We will set schools up as community hubs which act as one-stop-shops the whole needs of the child

are met so that they are ready to learn. WHY –Poverty stops kids getting to school and it stops them doing as well as they could when they are at school. Education is a route out of poverty, but poverty itself gets in the way of children getting a good education. To ensure all kids have the opportunity to learn we need to counter some of these ‘poverty blocks’ by ensuring childrens health and welfare needs are met at school. Hunger, sickness, and family dysfunction prevent chidren from being able to take up the opportunity of education and thus escaping poverty. By providing the services and support a child needs to be nurtured and healthy onsite, at school, we remove barriers that can prevent a family seeking help, and, as a result improve access to education. Internationally there is a growing consensus about the value of schools as hubs, or community schools. Evidence shows families will access the help they need if they know what is available and they can physically access it. Recent work on child poverty by the Ewvery Child Counts, and the Childrens Commissioners’ Expert Advisory Group on Child Poverty recommend schools as hubs as a key way of intervening in the poverty cycle and ensuing equitable access to education.

This is what the xxxx ecological sustsems theory means when xxxx

As part of the move to create schools as hubs we will provide: ON site ECE: Establish early childhood centres onsite at low decile schools where there is existing capacity at the school, and a need for ECE in the community. FREE AFTER SCHOOL CARE Provide free after school care for all kids up to age 12 – including providing quality extra curricular educational opportunities such as music and sport. (or progressive universal) SCHOOL NURSES - a nurse in every low decile school and centralise the funding for school nurses to ensure equity of access. SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAMME - Provide a healthy lunch in every low decile school, and a scheme where higher decile schools can access lunch programmes if they can demonstrate a need. COMMUNITY Facilitator Fund a community/cultural worker at every low decile school, to connect kids and their families with the community services they need. For example, getting kids to follow up dental nurse appointments, hearing and seeing followup appointments, connecting the family to WINZ, ACE, ESOL. FACILITATE ONSITE SERVICES Provide seed funding for a central hub to be established where community services can set up onsite at the school

ECE onsite Free onsite ECE has the potential to be the starting point for a comprehensive community hub in communities with the greatest need. According to the Childrens Commmissioner’s expert group the more socially and economically disadvantaged a child, the most they gain from paricipatin gin good quality ECE. As wall as positive impacts on school readiness and perfoamcne, the group cites maternal employment, less use of social services, and less crime amongst kids who attended a year or more of good quality ECE. Problem: 1/ Only xx per cent of children have attended ECE before arriving at school, Among Māori, the rate is xx and Pacific children, the rate is xxx. The second biggest factor parents cite when not accessing preschool is the availability of a service.(2009 childcare survey – parents preferring to care for their child comes first) Problem 2/ Low decile schools are suffering from falling rolls resulting in the average decile xx school with xxxx unused space. This compares with xxx in decile 8, xx in decile 9 and xx in decile ten schools. Green Solution: We propose establishing free, culturally appropriate, teacher-led early childhood centres onsite at low decile schools where there is a need in the area for quality, not-for-profit ECE. This solves multiple problems at once: Gets ECE into communities that need it Mitigates transport problems by siting ECE at places where families in many cases already go Is a less threatening introduction to school for families with a history of educational disengagement makes schools with falling roles more viable by building community support for them, and using empty space. Demysitifies and normalises ECE It is also likely to lead to increased enrolments at the primary school. (to be confirmed) Onsite ECE is already working in many school communities around New Zealand. Kindergarten teachers have expressed support for the idea, though this needs more feedback and consultation with the sector. In 2010 Early Childhood taskforce recommended that community hubs be established around new ece centres as a key way to mitigate poverty and increase ECE attendance. (Agenda for Amazing Children, final report of the ECE Taskforce 2010)

Our proposal is similar, but involves Government taking a more active role in identifying which areas have an ECE need, and working with the community to facilitating the establishment of centres onsite at the local primary school, if there is the space. The ECE taskforce suggested $20 millkioni as a one off establishment cost for the hubs but more research is needed to establish the cost breakdown. Potential for a lot of funding cross overs. (could transfer some funding from targeted assistance for participation funding)

FREE AFTER SCHOOL CARE - insert work on this here. Key recommendation of the EAG child poverty report. Provided in many communities already. Could consider a range of options including: Free at low decile schools, and less expensive for others. Free for all community service card holders (less keen on this as knocks out many lower income working families especially larger families in need but with two parents working) SCHOOL NURSES Problem: Underprivileged primary aged children and preschololers are more likely to suffer from ill health . Rheumatic Fever, asthma, and xx rates are xxx higher among Māori children than non Māori. Teenagers especially teenagers in low decile schools cite transoport and affordability as reasons for not seeing a GP but even studetns in higher deciles cite the same roblems, but to a lesser extent

urses indicated that the most common reasons for students using school-based health services are for reasons of ‘accessibility’ – in terms of both proximity and student comfort. Reasons of confidentiality and problems of transport to other services are also common, and other reasons include parents being unable or unwilling to pay, and students either not knowing about or not knowing how to access other health services. Nurses in lower decile schools are more likely than nurses in higher decile schools to cite transport and payment difficulties as reasons for students’ use of school-based clinics, but there are also quite high numbers in mid-range and high-decile schools who indicate that students use school-based health services because of difficulties with payment or transport to other services.
Evidence shows that nurse practitioners onsite

Health promoting schools DHBs fund nurses

OSCAR gets $3000 to set up and get cyfs approval etc…could be useful for set up costs….

Use community led development lingo Econological sysstems lingo Qwas: Social workers in schools – how many in lower decile schools now? Plan was to have them in every dec 1 to 3 by end of 2012 Community nurses, - in which schools now? Capacity in lower decile schools? Need for ece in some areas – wait times etc

Schools as Community Hubs, providing Partnership with community welfare, health and social orgs onsite To improve community, family and child wellbeing and assist in a Wellbeing focus along side learning focus at the school, Acheived through School Food and Wellbeing and learning plans

Drawing on collaborative teaching processes and community partnerships with health, social services etc (back to the beginning)

We will set schools up as community hubs, one stop shops, where the whole needs of the child are met so that they are ready to learn. To do that we will: Establish early childhood centres onsite at low decile schools where there is existing capacity at the school, and a need for the service Provide free after school care for all kids up to age 12 – including providing quality extra curricular educational opportunities such as music and sport. Put a nurse in every low decile school Provide a healthy lunch in every low decile school Employ a community/cultural worker in every low decile school, to connect kids and their families with the community services they need. For example, getting kids to follow up dental nurse appointments, hearing and seeing followup appointments, connecting the family to WINZ, ACE, ESOL. Encourage other community services to use the school as the anchor to the community…..bla bla, not sure how to do this.

Schools as Community Hubs (Anti Poverty: EAG recommended ‘the concept of the school as a community hub to be a viable and important option to mitigate the effects of child poverty in high deprivation communities(insert citation) The School as Community Hub acts as the anchor point to external community organisations The Hub connects pupils and their families to the services that will help address their wellbeing needs and ensures the overall wellbeing of the community upon which the child depends. It recognises that the child does not function in isolation from their family and their community and that schools can’t deal with the social and health problems children in disadvantaged circumstances experience on their own.

It recognises that schools need to partner with social service and health organisaitons in order to mitigate the effects of poverty. They can’t do it on their own. In successful models key features of a community hub include: o o o o o o o o Out-of-school activities and enrichment Early childhood education Parent involvement Medical and dental services Mental health services Social services Adult education And even community and economic development

Community Hubs should be examples of community led development, this means that every GREEN SOLUTION: Social workers and nurses in all decile 1 to 3 schools and available to others Currently xxx is the situation with social workers and xxx with nurses We would provide funding for each low decile school to have social workers and nurses. Evidence for this is the Commuity BNurse thing, the Victory experience ECE at Lower Decile Schools: PROBLEM: In New Zealand, we face a confluehce of problems in lower decile schools, where schools can be undermined by “white flight” based on perceptions problem in lower decile areas, of a corresponding lower rate of participation in early childhood education (get citation) GREEN SOLUTION But there are also spare spaces at lower decile schools. (include citation from qwas) We propose taking advantage of this capacity in lower decile schools establishing kindergartens and other not for profit, quality early childhood centres on the site of lower decile schools, if those communiities establish there is a need for ece there. This would be a key component of the development of community hubs. Funding/facilitation (What??) for the establishment of Hubs at lower decile schools This is about using the school as the physical and collaborative hub of a community, by partnering with welfare, health and community orgnaistions to provide a one stop shops which bring the community into the school, and establish the school as the centre of the community. Depending on community requirements this could see schools bcomeing a one stop shop for welfare, counselling, health, dentistry, community education, free internet, cultural growth and language learning and community problem solving. A school is a mini village.

How will we do this? For lower decile schools the wellbeing coordinator, in combination with the social worker and community nurse may provide the basis for a hub, which the community We also propose, that (something happens, a community fund maybe, to provide education and facilitation for communities and schools to jointly develop community development strategies, and identify what other providers are needed. We propose a new contestable fund be instated to help in the establishment of community hubs based at low decile schools and preschools, to run as partnerships between schools and community, health or cultural organistions, with the priority to be on establishing hubs in more disadvantaged communities. This fund would be jointly funded from Vote Health, Vote Social Development and Vote Education. We also propose a National School Hubs coordinator position be established, to help faciliatate community hub development in interested communities.

??? Initially, we propose a pilot of approximately ten Schools as Community Hubs be established at low decile schools, based on existing community school models, and that the hubs be evaluated leading to the development of communicty school models, which could be used by other community and school partnerships or hubs. This is COMMUNITY LED DEVELOPMENT Each community will want different things, will have different needs and diferent strengths.But the common threads are collaboration based on relationships. “Victory Priamry School “the more our school becomes a community centre, the more it becomes the centre of the community and family life, the better our children can do”
Family commission research into Victory School Benefits of a school hub model: Because of the multifaceted, synergistic and iterative nature of school-based integration of services, and the wide range of impacts sought throughout a community, this approach is especially vulnerable to the challenges of evaluation noted earlier. Evaluation evidence for the outcomes of school-based integration of services includes: > Students: Improved connection to school, academic achievement and learning competencies, attendance and behaviour. Improved health. Better access to and participation in services. > Families: Greater parent involvement in the school. Increased family stability. Better communication with teachers and school involvement. Improved parent involvement in their children’s learning. Increased participation in services. > Schools: Better links with parents. Acquisition of additional human and financial resources through community relationships. Reduced demands on staff because of accessible student services. Positive school culture. Positive parent-teacher relationships . > Communities: Increased security and stability. Enhanced community pride. Positive relationships

between students and residents (Baldwin Grossman & Vang, 2009; Coalition for Community 1 Schools, 2003).

(example of successful hubs, englan’ds early excellence ec ntres, victory etc, netherlands’s universal community schools or youth and family centres, sincle access point, provide prevention, advice and suport)

In a review of ECE policy and programmes, Wylie (1994) found that parents involved in ECE servies expericned ehnacesd relationships with their children, alleviation of material stress, upgrading of education or tyraining credientials and improved employment status.

Under the Education Amendement Act, the Government wants to make it esasier for private profilt making preschools, with less trained teachers, to be established onsite at schools. However, the evidence is

(example of successful hubs, englan’ds early excellence ec ntres, victory etc, netherlands’s universal community schools or youth and family centres, sincle access point, provide prevention, advice and suport) Social workers and nurses in all decile 1 to 3 schools and available to others Currently xxx is the situation with social workers and xxx with nurses We would provide funding for each low decile school to have social workers and nurses. Evidence for this is the Commuity BNurse thing, the Victory experience

Nurses in schools

Current'SBHS'are'funded'nationally'at'$5.6'million'per'annum,'covering'135'decile'one' and'two'schools,'teen'parent'units,'and'alternative'education'services.'In'April'2012,'the' Prime'Minister'announced'an'expansion'of'SBHS'to decile'3'secondary'schools,'at'a'cost' of'$10'million,'as'part'of'the'Youth'Mental'Health'Package.' 90.'The'EAG'supports'this'expansion.'However,'concern'remains'that'SBHS'continue'to'lack' sustained'resourcing.' 91.'The'quality'of'SBHS'matters.'The'Otahuhu'College'health'service'is'often'considered'the' best'example'of'how'SBHS'should'be'configured'and'implemented.2' The'Healthy'Community'SChoolls'initiative'was'a'p8lot'known'as'AIMHI'had'great'sgccess

Paths of Victory, Families Commission review of the Victory Village Community and School Hub model http://www.familiescommission.org.nz/sites/default/files/downloads/paths-of-victory.pdf 2 http://www.occ.org.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/9850/No_17_-_Health_policy.pdf

1

ECE at Lower Decile Schools: We propose taking advantage of this capacity in lower decile schools establishing kindergartens and other not for profit, quality early childhood centres on the site of lower decile schools, if those communiities say there is a need for ece there. This would be a key component of the development of community hubs. COST? In'terms'Otahuhu'school'health'clinic'is'funded'in'multiple'ways.'First,'the'school'

provides'the' facility'and'pays'overhead'(approx.'$42,000'per'annum).' Nurses'want'to'do'nursing'in'schools'

“Nurses can work with teachers and social workers in schools and early childhood centres to provide preventative health education, to advocate, to assess and provide brief intervention and/or referral, and to co-ordinate care for children, young people rangitahi and families whānau experiencing difficulties.”3

' Jill'Clendon'from'the'Nurses'org – there are some in sec ondary schools but not enough in primary schools, where there tend to be
http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/call-full-time-nurses-in-schools-4746677’
ppuvblic health nurses. we have found with public health nurses at the moment is they tend to be spread across 10 schools, that's just paying lip service to what nurses could do in schools.

The Victory Community Health Centre employs a nurse four days per week to work with children and their families whānau6.
And the Children’s Commission’ers EAG criticised the inconsistent funding of nurses in schools. It recommends sustainable funding for school based health servives, EAG page 21 AIMHI huges successes, see Chilrens COmmisioner’s report EAG page 21

Evidence'to'base'SBHS'at'school:' Research'appears'to'show'that'young'people'tend'to'use'health'and'other'services'in'a' fairly'spontaneous'manner'–'where'convenient,'when'needed,'and'when'the'health' provider'can'be'trusted.'The'availability'of'school[based'health'services'and'youth'onestop[' shops,'especially'when'they'are'staffed'by'professionals'who'understand'how'to' engage'with'adolescents,'appear'to'be'effective'ways'to'provide'health'services'for' adolescents'because'both'of'these'service'types'overcome'the'barriers'described.'(EAG' health'report)'

Nurses Organisation submission to the Green Paper on vulnerable children: http://www.nzno.org.nz/Portals/0/Docs/Activities/Submissions/2012-0228%20Green%20paper%20on%20vulnerable%20children%20NZNO%20submission%20final.pdf

3

Child Wellbeing focus In the same way our economy relies on our environment, a child’s learning relies on their physical and mental wellbeing and that of the family which nurtures them. (include citation) A child’s access to a good education is impeded by poverty and a lack of inclusiveness (nclude citation from EAG). To achieve equitable access to education, a child’s learning needs have to be addressed alongside their physical, psychological, cultural and social wellbeing needs. We propose to meet this in two ways: 1/ Providing school lunch to all children in lower decile schools 2/ Developing a comprehensive plan for each school pupil’s learning and wellbeing, overseen by a team of professionals including a wellbeing facilitator directly responsible for c coordinating the plan and connecting the school and child to any community services they need.

School Lunch Programme Insert details here Individual Learning and Wellbeing Plans IEP An IEP is an Individual Education Plan An IEP shows how the school programme will be adapted to fit the needs a of a student. Currently only children with identified special needs have an IEP and they are becomign less commonly used at secondary school, where a whole school approach to special needs is favoured, or kids of like need are grouped and their needs met. It inviolves those who know the student best, to plan the studetnts learning needss, apsoriations, taking into account their personality and cultural background. It looks forward and outlines the students goals, and records their acheivements, It does not replace current school reports. Problems: Teachers have often viewed IEPS as an administrative task, rather than a tool for more effective instruction at learningi. Teachers have also tended not to have a clear idea of rhte puirpose of an IEP, some viewing them as educational, others as having a legal, or accountability role.
The research indicates that the emphasis needs to shift to collaboration and teaching and learning. Collaboration - the heart of the matter and The IEP Process - building true collaboration of this resource include various strategies for achieving effective practice. In particular, see Facilitating collaboration. For more examples of effective IEP practices, see the online collection of tools, tips, and templates at IEP Online on TKI website.

Aotea College explains on their website their use of IEPS:
We develop and implement Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for a variety reasons. These can include that a student has a specific learning difficulty or a physical disability or the student may have other difficulties e.g. in the area of organisation, relationships or handling being at school in general. We develop IEPs always in consultation with the student and their families / caregivers, subject teachers. We also liaise with support providers such as GSE (Group Special Education), RTLBs (Resource Teachers for Learning and Behaviour) physio therapists, occupational therapists, counsellors, etc.) as necessary and applicable.

The Green’s Wellbeing and Learning Plan Good guidenlines for use of IEPS here: http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/literacy/literature-review We propose that each child in new Zealand would have their own Wellbeing and Learning Plan, in which their particular educational, wellbeing and cultural needs are outlined at key stages in their educaitonal journey. This is a collaborative and hands on model that involves the parents/caregiver of the student, along with the student themselves and key members of the team of professionals and experts who will work with the student and their family. Based on xxx principals of an ecolofical xxxxxx, and very well esteablisehd evidence of the benefits of bringing parents into an effective school/family partnership, Every me,ber of the group is accou8ntable to the group and the child and their parent, for meeting the needx outlined in the plan It ensures the students needs are recognised and then met, and provides real information about a students progress in an indepth holistic and understandable way, across all areas of the curriculum. Parents and kids would have access to the plan, which would be a living document. Educational goals would be clearly stated and agreed to by the student their parent/caregiver all members of the child’s Wellbweing and Learning Team. Progress against the goals would be clearly recorded along with the child’s achievements in a way that can be understood by the child and their caregivers. We envisage a sort of triage system, where for many pupils, review against the plan would align with reporting sytems already in place in the school and interactions with the family would be on a needs basis. But for the highest needs students, who have more complicated wellbeing and learning needs, review would be more comprehensive, regular and time consuming, with the child’s wellbeing team meeting perhaps monthly, to report on progress in the plan and address any new issues.

The wellbeing team concept, and the plan which is its tool is based on Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory, Bronfenbrenner believed
that the quality of the relationship between schools and families played an enormous part in a child’s development and much of his work related to the collaborative efforts necessary to provide optimum environments for that development. ((and his work has informed a lot of the current ed min thinking about the need to strengthen partnerships between the family and the school) In the Schooling Strategy 2005-2010 the importance of a collaborative relationship with parents is found in the following statements that are part of a description of “effective teaching for all students” (pp 19-20): The effect of teaching can be enhanced when there are positive interactions between teachers and families/whanau that are focused on students learning. ---------What is particularly useful for teachers is the detailed support provided by the guidelines in setting up and facilitating a meeting. Roles and responsibilities are explained and (for inexperienced teachers or those in need of support for a given meeting), there is acceptance for using a skilled facilitator from outside the core IEP team. This would take the responsibility of managing and guiding the meeting from a teacher, if necessary, but still respecting their professional contribution.

The plan would include: Specific learning goals of the student, and their acheivbement agsinst those goals

Special education needs and more specific plans to meet them, in line with the current IEP process Wellbeing goals, which might include plans to address truancy, mental health issues, disability support, vilenece, bulying harassment and wider family needs for help with understanding school processes, English language, adult education, or help liasing with WINZ. The new wellbeing (facilitator) may be an experienced teacher who would facilitate and oversee the action part of the plans facilitate would act as a lisason between the family and any external support they require. We propose that a wellbeing facilitator at each school (tbc) would oversee the development of an individual plan for each child at their entry to year 1 and again at year 13. The child’s parent, the child, the home teacher, and wellbeing facilitator would initially write the plan, which could be informed by the b4 school check, (check what happens to that info now) or involve an “starting school” health check if the b4 school check hasn’t happened and the family agrees.

IEP An IEP is an Individual Education Plan An IEP shows how the school programme will be adapted to fit the needs a of a student. Currently only children with identified special needs have an IEP and they are becomign less commonly used at secondary school, where a whole school approach to special needs is favoured, or kids of like need are grouped and their needs met. It inviolves those who know the student best, to plan the studetnts learning needss, apsoriations, taking into account their personality and cultural background. It looks forward and outlines the students goals, and records their acheivements, It does not replace current school reports. Problems: Teachers have often viewed IEPS as an administrative task, rather than a tool for more effective instruction at learningii. Teachers have also tended not to have a clear idea of rhte puirpose of an IEP, some viewing them as educational, others as having a legal, or accountability role.
The research indicates that the emphasis needs to shift to collaboration and teaching and learning. Collaboration - the heart of the matter and The IEP Process - building true collaboration of this resource include various strategies for achieving effective practice. In particular, see Facilitating collaboration. For more examples of effective IEP practices, see the online collection of tools, tips, and templates at IEP Online on TKI website.

Aotea College explains on their website their use of IEPS:
We develop and implement Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for a variety reasons. These can include that a student has a specific learning difficulty or a physical disability or the student may have other difficulties e.g. in the area of organisation, relationships or handling being at school in general.

We develop IEPs always in consultation with the student and their families / caregivers, subject teachers. We also liaise with support providers such as GSE (Group Special Education), RTLBs (Resource Teachers for Learning and Behaviour) physio therapists, occupational therapists, counsellors, etc.) as necessary and applicable.

Community hubs What will it look like? As an anti poverty measure: The EAG recommended “the concept'of'the'school'as'a'community'hub'to'be'a'viable'and'

important'option'to'mitigate'the'effects'of'child'poverty'in'high'deprivation'communities.”' Involve'external'community'organisations;'the'school'acts'as'the'anchor' Key'features:'
o o o o o o o Out-of-school activities and enrichment Parent involvement Medical and dental services Mental health services Social services Adult education And even community and economic development

' COMMUNITY'FACILITATOR,'early'years'service'hub'contract'with'MSD,'here'ttalks'about' what'the'facilitator'should'do'and'the'hub'be'accountable'for…' http://www.familyservices.govt.nz/documents/working[with[us/funding[and[ contracting/service[guidelines/early[years[service[hub[agreement.pdf'

Early Years Service Hubs
Providing high-need families with young children with more co-ordinated and accessible health, education and social services On this Page: Current locations of the Early Years Service Hubs Evaluation Practice Guidelines Read some hubs stories Early Years Service Hubs in high need areas provide a central point where families can access a range of services including ante-natal care, Well Child health checks and immunisation programmes, and quality childcare and education for under fives. Each hub is supported by a Hub Coordinator who implements the initial set up, develops a strong network of Early Years Services providers and keeps families connected to core services.

Early Years Service Hubs are located within or alongside existing community facilities - such as Family Service Centres, Heartland Services, and community centres or schools - and are supported by an Early Years Service Worker. Approximately 2,500 families (with children aged 0-6) receive services through or from Hubs each year. The Hubs were initially funded for three years (July 2006 to June 2009). In May 2009, Government approved $1.494 million to fund the initiative for an additional year. In May 2010, funding for the initiative was base-lined

' AFTER'SCHOOL'CARE'
Education and health recs from childrens commission’ers report: • Continue to implement ECE Task Force recommendations and progress work on initiatives to raise participation of Māori, Pasifika and disadvantaged children • Encourage schools and ECE centres in low SES areas to become ‘full schools’ or ‘community hubs’ • Continue and expand support for teachers and parents to address young children’s behavioural issues Health • Progress towards a single enrolment information system for child health and social services • Implement a common assessment pathway, service planning and delivery approach from antenatal to age 5 • Increase focus (led by Health Workforce NZ) on building a workforce that knows how to engage with Māori, Pasifika, and socioeconomically disadvantaged groups Inter-agency and community partnership • Expand the number of Teen Parent Units to more low decile schools with high teen birth rates • Sustain funding for youth-friendly health and social services in all NZ high schools, starting with low decile schools Education • Improve quality of ECE by strengthening: quality measures for homebased services; services for under 2s; centre-based group size; and improve accountability measures • Encourage schools and communities to initiate more after-school and school-holiday programmes (particularly those programmes evidenced to mitigate the impacts of poverty)'
8637 (2012). Jacinda Ardern to the Minister for Social Development (09 Oct 2012): How is Out of School Care and Recreation (OSCAR) funding calculated? Hon Paula Bennett (Minister for Social Development) replied: The level of funding awarded is determined based on providers’ demonstrated need for funding from within a capped pool of funding. The Ministry has provided two forms of grant funding to providers of OSCAR programmes since 2002: • Development Funding: one-off grants of up to $3,000 per programme to assist providers to establish new programmes and gain Child Youth and Family approval; • Assistance Funding: annual operational grants of up to $16,000 per programme to assist providers to meet operating deficits

'
Wellbeing team: Two options:

1/A single coordinator to monitor the wellbeing needs of children and their family and ensure they are met – medical, social etc at the school. Perhaps teacher or social workers refer kids to them. Will a single coordinator be able to identify and manage all potential needs? How to make the school, principal, social worker, accountable under this model? 2/ A wellbeing team a la the Finnish model, comprising a nurse, or doctor, social worker, special needs educataor and principal, who meet each fortnight to discuss the individual needs of the child, which have been identified buy the parent, child, or the teacher. Every member of the group is accountable to the group and the child’s parent for meeting the needs outlined in the wellbeing plan. Social workers in schools: Government has provided extra fudning to all decidle 1 to 3 schools to ensure there is a social worker in each one by the end of 2012. (possible qwa on this) Principals like it but EAG notes problems in organisation. Nurses in schools: A pilot nurses in schools programme – Health Community Schools initialtive was run in nione decle 1 South Auckalnd schools in the early 1990s. It funded school to employ nurses – unsure how many and the schools redirected other funding to'to'assist'the'schools'to'employ'social'workers,'and'community'

liaison'officers'(CLOs).

Resulted in dramatic improvements in educational achievement, but its not clear what happened to the programme once responsibily for nurses and social workers was devolved to MOH in 2007. Seems to have fallen apart. But EAG recs getting it up and running again.

i ii

Mitchell et al., 2010, page 18 Mitchell et al., 2010, page 18

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful