4/23/2013

A HUSKY Health Plan Initiative
Judith Jordan,  LCSW, MBA Director of Medical Administration,  DSS 860.424.5860 Michael Hebert, MSW, MBA Rewards to Quit Coordinator,  CHNCT 203.626.7120

Reimbursement & Incentives for  Tobacco Treatment
April 24, 2013
RQLHE0006‐0413 

1

Project Overview
• • • • • Medicaid Incentives for Prevention of Chronic Disease (MIPCD) grant program  under Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)  5‐year grant to test impact of incentives on smoking behavior change among  HUSKY A, C and D members ages 18 and over. Program builds on recent expansion of HUSKY coverage for smoking cessation  services (effective January 1, 2012) Program participation and outcomes will inform future decisions regarding   and future funding Medicaid smoking g cessation programs p g g Goals – Study the impact of financial incentives on quitting smoking with a special  focus on:  o Members with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) o Pregnant and Postpartum Women – Reduce rates of CT Medicaid members who smoke by 25 to 30 % 

RQLHE0006‐0413 

2

Project Overview
• Program oversight is provided by: – CMS: Federal grantor agency – CT DSS: Grantee, Lead Agency (state Medicaid agency) – CHNCT: Medical ASO for HUSKY Health – Yale University: State program evaluator    • Other key project partners: – – – – – Department of Public Health: CT Quitline Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services: LMHAs Hispanic Health Council: Peer Coaching & Focus Groups Local Mental Health Authorities (LMHAs), (6) privately‐operated Person‐Centered Medical Homes 

RQLHE0006‐0413 

3

1

4/23/2013

Project Overview
• Rewards to Quit to be implemented through select providers – – – – Local Mental Health Agencies  Obstetrics Providers   Pediatricians  Person‐Centered Medical Homes 

• Randomization to occur by provider, not by individual   – Randomization within each provider type – Randomization by practice, not site

RQLHE0006‐0413 

4

• Assess effectiveness  of financial incentives over standard care  for: • Cessation program enrollment • Use of counseling services (individual and telephone) • Program dropout rates • Cessation success rates at three months and twelve  months • Study will test various incentive levels: • No incentive • Low ($) incentive • High ($) incentive (process and outcome measures)
RQLHE0006‐0413 

Program Overview Objectives

5

Program Overview:  Experimental Design
• Randomized trials – Compares those with incentives (“Treatment”) to those without  (“Control”) • All patients have new access to cessation services • Only those randomized to incentives initially get incentives – Randomize to show causality: Does the program work? – CMS requires randomization • Randomization:  – By provider, not patient  – Within each provider type – By practice, not site or individual practitioner

RQLHE0006‐0413 

6

2

4/23/2013

Project Overview
Success of the program depends on providers 
• • • • • • Screen member for tobacco use Educate, inform and motivate Engage member in treatment Enroll smoker in incentive program  Provide smoking cessation services/products  Track and report activities for purposes of incentives 

RQLHE0006‐0413 

7

Motivation for Tobacco Cessation Reform?
Costs of chronic conditions and poor health  outcomes:
• Costs to plan sponsors (employers, government  (Medicare  Medicaid) (Medicare, • Costs to individual • Costs to society

RQLHE0006‐0413 

8

Incentives and Behavior Change:  The Problem
• Medical care for smoking related health issues costs $96  billion/year  • People living with mental illness or substance use disorders  consume 40% of all tobacco products (SAMHSA, 2013) • 38% of adults with mental illness or substance use disorders  smoke; these conditions k  only l  19.7% 19 7% % of f adults d lt  without ith t th diti   smoke (SAMHSA, 2013) • 60 % of Medicaid members with serious mental illness  smoke • 30% of CT’s Medicaid members smoke

RQLHE0006‐0413 

9

3

4/23/2013

Incentives and Behavior Change:  The Problem
Low income individuals are: 
• • • • more likely to smoke and be in poor health less likely to quit on their own  poor access to cessation programs lack support and/or coaching

RQLHE0006‐0413 

10

Incentives and Behavior Change:  The Problem
Many smokers want to quit and need help
• 70 % of current smokers want to quit  • 52 % of adult smokers stopped smoking for one day in an  attempt to quit • Smoking cessation success rates are low (as low as 3 %) • Too few seek professional services and medications

RQLHE0006‐0413 

11

Why Should Smoking Cessation  Be Incentivized?
• Many smokers want to quit and need assistance achieving their own goals: – As many as 70% of current smokers want to quit, with success rates as  low as 2%‐3%. – Barriers to quitting include access to smoking cessation programs,  nicotine replacement therapies and an inability to fully weigh the long  term risks of smoking. smoking   • Financial incentives may provide the additional support and motivation  needed to make a quit attempt. – Become aware of the full risks and associated costs of smoking  (personal and family members’ health, financial costs) – Smokers are present biased and often delay quitting today for the  temporary relief of tobacco, and the future quit attempt never comes. – Financial incentives can help reinforce the decision to quit and  reinforce the habit of not smoking.
RQLHE0006‐0413 

12

4

4/23/2013

Current Uses of Financial Incentives
• Health‐related financial incentives are used to improve health  outcomes, improve compliance, lower medical spending and  improve worker productivity • Who utilizes financial incentives?  Employers, health  insurance providers, contingency management • Examples of financial incentives used: direct payments,  bonuses, gift cards, vouchers, subsidized/free services,  premium adjustments • Examples of targeted behaviors: Weight loss, smoking  cessation, health risk assessments, primary care/preventive  care visits
RQLHE0006‐0413 

13

Incentives and Behavior Change:  Why Incentives? 
They work! 
• Increase efforts to quit • Increase quit rate • Short term cessation rates among incentive  groups were two to three times those of the  non‐incentive groups (Cahill & Perera, 2011)

RQLHE0006‐0413 

14

Incentives and Behavior Change:  Why Incentives? 
They work!  For pregnant women:
• ↑Abs nence at the end‐of‐pregnancy 

(41 % incentives vs. 10 % no incentives )  • 12‐week postpartum assessment (24 %  vs. 3 %); (Heil, 2008).  • Improved fetal outcomes

RQLHE0006‐0413 

15

5

4/23/2013

Incentives and Behavior Change:  Medicaid and SMI Populations
Still unknown: – Effectiveness for Medicaid population – Effectiveness for those with SMI – Long‐term effectiveness: g • One trial found a significant  effect of incentives  on cessation over one year (Volpp, 2009):  Cessation at 15/18 months: 9.4 % incentives vs.  3.6 % no incentives Rewards to Quit is an opportunity to study the effect of   incentives on these populations

RQLHE0006‐0413 

16

Incentives and Behavior Change: Characteristics of Effective Incentives 
• Paid on objective criteria — Clear cessation targets and timeframes • Frequent — Reinforces quit decision and behaviors • Immediate
— Instant rewards maintain motivation and participation

RQLHE0006‐0413 

17

Incentives and Behavior Change: Characteristics of Effective Incentives 
• Salient
—Messaging must be clear and targeted to smoker  (education, language)

• Dose Response p  
—Larger incentives for long‐term cessation motivates and  reinforces quit decision

• Complementary services
— Incentives combined with counseling and peer coaching  most effective
RQLHE0006‐0413 

18

6

4/23/2013

Provider participation is key to program success
Responsibility
Screen for tobacco use Complete screening, and smoking status  and habit assessment forms Complete intake form for program  enrollment Provide smoking cessation  services/products  Tobacco cessation counseling  NRT  Prescribe medications Provide referrals if necessary Administer CO test, if requested by  member Track and report activities for purposes of  incentives 
* Existing Quitline protocols

Randomized In  (Treatment)
X X X X X X X X X X

Randomized Out (Control)
X X

Connecticut  Quitline

X X X X X X*

X

RQLHE0006‐0413 

19

Program Overview: Incentives
Designed to be maximally effective:
– Paid on objective criteria – Paid for cessation approaches proven to be effective  – Counseling  Services (Individual or Group) – Negative CO breathalyzer test – Paid frequently to reduce dropout rates – Paid soon upon completion of task/achievement/goal – Cumulatively, payments are large for continued  participation (dose response) – Bonus payments provided to encourage continued  engagement

RQLHE0006‐0413 

20

Program Process and Rules Incentive Payments
• Incentive payments paid on objective and verified criteria: • Counseling incentives paid on Provider‐reported service data • CO test incentives paid on physician office confirmation • All incentives will be electronically deposited on a reloadable debit  card weekly: • All participants in Treatment groups will receive a reloadable  debit card • As incentives are earned, value is loaded onto the debit card,  which can be used for purchases (not ATM withdrawals) • Loading and other administrative fees associated with the  debit card are paid by state

RQLHE0006‐0413 

21

7

4/23/2013

Program Process and Rules Incentive Amounts
• The maximum incentive payments per member per activity (Treatment  Groups only): o Counseling Sessions:   o $5/each session with maximum of 10 sessions (total incentive payment  of $50) o Two bonus payments of $15 each can be earned, each one for  completing a series of five sessions o Tobacco‐free CO breathalyzer tests:   o $15 per negative test with a maximum of 12 tests per member o Four bonus payments of $10 can be earned, each one for having three  consecutive negative tests The maximum potential Rewards to Quit incentive payment per member:  
• $350 per 12‐month enrollment period (max two enrollment periods per  person), and  • $600 per calendar  year NOTE: No financial incentives are provided for NRT or prescription medications

RQLHE0006‐0413 

22

Program Process and Rules
Program Enrollment • Program enrollment completed  via clinicians within PCMHs,  FQHCs, LMHAs, OB‐GYN and  Pediatrician offices • 365‐day program cycle begins the  d  smokers day k  agree to t  participate ti i t   in the program. 
1. Clinicians screen for smoking  status  2. Patient eligible for study if:
a. Smoked within last 30 days b. At least 18 years old c. Enrolled in HUSKY A, C or D

3 Clinicians provide information  3. about study and ask to  participate. 4. If patient agrees to participate,  initial screening questionnaire  and enrollment forms required 5. If patient declines to participate,  they will be asked again at all  future visits.  

RQLHE0006‐0413 

23

Program Overview:  Enrollment
• All HUSKY A, C and D members ages 18 and over are eligible • Can enroll for up to two enrollment cycles • Each enrollment cycle = 12 months from date of  enrollment • Enrollment cycle for pregnant women = 12 months or ([months of enrollment prior to delivery]+[6 months post‐ partum]), whichever is longer  • Ensures that women can receive incentives for at least six‐ months postpartum  

RQLHE0006‐0413 

24

8

4/23/2013

Program Details 
New CT Medicaid Smoking Cessation  Coverage
Expanded Services
Smoking Cessation  Counseling    

Expanded Therapies
Nicotine  Replacement  Therapies Prescription  Medications for  Cessation

24 ‐hour Telephone  Quitline

Peer Counselors  (phase 2)

RQLHE0006‐0413 

25

Rewards to Quit Timeline
Target Populations
Medicaid  Smokers

Available Locations
Patient ‐ Centered  Medical Homes

Time Period Studied
First providers  begin  recruitment on  March 27, 2013

Pregnant and  Postpartum  Medicaid  Smokers Medicaid  Smokers with  Severe Mental  Illness

Federally  Qualified  Health Centers

Recruitment  ends Fall 2015  

Local  Mental Health  Authorities Participating  OBGYN &  Pediatrician  Practices

Evaluation  complete Fall  2016

RQLHE0006‐0413 

26

Program Details
Available Services & Treatments • Covered Medicaid services and  treatment Group counseling sessions Access to telephone Quitline Ni ti  replacement Nicotine l t th therapies i   Prescriptions for smoking  cessation • Study specific services  • Outcome‐ and process‐based  financial incentives • Peer counseling (via Hispanic  Health Council) within three cities
RQLHE0006‐0413 

• • • •

All participants  will have  access to Medicaid  services and treatments  regardless of study  group assignment

Access to study‐specific  services will depend  on  study arm assignment  and geographic  location

27

9

4/23/2013

Program Details
Rewards to Quit Program (365 Days) Program  Enrollment
• Physician  assesses smoking  status • Offers cessation  treatment  • If patient accepts,  enrolled in study  arm

Available  Services &  Treatments
• Medicaid  services: NRT,  prescription,  counseling   counseling, Quitline • Additional  services: peer  counseling‐ Phased in later

Process  Incentives
• Counseling  session  • Quitline call • Max # incentives • Bonus for  multiple  sessions/calls

Outcome  Incentives
• Tobacco‐free CO  test  • Max # incentives • Bonus for   consecutive  tobacco‐free  readings

3  mo.

Smoking Cessation Evaluation

12  mo.

RQLHE0006‐0413 

28

CO Breathalyzer Testing

RQLHE0006‐0413 

29

CO Breathalyzer Testing & Incentives
To be eligible for a reward for the tobacco‐free  CO breathalyzer test all must be true • It must be 7 days since the last test  (Maximum of 12 per year) • Maximum of 12 tobacco‐free tests results  per year To be eligible for a bonus for the tobacco‐free  CO breathalyzer test • Individual must have had 3 negative  (tobacco‐free) CO tests in a row • Maximum of 4 per year Technical note ‐ A CO test of >=8 parts per million  indicates current smoking for non‐pregnant  adults, and >= 2 parts per million for  pregnant women
RQLHE0006‐0413 

30

10

4/23/2013

Reloadable Rewards to Quit Card

RQLHE0006‐0413 

31

Welcome Card for Members

RQLHE0006‐0413 

32

Counseling & CO Breathalyzer  Motivational Cards

RQLHE0006‐0413 

33

11

4/23/2013

http://www.rewardstoquit.org

RQLHE0006‐0413 

34

Provider Portal to Access Intake Forms http://www.huskyhealthct.org/providers/provider updates.html website

RQLHE0006‐0413 

35

Intake & Informed Consent  Forms
Rewards to Quit Intake Form (Spanish version) Rewards to Quit Intake Form (English version)

• Program Instructions – General Instructions – Form Instructions • Part A – Basic Information – Provider information – Patient information • Part B – Smoking Status & Habits • Part C – Patient Informed Consent • Program Service Visit (Treatment Only)
RQLHE0006‐0413 

36

12

4/23/2013

Policy Transmittal 2011‐35, PB 2011‐94 Expansion of Smoking Cessation Coverage Smoking cessation billing.pdf

RQLHE0006‐0413 

37

Provider Billing Procedures‐ PB 2011‐94

RQLHE0006‐0413 

38

Changes to Rewards to Quit Program
• Incentives paid for CT Quitline calls will not be available to  treatment group enrollees at the start of the project on   March 27, 2013 • Psychodynamic group counseling services will be billable to  Medicaid at the beginning of the project with specific  credentialing and curriculum requirements for tobacco  cessation • Providers can receive support with enrollment applications by  calling 1.800.859.9889, Ext. 1070 • Members can receive support with tobacco cessation  questions by calling 1.800.859.9889, option 4 (Member  Services), option 4 (Smoking Cessation)
RQLHE0006‐0413 

39

13

4/23/2013

Questions 

RQLHE0006‐0413 

40

14

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful