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CHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION........................................................................................ 6 CHAPTER II: VILLAGE PROFILE AND ITS SURROUNDINGS............................................9 2.8 Cropping pattern............................................................................................. 20 2.9 Food Requirements......................................................................................... 21 CHAPTER III: HUMAN RESOURCES.............................................................................24 Age Sex Pyramid................................................................................................ 29 Sex Ratio............................................................................................................ 31 Literacy Rate...................................................................................................... 32 Occupation Pattern............................................................................................. 33 Table: Occupation pattern .................................................................................35 Chart: Occupation Pattern..................................................................................35 Workforce participation...................................................................................... 36 Table: Workforce Participation ..........................................................................36 Table: Main workers .......................................................................................... 36 Workers and Non-Workers..................................................................................37 Social Composition............................................................................................. 39 CHAPTER –IV: HOUSING ........................................................................................... 42 4.1 Housing Stock.................................................................................................. 42 4.2 Structural conditions....................................................................................... 43 Pucca House Semi Pucca House................................44

CONTENTS

Kutcha House........................................................................................................ 44 Single House Twin Houses Row House............................45 Courtyard House.........................................................................45

4.3 Proposals......................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER-V: PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.................................................................49 Analysis:............................................................................................................. 50

Sources of Supply............................................................................................... 51 Distribution Network and Tariff Details..............................................................52 Water Demand................................................................................................... 53 Sewerage system in the village:.........................................................................55 Observation existing sewerage system:.............................................................55 Table: Toilet facilities in the village....................................................................55 Fuel Energy and Other Rural Energies:..............................................................58 CHAPTER VI: SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE...................................................................59 6.1 Education Facilities:......................................................................................... 59 A. Mid Day Meal Scheme:...................................................................................... 60 B. National Program for Education of Girls at Elementary Level (NPEGEL):...........60 Higher Primary School:....................................................................................... 61 6.2. Health Facilities:............................................................................................. 63 Health Indicators:............................................................................................... 63 Types of Diseases:............................................................................................. 64 Immunization details:........................................................................................ 64 Primary Health Centre:....................................................................................... 65 Infrastructure facilities at Primary Health Centre:..............................................65 Health Schemes: ............................................................................................... 66 Janani Suraksha Yojana:..................................................................................... 66 Prasuti Araike Yojana:............................................................................................ 66 Bhagya Lakshmi scheme:...................................................................................... 66 Accessibility of services with distance:...............................................................66 Health Analysis:.................................................................................................. 67 Comparison of Man power at Primary Health Centre:............................................68 CHAPTER VII: PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION .....................................................71

...........................81 8.................. 85 Commercial land use :........................................... 84 Commercial:............................................4 Consolidated Vision and Proposals ..........................................83 Interrelationship of Land uses With Infrastructure...... 86 Public & Semi-public:.................................................................... 85 Public & Semipublic land use :................................................................................................................................81 Distribution of Land uses:.............................................................................................. 84 Public & Semipublic:.....................................82 Composition of Land Use..............................83 Land Suitability Analysis:......................... 86 Residential: .......................................................................................................... 85 Transportation & Communication land use:...........................................................................................................................................................3 Proposed land use:....................2 Vision .............................................86 Land use for Park & Open Space...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................86 9.............................................................. 84 Transportation & Communication:...............................................................................................................................................................................1 Existing Land use Analysis: ................................................. 86 Commercial:..........................................Employment Programs......................... 84 Residential land use: .................... 86 Proposals:....................................................................................................................83 9.............................................................................................................................................................86 Vision:.................................83 Interrelationship of Land uses with Topography:..................................... 77 CHAPTER VIII: LAND USE IN THE VILLAGE........................................................................... 84 Residential........................84 9................ 82 Interrelationship of Land uses With Village Activities....................................... 86 ..................................................................................

..................... 87 Strategies:................................................ 87 CHAPTER IX: GAP ANALYSIS..............Transportation & communication:................................... 88 .................................. 87 Policies:............................................................................................................................................................................................ STRATEGIES.......87 Park & Open Space:........................ VISION.................................................... PROPOSALS AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS ...........................................................

1 Introduction Indian villages are often described as 'cultural artefacts' or “repositories of culture”.19% to 68. cluster of houses or more than one such cluster bearing a distinctive place name. 1 .84% people living in rural areas and the proportion of rural population declined from 72. yet they are the most neglected people in not having the basic needs of life.2 Need for study The purpose of this village development plan is simply to provide the most basic daily needs to the villagers. the boundaries of which are defined. 1. In 1995. 2011 data reveals that 6. As we all know. 38. it is derived from ‘settle’ meaning to establish. let alone in other areas of development. Settlement is a generic term. As per 2011 provisions Census of India data reveals that about 68. 40. A unit having a parcel of land.CHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION 1. All areas which are not categorized as urban area are considered as Rural Area.84% from 2001 to 2011 1.588 and Provisional Census of India. Human Settlement means cluster of dwellings of any type or size where human beings live. Village defined as ‘parcel of ground with definite boundaries for revenue purpose’. the number of Rural Units (or Villages) in India is 6. As per 2001 census. This has led to migration from rural areas to urban areas and an increase in urban slums. villagers make up 75-80% of the total population of India. Planning Commission of India had made mandatory to preparation of village development plan as an integral part of Eleventh Five Year Plan document. In the last 60 years.867. Gandhijis themes for rural development are ‘Village perishes India will perish too’ and ‘One in all and all in one’ wisely proclaimed the greater truth ‘all the property is a trust’ and Gram Swarajya – a village centered society. Indian Census provides definition of the term ‘village’ means an adam. The 73rd constitutional amendment enjoins that the Gram Panchayat will have to perform basically two functions: (a) the preparation of plans for economic development and social justice. a concept was developed to make a model village in each province of India. they have contributed enormously to India's economy. Human settlement is defined as a place of human inhabited more or less permanently.

Planning Commission of India made preparation of village plans as mandatory. The Development Plan for Kanchgharkoppal village aims to strengthen the rural infrastructure to create rural assets. 1. social and economic infrastructure in the village To assess and identify the existing problems and development gaps for infrastructure provisions in the village To propose planning solutions and policy recommendations for over all development of the village .(b) the implementation of schemes for economic development and social justice as may be entrusted to them including those in relation to the matters enlisted 29 functions in the eleventh schedule of the Indian constitution. promote community cooperation and engagement by implementing a shared direction for the future. but also to reflect people's felt needs and perceptions.3 Objectives • To prepare the existing land use and understanding structure and its characteristics of village • • • To study the physical. It is imperative therefore to have a village development plan not only because it is mandatory in the act. based on prioritized and practical solutions for identified issues within the rural communities.

1.4 Flow Chart .

It is located within the K.CHAPTER II: VILLAGE PROFILE AND ITS SURROUNDINGS 2. Brass means “Kanchu” in Kannada so this village was named after as “Kanchugara Koppalu” village. It is situated within the Chunchanakatte Hobali and the village does not have any significant historical events associated with its existence. Topography The topography of the village is almost plain.7 mm during 2005 and minimum rainfall is 698.1 Historical Background Historically. 2. .820 m. The Mean Sea Level (MSL) of the village is 820m. the village is classified as denundation uplands with about 85 to 90% of the Taluk falling in this category. Geomorphologically. The village is situated in the direction of North to South. abutting Cauvery canal. the people are inhabited in that village were basically blacksmith. 76°18'14"E to 76°19'14"E longitude. The maximum rainfall is 1035. The Kanchugarakoppalu village is comes under administrative wing of Kestur Gram Panchayat.2 Longitude and Latitude The Village is bounded by 12°27'10"to 12°28'10 North latitude. The general elevation in the village ranges from 780-820 m. The village falls in the Survey of India topo sheet Nos. Thus the climate of Mysore district is temperate with moderate variations in temperature according to different seasons. The village is dotted with a small hillocks ranging from 800. Rainfall The annual rain fall variation from past 7 years has shown in the Table 1 and Chart 1. The next important geomarphological unit is older flood plains mainly in the Sir ramapura parts of K R Nagara taluk. Kanchugarakoppalu is one of the three basic villages which come under the administrative control of KesthuruKoppalu Gram panchayat.08 Hectares. It has no much significance in historical or cultural importance. The temperature ranges from 110 C to 380 C.5 mm during the year 2006 . The average height of this region is 800 and least is 780 MSL towards the north part of the village. The area of the village is 124. 57D /7.R. It is basically a small village which began its formation due to its high fertile lands with the Kaveri canal passing through the village which was built in 1932 and thus the development of its growth with a total population of around 1125 as per 2011 census. Nagar Taluk in Mysore district.

6 94.5 14 2 40 3.5 1. 9 Nov 34.3 68 56 9.3 9. Mysore and K.9 11.3 Climate and humidity The climatic conditions of the district are favorable to the crops like Paddy. 7 106.4 4.4 Annual total 743. 2 May 195. T.9 115. 7 285.7 0 23.7 773 823. 4 0.2 32. 3 76. Jawar. 4 Sep 94 107.3 76.6 50. 6 10 6 10 2 11 8 69.Nagar and southern transition zone . 7 0 0 0 0 0 Feb 0 4.7 161.R. 7 61.9 Source: Chart: Annual rainfall (in mm) 2.7 Jun 48. Pulses. The district can be divided into two agro-climatic zones. 5 137.9 Aug 46. Southern dry zone comprising of 4 taluks namely. 2 98.3 145. 2 57.Table: Annual and Monthly Rainfall Details Year 200 4 200 5 200 6 200 7 200 8 200 9 201 0 Jan 0 11.5 86.1 Ma r 8. Sugarcane and Tobacco. 7 Jul 100.8 155.8 35.5 111.5 154.6 69 15. 9 0. 2 66.8 49. 9 91. 9 93. 3 141.6 923. Nanjangud.5 93.6 220. 9 De c 0 8.7 698.4 145.Narasipur. 5 171.9 136. 8 30.5 Oct 119. 5 108.6 1035. 6 72.7 0 0. 3 137. 3 120. 6 84 103.2 Apr 90.2 92. Ragi.2 9.1 0 0. 8 67.5 823.

Nagar. through metallic and non-metallic road.R.monsoon starting from August till December.D. Hunsur. In this district. And reverse direction from North-East to South-West during retreating.R. Hosa Koppulu. however. paved roads. the majority of population living in rural areas. The State highway (SH-53) passes through K. Map: Settlement pattern . are likely to have cement-plastered homes. It has accessibility to neighbouring villages viz. The temperature ranges from 110 C to 380 C. the village is classified as denudation uplands with about 85 to 90% of the Taluk falling in this category. The rural settlements are characterized by compact villages in the western part of the state. Wind speed ranges from 14.consisting of H. Geomorphologically. Malali and Siddapura via mud roads passing through them. and a combination of the two in the central part.9kmph in October. It has directly connected to Hunsur which is nearby. Kestur Koppulu.Kote. Villages near the Town.1 kmph in July to 7. Settlement Pattern It is a rural habitat. & Periyapatna. Wind direction The wind direction is from South-West to North-East in monsoon season from June to August. groupings of hamlets in the eastern part. The next important geomarphological unit is older flood plains mainly in the Sir ramapura parts of K R Nagara taluk. Thus the climate of Mysore district is temperate with moderate variations in temperature according to different seasons. and electricity.4 Linkages and Accessibility The nearest railway station is in K. Nagar which is 10km from the village. A traditional village in Mysore district is a cluster of mud huts with roofs made of thatch (such as straw) or clay tiles and few amenities of modern living. Soil is red sandy loamy in most of the areas of the district. 2.

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the water tank) and the fertile soil. . Mineral There are no traces of mineral resources in the village. the Shallow Red soil.e. land. The underground water source is also ample.5 Natural resources The natural resources of a region include the air. The thickness of the soil varies from less than a meter to 6 m. The water resource (i. In this our study area also has small amount resources. The vegetation consists of Coconut plantation and Eucalyptus trees and few shrubs like cactus etc. Almost entire district is covered by red sandy soil except small parts of Taluk..Map: Sphere of influence 2. Deep Red clay soils and deep black soils. Soil The soil type of Village is grouped into three types viz. The soils are having high permeability and neutral with a pH of 7. water. biodiversity and Ecosystems. etc. the Cauvery canal. Vegetation In this study area there are no forest in revenue records and site analysis.

The tank drains a catchment area of more than 400 meters. a temporary bund hold the pond water. Deep Black soils occur in southwestern part of taluk in a small area. Tank The small water tank is located within the village. It is less permeable compared to sandy soil. It is characterized by clayey content mixed with sand. dark greyish brown to very dark grey or black in colour.North-west part of Taluk comprises of red loamy soil. These soils need to be drained once in 3-5 years with good quality water. On the north side. And on the south side. The village also draws water from bore wells. The thickness varies from less than a meter to 16 m. Overhead tank is about 11 km from the village and daily supply is estimated at 2. the water is distributed across the village through about 107 Tap connections. another temporary bund holds back the direct flow of small stream water into the pond. These soils are fertile and generally produce good yields. It is having good moisture holding capacity and is fertile. The canal is perennial. The tank is also used to be a source of water supply to the village but blockage of water flow sources almost led to the eutrophication of the pond.1 MLD. lake and canal are the main source of water for the village. Adequate soil and water management practices and drainage facilities are essential to obtain sustainable yields. Water: The water resources mainly a man-made canal called Kaveri canal / Cauvery Reservoir canal. The canal is well connected to the villages. hand pumps and bore wells which supply around 2 MLD of water to the . The existing canal acts as the natural barrier for the growth of the settlement. rice and other crops scattered over hundred acres of land. The Canal is the main water providing channel drawn from the back water of the Krishna Raja Sagar (KRS) Dam. sometime itself over flow. The construction of the reservoir has been beneficial for the production of sugarcane. otherwise salinity and water logging conditions may develop. Sources of water supply Ground water (aquifer). These soils are dark brown. It is a seasonal water body. The texture is usually clayey throughout the profile. its first irrigation water source of the village.

 K. cattle washing and irrigation purpose. Map: Influence zone . Administrative Purpose: The gram panchayat office is at Kestur Koppollu. Nagara at a distance of 30 km-depends for: • • • • Health and Recreation. Water is also drawn from canal which is located near to the village and is used for Cloth washing. Education Employment Transportation facilities.65KM : • Health: Since only 1 ANM is available in the village. The villagers going to kesturkoppulu for 1PHC and for vertenery purposes also. • •  Malali at a distance of 1.85KM from the village: • Health: To Malali for 1PHC. Education: For high school.R.population. Sphere of Influences on Neighboring Villages  Kesthurkoppalu at a distance of 1.

61 8.25 7.6 Land Utilization Land utilization in brief is simply the distribution of land among its important uses like cultivation forestry.14 2.63 3.83 3. Based on 9 fold classification.71 % 0.11 76.49 .37 2.75 10.58 123. Land utilization in rural area is as follows.56 0. grazing settlement etc.36 2.53 62.08 28.33 6.00 15. Table: Land Utilization Land Utilization Forest Area in non agriculture use Barren & uncultivable land Permanent pastures Land under miscellaneous Cultivable waste land Fallow land other than current fallows Current follows Net area sown Total Geographical area Area sown more than once Source: Village Panchayat * Area shown more than once is excluded in the total geographical area Chart: Land utilization Area in Hectares 0 18.08 0.74 2.2.22 100 37.

Agriculture Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the land or soil.08 Hectares.22%(76. Irrigation systems are also used for dust suppression. disposal of sewage. It is used to assist in the growing of agricultural crops. Irrigation is often studied together with drainage. In that 28. suppressing weed growing in grain fields and helping in preventing soil consolidation. In contrast. which is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. maintenance of landscapes.58 Hec) of total geographical area 123.71% of area is sowing more than once. and re-vegetation of disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of inadequate rainfall. agriculture that relies only on direct rainfall is referred to as rainfed or dry land farming. and in mining. irrigation also has a few other uses in crop production. which include protecting plants against frost. Additionally. .Net area sown is 62.

7 Land holdings: These data were tabulated according into 4 major size groups namely as small (<1 acre). medium (5-10 acres) and large (>10 acres).06 Large 42 23.05 182.9 8.08 56.99 ha) is irrigated and 56. Table: Land holdings Area in hectares % Small 14.58 ha.08%(32.58 % 43.71 Medium 56..7 37.92%(43.18 Marginal 68.Table: Irrigated area Area under irrigated Irrigated Non-irrigated Total net area Source: Village Panchayat Chart: irrigated area Area in hectares 32. Therefore almost 50% of the agriculture land is depending on the rain. 2.6 31.59 ha) is non-Irrigated in 76. marginal (1-5 acres).99 43.92 100 Total 43.59 76.2 100 Source: Primary Survey .

The main aim of using live stock details is:  Development of requisite infrastructure in States/ Uts for improving animal productivity. etc.  Expansion of aquaculture in fresh. Table: Live stock details S. welfare of fisherfolk. Sheep and Poultry) for development of superior germplasm for distribution to states.  Strengthening of central livestock farms (Cattle.  Preservation and protection of livestock through provision of health care.71% are Marginal Land holders is present and so it’s difficult implement the new irrigation project as revenue generated is small. brackish water.No 1 2 3 4 5 Bullock Cow Chicken Goat Sheep Animals Number 115 200 192 132 102 .Chart: Land holdings We can observe that there is 37. Livestock details: In view of the importance of livestock sector to the national economy and considering the short span of re-productivity and life of domestic animal.

Coconut yield throughout the year artificial fertilizer and cow dung as natural manure.Paddy & ragi  July to August . Based on the cropping pattern discussed earlier and information given by agriculture office K.8 Cropping pattern  December to march . it require moderate . yellu  October to march .R Nagar fallowing crops are grown as follows in Kanchugarakoppalu. It yield about 18 to 20 quintals per acre of well maintained agriculture land using indo chemical and other fertiliser. mango etc.Cereals & pulses.Pulses & tomato  March / April to mid June .Source: Primary Survey Chart: Live stock details 2.Sugar cane  Throughout year .coconut. Annual crop: Crops which are grown through the year raised in artificial irrigation some example are: • Coconut • Mango • tobacco Paddy yield about 25 to 30 quintals per acre using artificial fertilizer and cow dung as natural manure for enhance soil productivity and it require more amount of water. require relatively less when compare to paddy. Kharif crop: ragi normally grown after the harvesting of paddy in irrigated field.

85 100.9 Food Requirements Calories required: The number of calories the body consumes in a day is different for every person.000.52 20.35 2.12 silver oak 2. In one acre it can yield up to 40 coconuts per month per mature well maintained tree.54 Total 118.00 Source: Primary Survey Chart: Type of crops 2.09 5. There are three main factors involved in calculating how many calories your body needs per day: • Basal metabolic rate • Physical activity . gender. age and activity level all affect your caloric needs.11 vegeTable 6. You may notice on the nutritional labels of the foods you buy that the "percent daily values" are based on a 2. Height.28 pulses 6.58 5.amount of water.2.000 calorie diet -. Table: type of crops Type of crops Area in hectares % paddy 69.82 tobacco 6.71 2. But your body might need more or less than 2.07 5.50 ragi 24.000 calories is a rough average of what people eat in a day.53 58. weight.63 sugar cane 3.

To calculate the number of calories you expend in this process. lifting. and oils (yellow) 2. logger come under this category. consumes the next highest number of calories. the lungs breathing. men have a higher BMR than women. Physical activity includes everything from making your bed in the morning to jogging.(4. One of the most accurate methods of estimating your basal metabolic rate is the HarrisBenedict formula: Adult male: 66 + (6. or 10 percent.10 Occupation pattern There are three categories under occupational structure 1 .) + (12. meats and beans (purple).7 x height in inches) . In general. Walking. This accounts for about 60 to 70 percent of calories burned in a day and includes the energy required to keep the heart beating.8 x age in years) Adult female: 655 + (4.it takes energy to break food down to its basic elements in order to be used by the body. Tertiary sector-it provides services to both primary and secondary sectors . fruits (red). 3. These are primary because production is carried with the help of nature 2. vegeTables (green). The steps of the pyramid represent physical activity.9 x height in inches) . bending and just generally moving around burns calories. Secondary sector-all manufacturing industries come under this.7 x age in years) Measuring Food and Counting Calories The guidelines of the Food Pyramid established in 2005 emphasize finding a balance between food consumption and physical activity while making smart choices from every food group to get the most nutrition out of your calories. The thermic effect of food is the final addition to the number of calories your body burns.10. The second factor in the equation. and the food groups are illustrated as colors wedges which include grains (orange). but the number of calories you burn in any given activity depends on your body weight.3 x body weight in lbs. physical activity. This is the amount of energy your body uses to digest the food you eat -.• Thermic effect of food Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of energy your body needs to function at rest. the eyelids blinking and the body temperature stabilized. fishing. dairy products (blue).3 x weight in lbs. multiply the total number of calories you eat in a day by 0.agriculture.) + (4.primary sector.(6.

therefore. shortage of labour and dwindling natural resources. Consolidation is one such solution theme .11 Conclusion: While Indian agriculture has shown resilience to many shocks that penetrated into the world in the last decade. further fragmentation. Therefore agriculture is the main Economic base of the village. Chart: Occupational pattern details Year Primary Secondary 1971 177 16 1981 173 26 1991 149 64 2001 253 72 2011 301 84 1053 262 Total Tertiary 14 18 28 34 31 125 2.Table: Occupational pattern details S. all this will change in the coming decades as growing population. However. There is. These may put us back in the grip of a perennial food crisis. the farmers are successfully producing crops in spite of many hardships. Occupational Pattern 1 Primary activity 2 Secondary activity 3 tertiary Source: Statistical department Mysore Number 301 84 31 From the above most of people engaged in primary sector.No. a great responsibility on the farming community and the government alike to realize this future shock and take proactive steps to avoid such crises. land conversion will lead to lower productivity.

migration and population projection for future development. 3. 1971 census it was 777 total population. has increased to 782 in 1981. growth rate. This study covering the population growth. further increased to 813 in 1991. Table: Growth of population Year Population Male Female 1971 1981 1991 2001 777 782 813 970 388 392 416 472 389 390 397 498 Population variations in number 5 31 157 . occupation pattern especially workers and non-workers and workforce participation rate.1 Introduction The study human resource is one of the important components for Development Plan for village. 970 in 2001 and 1125 in the year 2011 based on primary household survey data. The size of population growth has increased in different census period viz. age-sex pyramid. 0-6 population. social composition. density. literacy level. sex ratio.CHAPTER III: HUMAN RESOURCES 3.2 Human Resource details Growth of population Population of Kanchugarakoppalu village has undergone variation in the growth of population from during 1971 to 2011.

The reason is outmigration of the people for better education and employment opportunities.2001 it has increased rapidly and 2001-11very meager changes. changes in the population growth of the village is steadily increased during 1971-81 and 1991 . .2011* 1125 536 589 155 Source: Census of India – Village directory * Primary survey (Household survey) When compare with previous decades.

the male population is more than the female population the 3 consecutive decades i. 1961-71.e. 1971-81. 73 and 19 respectively. and 1981-91 with a difference of 1. During the year 1991-2001.. the female population exceeded the male population by 26 and followed the same trend continued in 2001-11 where the difference increased to 53.Chart: Growth of population Source: Census of India – Village directory * Primary survey (Household survey) Male and Female population The composition of male and female population in Kanchugarakoppalu village shows that. Table: Male and Female population Variation (female to Total Year Male Female male) Population -1 1971 388 389 777 -73 1981 392 319 782 -19 1991 416 397 813 26 2001 472 498 970 53 2011* 536 589 1125 .

Chart: Male and Female population Population of 0-6 The population of age group between 0-6 years is crucial for the provision of the infrastructural facilities like health facilities and nutrition provisions etc. When coming to the case of this village. Table: Population of 0-6 Year Total population male female 1991 92 2001 122 2011* 41 * Primary Survey (Household survey) Chart: Population of 0-6 43 61 15 49 61 26 . 122 in 2001 and 41 in 2011. It indicates that the 0-6 population is declining as shown in following Table& Chart. the data reveals that the population of 0-6 during the year in 1991. This also helps in provision of Anganwadi’s. Health workers (ANM) for the population.

1991-2001 with 11. which helps to estimate the future requirement of resources which serve the growth in population. the population growth is following the positive trend from the past decades. When coming to the case of this village.64 3.The main reason behind the fall in growth rate of population is Migration (due to education/employment) Table: Population and Growth rate Year 1961-71 1971-81 1981-91 1991-01 2001-11 Growth of Population 777 782 813 970 1125 Decadal Variation 5 31 157 155 Decadal Growth Rate 0.Growth Rate The growth rate trend of the population is necessary for helping to know the projected population for future by taking the past and present growth rate.31 15. the decadal growth rate of 1961-71 is 0.931.6 for 2001-2011*. but the consecutive decade did not follow the same growth line forward as it fixed near 11.064.98 Chart: Decadal Growth rate .96 19.

An example of "semi permanent residence" would be the seasonal movements of migrant farm laborers.64 1971-81 1981-91 1991-01 2001-11 19.97 3. usually across a political boundary. People can either choose to move ("voluntary migration") or be forced to move ("involuntary migration"). Males are shown on the left hand side.96 Out Migration Migration (human) is the movement of people from one place in the world to another for the purpose of taking up permanent or semi permanent residence. Table: Information of out migration Reason Education Employment Age Sex Pyramid Age-sex pyramids (also known as population pyramids) are a special graph that displays this information and allows us to compare between countries and between time periods. Data is graphed in Number 12 32 .25 20 15 10 5 0 0.31 15. These show the percentage (or sometimes the actual amount) of a population broken down by sex and age.The migration in this village occurred due the main common reasons which are Employment and Education. while females on the right.

which gives the information of the fertility rate and the population of the teenage which shows the need of educational facilities. employment opportunities. And also the increase in the working population should be shown proper employment opportunities. and thus should be forecasted for future need also.five-year age increments on the y-axis. 40-44. else all the classified age-groups have more population than the male population where the value changed from minimum of 1 and maximum of 20. The population of the middle-age group (20-45) is more when compared the age group of 0-19. 2011 Age-group Male Female Total 0-4 12 23 35 5-9 20 29 49 10-14 53 42 95 15-19 50 60 110 20-24 40 60 100 25-29 40 56 96 30-34 39 51 90 35-39 60 69 129 40-44 54 34 88 45-49 54 37 91 50-54 21 32 53 55-59 26 11 37 60-64 20 28 48 65-69 17 22 39 70-74 14 17 31 75-79 9 10 19 80+ 7 8 15 Total 536 589 1125 Source: Primary Survey (Household survey) When coming to the composition of the population the female population is less in the age-groups of 10-14. and epidemics. Chart: Age sex pyramid . Table: Age distribution by Sex. wars. These show long-term trends in the birth and death rates but also reflect shorter term baby-booms. and percentages of the total population on the x-axis. 45-49 and 55-59.

This is a very good sign when compared with the even to the country level sexratio which is 940 females per 1000 males. when we go through the data we can observe that the sex ratio of female increased by decades.Sex Ratio Sex ratio is the number of females for 1000 male population. . The sex ratio in this village is 1055 in 2001 and 1099 in 2011*.

But the sex-ratio (0-6) increased in the decade of 1991-2001 and fall in the decade of 2001-2011.6 2 21.6 3 49.3 146 5 65.1 88 6 46. this directly shows effect on the development of a place or a settlement.8 0 37.9 85 4 62.6 5 34. The sex-ratio is also increased.Chart: Sex ratio 1150 1100 1050 1000 950 900 850 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 1003 995 954 1099 1055 • • • Gradual increase in population is observed in past two decade. Table: Literacy and Illiteracy Year Mal e 86 184 265 307 Literates % Fema le 22.0 247 % 22.4 Total Mal Fema e le 388 389 392 425 472 390 388 498 1971 1981 1991 2001 . which help the people in getting employment opportunities and knowledge in knowing the technologies developed in all the fields which help them in all ways.9 NA 242 251 % NA NA 62.6 Mal e NA NA 160 165 Illiterates % Fema le NA NA NA 37. Literacy Rate Literacy rate of a place gives the number of educated people.3 7 50.

Main workers were those who had worked for the major part of the year preceding the date of enumeration i. 1981 1991 2001 2011 174 184 8688 85 269 265 146 411 307 247 554 398 360 MALE FEMALE TOTAL 758 . Main Occupation.38 where the figure of Karnataka literacy touched 75. The literacy rate of the population is 67. those who worked for less than 183 days (or six months). those who were engaged in any economically productive activity for 183 days (or six months) or more during the year.. Chart: Literacy 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1971 Occupation Pattern The general categorization of occupation pattern of the people will be classified in mainly into Main Occupation and Marginal Occupation.8 8 511 589 There is an increasing trend in the literacy rate.e.8 360 61. The literacy rate of the village is predominantly very less in the decades of 1971-81.1 2 203 0 38. i. 1981-91 when compared to the size of the population. which is a very good sign for development.e. Marginal workers were those who worked any time at all in the year preceding the enumeration but did not work for a major part of the year.1 113 8 2 * Primary Survey (Household survey) 6 22. by the year 2011.4 0 2011* 398 77.60.. Marginal Occupation.

Expect in the year of 1991 and 2011*. the people participation in marginal occupation is almost equal to the half of the figures of the main occupation.The occupation pattern of the village is not following the same trend. . In the year 1991. although of the span of time. all the years shows the discouragement in the numbers of marginal workers. The occupational patterns keep on fluctuating.

there are complete 216 marginal workers are female. But in the year of 1991.Table: Occupation pattern Year Total Main Workers 216 196 264 253 341 Male Female Marginal Workers 3 0 216 2 97 Male Female 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 * 219 192 480 255 438 199 192 239 202 227 17 4 25 51 114 3 0 0 2 76 0 0 216 0 21 * Primary Survey (Household survey) The people choosing main occupation are male population is more when comparison brought with female participation. Chart: Occupation Pattern .

7 29.7 1 216 196 480 413 629 Tot al Non-Workers Mal e 189 200 177 182 115 % 48.7 1 52.2 9 561 388 586 392 333 416 557 472 496 536 589 498 397 319 389 Tot al Total Population Mal fema e le 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 * Table: Main workers Cultivato Agri. but there is lot of difference in trend of participation of workers when compared to the male participation. The female work participation is relatively low when compared to the working population of male workers.7 0 Fema le 70 4 216 123 175 % 18 1. but the number of female participation is also increased.4 4 84.6 75.5 6 15.9 8 63. The projection of workforce for future should be provided with proper access of work which will be increased in the time being.3 Fema le 372 315 156 375 381 % 82 98.9 8 45.4 6 61.3 70.5 4 38.2 9 47.4 24.0 2 36.02 54. Household Year rs Labors Workers 1971 177 130 3 1981 173 16 0 1991 149 82 6 2001 253 106 17 2011* 131 208 34 * Primary Survey(Household survey) Other than the household workers 0 7 26 30 24 .Workforce participation The workforce participation of a settlement ought to be studied by the planners to know the trends in knowing the workers strength and their participation and their percentage with taking into consideration of the male and female rate of participation into consideration. Table: Workforce Participation Year Workers Mal e 199 192 264 290 454 % 51.

The total number of Workers increased by means of time although the number of Non-worker population is not decreased. When comparison comes with the dependency . In the village context. ‘Non-workers’ were those who had not worked any time at all in the year preceding the date of enumeration. Worker involves not only actual work but also effective supervision and direction of work. Such participation was physical or mental in nature.Chart: Occupation Pattern Chart: Occupation Pattern in 2011 Workers and Non-Workers ‘Worker’ can be defined as person who participation in any economically productive activity.

The other than household worker mean they are the people moving for the employment from village. Cultivators. and Household workers and Other than household worker. It is also referred to as the "total dependency ratio". A measure showing the number of dependents (aged 0-14 and over the age of 60) to the total population (aged 15-64). Chart: Dependency Ratio . Table: Information Workers Total Male Female 1971 199 70 216 1981 192 4 196 1991 264 216 480 2001 290 123 413 2011* 454 175 629 * Primary Survey (Household survey) • • Year Non-Workers Male Female 189 372 200 386 177 156 182 375 115 381 Total 561 586 333 557 496 The main occupation in the village is daily wages based on Agriculture.ratio follows no unique trend although it increased in the years 1971 and 1981. of Dependents /Population (1559)}X100 Then dependency ratio is 78% in the village by the year 2011*. and it was 69% in 1991 and 134% in the year 2001. Calculated by: Dependency ratio = {No. When the statical data of previous decades considered there was huge dependency ratios prevailed in the years of 1971 and 1981 which are 259% and 299% respectively.

Other Backward Castes and General Categories. the social composition will be done by religion and caste based. The ST population was not found in the village. there are 249 SC’s and 876 General people. Kanchugarakoppalu has SC population almost equal to one fourth number of the general caste people. Chart: Social Composition . This study of a place gives the standard of living and what are the schemes should be provided to them. and providing source for development. This study is necessary for making the policy making for the upliftment of the backward caste people. When coming to figures. Scheduled Tribe.134 69 78 1991 Social Composition 2001 2011 According to census of India. The caste base system is classified into Scheduled Caste.

using data relating to the past available at that point of time. especially when looking beyond much further in time. Medical and health intervention strategies. a population projection can help illustrate the impact of an increased population on the use of fuel wood and the potential threat to the forests or the need for affordable housing projects to accommodate the large and growing population. forms a critical input in this mathematical effort. For example. doctors. this puts us in a better position to assess the need for new jobs. politico economic conditions and a host of other factors influence population dynamics. governments. donors. making it a somewhat unpredicTable exercise. climatic variability. Assumptions used and their probability of adhering in future. teachers.3 Population Projection Population projection is a scientific attempt to peep into the future population scenario. food. and healthcare staff need to know how many children will be alive in the future. For example. in order to plan an immunization program at some time in the future. urban housing. and requirements for resources. schools. . If we know how many people are in a country or region.ST SC General 3. food production and its equiTable availability. Predicting the future course of human fertility and mortality is not easy. nurses. Population projections are useful for a number of reasons and help stakeholders plan for the near and distant future. Population projections are also important for raising awareness of issues among policymakers. conditioned by making certain assumptions. Population projections can help us estimate future population size. socio-cultural setting.

P = Pp eM Where.Even though we have many types of population projection methods. Pp = Present Population.47/100)X10 P = 1304 . e = Exponential P = 1125 X e(1. M= KT where. K = Pop/T T = T projection year . The projected population for the year 2021 as per Exponential Growth Projection method is.T present year Projected Population. The most practiced method in India is the Exponential Growth Method.

Chart: Projected population CHAPTER –IV: HOUSING 4. . Totally there are 225 dwelling units.1 Housing Stock • The total number of house stock is 240 including cattle shed.

• Semi Pucca – the structure whose walls and roof both are made of non Pucca materials such as walls constructed with bricks and mud mortar roof covering with Mangalore tiles.19% 12.69 % 69. • Pucca – a structure whose walls and roof are made of permanent materials such as cement. burnt brick. walls surface plaster with cement mortar. stones etc.2 Structural conditions  There are four different types of housing based on structural conditions. The house hold average size is 5. • Kutcha – the structure in which both walls and roof are made of materials which have to be replaced seasonally.• • The total population of the village is 1125 as per primary survey.concrete. Table: Structural Conditions Structural Conditions Pucca Semi pucca Kutcha Total Chart: Structural Conditions No of Houses 35 131 23 225 Percentages 18.12% 100 . 4.

 Houses under Dilapidated housing conditions are 1.C Total No of Houses 48 16 138 4 19 225 Percentage 21.3 1.4 7.Pucca House Semi Pucca House Kutcha House  Semi pucca house are more when compare to the other structural conditions houses.4 100 .C. Table: Types of House Types of Houses Single houses Twin houses Row houses Courtyard houses R.77% = 4 .  Housing typology based on design can be made into four categories.7 8.2 61.

Chat No: Type of Houses Single House Row House Twin Houses Courtyard House .

6 5. Roof typology based on material used for construction of roof can be made into four categories Table: Types of Roof Material Types of Roof Materials Rcc Mangalore tile Country tile Sheet roof Total Chart: roof material typology No of Houses 16 127 69 13 225 Percentage 7 56.7 30.7 100 Mangalore Tiles Country Tiles .

38 52.27 100 Chart: Plot Dimensions of Houses .65 5.09 1.22 21.97 1.RCC Roof Sheet Roof  House typology based on the plot size can be made into six categories Table: Plot Dimensions of Houses Plot Dimensions 0-50sqmts 50-100 sqmts 100-200 sqmts 200-300 sqmts 300-400 sqmts Others Total No of Houses 39 117 50 12 4 3 225 Percentages 17.

New houses to be constructed are 44 and number of houses to repair or restored are 4 houses those which are under dilapidated housing condition. Household average size is 4.7 8.4 100 . Table: Proposal For Housing Types of Houses Single houses Twin houses Row houses Courtyard houses RCC Total No of Houses 9 4 27 1 3 44 Percentage 21.3 Proposals Projected population for 2021 is 1304.4 7.2 61.• • • 4.3 1.5.

Type of Road 1 2 National high way (212.The frequency of KSRTC bus service to village is about 5 buses per a day .at timing 8am.Major part of village households own bicycles which constitute about 55% in terms total owner ship . people used to board buses at the road turning point .4pm and 8pm.Almost every household has traditional bullock cart for their agricultural field work their continuous usage made those roads to damage. Major service roads of the village are Canal road which is located in direction of south to north and the Bituminous Tar road which is beside the temple.12 pm.The stop has no Bus shelter. The turning radius at entrance of the village . and the Minor service roads are the roads which are connecting fields from intermediate service roads or major service roads.9am. The existing approach road and other Kutcha roads of the village are in bad condition and makes circulation difficulty. Among total length of the roads. cattle. where as about 30% people are using two wheeler motor cycles and only 1% using cars . These minor service roads are also called cart tracks. Intermediate service roads of the village are connecting individual houses from major service roads. The quality of these roads in terms of construction & roadway structure is not satisfactory. two wheelers and buses.75 Direction south-east .766) State high Distance from Village (Km) 50. bullock carts.5 km length is finished with bituminous surface at the portion where it is subjected to public transport accessibility.along Canal Road is not sufficient for buses .9 4. oil tankers and other heavy vehicles .where school children play and This spot is also a place village people meet most frequently . The service roads connecting from major road to individual plots are very narrow and finished with no proper design and construction. only 0.1 Status of roads: Village service roads has both water borne macadam and bituminous type of roads carrying village traffic of people.CHAPTER-V: PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE 5.

way(120) 3 Other district road 1.45 south

Table: Types of roadway finishing & existing status S.N o 1 2 3 Type of roads Bituminous Roads Water Bound Macadam Road Earthern road Total Roads Status all weather roads fair weather roads fair weather roads length in km 1.055 0.3933 1.07 2.518

5.2 Transportation facilities: Table: Vehicle ownership in the village S.No Type of vehicle 1 Bicycle 2 Two wheeler(motor) 3 Car 4 Bullock cart Analysis: Chart Types of roads No. of vehicles 113 61 3 29 % 55 30 1 4

Chart no:5.2 Vehicle Ownership

5.3 Water supply: It is the study of provision of poTable water for public utilities, commercial and community uses along individual households, which is a principal component in this village, water supply for Irrigation is covered separately in other sections Water supply systems get water from different sources including groundwater. The water is, in most cases not treated or disinfected through chlorination or water from sources collected then pumped to elevated tank called overhead tank. Once water is used, wastewater is mostly discharged into open drainage system and flows towards low laying area. Sources of Supply Under ground water (from aquifer), lake and canal are the main source of water for this village. Over head tank is within the village are the principal storage units and the daily supply is estimated at 50000 liters by drawing water from bore wells and other areas provided with Hand pumps and open wells. The water is distributed to individual households of the village by providing 107 Tap connections, along with even hand pumps bore wells and open well water to the population. Water is also drawn from canal which is located near to the village for the requirements of washing and irrigation purpose. Details of Bore well water which is pumped to overhead tanks is given in following Table, which shows the details of sources from which the water is drawing. From the study it is observed that there is no regular water borne diseases as the quality of water is satisfactory. People have no comments on the bad quality of water Table : Water Supply Source S No. 1 2 3 4 Source Bore well 1 Bore well 2 Canal Tank Distance Within village Within village Within village Within village

Source: Primary survey Table: Water Supply Details

Water Supply capacity of OHT Frequency of water supply Duration of Water Supply Length of Distribution System Rate of Supply No. of OHTs no of pumping No. of hand pumps No. of stand post No. of BORE wells No. of Open wells Source: Primary survey Distribution Network and Tariff Details

50000 ltrs Sporadic 30 mins/day 1.2 km 57 LPCD 1 2 5 2 2 10

Water is supplied to the village under the governance of Panchayat distribution system along with two public stand posts and five hand pumps. The total length of the road is nearly 1.9 km and the length for which distribution mains provided is about 0.875km. There exists 4.3% are provide with direct water service connection in Kanchugarakoppalu as per 2012 Table: Water connection /tariff details: S. No. 1 2 3 4 5 Source: Primary survey SWOT Analysis: S. No 1 Item Strengths Weaknesses Opportunitie Threats s pollution due to Type of connection Domestic Public taps Commercial Industrial Total Number 189 NIL NIL NIL Charges/month (Rs.) 30 Nill NIL NIL 5670 Rupees/month

Water Water availably other

forThe canal onCanal water isWater thanwhich the villageavailable forexists

50 Gap 13 54 0.290 0.current Water demand at 2021 at 70 lpcd Source: Primary survey Key Observations: Following are major issues about water supply with need to be considered whileplanning for the future: 1.50 0.drinking isis depending willother thanhuman available innot having waterdomestic intervention nearby canalthroughout thepurpose. to taken bymaintenance are network improving theboth in neglected existing sector Water Demand Based on the study it is found that 57 LPCD is supplying in place of per capita supply of 70 liters per day as stated norms for rural careers. various flowing in thisyear requirements region for 2 Existing waterThe water supplyWater can beCitizen’s pipeline network hassupplied for 24participation and network isLeakages andhours if somefinances for Water available low measures areoperation and supply maintenance. Inadequate water supply Unit lpcd % liters (lakhs) liters (lakhs) Norm 70 100 0. There exit about 15% unaccounted water wastage due to leakage the corresponding water demand in the existing context are as follows Table: Water Supply – Gap details Indicators Per capita water supply Distribution network Water demand.415 .790 0.915 Existing 57 46 0.

2. Pipeline network not fully coveredthe village area a. Old pipeline causing leakages and low pressure. 3. Major shortage in water supply happens during summer season. 4. Due to lack of electricity supply the water supply found inconvenience. 5. Water pressure is not uniform throughout the village. 6. Canal is located at lower level so the Irrigation at higher elevated land is not possible without pumping 7. Irrigation mainly depend on rain. Although Kanchugarakoppalu does have an intrinsic water resource constraint, water supply is intermittent and restricted to a few hours a day and quality of water inconsistent rarely. In the absence of regulation governing the exploitation and use of groundwater unsustainable. General data on distribution network plan and infrastructure is too weak to support planning, management, monitoring and maintenance. 5.4 Village Sanitation Village Sanitary is an aspect concern to Public health of the village which deals to preserve and maintain health of individuals and the community at large, by preventing water born communicable diseases. It consists of scientific and methodical collection, conveyance, treatment and disposal of the waste matter, of the village public health so as to protect and the village environment. Sanitation is the prevention of the sporadic outbreak of diseases, majorly by proper sewerage system and solid waste management either by controlling or eliminating such factors that contribute in some form or the other to transmission of diseases. The waste matter, generated by the human and animal activity, and also by other activity is allowed to accumulate, and some will decomposed is contaminating and polluting water and land. As it was disposed either in the solid form or in the liquid form without having any environmental concern. The sanitary sewage includes majority

domestic sewage which includes used water from houses or communities at bath and kitchen the toilet waste has soak pit system and there no industrial wastes. The improper disposal of sewage and other waste is the major factor threatening to the health and comfort of individuals of the village. Sewerage system in the village: Health and growth of the village is depends on how effective the sanitation the village has Kanchugarakoppalu village has no Underground Sewerage System. Sewage is being generated daily at present households from kitchen and bathrooms are disposed to open drains while the waste from closet has septic tank facility. Some Households which does not have toilet facilities in the village habitations are not provided with the protected system of sanitation. Hence. Open defecation and disposal into the open grounds through common methods of sewage disposal, is real threat to the village. Observation existing sewerage system: o Underground drainage system in the village is absent. o Disposing the sewage &sullage water into open drains (reaches primary drain, then finally combines with Canal) o Environmental pollution: Due to open defection and open ground disposal of waste o Frequent clogging of open drainage system of the village due to garbage and debris. o Absence of Sewage Treatment process o Some houses has no soak pits to hold kitchen/washing/toilet water which usually flows on to roads and it is inadequate to lead this water into roadside drains o There is no proper cattle sheds and over many areas where cattle are tied during most part of the day. Table: Toilet facilities in the village Type of facility Septic tanks Public toilets Service provided to number of houses 61 Nil

soak pits open ground defecation No Septic tank (Direct connect to drain) Source: Primary survey Table: Sanitation stacks of the village Sanitation provisory Septic tanks provision Sewage Treatment process Under Ground Drainage coverage Public Toilets Source: Primary survey

Nil 128

0

Current Status in the village 32% Nil Nil Nil

5.5 Solid waste management in the village: Village There is no system street sweeping or Collection of Solid waste at community level. Individual households are taking care of it. It is estimated that the total quantity of waste generated in a day is about 2.5 tones out of which 2.24 ton is organic waste, 0.25 ton is inorganic waste to the community participation in the waste segregation is not ensured. The waste is segregated into biodegradable, non-biodegradable and hag before primary collection. Table: Organic waste from Domestic Animals Animal Nos. Solid waste generated in kg's 1190 616 56 Liquid Waste generated(l trs) 1360 704 448 Present Condition

Cow/Calf Bullock Buffalo

170 88 56

Dumping yard in each house near cattle shed Dumping yard in each house near cattle shed Dumping yard in each

84 Kms rectangle in the form with a size of 3' 3'' wide and 1' 6''deep.sheep 91 91 91 103 2706 house near cattle shed - goat 103 103 Chicken 191 191 Total 699 2247 Source: Compiled from Primary survey Note: quantity is roughly estimated by enquiry Key Observations 1. few areas the drainages lined with RCC. The storm water drains are laid either side along the major service roads of village and they are of open drains . 5. 2. 4.203 1. but the storm drains of the village are oriented to the existing canal . There is no Scientific Method for treating Solid Waste. The total length of storm water drains is 2.6 Storm Drainage system: Observations: The overall slope of the village is in the direction of North West to south.84 . Analysis: Table: storm drain details Status of storm drains katcha drains pucca drains Total length length of drains (in km) 1. Major part of the village is provided with storm water drains facility but they are in form of Kutcha drains. There is no Proper community Cleaning system of streets.637 2. There is no Proper method of collection of Solid Waste. Solid Waste is Dumping Behind The House or near the Cattle Field 3. where it has more scope for the spillover of storm into houses directly from streets and damages Kutcha houses during monsoon season. Most houses of the village were built at the same level of roads.

r. which covers only 56% of required length out of the existing storm drain length only 58% are Pucca drains from. The rest is in the status of Kutcha drains. The detais of rural consumption pattern is shown in Table 5. The non-domestic supply is provided for irrigation pumps.84 km. However. as it is available easily at present. From interview it is observed that.7 Electricity service in the village: The source of electricity for village is from K. The total no.t the location of network is concerned. Other types of energies such as wind energy and solar energy are not in practice.5 and Chart 5. The total supply per month for domestic connections is 15000 units’ and 10000 units supply for irrigation pump sets during summer. . Fuel Energy and Other Rural Energies: In kanchugara koppal few houses had biogas connection but now it is not being used in the village. The light poles are provided with sodium vapor lamps and mercury lamps for illuminating the streets of Kanchugarakoppalu village. The electricity network was well laid and no threat of damage from the electric supply network to any housing unit. The irrigation pump sets are connected at free of cost by the Government of Karnataka.Chart: Storm Drains & Their Lengths The total length of the storm drain is 2.R.4. Two transformers are providing to serve the village with 11000KV capacity in which one is specifically used for Non-domestic supply.Nagar substation which is located at about 8 km from Kanchugarakoppalu village. Few households are using energy of different form for domestic purpose. 5. of domestic connections is 165 and non-domestic connections that provide electric power for irrigation pump sets are 55. The duration of supply is 12 hours per day. the construction and maintenance of biogas and its connection demands extra attention and also difficult. public or cattle were observed w. most of the households depended upon the firewood and other similar agri-wastes.

and adapt to a proper lifestyle. it will not be possible to observe things that can be useful throughout life. Social Infrastructure facilities support many welfare activities especially for the poor and economically weaker sections. 6. the importance of education is also determined by the fact that it helps in shaping our career to become a responsible person. Contradictions are born out of an educated and intelligent mind. Until the mind is well trained and educated. Education further marks a personality too. and making the education system affordable too. It will help each and every human being to lad their won life. . health facilities and recreational facilities etc. but rather a function that will help in transforming the entire society in to a better place.Table: Energy consumption Chart:Energy Usage CHAPTER VI: SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE Development of Socio-Economic Infrastructure facilities play an important role in the community development and these facilities are essential to satisfy the immediate requirement of inhabitants and provide community needs such as education. the world. It is a part of the learning process that leads to a constructive future.1 Education Facilities: The importance of education is in the fact that it helps us to learn different ways to observe and analyze. We cannot deny that getting educated also means earning the degrees that we strive for throughout our life. Therefore. is giving due importance to education. This is not just a social cause. Education is important for everyone. Today. trying to make the entire population literate by opening up schools and colleges.

Mid Day Meal Program is Government of India's flagship programme for achievement of Universalization of Elementary Education (UEE) and is being implemented in partnership with State Government to cover the entire Karnataka. By the mid 1980s three States viz. especially those who are not in school. In 1925. Kerala and Tamil Nadu and the UT of Pondicherry had universalized a cooked Mid Day Meal Programme with their own resources for children studying at the primary stage By 1990-91 the number of States implementing the mid day meal programme with their own resources on a universal or a large scale had increased to twelve states. which provides additional support for enhancing girls education over and above the investments for girls education for through normal SSA interventions. National Program for Education of Girls at Elementary Level (NPEGEL) A.In this village. The programme provides for development of “model School” in every cluster . children's are getting benefit from following 2 schemes. a Mid Day Meal Programme was introduced for disadvantaged children in Madras Municipal Corporation. The scheme was launched in July 2003. National Program for Education of Girls at Elementary Level (NPEGEL): National Program for Education of Girls at Elementary Level (NPEGEL). The main objectives of the programme are: • • • To improve enrolment and attendance To improve retention rate To improve child health by increasing nutrition level B. Gujarat. it is an important component of SSA. Mid Day Meal Scheme: The Mid Day Meal is the world’s largest school feeding programme reaching out to about 12 crore children in over 12. A. Mid Day Meal Scheme B. Mid Day Meal in schools has had a long history in India. to reach the “Hardest to Reach” girls. is a focused intervention of Government of India.65 lakh schools/EGS centres across the country.

6th and 7th Classes in separate rooms. So. They are providing mid-day meals for the students in the afternoon in the school under the central scheme of Mid-day scheme. The details of the school are given in the following Table. Table: Higher Primary School details Type Boys Girls Total Students Total Teachers Student-Teacher ratio Source: Primary Survey 2012 Number 56 37 93 4 23 In this school. they give food without egg. there is only one Higher Primary School and it is located in the middle area of the village. There are only 4 teachers including head master for 93 students. Higher Primary School: In this village. The Scheme is being implemented in Educationally Backward Blocks (EBBs) where the level of rural female literacy is less than the national average and the gender gap is above the national average. due to the lack of teachers. 2 Girls toilets are available. there is 1 Gents toilet. development of gendersensitive learning materials. stationery. There is only small Play ground is available in the school premises. 4th & 5th classes in another room.with more intense community mobilization and supervision of girls enrolment in schools. in such a way that they are combining 1st to 3rd classes in one room. workbooks and uniforms are some of the endeavours under the programme. Gender sensitisation of teachers. In this school. There is no another person for cooking of this food. they are conducting classes in 4 class rooms only. . and provision of need-based incentives like escorts. In this. In this. students are playing in the private land of outside village. for drinking water they are having one Hand pump in the premises only. While this scheme provides an excellent opportunity to develop context specific strategies to address learning needs of girls and to focused community mobilization and gender sensitization of teachers in an innovative and effective manner.

SC & ST students getting scholarships from their welfare departments.65 km in Kesthurukoppalu village. there is one Anganwadi.86 57.11 Source: Population Census 2001 • Insufficient of Play ground for School children's . Girls are being provided benefits from National Program for Education of Girls at Elementary Level (NPEGEL).19 49. Education Analysis: As per 2001 census data. they are taking students for picnic to Holy place or new places of surrounding areas. In this school they are conducting parents meeting once in a month. In Kesthurukoppalu village. this village literacy rate is about 57% and comparing with other villages of Mysore district. Of Literates 749655 103994 554 Literacy (%) 45. Table: Comparison of Literacy details Area Mysore (Rural area) KR Nagar ( Rural area) Kanchugarakoppalu Total Population 1658899 208566 970 No.Infrastructure Facilities In this village. there is one 1 Higher Primary School and 1 High school. For college.In this school. There are 3 Anganwadi centres are available in the north-west direction at a distance of 1. as a preschool or day care centre for children below the age of 6 years. this village has good literacy rate. but now that is not working. children's are going to KR Nagar. For more details please find the below Table. Higher Primary School .

Kesthurkoppalu. lack of hygiene. Health Facilities: Health is not just about a healthy body but also about sound mental health. namely Kanchugarakoppalu. divided by the number of live births . namely Kanchugarakoppalu.40 km in Saligrama village.12 ha..15:1 at Higher Primary School. For better health facilities public are moving to KR Nagar. unhealthy lifestyle. In this 1 medical officer. There should be 1 health dispensary for every 15000 population with in the area of 0. There is one Veterinary Hospital in Kesthurkoppalu and this is serving for 4 surrounding villages. To this dispensary patients are coming with general seasonal diseases such as.• Student-Teacher ratio . Inspector. etc. There is one Ayurvedic dispensary in Kesthurkoppalu and this is serving for 4 surrounding villages. Fewer. Kesthurkoppalu. there is no health dispensary. but one Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) is coming twice in a week from Primary Health Centre of Malali and from past 3 months. this nurse isn't visiting the village. Over the past few years. As per UDPFI Guide lines. mental stress. The main causes behind poor health conditions are diseases. which is at a distance of 52 km from village. Primary health centre (PHC) is located in south-west direction at a distance of 1. which is at a distance a distance of 10 km from the village and for super specialty facilities they are moving to Mysore city. Kesthur and Kesthur gate. For this village. improper diet. Anaemia. injury. Cough and Diarrhea. 1 Veterinary assistant and 1 Multi-skilled Group D worker are available. Good health can be described as the condition where both our body as well as our mind is functioning properly.85 km in Malali village and Community Health Centre (CHC) is located in the north-west direction at a distance of 12. 6. In this 1 medical officer and 1 Multi-skilled Group D worker are available. 1 Sr. our lifestyle has changed and we often tend to ignore the importance of healthy living in one way or the other. Health Indicators: Infant mortality rate (IMR) is the number of deaths of children less than one year of age per 1000 live births. In this village. This can be calculated as the number of children dying at less than 1 year of age.08. Kesthur and Kesthur gate.2.

Head ache. Beyond this some of other diseases such as. So. Sugar and Hypertension. The Crude Birth Rate (CBR) in this area is 16 where as in Karnataka state this is 20 persons per 1000 population (2011).000 live births from any cause related to or aggravated by pregnancy or its management. Cold. excluding accidental or incidental causes.B. Cough. Crude Death Rate. Vomiting. Crude Birth Rate is the number of live births per thousand of population per year. In general in this village public are facing some seasonal diseases such as. The Crude Death Rate (CDR) in this area is 6 where as in Karnataka state this is 7 persons per 1000 population (2011). Table: Comparison of Health Indicators Health Indicator Malali Area Infant Mortality Rate 33 Crude Birth Rate 16 Crude Death Rate 6 Source: Primary Health Centre. Malali Types of Diseases: As per Mysore District Statistics report. Tonsils. There is not available information on this at PHC. Immunization is the best way to protect kids from prevenTable diseases. Anemia. the total number of deaths registered per thousand of population during a calendar year. Table: Immunization Schedule for Infants Vaccine Bacillius Calmette Guerin & Tuberculosis No. Malaria. Maternal Mortality Rate is the ratio of the number of maternal deaths per 1. there are some T. Body pains and Diarrhea.that year. The Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) in this area is 33 where as in Karnataka state this is 38 persons per 1000 population (2011). patients in this KR Nagar taluk but where as in our primary survey we haven't found these type of patients in this village. Immunization details: Infants are particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases. of Doses 1 Time Period 30 days Karnataka State 38 20 7 . In this village there are no chronic diseases.

Zero Polio & Dipheria Tetanus & Pertussis Measles & Vitamin A Tetanus Toxoid Source: Primary Health Centre. For this village. Head ache. 2. Fewer.85 km in Malali. Hypertension. Malali. viii. Mavotturu. and dressings No. Badrelli. Siddapura.5. iii. Anaemia. Kanchugarakoppalu. Body pains and Diarrhea. Beyond this some of other diseases area such as. Out Patient Department Medicine Store Room Laboratory Fridge room (with UPS) General Ward Total No. Cold. Kesthur. Vomiting. Kesthur gate and Margodanalli. Family Planning operations. of Beds (Extra 5) Operation Theatre Auto Clave bins Delivery Room Dressing Room . Cough. Primary Health Centre: 3 2 1 1.5.5 Months 9-12 & 16-24 Months 3 Years Primary Health Centre is basic health unit to provide as close to the people as possible. Infrastructure facilities at Primary Health Centre: This PHC is consisting the following Infrastructure facilities: i. an integrated curative and preventive health care to the rural population with emphasis on preventive and promotive aspects of health care. of Patients coming to this PHC is 400 persons in a month. -10 vi.(TB) Hepatatis -B (Jandis). Sugar. ix. Kesthurkoppalu. vii. Primary health centre (PHC) is located in south-west direction at a distance of 1. Malali PHC is serving for 8 surrounding villages namely. ii. v. iv. Tonsils. Pregnancies. To this PHC patients are coming with general seasonal diseases such as. 3.

1000/. which is at a distance a distance of 10 km from the village and for super specialty facilities they are moving to Mysore city.85 km in Malali village and Community Health Centre (CHC) is located in the north-west direction at a distance of 12. Under this scheme Rs. Paste. Napkin and Baby powder to BC/ SC/ST Population. Prasuti Araike Yojana: This is the incentive to BPL women who belong to BC/SC/ST category to help them during prenatal period. 1 Lakh for first baby boy of the family in the Backward classes people under Bhagya Lakshmi scheme. Bed Sheets. For better health facilities public are moving to KR Nagar. This scheme integrates cash assistance with delivery and post-delivery care. . Bhagya Lakshmi scheme: In this village Government giving Rs. Accessibility of services with distance: For this village.40 km in Saligrama village. Under this scheme Rs.Health Schemes: Janani Suraksha Yojana: Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) is a safe motherhood intervention under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) being implemented with the objective of reducing maternal and neo-natal mortality by promoting institutional delivery among the poor pregnant women. Primary health centre (PHC) is located in south-west direction at a distance of 1.is given in cash for pregnant women. which is at a distance of 52 km from village.700/will given in cash and 1 Madill kit consisting of Soap.

0.08. As per UDPFI Guide lines. . patients in this KR Nagar taluk but where as in our primary survey we haven't found these type of patients in this village.B. As per Mysore District Statistics report. The Crude Death Rate (CDR) in this area is 6 where as in Karnataka state this is 7 persons per 1000 population (2011).65 1. The Crude Birth Rate (CBR) in this area is 16 where as in Karnataka state this is 20 persons per 1000 population (2011).65 Ayurvedic Dispensary Centre Hospital Health Analysis: • • • • • Veterinary The Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) in this area is 33 where as in Karnataka state this is 38 persons per 1000 population (2011).Table: Health Facility details Type Location Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) Local Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) Malali Ayurvedic Dispensary Kesthurkoppalu Primary Health Centre Malali Community Health Centre Saligrama Private Hospitals K R Nagar Super Speciality Hospital Mysore Veterinary Hospital Kesthurkoppalu Source: Mysore District statistical department Distance (km) 1.85 12.40 10 52 1. There should be 1 health dispensary for every 15000 population with in the area of 0.85 1. there are some T.12 ha.

. Table: Comparison of Man power at Primary Health Centre Staff IPHS Guide lines Essenti Desirab al le 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 Manpower at PHC (Malali) 1 1 2 1 1 Medical Officer.3 Other Facilities: Community Facilities: In this village.Comparison of Man power at Primary Health Centre: To ensure round the clock access to public health facilities. Primary Health Centres are expected to provide 24-hour service with basic Obstetric and Nursing facilities. PHCs are being operationalized for providing 24 X 7 services in various phases by placing at least 3 Staff Nurses in these facilities. in general they are gathering at temple areas. Under NRHM. which are shown in the figures. But. there are no specified Recreational facilities.MBBS Medical Officer –AYUSH Accountant cum Data Entry Operator Pharmacist Pharmacist AYUSH Nurse-midwife (Staff-Nurse) Health worker (Female) Health Assistant (Male) Health Assistant (Female)/Lady Health Visitor 1 Health Educator 1 Laboratory Technician 1 1 Cold Chain & Vaccine Logistic Assistant 1 Multi-skilled Group D worker 2 1 Sanitary worker cum watchman 1 1 Total Manpower 13 4 9 Source: Indian Public Health Standards (IPHS) Guidelines for PHC (2012) 6.

Temple areas .Community facilities .

Other Facilities: • • • • This village is being served by the Chunchunkatte Police station This village people use to go to Malali Weekly Market for selling and purchasing vegeTables and other things This village is serving by the KR Nagar fire services. . Usually. this village people use to celebrate one village event (Bethuramma jathara) once in a year in temple area.

CHAPTER VII: PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 7.1 Organization pattern of Elected and executive body Chart: Panchayat Structure. .

Chart: Organization Pattern .Elected .

2 Finance and Budgeting Budget . 12th and 13th Finance Commission grants. license fee or auction etc. It also gets grants like statutory grants.Executive 7. . water tax.Source of Income and Expenditure Details The gram panchayat generates its own income the collection of taxes like property tax.Chart: Organization Pattern . development programs or schemes and SC-ST reserved fund etc from government.

2010-11 Source of income 12th Finance Commission Grants Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Program 13th Finance Commission Grants Indira Ashraya Yojane Amoun t 108234 351500 0 511800 151109 8 Expenditure 12th Finance Commission Grants Expenditure MGNREGA Expenditure 13th Finance Commission Grants Expenditure Indira Ashraya Yojane Expenditure Amoun t 76402 348703 6 102485 921000 . 2010-11 Details Propert y tax Water tax License Fee Cess Auction Total Bala nce 1746 71 3226 30 3900 4211 0 0 543 311 Present demand 69687 102480 11600 34654 0 218421 Total demand 244358 425110 15500 76764 0 761732 Tax collectio n 87255 86432 8800 25795 10000 218282 % collecti on 35.Table: Own Resources. 2010-11.77 33.33 56.60 0. Details Statutory Grants 12th Finance 13th Finance Grants availed 600000 0 511800 Grants used 450000 108234 511800 Table: Income and expenditure.00 28.65 remaining collection 157103 338678 6700 50969 0 543450 Table: Grants from Govt.70 20.

.3 Governance Preparation of Action Plans Kesturukoppal Gram Panchayat prepares the action plan for statutory grants given by the government under the chairmanship of Mrs.Grants from Government Tax collection Water grants Other funds Others Opening balance Total 450000 218232 41550 41500 15365 -11377 640140 2 Employee's salary Purchase of Electrical Equipments Water management Electricity Charges Office Expenditure closing balance 133010 179205 145009 281520 113404 962331 640140 2 Chart: Source of income and Expenditure 7. Zilla Panchayat. Mysore.Shantha and submits for approval to Chief Exectutive Officer.

2010-11 Proceedings of the meeting held on 10. Word committees/gram sabhas Table: Minutes of Meeting. 2010-11.8.Chart: Action Plan of Statutory Grants. Gram Panchayat.Shantha subject decision .2010 under the chairmanship of Mrs. Chart: Action Plan of Statutory Grants. 2011-12.

Table: Schemes For SC-ST SC.p.g/1/69/10-11 dated: Preparation and submission of 24.10 It is unanimously resolved to action plan of statutory grants for prepare and submit the action plan the year 2010-11 report to the Chief Executive Officer. gram panchayat had noticed individual beneficiaries for the following schemes. Mysore. KesthuruKoppalu Gram Panchayat implements the following schemes for development of people belonging to SC-ST community. But this programme is not being implemented mainly through Self-Help Groups. Table: Self Employment – Central Govt Scheme. Allotted amount 31200 19360 11840 62400 .4 Schemes and programs Poverty Alleviation Programmes for poverty alleviation in rural areas by providing assistance for self-employment activities and wage employment works are being implemented.G. and thus enabling them to take up remunerative self employment activities. In this village. training facilities and other supporting activities.Y) aims at assisting rural households below the poverty line through credit.ST scheme Educational Development Of People Belonging to SC-ST Financial Development Of People Belonging to SC-ST Other Developmental Activities of People Belonging to SC-ST Total Employment Programs This division deals with Self-Employment programmes such as Swarna Jayanthi Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY).9. subsidy. Swarna Jayanthi Gram Swarozgar Yojana (S. 7. Suvarna Gramodaya Yojane and Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Gaurantee scheme. Zilla Panchayat.s.m.As per the office order No:z.S.

00 33. watershed development and minor irrigation. including rural communication.00 4.00 3. housing.41 Improvement of Rural Infrastructure To improve the quality of life in rural areas. Toilet construction labour charges @ Rs.00 15. Table: Central Govt Housing Scheme Name of the scheme Indira Awas Housing Year 2008-09 No of beneficiaries 4 Amou nt 35000 Remarks Full subsidy . Construction of toilet at their own premises with a daily wages of Rs. The construction of toilet and self employment schemes were merged.37 achievement in lakhs 75. water supply and sanitation.125/day 20112012 2 16000 Table: Self Employment – State and Central Govt Scheme Name of the scheme year 20092010 MGNREGA .76 0.Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme 20102011 20112012 20122013 target in lakhs 535.91 63. it is essential to develop infrastructure.Name of the scheme Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Year 20102011 No of beneficiar ies 0 Amou nt 10000 0 Remarks Not Implemented Individual beneficiaries from Sericulture Department for silk trenching and mulching.125/day was encouraged.

2009-10 Scheme 2010-11 2011-12 4 0 6 40000 40000 63000 Full subsidy Not executed Full subsidy .

Name of the scheme Year 2005-06 2006-07 Ashraya Yojane Housing Scheme 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 No of beneficiaries 5 5 0 4 0 Amount 25000 25000 25000 35000 35000 Remarks 50% subsidy 50% loan 50% subsidy 50% loan 50% subsidy 50% loan 50% subsidy 50% loan Further Not executed . Name of the scheme Year No of beneficiari es Amount Remarks 75000 subsidy 25000 loan from RGRC with 11% interest.Table: State Govt Housing Scheme – BVYHS. 2010-11 Basava Vasati Yojane Housing Scheme 8 100000 2011-12 0 100000 Table : State Govt Housing Scheme – AYHS. 46 people from all three villages. 99 people from all three villages. 75000 subsidy 25000 loan from RGRC with 11% interest.

The village has grown along the major roadway with a two separate linear cluster as shown in the figure below.1 Existing Land use Analysis: Table: Existing land use.CHAPTER VIII: LAND USE IN THE VILLAGE Kanchugarakoppalu is one among the three basic villages which comes under the administrative control of KesthuruKoppalu Gram panchayat. 8.12 Hectares & the existing developed area under village built fom is about s5.54 Hectares.Nagara taluk. Mysore district.R. The extent of area under the revenue of the village is about 82. in K. The population of the village is 1125 with a density of 203 pph. .

00 49173. Distribution of Land uses: • The organic form of residential developments are spread along two axes of village road and concentrated more at the junction and gradually decreasing along the road towards the end. • Three small commercial buildings.94 18.00 %age with respect to developed area 32. One at the southwest portion of the village that has Primary school & Vacant Government land reserved for the future requirements & other portion of public and semipublic uses are on either side of the road at the central part of the village and a temple space is on the northeastern portion of the village.Land use Type Residential Commercial Public & Semipublic Transport & Communication Vacant Grand Total Area in sq. • The public & semipublic uses are distributed at three locations.m 15861. general grocery store & a bicycle repair shop are located close to the temple.25 0.08 0.00 23726. petty shop.00 464.47 48. Composition of Land Use The basic village character reflects in the residential land uses.00 9085.26 100 Source: Compiled from primary survey.00 37. One shop is located at isolated part of the village towards its south. . predominantly ancillary space for agriculture related activities. The village has minimum infrastructure within which it has the basic village function has minimized the operation of any other major land uses.

Inadequate commercial spaces in the village have made to depend on on nearby and adjacent towns even for higher order facilities such as to access to public distribution systems and other facilities. There is inadequate public & semipublic land use within the village. Interrelationship of Land uses With Infrastructure Physical infrastructure facilities such as roads & storm water drains are being developed in the village. Interrelationship of Land uses with Topography: The existing canal acts as the cultural barrier for the growth of the village & the water body in the southeast corner segregates the village. scrublands etc.Interrelationship of Land uses With Village Activities The primary occupation of the village that is agricultural activity has provided no scope for development of any secondary & tertiary activities and limits the settlements land use predominantly to residential use. The lands identified for residential use and other requirements can use the scrub land the scrub lands close to the settlements can be considered for further developments of the village. Mallalli & Shrirangapur village.Nagara town to other villages called kesthurkoppal. . Land Suitability Analysis: The vacant land abutting to the settlement area can be proposed for further uses. community facilities are not provided in the village which leads to dependency on other villages for these facilities. after which the other dry land which does not have land utilization that indicates different types of crop areas. Lack of bus shelter in the main settlement area acts as a spillover spaces for all other gathering activities of the village at the junctions of village roads passing through the village. No public utility spaces are provided in the village as physical infrastructure facilities like village sanitation are not provided in the village. The existing topography along with a roadway has dictated the growth form of settlements. The village road passing through Kechugarakoppal connects K. The village region is scattered with scrub lands.25% with vacant lands of 48. Social infrastructure facilities which include public health facilities.26% which is used for various agricultural activities. has constitutes about 32. Bus stop is located in isolation with this settlement towards its south. eucalyptus & coconut tree plantations along with cultivated lands. plantations.R.

R. hence extra area for the school needs to be identified. The per capita income of the village is Rs. There are 4 neighbourhood shops in the village catering to the needs of the people. The auxiliary nurse midwife appointed by the government who visits the village every week does not have an identified work space. goat etc) & poultry reared by the villagers. However the number of buses connecting the village is less. Income of the households is not regular & uniform. The housing required for the plan period 2021 as analyzed is 48 houses.9. Transportation & Communication: The transportation & communication area is 9083sqm & works out to be 15. The low per capita income of the village reduces the purchasing power & demand for further commercial spaces.2 . which is 28. The existing temple area is also serving as a place for community meetings & therefore existing area is inadequate which has to be increased. Therefore the economy of the village has to be improved and the commercial spaces are to be provided for higher order requirements. 9. hence other required supplies are purchased as & when possible from K. Existing bus stop which is located in the smaller settlement in the south is isolated from the main settlement and therefore providing a bus stop at a suiTable location & improving the junction needs to be addressed.76%. The existing area of the school does not meet the space requirement for a higher primary school. Public & Semipublic: Public & semipublic area is 464sqm which works out to be 00.6000 per year.00sqm. The daily food requirements are met from food crops/vegeTables grown locally & cattle (sheep. Commercial: The commercial area is 37 sqm which works out to be 0. SuiTable work space has to be provided.67% of the total built-up area.2 Vision Residential The existing residential area is 15861. As observed existing width of the roads are insufficient for easy public transport access.3 Proposed land use: The proposed land use for the future requirement are shown in the Table 9. therefore residential area has to be increased.84%.Nagar town on which this village depends for its higher order requirements.59% of the existing developed area.

which is abutting to the prime part of the village at the place close to the road junction will attract good gathering which is suiTable for commercial activities. The existing school which has three class rooms are proposed to be used as an anganwadi.00 64120. The residential area of about 44764. Commercial land use : The commercial area required for the planning period 2021 is about 460.00 0. is about 40 houses to accommodate the future population and to satisfy the housing requirements of the village.00 9800.00 6796. as analyzed.00 2800.00 sqm. The area required for public & semi public land use for a planning period 2021 is proposed as 6296.00 %age 69.80 15.00 sqm. .00 460. Public & Semipublic land use : The Public & Semipublic land use spaces existing within the developed areas of the village are utilized in addition to identified area at separate location to cater to the future requirement of the village and to satisfy the space standard required for a higher primary school. The water logged areas and a good agriculture areas where triple crops are grown in a year around the existing settlements are not disturbed and proposed them to retain. auxillary nurse midwife room and a community gathering hall.28 100 Residential land use: The housing requirement for the planning period 2021.00sqm is proposed in the areas as shown in the land utilization map. The area identified as developable area in the land utilization map.m 44264.72 10.Table: Proposed land use for 2021 Land use type Residential Commercial Public & Semipublic Transport & Communication Park & Open Space Grand Total Area in sq.60 09. which is identified for future development by designating through comprehensive analysis.

00sqm is proposed in the areas as identified in the land utilization map. The existing school which has three class rooms are to be used as an anganwadi. 9.4 Consolidated Vision and Proposals Vision: • The population exponential growth rate should be 0.00Sqm. Water logged areas.8 by the year 2021. • Provision of Physical & Social Infrastructure facilities and improve the administrative structure Proposals: Residential: The housing required for the planned period 2021 as analyzed is 40 houses. which are identified for development. Close to the existing temple at the north-eastern part of the village. Commercial: The commercial area for the plan period 2021 is proposed as 460.Transportation & Communication land use: The circulation pattern is suggested for improvement to suits to the existing settlement structure and new roads that consumes least extent of area is proposed for the new areas which is identified for the future growth. auxiliary nurse midwife room . triple crop areas around the existing settlements are undisturbed and retained.00 sqm. a suiTable open space as fair and festival ground is proposed with an extent of area of about 2800. Land use for Park & Open Space Since the village fair is conducted once in a year. therefore residential area of 44764. Public & Semi-public: The Public & Semipublic spaces existing within the areas are utilized in addition to identifying a separate location to cater to the space standard required for a higher primary school. The area identified as developable area in the land utilization map abutting the principle village road close to the junction is proposed for commercial activities.

Strategies: • Augmentation of water • • • • • • Fixing valve to the taps Lake Rejuvenation New pipeline network Individual Toilet facilities Developing roads with Pucca drains.Indira Avas Yojane 100% revenue generation through tax collection to strengthen the self sufficiency of Gram Panchayath Policy gaps and gaps in identification of beneficiaries have to be filled through interaction between elected and executed body of Gram Panchayath with the village population.00 sqm.and a community gathering hall. Close to the existing temple at the north-east. .00Sqm. a suitable fair ground is proposed of an area of 2800. Introducing Scada system Policies: • Toilets and roads under Bharat Nirman Yojana • • • • Rural Employment Scheme MGNREGA Housing-Basava Vasathi Yojane. The area required for public & semi public plan period 2021 is proposed as 6296. Transportation & communication: The circulation pattern is improved to suit the existing settlements and the new areas identified for future growth. Park & Open Space: Since the village fair is conducted once in a year.

VISION.CHAPTER IX: GAP ANALYSIS. STRATEGIES.8 percent for planning origin of 2021. • Provision of Physical & Social Infrastructure facilities and improve the administrative structure 9. PROPOSALS AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS 9.1 Vision • The population projection of village taking the exponential annual growth rate of 0.2 Objective .

it leading to decrease in revenue • • 70% of the houses are of semi-pucca type 18% of the houses are kutcha houses and 04 houses are in dilapidated condition Out of the existing 2.social and economic infrastructure in the village To assess and identify the existing problems and development gaps for infrastructure provisions in the village.42% of the drain length is kutcha Power supply is 03 hours/ day The canal is non perennial leading to water shortage Leakages and low maintenance of water supply network Existing water supply of 57 lpcd below the existing norm according to accelerated rural water supply scheme minimum lpcd is 70 Existing piped water supply network covers 46% of the village 80(42%)houses out of 189 houses do not have toilet facilities Insufficient Play ground for School children Shortage of teachers (04 teachers for entire higher primary school) Poor access to health services Inadequate Community facilities leading to activities in vacant lands around temples spill over of these • • • • • • • • • • • .2km length is kutcha drain and 1.40km WBM road and 1.51 km length of village road 1. 42% of the roads are unmettalled Out of the existing 2. To propose planning solutions and policy recommendations for over all development of the village Problems • Share of small and marginal land holding are more.• • • • To prepare the existing land use and understanding structure and its characterstics of village To study the physical .85 km drain length 1.07km Earthern road.055km road is bitumen tar road 0.6km is pucca drain.

Housing Providing housing for 40 new houses for the projected population of 1304 people by 2021 Provide support to convert kutcha houses to semi-pucca houses and restrict deterioration of existing housing facilities Physical Infrastructure All roads( length in kms) to be upgraded to bituminous tar roads by 2021 Providing 100% pucca drains by 2021 Conversion of all street lights from traditional Fluorescent bulbs & Candescent Lamps to solar energy lighting Providing individual taps to each house..e. Social Infrastructure Allocation of new area for Primary and Higher Primary School Reopening of Anganwadi centre which was available in this village. Upgrading of Infrastructure facilities in Malali Primary Health Centre Provision of Mobile van health service .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Proposals Economic infrastructure Encouraging traditional occupation of village i. Rejuvenating the existing tank by dredging and desilting and provision for recreational facilities Environmental Hygienic condition of water bodies is maintained by creating awareness Providing proper water distribution network and fixing the gate valves to reduce loss and leakage Proper disposal of sewage & sullage water. making of articles from brass.

scheme MGNREGA to be used as a tool for construction of roads and generating employment Nirmal Bharath Abhiyan . Strategies Central Govt.• • • • • Allocation of Area for Village events. IAY and state Govt BVY to be used as tools to provide housing for the poor in the areas identified for residential development in the Development plan IAY scheme to be used as a tool to upgrade kutcha houses to semipucca houses Policy gaps and gaps in identification of beneficiaries have to be filled through interaction between elected and executed body of Gram Panchayath with the village population Encourage participatory governance and transparency in identifying beneficiaries • • • .Myrada to be used as a tool for construction of toilets for all houses.