotel receiving a special room service breakfast? The menu card could be about 3 inches wide by 4 inches long (7.5cm by 10cm), so that it doesn’t take up too much room on the tray. Make sure you decorate it!

Joanne Newell

55

making mom Breakfast in Bed Cont...
The Breakfast Planner If you plan on serving breakfast to Mom at 9am, you’ll need to start making everything at about 7:30am. The night before, you’ll need to chop and soak the cashews to be able to make the Cashew Cream in the morning. 7:30am Make the Cashew Cream (see the recipe on page 88). 7:45am Put the dip in the fridge to chill. Chop the fruit for the Pine-Mango Splash (page 42). 8:00am 8:30am Make the Summer Days Fruit Salad (page 60). Make the juice and pour it into a tall glass – you won’t need to add water to this juice, as grown-ups can drink pure juice. You can add water to the rest of the juice later, to give yourself a big “well done” drink!

8:40am Go out into the garden and find a beautiful flower, or even a very small branch with glossy green leaves, that you can put on the tray. 9:00am Set the tray (see the picture on next page). Take the tray carefully in to Mom, with a big smile on your face, and a big “good morning” kiss once you’ve put the tray on her lap.

56

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to Set the Tray Moms usually love pretty things, so make the tray as gorgeous as you can. If you like, you could lay a colorful placemat on the tray, to start things off. Here’s how you could lay things out:

This is a beautiful way to say “thank you” to your mom, and to let her know how much you love her. By the way, this doesn’t just have to be for moms; it can be for any grown-up who showers you with love every day!

Joanne Newell

57

The “why we love Fruit” word search
There are so many reasons why we love fruit. We’ve hidden 16 fruit-loving reasons in the puzzle below – try searching for the hidden words. When you find one, circle it in the puzzle and cross it off the list. See if doing this puzzle doesn’t make you want to head straight for the fruit bowl… H P A C S G D E L I C I O U S B V E Z U C V P O R T W D O U X A T L C R A I N B O W M W J P M U N C H Y P N W V S J A T A L N D U G S T E I B R U O Z I R F I L M D Z B F L B I D C G U A Y E T E R H S W A C L R D F R O N S A V J M L S Y P U Y B R H T N L N A O Y U E G N S W E E T V I R G O I J R L C M P H A S C V S X Y E G V P H O A E L T H E I A C R E A M Y O B M G X L Y K T E B C E L O T V W H O L E S O M E M B J E H L I A M A G N I F I C E N T

ALIVE CREAMY CRUNCHY DELICIOUS

FRESH JUICY MAGNIFICENT MUNCHY RAINBOW SLURPY

SMOOTH SUCCULENT SWEET TANGY WHOLESOME VIBRANT

For the solution, please turn to page 140. 58 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

SALADS & DRESSINGS
Crunch and munch your way through these colorful, tasty bowls of goodness!

59

summer days Fruit salad
Serves 2-3 (makes about 4 cups)
Sweet, tangy and oh-so-summery. This juicy, vibrant fruit salad is perfect with dollops of chilled Cashew Cream on top (see the recipe on page 88). Mmm-mmm!

Ingredients

1 mango

1 peach

12 green grapes

6 strawberries

1 banana

Equipment

1 ⁄ 4 cup blueberries (fresh or defrosted)

1 passionfruit

sharp knife

chopping board

large bowl

dessert spoon

teaspoon

2 medium serving bowls

60 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Starting at the top of the mango, carefully cut a large piece off one side (try not to hit the large seed that is in the middle of the fruit). Then cut another large piece off the other side. There should be 2 smaller pieces on either side of the seed – carefully slice these pieces off the seed. 2. Make 1 ⁄ 2 -inch (about 1cm) criss-cross patterns across the flesh of each piece of mango, making sure you don’t cut through the skin on each piece (a grown-up may need to help). Then push the skin inside-out, so that the criss-cross pieces are sticking out. Pull the criss-cross pieces off the skin, and pop the pieces into the large bowl. 3. Carefully slice the peach in half, from the top of the stem all the way around. Twist the halves apart and remove the large stone. Slice each half into 4 wedges and cut these into chunks. Pop the chunks into the bowl with the mango. 4. Chop the grapes in half, lengthways (scoop out the seeds, if there are any) and add these to the bowl. 5. Chop the green hulls off the strawberries, and cut each strawberry into about 4 pieces, lengthways. Add these to the bowl. 6. Peel the banana and chop it in half, lengthways. Cut the halves into small chunks and add to the bowl. 7. Add the blueberries to the bowl. 8. Cut the passionfruit in half, and scoop out the seeds and juice with the teaspoon, adding to the bowl. Mix the fruit around with the dessertspoon, coating all fruit with passionfruit seeds and juices. 9. Use the dessertspoon to spoon the mixture into the serving bowls. Enjoy!

Top tip: T ry making your own summery fruit salad, using other fruits that are in season – what about a stonefruit salad w ith peaches, apricots, plums, and cherries?
Joanne Newell

61

winter Happiness Fruit salad
Serves 4
Make your tummy happy with this tangy fruit salad, which uses fruits that are at their best in winter. Try it for breakfast – it’ll brighten up the grayest winter morning!

Ingredients

2 mandarins

2 oranges

2 kiwifruit

1 pear

1 red apple

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large bowl

paring knife

citrus juicer

dessert spoon

2 medium serving bowls

62

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Peel the mandarins and separate the segments. Chop each segment in half (removing seeds, if there are any), and place these in the large bowl. 2. Peel 1 of the oranges, and separate the segments. Chop each segment into about 3 pieces (removing seeds, if there are any), and add these pieces to the bowl. 3. Slice the other orange in half, and use the citrus juicer to juice the halves. Set the juice aside. 4. Using the paring knife, carefully slice off the skins from the kiwifruit. Using the sharp knife, chop each kiwifruit in half lengthways (down the longest part of the fruit), and then chop each half into small chunks. Add these chunks to the bowl. 5. Slice the pear in half lengthways, then slice each half in half again (so that you have 4 quarters). Using the paring knife, cut the core out of each quarter. Using the sharp knife, cut each quarter into about 4 pieces, and chop these into chunks. Add the chunks to the bowl. 6. Slice the apple in half lengthways, then slice each half in half again (so that you have 4 quarters). Using the paring knife, cut the core out of each quarter. Using the sharp knife, cut each quarter into about 4 pieces, and chop these into chunks. Add the chunks to the bowl. 7. Pour the orange juice into the bowl, and use the dessertspoon to mix around the fruit pieces until they are well coated with the juice. 8. Then use the dessertspoon to spoon the mixture into the serving bowls. Enjoy!

Top tip: For a super-colorful salad, try using blood oranges instead of normal oranges, and a green apple instead of a red apple.

Joanne Newell

63

Dracula’s carrot salad
Serves 3 (makes 4 cups)
Whenever Count Dracula feels like a salad, this is the one he makes. He loves the bright orange of carrots, the bright red of beet, and the crunch of green onion and almonds. It’s a scarily tasty treat. He always makes Count Your Blessings Salad Dressing to go with it – be sure to make the dressing before starting the salad. Mwuh-ha-haha-ha!

Ingredients

1 beet (beetroot)

3 carrots

2 green onions (spring onions)

1 serving “Count Your Blessings Salad Dressing” (page 66)

12 almonds

Equipment

2 tablespoons 2 tablespoons raisins (sultanas) cilantro (coriander) leaves (pack leaves gently into spoon)

sharp knife

chopping board

rubber gloves

large stainless steel bowl

vegetable scrubber

potato peeler

grater

fork

3 medium glass serving bowls

64 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Peeling and grating beet is a messy job, so protect your hands by putting on some rubber gloves (and make sure you have your apron on, too!). Thoroughly clean the draining board next to the sink, and fill the sink with a little water. Put the large glass or stainless steel bowl beside the draining board. 2. Scrub the beet and carrots in the sink, and peel the outer skin from the beet with the vegetable peeler (to make it easier to peel, you could chop off the beet’s long root before peeling). 3. Place the grater on the clean draining board, and grate the beet onto it. Make sure you use the “coarse-grate” side. Place the grated beet into the bowl, and rinse down the draining board and grater. You could remove the rubber gloves now, or keep them on to grate the carrots. 4. On the chopping board, coarsely grate the carrots. Add the grated carrot to the bowl. 5. Peel the outer skin from the green onions, and chop off the root end off the onions. Chop the white part of the onions (and about 1 1 ⁄ 2 inches – 4cm – of the green part) into little circles. Add the chopped green onions and salad dressing to the bowl of beet and carrot, and combine gently with the fork. 6. Chop the cilantro and almonds roughly, and set aside. 7. Use the tongs to serve the salad into the glass serving bowls. 8. Sprinkle the raisins over the top of each salad, followed by the chopped almonds and cilantro. 9. Serve.

Top tip: T o make the raisins extra plump and juicy, try soaking them overnight in a tea cup, using water or the juice of an orange.

Joanne Newell

65

count your Blessings salad dressing
Makes 1 ⁄ 4 cup
This creamy, tangy orange dressing is perfect on green salads, but it’s also fabulous mixed through Dracula’s Carrot Salad (see the recipe on page 64). Yes, Count Dracula loves this one…

Ingredients

1 orange

2 tablespoons macadamia oil

2 teaspoons almond butter

teensy pinch Celtic sea salt

Equipment

grater

tea towel

chopping board

small bowl

sharp knife

citrus juicer

measuring spoons

mini whisk

66 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Wash and dry the orange thoroughly. 2. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the zest of half the orange. Put the zest into the small bowl. 3. Cut the orange in half and use the citrus juicer to juice the orange. Add the juice to the bowl. 4. Add the macadamia oil, almond butter and sea salt to the bowl. 5. Use the mini whisk to whisk the ingredients together, until everything is completely blended. 6. Serve over your favorite salad.

Did you know? That you can make your own almond butter? All you have to do is chop up about 1 cup of almonds as finely as you can, then put them in a food processor. Process the almonds until they look powdery, then gradually add about 5 to 6 tablespoons of almond oil and keep processing until you have a slightly runny paste. Store the butter in a glass jar in the fridge.
Joanne Newell

67

simple Garden salad
Serves 2-3 (makes 4 cups)
This easy salad tastes so good, and is so good for you! All of the ingredients here can be grown easily in your garden – why not ask a grown-up to help you set up a veggie patch or veggie pots?

Ingredients

1 butter lettuce

12 cherry tomatoes

1 carrot

3-inch (7.5cm)long piece continental cucumber

1 ⁄ 2 red

bell pepper (capsicum)

2 green onions (spring onions)

Equipment

1 serving “Sparkly Sunshine Salad Dressing” (page 70)

sharp knife

chopping board

salad spinner

large salad bowl

salad servers

2 medium serving bowls

68 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop off the stem of the lettuce and place the lettuce leaves in the salad spinner. (Don’t use any outer leaves that seem a bit limp.) 2. Rinse the leaves with water from the tap. Spin the leaves in the spinner until they are completely dry. Tear the leaves into small pieces that are no bigger than the palm of your hand. Place the pieces in the salad bowl. 3. Chop the cherry tomatoes in half and add to the bowl. 4. Chop the carrot into 1-inch-long (2.5cm-long) pieces and chop these into thin sticks. Add the sticks to the bowl. 5. Slice the cucumber into medium-sized circles, and add these circles to the bowl. 6. Chop the core and seeds out of the middle of the bell pepper, and slice the red part of the pepper into medium-sized sticks (make sure you place the shiny side of the pepper’s skin on the chopping board, and chop the inside, fleshy part with the knife). 7. Peel the outer skin from the green onions, and chop off the root ends. Chop the white part of the onions (and about 1 1 ⁄ 2 inches – 4cm – of the green part) into little circles. Add the chopped green onion and salad dressing to the bowl. 8. Use the salad servers to mix together all the salad ingredients and the dressing. 9. Place the salad into the glass serving bowls, using the salad servers.

Top tip: If you don’t have a salad spinner, you can rinse the lettuce leaves in the sink and then leave them to drain for a few minutes in a colander. You’ll need to finish drying the leaves w ith a tea towel.

Joanne Newell

69

sparkly sunshine salad dressing
Makes 1 ⁄ 4 cup
Try this zippy dressing on the Simple Garden Salad (see the recipe on page 68) – you’ll want to make it again and again!

Ingredients

1 clove garlic

1 lemon

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons honey

teensy pinch Celtic sea salt

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

small bowl

grater

tea towel

citrus juicer

measuring spoons

teaspoon

mini whisk

70 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Peel the skin from the garlic (tip: chop off the root end of the garlic – this will make it easier to pull off the papery skin). Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the clove (watch your fingers!). Add the grated garlic to the bowl. 2. Rinse and dry the lemon. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate half of the lemon’s skin. Put this zest into the bowl. 3. Cut the lemon in half and use the citrus juicer to juice it. Add the juice to the bowl. 4. Add the olive oil, honey (tip: use a teaspoon to scoop the sticky honey out of the measuring spoon) and salt to the bowl. 5. Use the mini whisk to whisk the ingredients together, until everything is completely blended. 6. Serve over your favorite salad.

Top tip: If your family eats only vegan food, it’s possible that you don’t eat honey. For this recipe, you could use 2 teaspoons of agave nectar instead of honey.

Joanne Newell

71

alfalfa in your mouth salad
Serves 2 (makes 3 1 ⁄ 2 cups)
If you’ve had a go at growing your own alfalfa sprouts (see the instructions on page 76), try them in this salad. Sweet, tangy, crunchy, slippery, soft – all the different ingredients in this salad provide amazing flavors, textures, and colors! And for extra fun, try eating it with chopsticks. I dare you.

Ingredients

2 cups alfalfa 1 cup spinach, sprouts (pack rinsed (pack lightly into cup) lightly into cup)

1 ⁄ 4 red bell pepper (capsicum)

1 mango

1 serving “Sublime Lime Salad Dressing” (page 74)

1 ⁄ 4 cup

mung bean sprouts

Equipment

measuring cups

medium bowl

sharp knife

chopping board

tongs

2 medium serving bowls

72

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Tip the alfalfa sprouts into the bowl. Gently use your (clean!) fingers to pull apart the sprouts so that they aren’t in a big clump. 2. Finely shred the spinach and add this to the bowl, using the tongs to combine the sprouts and shredded spinach. 3. Slice the bell pepper into thin sticks that are about 1 inch (2.5cm)long (make sure you place the shiny side of the pepper’s skin on the chopping board, and chop the inside, fleshy part with the knife). Add these sticks to the bowl. 4. Starting at the top of the mango, carefully cut a large piece off one side (try not to hit the large seed that is in the middle of the fruit). Then cut another large piece off the other side. There should be 2 smaller pieces on either side of the seed – carefully slice these pieces off the seed. 5. You’re only going to use the 2 larger pieces of mango in this salad, so set the smaller pieces aside (you can eat those later!). Make 1 ⁄ 2 inch (about 1cm) criss-cross patterns across the flesh of each piece of mango, making sure you don’t cut through the skin on each piece (a grown-up may need to help). Then push the skin inside-out, so that the criss-cross pieces are sticking out. Pull the criss-cross pieces off the skin, and pop the pieces into the bowl. 6. Add the salad dressing to the bowl, and stir everything gently with the tongs. 7. Use the tongs to serve the salad into the serving bowls. 8. Sprinkle the mung bean sprouts over the top of each salad. 9. Serve!

Top tip: T ry grow ing your own mung bean sprouts as well as alfalfa sprouts – however, they’ll need to be rinsed thoroughly (until the water runs clear) before you sprout them. When they’re harvested in China, the beans are dried on gravel roads, so they get very dusty.
Joanne Newell

73

sublime lime salad dressing
Makes 1 ⁄ 4 cup
Ooh! It’s good! Try it on Alfalfa in Your Mouth Salad (see the recipe on page 72) or on any green salad.

Ingredients

1 lime

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons agave nectar

teensy pinch Celtic sea salt

Equipment

tea towel

grater

chopping board

small bowl

sharp knife

citrus juicer

measuring spoons

mini whisk

74

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Rinse and dry the lime. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate half of the lime’s skin. Put this zest into the bowl. 2. Cut the lime in half and use the citrus juicer to juice the lime. Add the juice to the bowl. 3. Add the olive oil, agave nectar and salt to the bowl. 4. Use the mini whisk to whisk the ingredients together, until everything is completely blended. 5. Serve over your favorite salad.

Did you know?
That English sailors used to be called “Limeys”? They got this nickname from eating citrus fruit (such as lemons and limes) on long voyages, to prevent a nasty condition called scurvy. Citrus fruit contains heaps of vitamin C, which helps prevent scurvy.

Joanne Newell

75

your own indoor Garden
Wow – an indoor garden! How do you do that? Well, it’s really easy. All you need is a jar, a bit of water, and some seeds, beans, grains or nuts. In a few days, you’ll have a bumper little garden in a jar – and it’s a garden you can eat. Sprouts can grow just about anywhere, so if you don’t have a lot of room in your garden, sprouting in jars on your kitchen bench is just perfect. It’s also a really cheap way of growing your own food. Why Eat Sprouts? You know, seeds are pretty amazing. If you planted one in the ground, it could grow into a big plant, even a tree! It has to have a lot of nutrients inside it, to make sure that it can grow when it’s planted. Actually, seeds contain all sorts of things are all soooo good for your body – awesome vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and enzymes (enzymes make plants “alive”). All of these things are just sitting inside the seed, waiting for the day when it will be planted. When that happens, they will “come alive” and grow themselves into a plant. When you soak a seed in water, the enzymes in it start to “wake up”. As the seed starts to “germinate” (start growing into a plant), all the other good things in the seed start to multiply – so a sprouted seed can have heaps more vitamins and minerals in it than when it was still just a seed. It’s also much easier for your tummy to digest. Oh, and sprouted seeds taste fantastic! You can munch them on their own, and eat them in salads.

76

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Let’s Get Growing! You can sprout just about any uncooked seed, bean, grain or nut, but great ones to try include alfalfa seeds, mung beans, adzuki beans, quinoa grains, whole oats and hulled sunflower seeds. These all need different soaking times, and some grow more quickly than others, so check the instructions on your packet. Note: do not sprout kidney beans, because these are not safe to eat when they’re raw. Let’s show you how to sprout alfalfa seeds – these are really easy to grow. They’re teensy, tiny seeds, but they’re packed full of vitamins. Once you’ve sprouted a batch of these seeds, why not make the Alfalfa in Your Mouth Salad, on page 72?

Joanne Newell

77

your own indoor Garden cont...
You’ll need: • A large glass jar • A piece of nylon screen (or cheesecloth, or clean stocking) big enough to wrap over the mouth of the jar • A rubber band • 2 tablespoons of alfalfa seeds (try to get organic seeds) You can also buy special sprouting jars that have plastic, screwon lids – the lids have tiny drainage holes, and may also have a little “stand” on the edge so that you can tip the jar upside-down and it will stay that way to drain. These special jars are great, and are usually available from health-food stores. 1. Tip the alfalfa seeds into the jar. 2. Pour cool, fresh water over the seeds, until the jar is half full. Put the nylon over the mouth of the jar, and pull the rubber band over the top of the nylon, so that the rubber band is holding the nylon onto the jar. 3. Swish the water around, then tip the water out of the jar, into the sink. The nylon will stop the seeds from falling out. 4. Pour cool, fresh water into the jar (the water will go through the nylon – or you can take it off, to make it easier to pour in the water), making the jar about three-quarters full with water. Leave the seeds to soak for eight to 12 hours. 78 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

5. Swish the water around, then tip the water out of the jar, into the sink. Then rinse by pouring in more cool, fresh water, swishing it around, and tipping it out. 6. Turn the jar upside-down, and let it rest at a 45% angle so that the water can keep draining out (leaving it on a dish rack is a good idea). It’s important to let the sprouts drain while they grow, so that they don’t go moldy. Also, make sure the seeds aren’t blocking the drainage screen. The jar should be at room temperature, in a slightly dark area of the kitchen. 7. About eight hours later, rinse the seeds by pouring fresh, cool water over them, swishing the water around, and tipping the water out. The seeds should just be starting to grow little sprouts. Very exciting! 8. Leave the jar to drain again at a 45% angle, and keep rinsing the seeds every morning and evening for about four days. You’ll see the sprouts growing bigger each day. 9. On the fifth day, put the jar somewhere that receives natural light (but not direct sunshine). This will help turn the sprouts green. Your delicious alfalfa sprouts should be ready to eat within a day or two.
Joanne Newell

79

monkey mike’s maze
I want to whip up a delicious, creamy, banana smoothie (see the secret recipe on page 32). Can you help me find my way to the bananas I’ll need for the recipe? Thanks!

80 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

sweet snacks
Do you have a sweet tooth? Then you’ve come to the right place. Read on!

81

smiley-Face Frozen orange wedges
Makes 16 frozen wedges
It’s going to be a hot day tomorrow. So what can you make to help you keep cool? Try these thoroughly refreshing, scrumptious, icy treats – frozen wedges of orange! They’ll definitely put a smile on your face…

Ingredients

2 large navel oranges

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

long plastic container

82

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Slice the oranges in half – start at the bottom of each orange, where you’ll find the “navel” (seed), and cut through to the top of the orange. 2. Cut these halves in half again, starting at the “navel” and cutting through to the top of each orange. 3. Now that you have quarters of oranges (4 quarters from each orange), cut each piece in half in the same way as before, so that you have 16 pieces of orange. 4. Place all of the pieces of oranges in the long container, and make sure you keep each piece of orange separate from the others – if they are too close together then they will freeze in one big lump. Also, don’t put a lid on top of the oranges. 5. Place the container in the freezer, and freeze overnight. 6. The next day, remove the number of orange wedges that you’d like to eat, and then chew or suck away, keeping cool! You can peel off the outer skin of the wedges first, if you like, but it is fun to put an orange piece at the front of your mouth, with the skin facing out – showing your lovely big orange smile…

Did you know? That navel oranges were given their name because they have “navels” that look a bit like our belly-buttons (navels)?

Joanne Newell

83

kiwi eggcups

Serves 2 (makes 4 eggcups)
Eating kiwifruit this way is really fun. You scoop your spoon into kiwifruit halves in the same way as eating a soft-boiled egg. See how much fruit you can get out of each half without making holes in their skin!

Ingredients

2 kiwifruit

Equipment

tea towel

sharp knife

chopping board

2 sandwich plates

2 teaspoons

84 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Rinse and dry the kiwifruit. 2. Slice each kiwifruit in half, widthways (across the shorter middle bit of the kiwifruit). 3. Place 2 kiwifruit halves on each plate, and serve with the teaspoons.

Did you know? That delicious, tangy kiw ifruit are also known as Chinese gooseberries? Did you also know that the inside of a kiw ifruit is usually a beautiful bright green, but can also be a yellowy-gold color?
Joanne Newell

85

Apple-Raisin Boats
Serves 2
Ahoy there! Take a trip on the high seas – and see if you can eat these boats without letting any raisins fall off. Please excuse me from taking the trip with you – I’m definitely a scaredy-monkey landlubber!

Ingredients

3 cups warm water

5x6-inch (15cm)- 1 apple long pieces dried wakame

about 25 raisins (sultanas)

Equipment

measuring cups

large bowl

tea towel

sharp knife

paring knife

2 chopping boards

2 sandwich plates

86 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Pour the warm water into the bowl. 2. Place the dried wakame into the bowl, pressing the wakame down into the water. Leave the “sea” to soak while you prepare the “boats”. 3. Rinse and dry the apple. On one of the chopping boards, chop the apple into quarters (4 pieces). 4. Using the paring knife, cut out the core from each apple quarter, so that you’re left with apple pieces that look like boats. 5. Pull the pieces of wakame out of the water, and squeeze as much water as you can out of each piece. 6. On the other chopping board, chop the wakame into 2-inch (5cm)long pieces. 7. Place half of the wakame on 1 of the sandwich plates, and place the other half on the other plate. 8. Lay 2 apple quarters on each sandwich plate. 9. Place about 5 or 6 raisins on the scooped-out part of each apple quarter. 10. Serve, and make sure you try the salty “sea” as well as the “boats”!

Did you know? That according to Guinness World Records, the heaviest apple in the world was picked in Japan in 1995, by a man called Chisato Iwasaki? The apple weighed 4lb 1oz (1.849kg)! That’s as heavy as about 12 normal-sized apples!
Joanne Newell

87

cashew cream
Makes about 1 cup
This thick, yummy nut cream can be used for dipping fruit into, or dolloped onto the Summer Days Fruit Salad (page 60). To make the nuts soft enough to blend into a great cream, you’ll need to allow time to soak them.

Ingredients

1 cup cashews

1 ⁄ 2 cup

water, for soaking

1 tablespoon agave nectar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (or 1 ⁄ 3 vanilla bean)

2 tablespoons water, for blending

Equipment

measuring cups

sharp knife

chopping board

medium bowl

tea towel

dessert spoon

measuring spoons

blender

glass serving bowl

88 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Finely chop the cashew nuts (tip: it’s easier if you chop ½ a cup of nuts at a time). Place the chopped nuts in the bowl, and pour the ½ cup of soaking water over the top. 2. Cover the bowl with the tea towel, and put the bowl in the refrigerator. Leave the nuts to soak for at least 2 hours. 3. After the nuts have soaked, use the dessertspoon to help tip the nuts (including the soaking water, which will have been absorbed into the chopped nuts) into the blender. Add the agave nectar, vanilla extract and 2 tablespoons water. 4. Blend on low speed (turning it up to medium speed) for at least 30 seconds, or until everything is well blended and you can’t see any lumps. 5. Use the dessertspoon to scoop the cashew cream into the glass serving bowl, and chill it for a couple of hours.

Did you know? That cashews taste amazing and are packed w ith important minerals (such as magnesium, which gives us energy and helps keep our muscles, bones and teeth healthy)? However, cashews also contain a lot of fat – these are good fats, but it’s best to eat only eat small amounts of cashews at a time.
Joanne Newell

89

orange-choc Bliss Balls
Makes 20 balls
Rather than opening up a candy bar when you next feel like eating something sweet, try making these tasty little morsels – they’re tangy, orange-flavored balls with a hint of chocolate.

Ingredients

1 cup almonds

1 ⁄ 2 cup

cashews

4 Medjool dates

1 cup raisins (sultanas)

1 orange, rinsed 1 ⁄ 4 cup cacao & dried (or carob) powder

1 ⁄ 4 cup

Equipment

desiccated coconut, for the mix

cup desiccated or shredded coconut, for rolling

1 ⁄2

measuring cups

sharp knife

chopping board

food processor

grater

citrus juicer

2 dinner plates

90 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Roughly chop the almonds, so that each nut has been chopped into about 2 or 3 pieces (tip: to make this easier, chop ½ a cup at a time). Put these pieces into the food processor. 2. Roughly chop the cashews and add these to the food processor. 3. Process the nuts until they look like a fine powder (a bit like breadcrumbs – this will take at least 20 seconds). 4. Chop the dates in half and remove the pit. Roughly chop each date. 5. Add the raisins (sultanas) and chopped dates to the food processor. 6. Using the “fine-grate” side of the grater, grate the orange’s zest onto the chopping board. Put the zest into the food processor on top of the chopped nuts and dried fruit. 7. Chop the orange in half, and use the citrus juicer to squeeze the juice. Add the juice to the food processor. 8. Add the cacao powder and coconut to the food processor, and process the mixture until it is like a thick, sticky dough. If the mix is a bit stiff, add a few drops of water. 9. On 1 of the dinner plates, spread out the extra ½ cup of coconut. Put the other dinner plate next to it. 10. Wet your hands, and pull off a small chunk of the mixture. Roll it into a ball, making it about the size of a macadamia nut that’s in its shell. Then roll the ball in the coconut, and place the finished ball on the final dinner plate. Chill the balls for at least 1 hour.

Did you know? That chocolate was first consumed by the ancient Maya civilization as a drink? It wasn’t made for eating until the mid-1800s, when a Dutchman called Coenraad Van Houten invented a way of taking cocoa butter out of the cocoa bean. 91

Joanne Newell

delish Dates

Serves 4 (makes 8 candies)
If you’d like to make a quick, sweet treat, this recipe is perfect. You’ll have the energy of a superhero after eating one of these!

Ingredients

4 Medjool dates

4 teaspoons almond butter

1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon

vanilla extract

Equipment

small bowl

measuring spoons

teaspoon

sharp knife

chopping board

sandwich plate

butter knife

92

Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Place the almond butter in the small bowl (tip: use the teaspoon to scoop the sticky almond butter out of the measuring spoon). 2. Add the vanilla extract to the bowl, and use the teaspoon to stir together the almond butter and vanilla. 3. Chop the Medjool dates in half and remove the pit. 4. Place the date halves on the sandwich plate. Using the butter knife, scoop up some of the almond-vanilla mix, and squish it into 1 of the date halves. 5. Continue scooping up the almond-vanilla mix and filling the remaining date halves. 6. Serve.

Top tip: T ry these w ith macadamia nut butter instead of almond butter (and don’t worry about adding the vanilla). Yum!

Joanne Newell

93

“Surprise!”
Have you ever given someone a gift? It feels great, doesn’t it? Somehow, giving a gift is almost as good as receiving a gift (in fact, it can feel even better!). Also, when you go to the effort of making and wrapping a present yourself, it becomes extra special. Whether it’s for a birthday, for Christmas, or to say “thank you”, it’s so much fun to see the look of delight on someone’s face when you give them a hand-made present. It lets them know how much you really care about them. One of the best presents you can give is the gift of health. This book is chock-full of healthy recipes, and many of the recipes make fantastic gifts. Lip-Smacking Gift Ideas The following recipes from this book are perfect for gift-giving: • Orange-Choc Bliss Balls (see the recipe on page 90). • Delish Dates (page 92). • Walnut Creek Dip (page 102) and veggie-stick dippers. • Cashew Cream (page 88) and fruit dippers. • Green smoothies such as Alien Slime Smoothie (page 48), Groovy Green Monster (page 50) or Froggy Delight Green Smoothie (page 52). All of these recipes should be made and given on the same day, and the recipient (the person who receives the gift) should keep them in the fridge for no longer than two days.

94 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

It’s also a great idea to include a hand-written copy of the recipe when you give the gift of food, so that the recipient can make the food or drink again later. One of the best, simplest gifts is a pretty basket or large box of fresh fruit. Then the recipient can eat the fruit as it is, or use it in whichever way they like, such as in a smoothie or a fruit salad. Remember to include a copy of your favorite recipe, depending on what fruit you give – what about recipes for Merry Berry Milkshake (page 36) or Summer Days Fruit Salad (page 60)? Gifts from your garden are the ultimate. A little box of strawberries, or a decorated brown paper bag containing a few dirt-covered, freshly picked carrots, is perfect. Grown-ups, especially, love getting gifts from your garden. Wrap It Up! Sometimes, the type of wrapping you use can make your gift seem even better! Little, nibbly (non-dribbly) presents, like Delish Dates and Choc-Orange Bliss Balls, look great in small cardboard boxes that have been lined with colored tissue paper. There are lots of websites with templates for cards, envelopes and boxes – a really great website is http://www.ruthannzaroff .com/mirkwooddesigns/templates.htm. Here you’ll find all sorts of templates. You can use beautifully colored card, or paint white card with your own original artwork.
Joanne Newell

95

“Surprise!” cont...
Smoothies and other drinks can be poured into clean Mason preserving jars, or glass juice jars. Silky or patterned ribbons make gifts look special, and gift tags are also great. You can easily make your own gift tags by cutting out rectangles of cardboard, and decorating them. They can be stuck on with tape, or you can punch a hole through the tag and tie it to the present with string. Go crazy experimenting with other gift decorations such as glitter, stencils, leaves and flowers. Also, making your own greeting cards is a great idea (you can make the card match the design of your wrapping paper), as is including a poem you’ve written yourself. Happy gifting!

96 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Creating a Still Life
A “Still Life” artwork is a picture that features everyday items “standing still”. The pictures – usually a painting, drawing, or photo – capture the items in a type of “snapshot”. All sorts of ordinary items can be used, including glasses, flowers, vases… even shoes! It’s important that the objects are arranged in a way that makes them looks beautiful, and that the lighting (bright sunshine, or maybe shadows) makes the objects look interesting and creates a special “mood”. Fruit is also a really popular subject for a “Still Life” picture, as they have gorgeous colors and shapes. For example, have a good look at a pear – isn’t its shape just so satisfying? And the color and texture of its skin – perhaps a pale greeny-brown with slight bumps? Sitting it on the kitchen bench, with afternoon sunlight streaming across it, would make a really pretty picture. Why don’t you rustle up some thick art paper, some watercolor or oil paints, and some sturdy brushes (or coloring pens or pencils) and have a go at being a Still Life artist? Everyone is an artist, in their own way!

Joanne Newell

97

Creating a Still Life cont...
Gather some fruits from your fridge, fruit bowl or garden, and arrange them in a spot that has a simple background (that is, there aren’t too many bits and pieces around) and whatever lighting you like – soft or dramatic. Then take up your brush, pen or pencil, and draw what you see. If you can, try to draw the “feeling” that you have when you look at your arranged fruits. Remember, it doesn’t have to be perfect! If you want to know more about Still Life artworks, head to your computer and do a search for this term on the internet. While you’re at it, why not look up some famous Still Life artists like Clara Peeters, Paul Cézanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Jean Chardin, Vincent Van Gogh, and Joan Miró? Who knows? – maybe, one day, your name might be included in this list!

98 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

savory snacks
Mmm – school’s over, and I’m hungry. What can I eat? Ooh, there’s plenty here!

99

Mrs. Mac’s veggie Face
Serves 2
Remember Old Macdonald, who had a farm? Well, his wife worked hard on that farm – and she loved to stop for a snack of crunchy veggies and creamy dip. If you’ve been working hard in your garden (or working hard on your homework!), why not stop for a “Mrs. Mac” snack?

Ingredients

1 ⁄ 2-inch

(1cm)long piece continental cucumber

4 raisins (sultanas)

1 red bell pepper (capsicum)

1 carrot

2 cherry tomatoes

2 small broccoli florets

1 ⁄ 2 cup

“Walnut Creek Dip” (page 102)

Equipment

2 dinner plates

sharp knife

chopping board

dessert spoon

2 small bowls

100 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Lay the dinner plates next to each other, near the chopping board. 2. Slice 4 medium-sized circles from the cucumber. Lay 2 cucumber circles on each plate, where the eyes would be on a face. 3. Place 1 raisin in the middle of each of the 4 cucumber circles (these are the “pupils” of Mrs. Mac’s eyes). 4. Chop the carrot into 1½-inch (4cm)-long pieces and chop these into thin sticks (but not too thin – they need to be thick enough to scoop up dip). Place the carrot sticks around the top of the dinner plates, so that they look like Mrs. Mac’s crazy sticky-outy hair. 5. Carefully chop across the short side of the bell pepper, and cut a ½-inch (about 1cm) slice, so that you have a “circle” of bell pepper. Chop this circle in half, so that you have 2 “smiles”. Add these smiles to each plate, where a mouth would appear. 6. Chop the cherry tomatoes in half, and place one half where each of Mrs. Mac’s cheeks would be. These can be facing up, or down. 7. On each plate, place a small floret of broccoli where Mrs. Mac’s nose would be. 8. Use the dessertspoon to scoop dip into each of the 2 small bowls. 9. To serve, place the Mrs. Mac plates on the dinner table, and place a small bowl of dip next to each plate.

Top tip: Can you think of a dipping vegetable you could add to make Mrs. Mac’s eyebrows? Maybe thin celery strips, or more strips of red bell pepper? And what about her ears? Or her teeth? Or her tongue?

Joanne Newell

101

Walnut Creek dip
Makes 1 1 ⁄ 4 cups
Fancy taking a dip into something yummy? This is perfect if you’re having friends over for lunch. Serve it with sticks of veggies, or with plates of Mrs. Mac’s Veggie Face (see the recipe on page 100).

Ingredients

1 1 ⁄ 2 cups walnuts

1 lime

1 green onion (spring onion)

1 ⁄ 2 clove

garlic

1 red bell pepper (capsicum)

1 tablespoon olive oil

pinch Celtic sea salt

Equipment

1 tablespoon parsley leaves (pack leaves lightly into spoon)

measuring cups

sharp knife

chopping board

food processor

grater

measuring spoons

dessert spoon

spatula

serving bowl

102 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Tip the walnuts into the food processor. 2. Using the “fine-grate” side of the grater, grate the skin of half the lime. Add this zest to the food processor. 3. Peel the outer skin from the green onion, and chop off the root end. Roughly chop the white part of the onion (and about 1½ inches – 4cm – of the green part). Add the chopped onion to the food processor. 4. Peel the skin from the ½ clove of garlic. Roughly chop the garlic and add it to the food processor. 5. Chop the bell pepper in half, scoop out the core and seeds and chop the rest of the pepper into rough chunks (make sure you place the shiny side of the pepper’s skin on the chopping board, and chop the inside, fleshy part with the knife). Add these chunks to the food processor. 6. Add the olive oil and salt to the food processor. 7. Turn on the food processor and combine the ingredients for at least 30 seconds, until you have a nice mushy, fully blended dip. 8. Switch off and unplug the food processor, and use the dessertspoon to scoop the dip into the serving bowl. 9. Finely chop the parsley and use the dessertspoon to stir this through the dip. 10. Serve!

Did you know? That eating about one-quarter of a red bell pepper w ill give you all the vitamin C that a child your age needs in a day? This fantastic vitamin is sooo good for you, as it makes sure your body is healthy enough to fight off colds, and to grow strong.

Joanne Newell

103

Hunky-dory Almond Hummus
Makes 1 1 ⁄ 2 cups
Traditional hummus, made with chickpeas, is totally scrumptious – but this version, made with almonds, is also a real winner! Try dipping sticks of crunchy veggies (or dehydrated savory crackers) into this creamy, tangy dip.

Ingredients

1 1 ⁄ 2 cups almonds

1 1 ⁄ 2 cups water, for soaking

1 lemon

1 clove garlic

1 ⁄ 4 teaspoon

1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon

cumin

sesame oil

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 ⁄ 2 cup

water

big pinch Celtic sea salt

Equipment

measuring cups

medium bowl

tea towel

colander

food processor

sharp knife

chopping board

citrus juicer

measuring spoons

spatula

serving bowl

104 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. The day before you want to make this dip, place the almonds in the medium bowl and add the soaking water to the bowl. Cover the bowl with the tea towel, place the bowl in the fridge and leave the nuts to soak for at least 8 hours (it’s best to soak the nuts overnight). 2. The next day, put the colander in the sink and tip the almonds and water into the colander. 3. Put the strained almonds into the food processor. 4. Cut the lemon in half, and use the citrus juicer to juice each half. Add the lemon juice to the food processor. 5. Peel the skin from the clove of garlic. Roughly chop the garlic and add it to the food processor. 6. Add the cumin, sesame oil, olive oil, water and salt to the food processor. 7. Turn on the food processor and combine the ingredients for at least 30 seconds, until you have a nice mushy, fully blended dip. You might need to turn off and unplug the processor and use the spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl, and then continue processing the dip until it’s all blended. 8. Use the spatula to scoop the dip into the serving bowl. Serve!

Did you know? That it’s believed that almonds originally came from central Asia? T ravelers along the “Silk Road” from Asia to the Mediterranean often carried almonds to eat on the way, and it’s likely that they dropped a few. With the right type of soil and enough rain, these kernels grew into more and more trees, and almondeating began to spread!

Joanne Newell

105

mini burritos
Serves 4 (makes 8)
These are a little different to traditional burritos. But once you’ve tried them, you might always want to make them this way. Remember to keep napkins handy for the tangy juices that might run down your chin.

Ingredients

1 avocado

2 tomatoes

1 ⁄ 4 yellow

bell pepper (capsicum)

1 ⁄ 4 red

onion

1 ⁄ 2 lime

1 clove garlic

2 tablespoons cilantro (coriander) leaves (pack gently into spoon)

teensy pinch red chilli powder

1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon

Celtic sea salt

8 baby romaine (cos) lettuce leaves

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

medium bowl

dessert spoon

fork

grater

citrus juicer

measuring spoons

4 sandwich plates

106 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Cut the avocado in half all the way around the long part. Pull apart the halves of the avocado, and use the dessertspoon to scoop out the stone (throw away the stone). 2. Use the dessertspoon to scoop out the creamy green flesh from the avocado, and put the flesh into the bowl. Use the fork to mash the avocado until it is nearly smooth. 3. Cut the tomatoes in half, and roughly chop the tomatoes into ½-inch (1cm) cubes. Put the chopped tomatoes into the bowl. 4. Finely chop the yellow bell pepper and add to the bowl (make sure you place the shiny side of the pepper’s skin on the chopping board, and chop the inside, fleshy part with the knife). 5. Finely chop the red onion and add to the bowl. 6. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the lime’s skin. Put this zest into the bowl. 7. Use the citrus juicer to juice the lime. Add the juice to the bowl. 8. Peel the skin from the garlic (tip: chop off the root end of the garlic – this will make it easier to pull off the papery skin). Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the clove (watch your fingers!). Add the grated garlic to the bowl. 9. Finely chop the cilantro and add this to the bowl. 10. Add the red chilli powder and salt to the bowl, and stir everything together with the fork. 11. Rinse and dry the lettuce leaves, and put 2 leaves on each plate. Take the plates and bowl to the table. 12. Scoop up a couple of dessertspoons of mixture and put them in the middle of each leaf. Roll the leaves around the mixture, and eat!

Did you know? That the avocado is actually a fruit? It’s true!

Joanne Newell

107

Squiggly zucchini pasta & cherry-tom sauce
Serves 2
If you’re after a tasty snack for afternoon tea, or just want a light dinner before heading to a friend’s place for a sleep-over, try this fun and easy “pasta” and tangy, tomatoey sauce.

Ingredients

3 halves sun-dried tomatoes

1 ⁄ 2 clove

garlic

2 tablespoons olive oil

pinch Celtic sea salt

2 button mushrooms

2 basil leaves (or 1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon dried)

6 cherry tomatoes

3.5-inch (8.5cm)-long piece zucchini (courgette)

Equipment

small bowl

sharp knife

chopping board

grater

medium bowl

measuring spoons

dessert spoon

tea towel

spiralizer (or use grater)

tongs

2 pasta bowls

2 forks

108 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Pour hot water (carefully) into the small bowl. Add the sun-dried tomato halves to the bowl, and leave them to soak while you prepare the rest of the recipe. 2. Peel the skin from the ½ clove of garlic. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the garlic (watch your fingers!). Add the garlic to the medium bowl. 3. Add the olive oil and salt to the bowl, and use the dessertspoon to mix with the garlic. 4. Peel the skin from the mushrooms. Finely chop the mushrooms, and add these to the bowl, stirring gently. 5. Finely chop the basil leaves and add these to the bowl. 6. Chop the cherry tomatoes in half, and then chop them as finely as you can. Add the chopped tomatoes to the bowl, and stir. You’ve just made a pasta sauce! 7. Put the piece of zucchini in the spiralizer (check the instructions for your particular spiralizer) and switch it to the “fine-strand” mode. If you don’t have a spiralizer, simply use the “fine-grate” side of your grater, and grate the zucchini into long, thin strands. Once you have long strands, use the tongs to divide these between the 2 pasta bowls. 8. Remove the sun-dried tomatoes from their soaking water, and dry them on the tea towel. Finely chop these tomatoes, and add these to the bowl of pasta sauce. Mix thoroughly. 9. Use the dessertspoon to scoop the sauce on top of the zucchini spirals in each bowl. 10. Serve! (Don’t forget the forks!)

Top tip: Basil is super-easy to grow – it just needs lots of sunshine, lots of plant food, lots of “picking” to keep it grow ing (that means you should use heaps of basil), and lots of love! Give it a try this summer!

Joanne Newell

109

The Great Veggie Tie-Up
Using a colorful pencil, crayon or pen, see if you can match up the vegetable description with its picture. The answers are on page 140, before the index.

9
Kale tomato

2
(beetroot)

5 1 4 8

Beet

7
Celery

3
Bell Pepper

Spinach

(capsicum)

6

Carrot

(courgette)

Zucchini

110 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

11. 2
2.

Has a white, spongy core with white seeds. Its skin is usually red, green, or yellow. Has green (sometimes curly) leaves, and is a type of cabbage. Is actually a berry, and – if green when picked – can be ripened on a windowsill. Has stick-like stems with a “rib” pattern. Tastes a little bit salty. Grows in the ground as an orange-colored root vegetable, and contains a lot of vitamin A (which is good for eyesight). Usually has soft, oval-shaped green leaves. Looks a lot like a cucumber, and can be green or yellow (and it’s actually a fruit!). Has roundish, often dark-red roots, and red stalks. Also has green leaves with a reddish tinge.

3. 3

4

4.

5. 5

6 6.
7. 7 8. 8

Joanne Newell

111

Up to the table!
Where do you do most of your eating? Up at the dining table? Leaning against the kitchen bench? Sitting in front of the TV? On the run, as you head off to your next sport?

The best place to eat food is at a dining table. Why is that? Well, your stomach has a good chance of digesting your food properly, because you’re sitting still. Also, it means that you really notice what you’re eating, and you may get to chat with other people. It can be really fun! If you’ve been trying out different recipes in this book, why not set up your dining table to show off your creations? While you’re at it, why not impress the grown-ups in your home by showing off your table manners? We’ll show you how!

112 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to Set the Table In your family, it may be that setting the table is already one of your jobs. If not, below is a picture of how to set each person’s place at the table. You won’t need a knife and fork for all the recipes in this book, but it’s good to know how they should be set out.

To make the table look beautiful, pick some flowers or pretty leaves from the garden, and put these in a small vase or two down the middle of the table. Or, you could add a few small candles – make sure a grown-up lights these for you, and that the candles are sitting on holders. If you’ve invited some friends over for lunch, what about drawing a fun menu that shows your guests what food and drinks you’ll be making? You could create a meal that starts with Green Light for Go! Juice (see the recipe on page 44), has a main of Squiggly Zucchini Pasta & Cherry-Tom Sauce (page 108) and finishes with a dessert of “Let’s Split!” Banana Split (page 124) or Cat’s Meow Choc Pudding (page 126). You could hand the menu around, stick it up on a wall, or make a little menu card for each person – these could go at the top of the placemats.
Joanne Newell

113

Up to the table! cont...
Table Manners The word “manners” might sound a bit boring, but, really, it just means “kindness to others”. Every family has its own “rules” for manners at the table, but here are some ways of showing consideration for other people at mealtimes, and for making everything feel happy and calm. • Wash your hands before coming to the table. • If you’re wearing a hat, take it off before you sit down. • Once you’re sitting in your chair, place your napkin in your lap. • Only start eating once everyone is seated and they are all ready to eat. • Offer food to other people before taking some for yourself. • Try to wait until another person has stopped talking before you start talking. • Avoid fighting or yelling at the table. • Chat about happy things. • When everyone has finished eating, ask a grown-up’s permission to leave the table. • Help carry dishes to the kitchen. If your family doesn’t normally start meals with a blessing, why not ask if you can start a new “gratitude” tradition where everyone gives thanks for something before starting to eat? You could all hold hands, and then mention one thing that you’re grateful for that day – it could just be that you’re grateful for the yummy food in front of you! 114 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

desserts & Puddings
Woo-hoo! Dessert! Sweet, creamy, chocolatey, tangy – so many recipes to choose from. What will you make?

115

Strawberry Patch Ice lollies
Serves 4 These tangy, sweet, refreshing ices are fantastic! If you’ve grown a lot of strawberries in your garden this summer, why not use them in this recipe? These ices take a little while to freeze, so you’ll need to make them the day before you want to eat them.

Ingredients

20 strawberries

1 ⁄ 4 cup

water

4 teaspoons honey

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

blender

measuring cups

measuring spoons

4 x 2.5oz. (80ml)capacity ice lolly molds

116 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Chop the green hulls off the strawberries, and cut each strawberry in half. Put the pieces in the blender. 2. Add the water and honey to the blender and blend for at least 15 seconds. 3. Carefully pour the strawberry mixture from the blender into each of the ice lolly molds, until they are filled to at least ½ an inch (1cm) from the top. If you have leftover mixture, drink it from the spoon! 4. Put the plastic ice lolly handles into each mold, and carefully carry the molds over to the freezer. Freeze the lollies for at least 8 hours. 5. When you’re ready to eat the ice lollies, run the sides of the molds under hot water for about 10 seconds. This helps loosen the frozen strawberry mix away from the sides of the molds. 6. Serve – and slurp away!

Top tip: For extra texture, roughly chop 1 strawberry and add the chopped pieces to the molds after you’ve poured in the strawberry mixture. Yum!

Joanne Newell

117

Chunky Monkey Ice Cream
Serves 4
This cheeky, chunky ice cream is just soooo good. Full of munch and crunch, and fruity goodness, it’ll give you heaps of energy to go climb a tree! I’m just glad it’s not made from real monkeys… Make sure your bananas are really ripe for this recipe (see page 24 for how to tell when they’re ripe).

Ingredients

3 bananas

1 orange

1 ⁄ 2 cup

raisins (sultanas)

1 ⁄ 2 cup

walnuts

1 ⁄ 4 cup

shredded coconut

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large freezer bag

tea towel

grater

sandwich plate

citrus juicer

tea cup

measuring cups

food processor

measuring spoons

teaspoon

5 dessert spoons

medium bowl

4 dessert bowls

long, shallow plastic container

118 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. The night before you want to make this ice cream, chop 2 of the bananas into little pieces and pop the pieces into the freezer bag. Spread out the banana pieces inside the bag, seal the bag, and then put it into the freezer. 2. The next day, rinse and dry the orange. Use the “fine-grate” side of the grater to grate the orange’s skin. Put this zest onto the sandwich plate. Cover with the tea towel and set aside. 3. Cut the orange in half and use the citrus juicer to juice the orange. Pour the juice into the tea cup. Put the raisins in the tea cup, and leave them to soak for at least 20 minutes. 4. Roughly chop the walnuts and set aside. 5. Roughly chop the 1 fresh (not frozen) banana. 6. Take the bag of frozen banana out of the freezer and, while the bag is still sealed, use your hands to break up some of the chunks of banana. Then open the freezer bag and tip the banana pieces into the food processor, along with the fresh banana and vanilla extract. 7. Process the bananas and vanilla until the mixture appears smooth. Use a dessertspoon to scoop the banana ice cream into the bowl. 8. Add the soaked raisins (along with the soaking juice), chopped walnuts, shredded coconut and orange zest to the bowl, and stir with a dessertspoon until blended through the ice cream. Did you know? 9. If you want to serve the ice cream straight away, use a dessertspoon to scoop the ice cream into dessert bowls, and serve with the dessertspoons. If you want to make the ice cream a little firmer, spoon it into the long plastic container and freeze it for at least 2 hours – freezing it in a long container means you can use an ice-cream scoop to make long, round scoops.

That while most bananas are yellow, you can also get red bananas? It’s just the skin that’s red – inside, the banana itself is yellow. 119

Cherry-Banana Ice cream
Serves 4
This ice cream tastes so good, you won’t believe that it’s also good for you! The banana makes the ice cream creamy, and the cherries add “zing” and pretty color. This recipe uses a food processor to make ice cream, but if you have the type of juicer that can make ice cream from frozen fruit, you can use that instead.

Ingredients

2 bananas

10 fresh cherries

2 cups frozen cherries

1 tablespoon honey

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

large freezer bag

melon baller (or knife)

medium bowl

measuring cups

measuring spoons

food processor

teaspoon

5 dessert spoons

4 dessert bowls

long, shallow plastic container

120 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. The night before you want to make this ice cream, chop 1 of the bananas into little pieces and pop the pieces into the freezer bag. Spread out the banana pieces inside the bag, seal the bag, and then put it into the freezer. 2. The next day, when you’re ready to make the ice cream, slice the 8 fresh cherries in half, and remove the stones (the melon baller is useful for this, or you can carefully use the tip of the knife). Put the cherry halves into the bowl. 3. Roughly chop the 1 fresh (not frozen) banana and put this into the food processor. 4. Take the bag of frozen banana out of the freezer and, while the bag is still sealed, use your hands to break up some of the chunks of banana. Then open the freezer bag and tip the banana pieces into the food processor, along with the frozen cherries and honey. 5. Process the ingredients until they appear smooth. You may like to use a teaspoon to taste a little bit, to see whether or not the mixture is smooth enough – make sure you unplug the food processor at the wall before doing this. 6. Use a dessertspoon to scoop the ice cream into the bowl. Stir until the fresh cherry halves are blended through the ice cream. 7. If you want to serve the ice cream straight away, use a dessertspoon to scoop the ice cream into dessert bowls, and serve with the dessertspoons. If you want to make the ice cream a little firmer, spoon it into the long plastic container and freeze it for at least 2 hours – freezing it in a long container means you can use an icecream scoop to make long, round scoops.

Top tip: You can make your own frozen cherries by cutting fresh cherries in half, pulling out the cherry stones w ith a melon baller and freezing the cherry halves overnight in a freezer bag.

121

Gooey chocolate sauce
Makes 1 ⁄ 4 cup
This sauce is perfect for dipping into with whole strawberries, slices of banana, or segments of orange and mandarin. It’s also great in the amazing “Let’s Split!” Banana Split (see the recipe on page 124), or, if you leave it to firm up in the fridge you could use it as a filling in Delish Dates (page 92). Chocolate sauce is definitely a “treat” food, so only indulge in it occasionally.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons cacao (or carob) powder

1 tablespoon agave nectar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

4 teaspoons coconut oil (runny)

2 teaspoons almond butter

1 1 ⁄ 2 tablespoons water

Equipment

measuring spoons

small bowl

mini whisk

122 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Place all of the ingredients in the bowl. 2. Use the mini whisk to whisk the ingredients together until you have a runny, silky chocolate sauce. 3. Serve!

Top tip: Why don’t you try this sauce drizzled over ice cream? Mmm-mmmm…

Joanne Newell

123

“Let’s Split!” Banana Split
Serves 4
OK, so you’ve got some friends coming over to play this afternoon. Want to make it a play date to remember? Your friends will love this fun banana split – and they can help you put it together. Whip up a batch of Cherry-Banana Ice Cream this morning (if you have a chopped banana in the freezer) and let it firm up in the freezer for 2 hours. Then throw together some Gooey Chocolate Sauce, grab your split ingredients, and you’ve got it made. I make this for my friends all the time.

Ingredients

1 serving 1 serving “Gooey 1 ⁄ 4 cup “Cherry-Banana Chocolate Sauce” walnuts (page 122) Ice Cream” (page 120)

8 cherries

4 bananas

Equipment

sharp knife

chopping board

2 sandwich plates

melon baller

4 dessert bowls (or long dishes)

4 serving spoons

ice-cream scoop

measuring spoons

124 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. First of all, make the Cherry-Banana Ice Cream, putting it into a long plastic container and freezing it for at least 2 hours before you start to make the banana splits. 2. Make the Gooey Chocolate Sauce and set aside. 3. Roughly chop the nuts and put these on 1 of the sandwich plates. 4. Chop the cherries in half and carefully use the melon baller to scoop out the stones. Place the cherry halves on the other sandwich plate. 5. Rinse and dry the chopping board, and slice the bananas lengthways (down the longest part of the banana), so that each banana becomes 2 long pieces. 6. Place each banana in a dessert bowl or dish, with the 2 halves opened up. 7. Use the ice-cream scoop to scoop up the ice cream, placing 2 balls of ice cream down the middle of each split banana. 8. Drizzle 2 teaspoons of the chocolate sauce over each plate’s ice cream balls. 9. Drop 4 cherry halves onto each plate, over the banana halves and ice cream. 10. Sprinkle the chopped nuts over each of the banana splits. 11. Serve!

Top tip: T ry making the splits w ith Chunky Monkey Ice Cream (see the recipe on page 118) instead of CherryBanana Ice Cream, and sprinkle w ith shredded coconut instead of cherry halves.

Joanne Newell

125

Cat’s meow Choc pudding
Serves 4 (makes about 2 cups)
You’ll be purring like a kitten when you taste this super dessert. It’s a pudding that combines chocolate with tangy raspberries – yum! This is a really special treat.

Ingredients

1 cup raspberries (fresh or defrosted)

2 avocados

2 tablespoons cacao (or carob) powder

2 teaspoons coconut oil (runny)

2 teaspoons almond butter

2 teaspoons vanilla extract (2 ⁄ 3 vanilla bean)

1 ⁄ 3 cup

nectar

agave

4 extra raspberries, as garnish

Equipment

2 medium bowls

fork

sharp knife

chopping board

potato masher

measuring cups

dessert spoon

measuring spoons

blender

4 small dessert dishes

long, shallow plastic container

126 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1. Place the raspberries in 1 of the bowls. Mash the berries with the fork until they are well and truly squashed. Leave the bowl to the side while you prepare the rest of the pudding. 2. Cut the avocados in half all the way around the long part of each avocado. Pull apart the halves of each avocado, and use the dessertspoon to scoop out the stone from each half (throw away the stones, or keep 1 or 2 to grow into avocado plants!). 3. Use the dessertspoon to scoop out the creamy green flesh from each avocado, and put the flesh into the other bowl. Use the potato masher (or you could rinse the fork and use that) to mash the avocados until you can’t see many lumps. 4. Add the cacao powder to the mashed avocado, and stir the avocado and powder together with the dessertspoon. Scoop the mixture into the blender. 5. Add the coconut oil, almond butter, vanilla extract and agave nectar to the blender, and blend on low speed (turning it up to medium speed) until everything is well blended. 6. Rinse and dry the dessertspoon, and use it to put the blended mixture into the bowl containing the mashed raspberries. Mix thoroughly, and then spoon the mixture into each of the 4 dessert dishes. 7. Put the bowls into the long plastic container and carry the container to the fridge. Chill the puddings for at least 2 hours before serving. Serve with a raspberry on top of each pudding. Did you know?

That the raspberry plant is actually a member of the rose family? Wow!

Joanne Newell

127

Kitchen party at Your house
Right, so you’ve tried a few recipes in this book. You love how they taste, and you’ve been experimenting with them, too – adding cherries to a smoothie, or making Mrs. Mac look puzzled (see the recipe on page 100). You’re getting to be a pretty good chef! What about inviting over a friend or two, and showing them what you’ve learned? You could pretend you’re a TV celebrity chef, whipping up smoothies, juices, salads, sweet treats – or even ice cream. Your friends will love it! Prepare to Have Fun! 1. First, design a colorful invitation. Perhaps you could invite them to “Sam’s Big Kitchen Adventure” or “Superchef Sarah’s Kitchen Academy” (of course, you’d put your own name in the invitation!). 2. Next, think of the food and drinks you’d like to make. Flip through this recipe book and put a sticky note on the recipes you think your friend would like. Oh, and find out whether or not your friend (or friends, if you’re inviting more than one person) has an allergy to nuts – if they do, just avoid making anything that includes nuts. If you’re having your friend over in the afternoon, you might like to start by showing them how to make the Froggy Delight Green Smoothie (page 52), then maybe some Orange-Choc Bliss Balls (page 90), and maybe even some Chunky Monkey Ice Cream (page 118). Or, if they’re coming for lunch, you could show them how to make Bunny Juice (page 40), followed by Simple Garden Salad (page 68) 128 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

with Sparkly Sunshine Salad Dressing (page 70). If you’re not full from that, you could finish lunch with Kiwi Eggcups (page 84).

You might just want to have a “Green Smoothie Slurp-Up”, where you spend an hour or so making all sorts of fantastic green smoothie combinations! For more about green smoothies, see page 46. Or you could just do something super-easy, like making Cashew Cream (page 88) and chopping up dipping fruits to go with it – fruits like strawberries, kiwifruit, bananas, and pineapple. 3. Once you’ve decided what to make, you’ll need to write a shopping list for any ingredients you’ll need. 4. You should also check whether any of the recipes need ingredients to be prepared earlier – for example, it’s great to freeze fruit for smoothies the day before you want to make them. 5. If you’re feeling nervous, you could practice the recipes a couple of times before your friend comes over, asking a grown-up to help you.

Why not ask a grown-up to video your kitchen party, so that your guests can take home a great memory of the day?

Joanne Newell

129

Kitchen party cont...
Get the Party Started Before your friend arrives, check that you have all the ingredients and equipment that you’ll need, and that your kitchen and dining table are clean, and clear of clutter. Make sure you have a spare apron for your friend, as well as a hair tie if they have long hair. When your guest arrives, greet them with a big smile and a hug, and show them into the kitchen. Encourage them to wash their hands, put on their apron, and (if necessary) tie back their hair.

130 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Then have them stand beside you, or opposite you, while you dazzle them with your kitchen skills – show them the recipe you’re going to make, get out the equipment and ingredients, and then make the food or drinks, explaining each step to them. Really pretend that you’re a chef, even speaking like one and moving around the kitchen with confidence. Get your friend involved by getting them to chop and mix ingredients. They’re going to love it! Make sure you give them a taste of everything you make, and that when you serve your creations they look great – you could serve your smoothies with fun, twisty straws, and have colorful napkins at the table. Oh, and don’t forget to show them how clever you are at growing sprouts (page 76). If you have leftovers, you could put some in a container for them to take home to share with their family. It’ll be a party they’ll never forget…

Joanne Newell

131

memory match-up
Are you good at remembering things? This fun game gives you lots of memory practice. Just print out these pages, glue them onto thin cardboard, let the cardboard dry, and then cut out the boxed pictures. Then lay all the cards face down on a table. Grab a partner, and take turns turning over two cards at a time. If you turn over the same two pictures in one turn, you have a match! Collect those cards and keep them in a pile near you. If you turn over two different cards, it means you don’t have a match – turn the cards back over, but when you do this, try to remember what the cards’ pictures are, and where they are. When it’s your turn again, you’ll hopefully remember where cards are, and it will be easy to make a match. The person with the most pairs of cards at the end of the game is the winner. But everyone who plays is a winner, because you’re all improving your memory, learning about turn-taking, and having fun!

Pear

Pear

132 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

cherry

Apple

Apple

Blueberry

Blueberry

pineapple

Kiwifruit

Kiwifruit

Pineapple

Joanne Newell

133

cherry

Grape

Grape

STrawberry

STrawberry

Raspberry

BAnana

BAnana

Raspberry

134 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Recipe worksheets
It’s great fun following recipes, but it’s also fantastic to make your own recipes! You might have tried a few recipes from this book, so you know how ingredients and flavors combine – maybe you’d like to experiment with your own ideas? On the next few pages are a couple of worksheets for you – when you next go into the kitchen to make a smoothie or some other treat, write down the ingredients, equipment and steps you took to make it. Then, when you want to make your amazing creation again, you’ll have all the information you need!

Right, let’s monkey around in the kitchen!

Joanne Newell

135

title

Serves

Ingredients

Equipment

136 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

137

title

Serves

Ingredients

Equipment

138 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

How to make it
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

139

Solutions to puzzles
The “WhY We Love Fruit” Word Search (page 58) H P A C S G D E L I C I O U S B V E Z U C V P O R T W D O U X A T L C R A I N B O W M W J P M U N C H Y P N W V S J A T A L N D U G S T E I B R U O Z I R F I L M D Z B F L B I D C G U A Y E T E R H S W A C L R D F R O N S A V J M L S Y P U Y B R H T N L N A O Y U E G N S W E E T V I R G O I J R L C M P H A S C V S X Y E G V P H O A E L T H E I A C R E A M Y O B M G X L Y K T E B C E L O T V W H O L E S O M E M B J E H L I A M A G N I F I C E N T

The Great Veggie Tie-Up (page 110) 1. Bell pepper (capsicum) 2. Kale 3. Tomato 4. Celery 5. Carrot 6. Spinach 7. Zucchini (courgette) 8. Beet (beetroot)

140 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Index
A
activities Great Veggie Tie-up, The 110–11 Life’s a Bowl of Cherries Coloring-in & Jigsaw 28 Memory Match-up 132–4 Monkey Mike’s Maze 80 recipe worksheets 135–41 “Why We Love Fruit” Word Search, The 58 Alfalfa in Your Mouth Salad 72–3 Alien Slime Smoothie 48–9 Apple-Raisin Boats 86–7 Bunny Juice 40–1 Cantaloupe Cruiser 30–1 Cashew Cream 88–9 Cat’s Meow Choc Pudding 126–7 Cherry-Banana Ice Cream 120–1 Chop, Chop! How to Use a Knife feature 26–7 Chunky Monkey Ice Cream 118–9 Count Your Blessings Salad Dressing 66–7 Creamy Almond Milk 34–5 Creating a Still Life feature 97–8 Delish Dates 92–3 desserts Cat’s Meow Choc Pudding 126–7 Cherry-Banana Ice Cream 120–1 Chunky Monkey Ice Cream 118–9 Gooey Chocolate Sauce 122–3 “Let’s Split!” Banana Split 124–5 Smiley-Face Frozen Orange Wedges 82–3 Strawberry Patch Ice Lollies 116–7 dips Cashew Cream 88–9 Gooey Chocolate Sauce 122–3 Hunky-Dory Almond Hummus 104–5 Walnut Creek Dip 102–3 Dracula’s Carrot Salad 64–5 equipment 20–1

B C

D

E

141

Index Cont...
F
feature articles Chop, Chop! How to Use a Knife 26–7 Creating a Still Life 97–8 Feeling Great! feature 12–15 How Can I Tell If It’s Ripe? 24–5 Kitchen Party at Your House 128–31 Making Mom Breakfast in Bed 54–7 Mike’s Kitchen Giggles 19 “Surprise!” 94–6 Up to the Table! 112–14 Your Own Indoor Garden 76–9 Feeling Great! feature 12–15 Froggy Delight Green Smoothie 52–3 Gooey Chocolate Sauce 122–3 Great Veggie Tie-up, The, activity 110–11 Green Light for Go! Juice 44–5 green smoothies Alien Slime Smoothie 48–9 Froggy Delight Green Smoothie 52–3 Green Smoothies are Great! feature 46–7 Groovy Green Monster 50–1 Green Smoothies are Great! feature 46–7 Groovy Green Monster 50–1 How Can I Tell If It’s Ripe? feature 24–5 Hunky-Dory Almond Hummus 104–5 ice creams & ice lollies Cherry-Banana Ice Cream 120–1 Chunky Monkey Ice Cream 118–9 Smiley-Face Frozen Orange Wedges 82–3 Strawberry Patch Ice Lollies 116–7 ingredients 22–3 introduction for grown-ups 5–7 introduction for kids 10–11 introduction to the kitchen 16–18 jigsaws Life’s a Bowl of Cherries Coloring-in & Jigsaw 28 jokes Mike’s Kitchen Giggles 19 juices Bunny Juice 40–1 Green Light for Go! Juice 44–5 Pine-Mango Splash 42–3

G

H

I

J

142 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

K

Kitchen Party at Your House feature 128–31 Kiwi Eggcups 84–5 knife skills 26–7 “Let’s Split!” Banana Split 124–5 Life’s a Bowl of Cherries Coloring-in & Jigsaw 28 Making Mom Breakfast in Bed feature 54–7 Memory Match-up activity 132–4 Merry Berry Milkshake 36–7 Mike’s Kitchen Giggles feature 19 milkshakes Merry Berry Milkshake 36–7 Vanilla-Cashew Milkshake 38–9 Mini Burritos 106–7 Monkey Mike’s Banana Smoothie 32–3 Monkey Mike’s Maze 80 Mrs. Mac’s Veggie Face 100–1

L

M

N

nut milks Creamy Almond Milk 34–5 Orange-Choc Bliss Balls 90–1 Pine-Mango Splash 42–3 Puddings Cat’s Meow Choc Pudding 126–7 raw-food resources for grown-ups 8–9 recipe worksheets 135–41 ripeness 24–5 salad dressings Count Your Blessings Salad Dressing 66–7 Sparkly Sunshine Salad Dressing 70–1 Sublime Lime Salad Dressing 74–5 salads Alfalfa in Your Mouth Salad 72–3 Dracula’s Carrot Salad 64–5 Simple Garden Salad 68–9 Summer Days Fruit Salad 60–1 Winter Happiness Fruit Salad 62–3 savory snacks Mini Burritos 106–7 Mrs. Mac’s Veggie Face 100–1 Squiggly Zucchini Pasta & Cherry-Tom Sauce 108–9

O P

R

S

143

Index Cont...
S cont... Simple Garden Salad 68–9 Smiley-Face Frozen Orange Wedges 82–3 smoothies Alien Slime Smoothie 48–9 Cantaloupe Cruiser 30–1 Froggy Delight Green Smoothie 52–3 green, see green smoothies Green Smoothies are Great! feature 46–7 Groovy Green Monster 50–1 Monkey Mike’s Banana Smoothie 32–3 Sparkly Sunshine Salad Dressing 70–1 sprouts growing 76–9 Alfalfa in Your Mouth Salad 72–3 Squiggly Zucchini Pasta & Cherry-Tom Sauce 108–9 Strawberry Patch Ice Lollies 116–7 Sublime Lime Salad Dressing 74–5 Summer Days Fruit Salad 60–1 “Surprise!” gift feature 94–6 sweet snacks Apple-Raisin Boats 86–7 Delish Dates 92–3 Kiwi Eggcups 84–5 Orange-Choc Bliss Balls 90–1 Smiley-Face Frozen Orange Wedges 82–3 U Up to the Table! feature 112–14 V Vanilla-Cashew Milkshake 38–9 W Walnut Creek Dip 102–3 “Why We Love Fruit” Word Search, The activity 58 Winter Happiness Fruit Salad 62–3 Y Your Own Indoor Garden feature 76–9

144 Monkey Mike’s Raw Food Kitchen

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful