The Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

Modes From the Melodic Minor Scale by John Ruffi

Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes
Forward After many years of studying, exploring and teaching guitar, I’ve developed a system which communicates to the student the modes and how they are used. But, most importantly, it shows where they come from and enables the student to create modes and scales on-the-fly — which is the ultimate goal of studying any kind of theory. Part I & II contain all the 7 note modes which can be created using two intervals: half steps and whole steps, without two adjacent half steps. All the modes have 7 degrees, and all in this group have 5 whole steps, or whole tones and 2 half steps as intervals between the adjacent degrees. Since the half steps never occur twice in a row, that means we’ve only got 2 possibilities for grouping the whole steps: a group of 2 and a group of 3, or a group of 4 and a group of 1. All the modes which can be made with one group each of 2 and 3 whole steps are called the Natural Modes, or Melodic Major Modes. Those made with one group each of 4 and 1 whole steps are called the Melodic Minor Modes — not because they are all minor, but because they are derived from the ascending Melodic Minor Scale. In Part II we explore the Melodic Minor Modes. The ascending Melodic Minor Scale is almost exactly like the Natural Major Scale, with the exception of a flatted 3rd. Flatting the third changes the sound of any scale into a minor or “sad” sound. As I’ve stated earlier, all these modes aren’t necessarily minor. They’re called the Melodic Minor Modes because they come out of the Melodic Minor Scale. The Melodic Minor Modes — What are they? The Melodic Minor Scale The C major scale or C Ionian Mode is shown below. Notice that it begins and ends on C. The numbers below also begin and end on “1”.The higher “1” is the octave (symbol 8ve) of the root note (the lowest note). The half steps within the following scale fall between the 3rd and 4th tone, and the 7th and 1st, or octave. C 1 D 2 E F 3 4 G 5 A 6 B C 7 1

The modes in the Natural series (shown in detail in Book I), and the chords that come from them, are as follows: Mode Ionian Dorian Phrygian Lydian Mixolydian Aeolian Locrian Associated Chord major7 (symbol, maj7) minor 7 (min7, m7, –7) m7 maj7 dominant 7 (symbol, 7) m7 minor 7 flat 5 (symbol m7b5 or –7–5) or half diminished (symbol ø)

I ii iii IV V7 vi vii

1

Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The 6th, or Aeolian Mode is the Natural Minor scale. The notes of the A Aeolian are shown below: A 1 B C 2 3 D 4 E F 5 6 G 7 A 1

The Melodic Minor scale is based on this Natural Minor scale. When used by Baroque and Classical composers the descending Aeolian Mode was left untouched. But when played in an ascending passage the 6th and 7th tones were raised, as shown here: A 1 B C 2 3 D 4 E 5 F# 6 G# A 7 1

Changing these notes gives us some really interesting harmonic possibilities, since many of the chords that are made from the modes within it are quite different from those made from the Natural series. The resulting modes and chords are shown below: Mode Melodic Minor Dorian Flat 2 Lydian Augmented Lydian Dominant Mixolydian Flat 6 Aeolian Flat 5 Super Locrian Associated Chord minor with a major 7th (symbol, min maj7) minor 7 augmented with major 7 (symbol + maj7) dominant 7 dominant 7 half diminished half diminished (or altered chord — see page 7 for details)

i ii III+ IV7 V7 viø viiø

What are modes for? Every tone contained in the scale or mode one is using affect the color, or flavor of the music. Playing these modes will both give guitarists a wider palate of flavors to use, but also allow them to “taste” more sounds, so that they can recognize them when these flavors come along in music they like and want to learn or emulate. So, in other words, if you practice these modes you’ll be able to: 1 play a greater variety of melodies and phrases. 2 develop your ear to be able to interpret more melodies and phrases. In Summary, if you’ve read Book I of this series you may notice some of the information is repeated, such as the Technique page. This is to ensure that each book can stand on its own. Some of the Natural Modes are referred to in this book though, so it is expected that the reader be familiar with them.

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

Technique
Playing scales and modes are to a musician what running is to an athlete. It’s a great way to work on strength, speed, coordination and stamina. And a good way to warm up, when played slowly. Playing through the modes very slowly when you first pick up the guitar is a great way to relax, focus, and get the fingers ready for playing, as well as getting one in the right frame of mind for making music. Using the left hand properly and safely. it’s good to remember Ruffi’s 3 rules of intelligent technique: When at all possible... 1 When you skip a fret skip a finger. This first rule is most important because it prevents us from spreading the 2nd and 3rd fingers across more than 2 adjacent frets. 2 Never use the same finger twice in a row (unless shifting or sliding). 3 Never shift twice in a row. Of course, like every rule, these sometimes have to be broken. That’s why it says “when at all possible.”

1 1 2 3 4 4

The first finger may occasionally reach out of position to reach a note on the lower fret.

The fourth finger occasionally needs to reach out of the position to grab a not one fret higher.

Notation method in this book
In the charts in this book, the strings are shown as vertical lines, with the 6th string on the left. The frets are shown as horizontal lines, with the top fret shown on the chart being closest to the nut. The numbers denote the order the notes are to be played in the scale. These numbers also tell us where the roots are (1), the other chord tones, or notes in the triad (3 and 5) and which note to add to make a 7th chord (the 7). And, as you become more familiar with the modes you’ll begin to be able to identify the sounds of the tones by these numbers. For example, a 6 always has a certain sound the can be very easily memorized, as can the other degrees of the modes.

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Melodic Minor Modes
In this group of modes the guitarist will discover some more interesting. combinations of notes, forming chords such as diminished, augmented and minor/major.

1

I

The Melodic Minor Scale
1 2 2 3

1 2

The intervals are as follows: 1 1/2 1 1 1 1 1/2 In other words, the half steps are from 2 to 3, and from 7 to 1. This can be easily seen in the diagram to the right. You can play the mode entirely on one string starting from any fret, and it will be the Melodic Minor Scale. This mode is a minor mode with a major 7th. The flatted third gives it the minor sound, but the 7 is only a half step down from the root, or “1” which gives it a major 7th.

4

1

4 7

3

5

1
5

2 3

5

1

4

6
6 1 2

6

2

7
1 2 7 1

Typical chord progression for using the A Melodic Minor Mode: Am | E7 or Am maj7 | E7

1 4 2 7 1 3 5

1

1 4
4

7 3 1

5

1

6

2

5

6

2
Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

5

1

4

6
copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

3
1

ii The Dorian b2 Mode

6

2

1 2 7

1 2

As the name says, this mode is like the Dorian Mode, but has a flat 2 as well, making it 2 1 a flat 7, 3 and 2 mode. Throughout this book all flatted or sharped degrees are in 2 comparison to the Ionian Mode, or Natural Major Scale. 3

3

1 2

4

7

3

5

1

4 1

1 4 4 7 1 5 4 2
1 7 2 7 6

1 4

7

3

5 6
5

5 3 6

1 2

4

6 7

5 2

2

5
1 2

1

6

3

6

3

6

2

1

4

3

5

1

Typical chord progression for using the 7 B Dorian b2 Mode: Bm | D or Bmin7 | D7+
2 1 3 2 6 5 2 1 5 4 1 7 4 3 4 6 5 6 7 1

1 2

7 1 1

1 2

1

4 5

7

3 6

1 1 2
1

4

7 5

III+ The Lydian Augmented Mode 1 1
6 7
2

2
1

1 6

4 5 7
2

2 This mode has a sharp 4 and 5. Sharping the 5 is what makes it an augmented mode.

3

1 3 6

3
1 2

2

2 3 3

2

2

1

4

7

3

5

1

1 4 7

1 3 5

1 4

7 3 1 4

5

1
3

2 5 1 2 6 4 6 7 3 2

4

4

1 5
5

6 4
5

2

5

6
4

3

7
5 6

1 2

6

2
6

7
1 2 6

3

6

2
1 2

Typical chord progression for using the C Lydian Augmented Mode: 7 C+ maj7 | F#m7 b5 or C+ maj7 | Amin maj7
4 7 3 5 1 4 5 6 2 1 1 4 5 1 4
1 2 7

1 2

1

7 13 6

1

1

4 1 2 5 7 3 4

1 2

7 1

5

1 6 1

2

2 3

5

1

4

6

Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi
1 1

6

1 1 1 IV The Lydian Dominant Mode 2 2

2

7

This mode has the #4 of a Lydian, and the b7 of a Mixolydian.
1 2 2 3 3 2 2

1 5 1
3

4 7

3

5

1
3

1 4 2 5 3 6 2 7 1 4 7 3 5 6

1
4

1 4 2
5

7
43

2 6
4 3

5

1

4

6
1 2 4 5

1 2

5

1
5

4

7
1 2 5 6

6

2

7

1 2

3
6

6
1 2

2
6 7

1 2

6 7

Typical chord progression for using the D Lydian Dominant Mode: 7 7 D7 | E7 1 1 4 7 3 5 1 1 1
2 1

1 4 7 1 5 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 3 7 3 5 6 1 1 1 1 1
1 2 1

1 4 2 1 1 3 6 5

1

4 5

7

3 6

1

2 1 3 2

1

2

1

4 5 5 1 7 2 4 3 4 6 7 6
1

1

2

2 3 1 6

1

4

6 1 V The b6 Mode 5 7 Mixolydian 1 1 1
2

3

6

11 1 1 1

2 3

2 again, just like 2 3 this 6 mode 2 has 5 the 7 flat 7 of Mixolydian with a1flat 1 Once the name says, 6 as well.
2 3 2

1 1

1 1 7

12 1 1 1 3
4

1 2

1 4 1 2
1 2

1
4 4

4

7 3 3

5 6

1

3 1

4 5

6 1 4 5 2

2
5 5

5 6

1 44 7
1 2

1 2

4 2 5 3

5

6

7 1
2

5 6

3
6 1 2 6 7 7 1

2

5 6 1 2 6 7

3

6

7

Typical chord progression for using the E Mixolydian b6 Mode: 7 E7 | Am or E7 | D7 1
1 2 1 1 1

6

5

1 2

4

6 7

2 5 3 6

1 4 2

6

2

5

1 4

6 7 copyright ©2006 John Ruffi
1 1 2

3 6

Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes
1 1 viø The Aeolian b5 Mode

7

1 3

6

2

This mode has a flat 7, 3, 6, and 5. The chord tones (arpeggio) that come out of it 2 2 form a half diminished (symbol ø) or what is also called a minor 7 flat 25 chord.

1 2

2 3

1

4

7 3

5 6 1 7

1 3

1

4 5

7 33 6 1
4 5

1

1 2

3 4 1

4 7 5 1
6

1 2

3 4

2

5 6

1

4

4 4 7

3

5

2 3

1 1
2

1 2

1 4
5

4 5 7
1 2 5 6

2

6

1 1

6 2
1 2

3

2

12 2

5 5 6

1

4

6

3
6 7 7

6

2

5

7

1
7

3

1 1

6

2

7

7 Typical chord progression for using the F# Aeolian b5 Mode: 1 F#m7b5 |2 G#m7b5 or F#m7b5 | Bm7 1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

5

1
1 2

4 7 3 Locrian, 5 4 3 vii The Super or Altered Mode 1 1 1

The Super Locrian is probably the most unusual sounding in this group of unusual sounding modes. All the tones, with the exception of the root, are This mode is 5 4 4 flatted. 7 2 2 2 1 also called the Altered Scale, and is commonly used as a subsitution for the Misolydian 2 Mode when 3 a more sound Mode 3 over the G7 6 exotic 2 7 is desired. Try a G Super 3 6 Locrian 2 chord in the progression G7 - C and you’ll see what i mean.
3

2

1

6

2

5

1

6

1 2

Playing a chord using all of the this scale will result in the altered chord. the 2 4 4 1 becomes a major 3. and 3 become the flat 9 and sharp 9, while the flatted 4 actualy 2 the flat 6 becomes 4 a sharp 5. The chord is notated as “7b5#5 b9#9” or 5 “7-5+5-9+9,” 1 or more simply “7alt.” 2
1 1
5 4

1 notes 2in

3

1 2

3 4

5

7

3 6

1 1
2

5 6

4 1 2 5 1 3 6 2 5 7
1 1

5

7

3 4

6

1

6

for using the Typical chord progression 6 12 4 1 G# Super Locrian Mode: 2 7 7 G#7-5+5-9+9 | Am
3 6 2 5 7

6
7 7

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1

1

See page 19 for more uses of this mode.
1 1

1

1

7
1

1

Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Arpeggios
Below are each of the seven modes we’ve just gone over. Here they are shown with the arpeggios highlighted. The roots (or “1s”) are highlighted in red; all other arpeggio notes, or chord tones, are shown in blue. It is recommended that after playing the mode ascending and descending, you should play the corresponding arpeggio ascending and descending — first without the 7th (1 3 5s only), and then with 1, 3, 5 and 7.

1

4 7

3

5

1

2 3

5

1

4

6

i Melodic Minor minor chord with a major 7th min maj7

6

2

7

ii Dorian minor 7th arpeggio
1 2 5 3 6 1 2 4 6 7 4 7 3 5 1

III+ Lydian Augmented augmented with major 7th
1 4 2 5 3 6 2 7 1 4 7 3 5 6 1

IV Lydian Dominant dominant 7th arpeggio
1 4 2 5 1 4 3 6 2 7 3 6 7 5 1

V Mix flat 6 dominant 7th arpeggio

vi Locrian Natural 2 minor 7th flat 5 (or half diminished) arpeggio
1 4 5 2 1 6 2 4 5 7 7 3 6 1

viiø SuperLocrian half diminished arpeggio
4 1 2 5 1 3 6 2 5 7 7 3 4 6 1

1

4

7 3

5 6

1

2

5 6

1

4 7

3

3

2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

Extended Arpeggios
The preceding page shows each mode, with the 1, 3, 5 and 7 marked. But what about other chords, such as 9th chords, 11th chords, and so on? These are based on an extended arpeggio. If we continue numbering the notes up past the octave (8ve), which is merely the root note again, we find that 2 is also 9, 4 is also 11, and 6 is also 13. So a ninth chord is 1 3 5 7 and 9 (or 2). An 11th chord is 1 3 5 7 9 and 11 (1 3 5 7 2 4). When playing the extended chords on guitar it’s common to leave out some of the notes. The best notes to keep would be the 3 and 7, since they define whether the chord is a major 7th, dominant 7th, or minor 7th chord. For a C major ninth chord (C E G B D) the 1, 3, 7, 9 (C E B D) or 3, 5, 7, 9 (E G B D) can be played. By using the charts in the folllowing pages and becoming familiar with the arpeggios and their extended tones, the guitarist can have a hundred options for any and every chord.

Every Mode Within Every Other Mode
Thinking of the numbers while playing the modes is very important. This will help you to develop a sense of what a major 3 sounds like compared to a minor 3, for example. As your ear develops you’ll probably realize that you can hear the same note in a few ways: • Its number in relationship to the root of the chord over which it’s being played • Its number in relationship to the key in which that chord appears. • Its relationship to the tones in the chords before and after the chord being played. Another important but obvious reason for learning how to play every mode within every other mode is this: any mode can then be played at any position on the neck. On the following pages it is shown how each mode can be played within the fingerings of the other 6 modes that were shown earlier in this book. The arpeggios can also be played in this way as well. After connecting the modes together so they belong to the same key, you will actually be able to play any mode on the entire neck of the guitar - in every position, and on every string. Here are explanations of the Melodic Minor mode fingerings as shown on the following page: The Melod-Minor 6 - 1 — This is the mode as seen on page 4. The root of the scale is played on the 6th string with the first finger - hence the name “Ionian 6 - 1.” Melod-Minor 6 - 2 — Here the same mode is played one fret lower. The root is played by the 2nd finger on the 6th string, but the 7 below it is also shown, since it’s a part of the mode. Notice that this looks exactly like the Super Locrian mode on page 7, but the numbers have changed. All of the modes can be played in every position, either by using the above method, or by finding the root note for any position. A chart of all the notes on the neck is included in book I of this series.

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Melodic Minor Mode in 7 Positions
This mode has a flat 3 in comparison to the Major Scale, or Ionian Mode. All other notes are unchanged from the Ionian. The tones 1, 3 and five form a minor triad. When the seventh is added (1, 3, 5 and 7) the tones form a minor chord with a major 7th. The symbol for this is “min maj7.”

Melod-Minor 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 4 7 2 3 6 2 7 5 1 4 6 3 5 1

Melod-Minor 6 - 2 6th string, 2 finger
3 7 1 4 7 2 5 1 4 6 6 2 3 5 7 1

Melod-Minor 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 2 3 7 1 4 7 6 2 3 5 5 1 4 7 1 6

Melod-Minor 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
5 1 4 7 6 2 3 7 6 5 1 4 7 2 3 6 5

Melod-Minor 5 -3 5th string, 3rd finger
4 7 5 1 4 7 6 2 5 3 6 2 3 6 5 1 4

Melod-Minor 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 6 4 7 5 1 4 2 3 6 2 5 5 7 1 4 3

Melod-Minor 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 3 6 4 7 2 3 5 7 1 4 5 1 4 6 2 3

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Dorian Flat 2 Mode in 7 Positions
This variation of Dorian has a flat 2, flat 3 and flat 7 in comparison to the Major Scale. The arpeggio forms a minor 7th chord, and adding the 2 will result in a m7b9 chord.

Dorian b2 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 2 5 3 6 1 2 4 6 7 4 7 3 5 1

Dorian b2 6 - 3 6th string, 3rd finger
7 3 6 1 2 5 1 6 4 7 3 5 1 2 4 7

Dorian b2 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
2 6 7 3 6 1 4 7 3 5 1 5 1 2 4 6 7

Dorian b2 5 - 1 5th string, first finger
5 1 2 6 7 3 6 5 1 2 4 4 7 3 6 7 5

Dorian b2 5 - 3 5th string, third finger
4 7 3 6 5 1 2 6 5 4 7 3 6 1 2 5 4

Dorian b2 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 6 4 7 3 6 5 1 4 2 5 1 2 5 4 7 3

Dorian b2 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 5 3 6 4 7 3 1 2 5 1 4 4 6 7 3 2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Lydian Augmented Mode in 7 Positions
The Lyd-Aug Mode has sharped 4 and 5, when compared to the Major Scale. The tones 1, 3 and five form an augmented triad, commonly represented by the “+” symbol.. When the seventh is added (1, 3, 5 and 7) the tones form an augmented chord with a major 7th. The symbol for this is “+ maj7.” Adding the 4 will give an augmented major7 sharp11 chord. Lyd-Aug 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 4 2 5 3 6 2 7 1 4 7 3 5 6 1

Lyd-Aug 6 - 2 6th string, 2nd finger
7 1 4 2 5 7 1 3 5 6 3 6 2 4 7 1

Lyd-Aug 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 2 5 7 1 4 7 5 3 6 2 4 7 1 1 3 6

Lyd-Aug 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
1 5 6 2 5 7 3 6 2 4 7 4 7 1 3 5 6

Lyd-Aug 5 - 2 5th string, 2nd finger
4 7 1 5 6 2 5 4 7 1 3 3 6 2 5 6 4

Lyd-Aug 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 6 2 5 4 7 1 5 4 3 6 2 5 7 1 4 3

Lyd-Aug 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 5 3 6 2 5 4 7 3 1 4 7 1 4 3 6 2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Lydian Dominant Mode in 7 Positions
The Lydian Dominant Mode has a sharp 4 and flat 7 in comparison to the Major Scale. The arpeggio is a dominant seventh arpeggio. This mode is useful for 7 sharp eleven chords (7#11).

Lyd-Dom 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 4 2 5 1 4 3 6 2 7 3 6 7 5 1

Lyd-Dom 6 - 3 6th string, 3rd finger
7 3 1 4 2 5 1 6 7 3 6 2 4 5 1 7

Lyd-Dom 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 7 3 1 4 6 7 2 4 5 1 2 5 1 3 6 7

Lyd-Dom 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
5 1 4 6 7 3 6 4 2 5 1 3 6 7 7 2 5

Lyd-Dom 5 - 2 5th string, 2nd finger
7 4 5 1 4 6 2 5 1 3 6 3 6 7 2 4 5

Lyd-Dom 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 6 7 4 5 1 4 3 6 7 2 2 5 1 4 5 3

Lyd-Dom 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 5 1 4 3 6 7 4 3 2 5 1 4 6 7 3 2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Mixolydian Flat 6 Mode in 7 Positions
The Mix b6 Mode has a flat 6 and 7, in comparison to the Major Scale. Using the 1, 3, 5, 7 and 6 will form a seven flat13 (7b13, or 7-13) chord. Using the 1, 3, 6 (in place of the 5), and 7 will form an augmented 7th chord.

Mix b6 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 4 7 3 2 5 6 3 2 1 4 7 5 6 1

Mix b6 6 - 3 6th string, 3rd finger
7 3 1 4 7 3 2 5 1 6 2 5 6 1 4 7

Mix b6 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 2 7 3 1 4 7 5 6 2 5 1 1 3 4 7 6

Mix b6 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
5 1 4 7 2 5 6 6 7 3 2 5 6 1 3 4 7

Mix b6 5 - 3 5th string, 3rd finger
4 7 3 5 6 2 5 3 1 4 7 2 5 6 6 1 4

Mix b6 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
6 3 4 7 3 5 1 4 7 2 5 2 5 6 1 3 4

Mix b6 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 5 6 3 4 7 3 2 5 6 1 1 4 7 3 4 2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Aeolian b5 Mode in 7 Positions
The Aeolian Flat 5 Mode has a flat 7, 3, 6 and 5 in comparison to the Major Scale. The arpeggio forms a m7b5 chord. Adding the 2 will form a m9b5 chord.

Aeol b5 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
1 4 5 2 3 6 2 1 4 5 7 7 3 6 1

Aeol b5 6 - 3 6th string, 3rd finger
7 3 6 2 1 4 5 2 1 7 3 6 4 5 1 7

Aeol b5 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 2 7 3 6 2 1 4 7 3 5 1 4 5 1 7 6

Aeol b5 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
5 1 6 2 7 3 6 4 5 1 4 7 7 2 3 6 5

Aeol b5 5 - 3 5th string, 3rd finger
4 5 1 6 2 4 5 7 2 3 6 7 3 6 1 4 5

Aeol b5 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 6 2 4 5 1 4 2 7 3 6 1 4 5 5 7 3

Aeol b5 4 - 1 4th 5 string, 1st finger
2 3 6 2 4 7 3 6 1 4 1 4 5 7 2 3

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Super Locrian Mode in 7 Positions
The Super Locrian Mode has every note with the exception of the 1, or root, flatted in comparison to the Major Scale. The 1,3, 5 and 7 form a m7b5 chord, but there are a few uses for this mode. If 1, 4, 5, 7 are used (4 instead of 3), a 7b5 chord is formed. If 1, 4, 6, 7 are used (4 and 6 in place of 3 and 5), a 7#5 chord is formed. Super Locrian 6 - 1 6th string, 1st finger
4 1 2 5 1 3 6 2 5 7 7 3 4 6 1

Super Locrian 6 - 3 6th string, 3rd finger
7 3 4 1 2 5 1 7 3 4 6 6 2 5 1 7

Super Locrian 6 - 4 6th string, 4th finger
6 2 5 1 7 3 4 1 7 6 2 5 1 3 4 7 6

Super Locrian 5 - 1 5th string, 1st finger
5 1 6 2 5 1 7 3 6 4 7 3 4 7 6 2 5

Super Locrian 5 - 3 5th string, 3rd finger
4 7 5 1 6 2 5 3 4 7 3 6 6 1 2 5 4

Super Locrian 5 - 4 5th string, 4th finger
3 4 7 5 1 3 4 6 1 2 5 6 2 5 7 3 4

Super Locrian 4 - 1 4th string, 1st finger
2 5 1 3 4 7 3 1 6 2 5 7 3 4 4 6 2

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

The Whole Tone Scale
Playing every note in succession, using all the sharps and flats (or accidentals) gives us the chromatic scale. The whole tone scale is a six tone scale comprised of all whole tones — in other words, every other note of the chromatic scale. Taking a look at the A Melodic Minor once again, we notice a long stretch of whole tones — from C to G#. A 1 B C 2 3 D 4 E 5 F# 6 G# A 7 1 The Chromatic Scale

Replacing the A and B with the note halfway between, a Bb, would transform tha above scale into a whole tone scale: Bb C D E F# G# Bb Whole Tone Scale

The Whole Tone Scale is completely symmetric. Any tone can be used as the starting point, or root, and the scale still has the same sound. Playing every other note as an arpeggio gives us the notes to create and augmented chord. Again, because this scale is symmetric, any tone can be used as the root. And the augmented arpeggio is symmetric as well: C major 3rd E major 3rd G# major 3rd C

Try using the Whole Tone Scale as a substitute for the Mixolydian, Altered Scale, or over any Dominant (symbol = 7) chord. Whole Tone Scale Below is a progression using an augmented chord:

C Ionian

C Whole Tone

F Lydian

F Melod Minor

||:

Cmaj7

|

C+

|

Fma7

|

Fm

:

||

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

Additional Chord Progressions
Combining the Natural Modes with the Melodic Minor Modes. The Circle of Fifths in the key of C is shown in book I. But what if the song uses combinations of chords from different keys? One could solo over the progression below using C Ionian and E Mixolydian. Three notes would change in doing this. Using the modes below will cause only one note to change between the 2 chords. This gives a softer, less drastic sound to the change, and gives us some really interesting harmonic sounds to work with: The Cmajor 7 #11 chord (C major 7 with an F# in it) and the E 7 flat 13 chord (E7 with a C natural added to it). All of the Melodic Minor Modes have a long stretch of whole steps — in the case below, C - D - E - F# - G#. The whole tone scale has an ethereal, unrestful sound to it. Try shifting into the E whole tone scale over the E7 chord, as well. modes to use: progression: C Lydian E Mix Flat 6

||:

Cmaj7

|

E7

:

||

Below is another “softened” chord change. C Ionian Bb Lydian Dom

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Cmaj7

|

Bb7

:

||

We can continue by using any of the C Major Modes in the same way: A Aeolian Bb Lydian Dom

||: ||:

Am7
G Mix

| |

Bb7
Bb Lydian Dom

:

|| ||

G7

Bb7

:

Here the Melodic Minor Mode is susbstituted in place of the Aeolian. The Major 7 in the C Melodic Minor is the same note as the 3 in the G Mixolydian.

G Mix

C Melodic Minor

||:

G7

|

Cmmaj7
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:

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

Substitutions Try the two modes below over the following: modes to use: progression: G Mix G Super Locrian

||:

G7
G Mixolydian

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G7
C Ionian

:

||
C Ionian

G Super Locrian

||: G7

Cmaj7

|

G7

|

Cmaj7 :

||

Try substituting Mix b6 and Lydian Dominant in any progression where the Mixolydian can be used. In the following progression Db7 and G7 are used interchangeably. Db Super Locrian has all the same notes as G Lydian Dominant. Db Super Loc C Ionian Db Super Loc C Ionian

||: Db7
D Aeol b5

| | |

Cmaj7

| | |

G7

| | |

C7

:

|| || ||

G Mix (or Mix b6)

C Ionian

||: Dm7-5
D Locrian

G7
G Mix b6

Cmaj7
C Melodic Minor

:

||: Dm7-5

G7

Cmmaj7

:

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Modal Guitarist — Part II Melodic Minor Modes

copyright ©2006 John Ruffi

In Closing
Contained in this book is everything you need to know to become thoroughly familiarized with the Modes based on the Melodic Minor Scale. There are 4 books in this series: The Modal Guitarist — Part I Modes from the Major Scale The Melodic Major or Natural Modes

The Modal Guitarist — Part II The Melodic Minor Modes Modes from the Melodic Minor Scale

The Modal Guitarist — Part III The Harmonic Minor Modes Modes from the Harmonic Minor Scale

The Modal Guitarist — Part IV The Harmonic Major Modes Modes from the Harmonic Major Scale

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