OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, April 25, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 42 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 • Fax: 835-8277
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Oregon School District
Wireless Internet upgrade to cost $600K
Coverage will improve in
all schools by next fall
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
With classrooms relying more
on wireless Internet service, the
Oregon School District is poised
to pay up to $600,000 to upgrade
its system in time for the start of
the 2013-14 school year.
OSD first installed wireless
about five years ago, and more
than two years ago it added doz-
ens of access points so just about
every room in every school could
get online.
But the number of students
and staff accessing the district’s
wireless system is growing expo-
nentially. Last April, about 400
mobile devices – such as smart
phones, tablets or laptops – used
the system daily. By January, that
number had more than tripled,
district technology director Jon
Tanner told the Oregon School
Board Monday.
With that in mind, the board
unanimously approved a plan to
beef up the district’s network-
ing infrastructure and add more
access points to ensure Internet
speeds don’t bog down when lots
of people in one classroom go
online.
The upgrade i s “cri t i cal l y
important,” said superintendent
Brian Busler, as the district con-
tinues its push to customize edu-
cation for each student, an edu-
cational trend that’s sure to put
even more tablets and laptops in
students’ hands. The district has
also begun encouraging kids to
bring their own wireless devices
Village of Oregon
Curbing alcohol
After years of debate, new ordinance takes a light touch
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
After a few years of dis-
cussing possible changes to
the village’s ordinance on
alcohol sales, the Village
Board last week adopted
resolutions that will likely
have a minimal impact on
businesses and consumers.
In fact, as several offi-
cials pointed out at last
week’s meeting, the only
change t hat wi l l affect
anyone immediately is the
decision to prohibit the
sale of single servings of
fermented malt beverages,
primarily beer, by business-
es that also sell gasoline.
The board approved a
first reading of the ordi-
nance on a 6-1 vote, with
t rust ee Davi d Donovan
casting the sole vote against
it. He did not return calls
seeking a comment.
Ot her changes i n t he
ordinance include restrict-
ing businesses with a Class
A license – which means
those that can sell alco-
hol to go – from operating
within .2 miles (1,056 feet)
of a similar business and
prohibiting a liquor license
for businesses that sell pre-
scription medications.
The former rule would
have prevent ed Al pi ne
Liquors from locating near
Oregon Liquors a year ago,
and the latter would have
avoided a debate three and
four years ago over Wal-
greens’ liquor license appli-
cation.
The or di na nc e a l s o
“tightens up the guidelines
for server t rai ni ng and
ongoing server training,”
and requi res t hat when
Village of Oregon
Officials to seek
more funding for
planned trail
Denial of easement
alters path cost,
timing
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village Board Mon-
day approved resolutions
authorizing officials to
apply for two grants to
help fund the construction
of a recreation trail that
they plan to build north-
west of the village.
The projected cost for
the trail increased con-
siderably when village
officials were not able
to acquire an easement
allowing the path to cross
land owned by the Alpine
Dairy. That pushed back
the timeline for the proj-
ect. Officials had hoped to
build the trial this year but
now do not expect to break
ground until sometime in
2014.
The trail is planned to
extend west from Cusick
Parkway in the Alpine
Busi ness Park t o Fi sh
Hatchery Road. The ulti-
mate goal is to connect the
path to the Badger State
Trail about seven miles
west of the village and
allow cyclists and oth-
ers to travel from the Vil-
lage of Oregon to Madi-
son without having to use
county roads.
Village President Steve
Staton said because he was
unable to get an easement
to cross Alpine Dairy land,
the trail will need more
boardwalk than previously
planned.
Instead of 200 to 300
feet, the trail will now
require about 1,300 feet
of boardwalk, said Pub-
lic Works director Mark
Below.
That could increase the
project cost by almost
$700,000 or more. The
numbers are still largely
preliminary.
Wi t h t h e b o a r d ’ s
approval Monday night,
the village will apply for
a second Dane County
PARC grant of $250,000 –
it was awarded a $250,000
PARC grant two years ago
– and also for a $480,000
Stewardship Grant from
the Department of Natural
Resources.
Officials plan to apply
$120,000 in TIF 2 funds
for segment A of the trail,
and also borrow about
$118,000 for the project.
“We’ve applied for a
couple more grants, and
we’ll see if we get those
and how much we can
build,” Staton said after
Monday’s meeting. “What
Union and district head to mediation
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
A stalemate between the
local teachers’ union and
district officials is heading
to mediation this week, with
both sides hoping to reach a
voluntary settlement.
Oregon School District
teachers were offered a
salary increase last October
for the 2012-13 school year
but balked at a proposal to
scrap their traditional sal-
ary schedule, which provides
automatic raises for years of
experience and educational
credits.
Union leaders have also
criticized the district for not
negotiating issues other than
wages. The state’s contro-
versial Act 10 legislation
in 2011 forbid that, but a
court ruling last fall called
into question what, exactly,
unions and districts could
negotiate.
With negotiations at a
standstill and the school
year mostly complete, union
leaders and members of the
district’s human assets com-
mittee were slated to meet
Thursday afternoon with
William Houlihan, an attor-
ney with the Wisconsin
Employment Relations Com-
mission.
That mediation session
could yield a “tentative
agreement” that would still
Turn to Upgrade/Page 5
Turn to Mediation/Page 2
Oregon School District
Key changes
• No Class A license will be granted or transferred to any
business located within 1,056 feet (.2 miles) of another
premise for which a Class A license has been issued.
• No license can be granted for any business where a pre-
scription medication is sold.
• No business that sells gasoline may sell single servings
of fermented malt beverages.
Turn to Alcohol/Page 8
Photo by Seth Jovaag
A new village ordinance would ban selling single servings of fermented malt beverages in places such as gas stations.
Inside
See a map of the
recreation trail
Page 7
Turn to Trail/Page 7
2
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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PLANT SALE!
Saturday, May 4th, 9 am-12 pm
Heritage Monona
111 Owen Rd., Monona, WI
Garden plants are donated locally.
Golden Retriever Rescue of Wisconsin
(GRRoW) will be there with dogs in tow!
Please donate flowers, vegetable
plants, small bushes and split plants
from your garden.
Donated plants must arrive by Friday, May 3
at noon in planters. Please label each variety.
Questions? Contact Kate at
kmayefske@heritageal.com
608.441.9990 • www.heritagesenior.com
Proceeds
benefit the
Golden
Retriever
Rescue of
Wisconsin
(GRRoW)
Beautiful Spring Ideas For
Mothers Day!
Lizou New Designs!
This quality jewelry is made of Pewter so they don’t tarnish!
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State Bank wants to award
YOU $1,000to beautify
your home.
&Win!
Enter at facebook.com/statebankofcrossplains or crossplainsbank.com
Submission Period: April 8 - April 28, 2013.
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see any State Bank representative for details.
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Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Oregon High School
“Shadow Indoor Percussion”
team reached a new high last
weekend when it competed
in the World Guard Inter-
national’s world champion-
ships in Dayton, Ohio.
Led by artistic direc-
tor Dave Skogen, the OHS
group of about three-dozen
student percussionists placed
seventh out of 12 teams that
competed in the independent
marching class A finals.
It marked the first time an
OHS team reached the finals,
a goal set when the group
first formed in 2009, Sko-
gen said. Unlike the OHS
squad, many of the top teams
included college-aged stu-
dents.
The team’s final score of
88.33 was the highest an
OHS team had ever recorded
at the event, he said.
To qualify, the group com-
peted at regional competi-
tions earlier this year in Min-
neapolis and Indianapolis,
finishing first and second,
respectively. It also had to
pass through a preliminary
competition last week that
included roughly 30 teams.
The event concl udes
the winter season for the
group. The separate summer
marching band, Shadow
Armada, began rehearsals
Sunday.
Oregon High School
Percussion group places in world championships
Photo courtesy of Beth Skogen Photography
The Oregon High School “Shadow Indoor Percussion” team reached a new high last weekend when it
competed in the World Guard International’s world championships in Dayton, Ohio.
need to be ratified by the Oregon School Board and
Oregon Education Associa-
tion, explained Jina Jonen,
the district’s in-house coun-
sel and human resources
director.
Last October, the district
offered to boost teacher
salaries by 2.8 percent and
bump annual pay by $4,000
for employees that attain a
master’s degree this year. It
also offered to increase start-
ing pay for teachers from
$33,700 to $36,000. The pre-
vious contract expired July 1.
But union leaders have
called for broader negotia-
tions to cover issues like prep
time and training for staff
and for keeping the tradition-
al salary schedule.
“The district has stated
that they have a new way of
doing business and are not
interested in a mutual part-
nership,” OEA president
Fishwild said in an email.
“The OEA hopes that the
mediator will help us to
reach common ground and
hopefully reach a voluntary
settlement.”
The mediation session will
cost $800, with the OEA
and district splitting the cost,
Jonen said.
Meanwhile, the district is
still negotiating with unions
representing district support
staff, such as secretaries, cus-
todians and other paraprofes-
sionals.
Union: Calls for broader negotiations to cover prep time
Continued from page 1
Oregon Masonic Lodge
201 Park Street, Oregon
Pancake Breakfast
Pancakes, French toast, eggs, sausage, coffee, milk & juice
Sunday, April 28 - from 7am to Noon
Open to the Public
Adults - $6.00; 5-10 yrs. old - $3.00
under 5 - Free
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April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
© 2006 002138 – 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
© 2006 002138 – 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
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(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI SToRAgE
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I would like to thank everyone who supported me in
the April 2nd election for Town Of Oregon Chairperson.
Every vote matters as we demonstrated by the tie vote
and subsequent coin toss to determine the winner.
I appreciate the support and confdence during this
historic election.
Chris Johnson
Thank You!
UN284205
Special Thank You
We would like to thank all who supported
our Rose Sale making it a great success.
100% of the profts go for community
services and other services needed
throughout.
Thank You
Oregon/Brooklyn Lion’s Rose Chairman
Past District Governor Arlen Milestone
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“On Our Way to Kindergarten”
Public Forum
For Parents/Guardians of children entering
5-Year-Old Kindergarten in the Fall, 2013
Monday, April 29, 2013
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Oregon High School
Performing Arts Center
Please join district administrators and support staff to learn more
about the Oregon School District! The following topics will be ad-
dressed: Community Education, Food Service, Infnite Campus,
Curriculum and Assessment, Parent-Teacher Organizations (PTO),
Positive Behavior Intervention Systems (PBIS), Transportation,
“Typical Day in the Life of a Kindergarten Student,” and the Kinder-
garten Transition Process.
This forum is intended for adults only. There may be limited child-
care available for children ages 3 and older. However, we high-
ly encourage families to make alternate childcare arrangements
as we will not be able to accept all children. If you would like to
make a request or inquire about childcare, please contact Scott at
srl@oregonsd.net.
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Blanchard leaves mark with parks
Board president steps
down after 27 years
Bill liviCk
Unifed Newspaper Group
The longtime president
of the Oregon Park Board is
stepping down after some-
thing like 27 years on the
board.
Jon Blanchard can’t say
for sure how long he’s served
on the board, but 27 years is
his best estimate.
“There doesn’t seem to be
a record of it,” he said.
“It’s just a lot of years
doing it, and I’m feeling a
little bit of burn out,” he said
in explaining why he’s leav-
ing the board now. “I’ll let
someone else take the reins.
“We have a lot of good
people on the board now,” he
added. “It’s been fun, and I
enjoyed it. I’ve seen a lot of
changes.”
Blanchard and his wife
moved here in 1984 and
raised three children.
He initially got involved
with the Park Board when he
was a member of the Oregon
Jaycees.
The organi zat i on had
raised lots of money for
parks, especially Jaycee
Park, and had a representa-
tive on the Park Board.
“The person that was doing
it aged out of the Jaycees,”
Blanchard recalled. “They
were looking for somebody
to replace him, and I thought
it sounded interesting so I
thought I’d do it for a couple
years.”
Twenty-seven years and
12 additional parks later,
Blanchard has decided it’s
time for a change.
He said the world has
become more complicated
than when he joined the
board around 1987.
The Park Board used to
prepare the village’s park
plan itself, as well as apply-
ing for grants and other fund-
ing sources. Now the village
uses a professional planning
consultant for those things.
The parks themselves have
also changed. Most parks no
l onger use
the individual
st eel -st ruc-
t ur e i t ems
t h a t u s e d
to make up
pl ayground
equi pment .
Nowadays,
they tend to
be a single unit with slides,
monkey bars and teeter tot-
ters and whatever else a com-
pany can add to the mix.
“They’re kind of like all-
in-one structures,” Blanchard
said. “There’s one in the
middle of Jaycee Park and
one in Bethel Green Acre,
which is on Burr Oak Street.
We put up a shelter over
there, too.”
Perhaps the single biggest
cumulative accomplishment
under Blanchard’s tenure has
been the 12 new parks estab-
lished in the village, including
a skate park next to the tennis
courts on Oak Street.
About 15 years ago, the vil-
lage spent close to $100,000
in electrical improvements
near the ball diamonds by
Kiser Park.
“We had help from the
softball association and the
chamber,” Blanchard said.
“We replaced the lights at
that time, and the carnivals
were being required not to run
their main feeder lines above
ground and so the chamber
got involved and set up a box
there for the Summer Fest
area.”
The Park Board also over-
saw the development of sev-
eral paved recreation trails
and is in the process of devel-
oping Keller Alpine Mead-
ows Park on the west side.
Blanchard said he worked
with a total of six different
village presidents since he
joined the Park Board.
“I got along well with all of
them,” he said.
In interviews with the
Observer over the years,
Blanchard often stressed
that new parks being devel-
oped were never at taxpayer
expense. The funds came
from fees assessed to devel-
opers, who were also usually
required to dedicate land for a
neighborhood park.
Last year, Blanchard and
the board worked out a res-
ervation system for organi-
zations and individuals who
wanted to reserve a park shel-
ter or play area, ending what
had become a source of con-
flict for park users.
“In January, we lock down
the reservations for shel-
ters in parks and you can’t
reserve them for one year to
the next,” he explained.
“We have the different
entities come to our January
meeting and compare their
schedules for the year and
work out any differences.
After that they make their
reservations to reserve shel-
ters, and now they can actu-
ally reserve them through the
school district.
“We do that at the end of
January, and after January
it’s open to the public.”
With nearly three decades
of experience dealing with
local parks, Blanchard joked
that he could probably begin
a second career as a munici-
pal parks consultant.
But all joking aside, he’s
proud of the contributions
he’s made in Oregon.
“It definitely was time well
spent,” he said, “and I think
I’ve added something to the
village.”
Blanchard
Parks
Community parks
developed while Jon
Blanchard served as
Park Board president:
Merry Hill, Rustic
Vineyards, Thompson,
High Meadows,
Hawthorne Estates,
Bergamont, Stone
Ridge, Keller Alpine
Meadows, Windcrest,
Meadow View, Liberty,
Forest View.
New warden (again) at Oakhill Prison
F o r
t h e s e c -
ond t i me
i n f o u r
mo n t h s ,
a n e w
w a r d e n
has been
appointed
t o l e a d
Oakhill Correctional Insti-
tution.
On April 7, Wisconsin
Department of Corrections
Secretary Ed Wall appoint-
ed Daniel A. Westfield to
lead the minimum-security
prison with roughly 700
inmates located at 5212
Count y Hi ghway M i n
Fitchburg, about a mile
north of Oregon.
Westfield succeeds John
Paquin, who took over as
warden last December.
Paquin transferred from
Oakhill April 7 to become
assi st ant admi ni st rat or
of the Division of Adult
Institutions, according to
a news release. He had
served as Oakhill’s warden
since Dec. 4.
Paquin had succeeded
Dei r dr e Mor gan, who
left Oakhill last Septem-
ber after eight years as
its warden. Morgan was
appointed deputy secretary
of the DOC on Oct. 29.
Westfield’s most recent
job within DOC was as
secur i t y chi ef f or t he
Division of Adult Institu-
tions. Prior to that, he had
worked in Dodge, Colum-
bi a, Waupun, Oshkosh
and Fox Lake correctional
institutions between 1981
and 2005, according to a
separate news release.
Westfeld
Police rePort
Information taken from the
log book at the Oregon Police
Department.
March 29
1:24 a.m. Police cited a
33-year-old Madison man
with first offense of drunken
driving on the 900 block of
Janesville Street.
7 p.m. Local police were
called to assist a Dane County
Sheriff’s Office deputy on the
arrest of a 21-year-old man
for a previous offense on the
300 block of Concord Drive.
The man fled through a back
window but was arrested after
a short foot pursuit.
– Seth Jovaag
4
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Oregon Observer
Stoughton Courier Hub • Verona Press
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
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Thursday, April 25, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 42
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
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Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
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Opinion
We never outgrow the need to
be socially active or to have con-
nections and interactions with
other people.
From the time we are born,
human contact is imperative for
us to become emotionally stable
and well-adjusted individu-
als. That social contact remains
important
throughout the
entire span of
human life.
Staying
involved in
activities
promotes our
mental and
physical well-
being, which is
the main reason
senior centers around the area,
including Oregon’s, continually
promote a variety of social activi-
ties to keep seniors active.
As we age, not being active
enough can be highly detrimen-
tal.
Research has demonstrated that
a lack of adequate socialization
contributes to more rapid dete-
rioration of the aging brain, as
well as contributing to physical
ailments, depression and anxi-
ety. Social isolation can result
from living alone, having a small
social network, and infrequent
participation in social activities.
Unfortunately, as people age,
the social circle they have built
over a lifetime changes. Families
and friends move or pass away.
Children or grandchildren may
be so busy with their own obliga-
tions that they are not as socially
available as one might wish.
Seniors themselves may find
that they can’t get out as much
as they used to, for a variety of
reasons that may range from no
longer driving to poor mobility.
So when seniors rely on their
families for all of their transpor-
tation and human contact, it can
make them feel dependent and
unhappy.
The Proceedings of the Nation-
al Academy of Sciences showed
that when mental and physical
health conditions were factored
out, the lack of social contact
continues to lead to early death
among 6,500 men and women
tracked over a seven-year period.
“They’re dying of the usual
causes, but isolation has a strong
influence,” said study author
Andrew Steptoe, an epidemiolo-
gist at University College Lon-
don.
According to a Los Ange-
les Times article by Geoffrey
Mohan, “A similar look at retired
Americans in 2012 reinforced
multiple studies that link lone-
liness to numerous illnesses,
including heart trouble and high
blood pressure. Unfortunately
in our study, we can’t tell which
comes first. We did know that
lonely people did have more ill-
nesses.”
Richard Suzman, director of
the National Institute on Aging’s
division of behavioral and social
research, elaborated on this
chicken-and-egg question.
“It may be that loneliness
and ill health are much more
entangled. The question is, does
loneliness lead to ill health or is
it that when you get ill you get
more lonely – you don’t get out
or people don’t visit as much?”
In any case, people who are ill
and lonely, whatever the cause,
need as much social interaction
as they can get.
The Oregon Area Senior Cen-
ter strives to continue providing
opportunities for socialization to
local seniors, regardless of the
limitations they may experience.
Such opportunities are vital to
keeping seniors healthy and inde-
pendent in their own homes and
in their own communities for as
long as possible.
For more independent seniors,
the Center offers a variety of
options, from card groups and
computer classes to Zumba ses-
sions and entertainment. The
numerous volunteer positions
open to seniors offer varying
degrees of socialization, as well
as a sense of identity and pur-
posefulness.
For less mobile seniors, the
Center’s two case managers work
with a variety of resources to
meet the social needs of home-
bound seniors. They might match
a senior up with a volunteer who
is a “friendly visitor” or arrange
for the senior to attend the Cen-
ter’s Adult Day Program, which
is designed for those who are at
risk of social isolation.
More and more studies dem-
onstrate the value of social con-
nections to successful aging and
the Oregon Area Senior Center
recognizes this every day. With
a complete schedule of social
activities, two case managers
to help support independence, a
nutritious meal program, a state-
certified Adult Day Program,
transportation available to meals,
shopping and the Adult Day Pro-
gram and many wellness offer-
ings, the Center is focused on
keeping seniors independent for
many years.
Alison Koelsch is the director
of the Oregon Senior Center.
Staying active, keeping
healthy go together
Koelsch
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Walker’s Medicaid funding refusal
is bad business for Wisconsinites
How generous of Gov. Scott
Walker to donate Wisconsin’s
federal tax money to other states.
Historically, for every dollar
the taxpayers of Wisconsin sent to
Washington, we’ve been getting
less than 60 cents back. The rest
has gone to programs elsewhere in
the country.
With his proposed state budget,
Walker rejects $4.4 billion in new
federal Medicaid funding, giving
away even more of our dollars to
other states. This money would
have provided full Medicaid ben-
efits to an additional 175,000 low
income Wisconsinites well into
the future.
Walker’s alternative is to tell
these needy Wisconsinites they
can buy private insurance. In this
creative vein, he could also advise
the homeless to rent hotel rooms,
or those without wheels to buy
horses.
Another excuse Walker makes
is that new Medicaid money
could run out in coming years. He
ignores the fact that Wisconsin is
allowed to withdraw from the pro-
gram in the future.
For decades, both our Repub-
lican and Democratic leaders in
Wisconsin have pleaded with
Washington to give us back our
hard-earned tax dollars. How iron-
ic, now that it’s happening, that
we must plead with our own gov-
ernor to use our own federal taxes
in our own state!
Carol Elme Heidenway
Town of Dunn
Political left has extremists, too
Uphoff and Noelder must lunch
together.
In 14 paragraphs decrying polit-
ical extremism, never once does
Charles Uphoff give so much as a
nod to the extremism on his side
of the aisle.
I remind him that Ted Kennedy
once had the temerity to com-
mit the following words to print:
“Wanted or unwanted, I believe
that human life, even at its earli-
est stages, has certain rights which
must be recognized – the right to
be born, the right to love, the right
to grow old. When history looks
back at this era it should recognize
this generation as one which cared
about human beings enough to
halt the practice of war, to provide
a decent living for every family,
and to fulfill its responsibility to
its children from the very moment
of conception.”
Can Uphoff supply any other
reason beyond political extrem-
ism to explain the extinction of
the species known as the pro-life
Democrat? I also remind him that
Senator Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.)
is on record explicitly supporting
infanticide:
Senator Santorum: “You agree,
once a child is born, is separated
from the mother, that that child is
protected by the Constitution and
cannot be killed? Do you agree
with that?”
Boxer: “I think when you bring
your baby home, when your baby
is born … the baby belongs to
your family and has all the rights.”
Extremism comes in all flavors.
Joseph T. Leone
Brooklyn
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
AmericAn Legion BAr
803 N. Page St., Stoughton, WI
Universal Sound
50s to 80s, Rock & Roll
Saturday, April 27, 8 p.m.-12 a.m.
No Cover
Coming Up:
Blue Moon Karaoke Saturday, May 4
Syttende Mai Saturday, May 18
Dan Riley 7-11 p.m.
Open to the Public • (608) 205-9090
Friday Fish Fry 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Meat Raffe Every Saturday – 2 p.m.
UN284144
April 27 & 28
17th Annual
Depot Days in Brooklyn
All aboard for family fun
Saturday 10am-5pm & Sunday 10am-4pm
“Speeder Car” rides on the hour on C&NW railine,
Model Train Raffle,
Model Railroad Displays,
Local Artists Show & Sale,
Village-wide Garage Sales,
Inflatable Fun Blow-up Rides,
Support Your Local Non-Profits,
Bake Sale/Concessions,
Fire Department Pancake Breakfast on Sunday.
Second Annual Vintage Car Show Sat. 1-4 pm
Downtown. Register at 12:30pm at 100 E. Main St.
Rain Date: Sunday
Brooklyn is 20 mi. south of Madison, Hwy. 14 to Hwy. 92
(608) 455-3121 • www.DepotDays.info
Depotdaysinbrooklyn(WI)
UN279353
Friday, April 26 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 27 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
GREAT STUFF AT GREAT PRICES! LUNCH AVAILABLE
Christ Memorial
Annual
Rummage Sale
2833 Raritan Road • Fitchburg • 271-2811
Hwy. PD to Richardson to Raritan
U
N
2
8
2
3
2
2
U
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2
7
8
2
6
8
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Art GAllery Opens
April 19 • 4-9 p.m.
Join us for our Friday Fish!!
Cod, Perch, Trout & Salmon
6895 Paoli Rd., Paoli
(Between the Park & the Pub)
(608) 845-3663
Open 7 days a week
UN278804
Paoli Market & Art Gallery
EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 29, 2013
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 22 at 5 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 23 at 12 Noon
Deadlines for the May 30, 2013
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 24 at 12 Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 27.
Railroad enthusiasts will
be in Brooklyn this week-
end for the 17th annual
“Depot Days” heritage fes-
tival.
The event runs from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
April 27, and 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Sunday, April 28. It
features “speeder car” rides,
model train exhibits, a car
show, a raffle and plenty of
food.
Thi s year ’ s event i s
bringing back a vintage car
show for the second year.
The show will run from
1-4 p.m. Saturday, with off
street parking downtown.
Participants should check-
in by 12:30 p.m. at 100 E.
Main St., with the first 20
cars receiving commemora-
tive dash plaques. For more
information call Rich Wal-
ford at 455-1713.
The half-hour “speeder
car” rides take place on a
former railroad mainte-
nance vehicle, powered by
a gasoline engine, on the
train tracks. Tickets are $7
for adults and $3 for kids
ages 10 and under and are
on sale downtown near the
tracks during the festival.
Rides leave on the hour.
This year’s event also
includes two new booths
that will include a telegraph
demonstration on Saturday
and representatives from
ProRail, a volunteer group
that supports passenger rail.
Depot Days coincides
with a village-wide garage
sale, a bake sale and con-
ces s i ons at Br ookl yn
Methodist Church and the
Brooklyn Fire/EMS pan-
cake breakfast Sunday from
7-11 a.m. at the fire station
on State Hwy 92.
Commemorative Depot
Days buttons are free with
the purchase of a $5 raffle
ticket to win a “Thomas and
Friends” engine wooden
railroad set or tourist trains
guidebook.
Model train exhibits are
free, interactive and will
be held in the community
building, 102 N. Rutland
Ave.
The Br ookl yn Ar e a
Chamber of Commerce
sponsors the event that
commemorates Brooklyn’s
ties to the railroad that date
back to 1864.
– Seth Jovaag
to school.
The wireless upgrade
will be paid for over five
years with what amounts
to a no-interest loan from
Cisco Systems, Inc. The
district uses Cisco equip-
ment, and the company
often offers such agree-
ments to government or
educational institutions so
installations can happen
all at once, rather than over
many years, expl ai ned
business manager Andy
Weiland.
The board authorized
the district to pay for the
upgrades from its reserve
fund, though they could
opt in subsequent years
to use general operating
funds to make annual pay-
ments.
The district currently has
enough broadband capac-
ity – at 100 megabits per
second – to keep up with
demand. But that could
change in a few years.
A widely cited study
by the State Educational
Technol ogy Di r ect or s
Association says districts
should plan for Internet
speeds of one gigabyte
per second for every 1,000
students by 2017. For Ore-
gon, that translates into
four gigabytes, or 40 times
current capacity, in just
four years.
Security among
summer maintenance
jobs
Building a more secure
entrance to Prairie View
Elementary School and
fixing leaky rooftops at
Brooklyn Elementary and
Oregon High School are
among a half-million dol-
lars in upgrades slated for
local schools this summer.
The board unanimously
approved a list of “capital
maintenance projects” for
the 2013-14 school year
Monday night.
The district annually
compiles a list of top main-
tenance concerns that tally
up to $600,000. Most of
the funding comes from a
2008 referendum, which
al l owed t he di st ri ct t o
override spending limits
annually by $400,000 to
pay for building projects.
This year’s list includes
nearly 20 items, such as
spending $13,000 to add a
sprinkler system for OHS
athletic fields or $15,810
to install an automated sys-
tem to open and close the
bleachers at Oregon Mid-
dle School. All costs are
estimates.
For $48, 145, Prai ri e
View will get a secure
vestibule, where visitors
will be buzzed in using
an intercom system, and a
hallway will be reconfig-
ured to allow kids to get to
the cafeteria without pass-
ing through the vestibule.
OHS will get card-acti-
vated locks on 15 interior
doors for $17,500, another
move designed to improve
security.
At nearly $58,000, one
of the costliest jobs will be
replacing asbestos flooring
in a gym and closet at Prai-
rie View.
Another big item is an
annual $55,000 payment
on a 2010 roof repair at
Oregon Middle School.
Ot her proj ect s i ncl ude
renovating bathrooms at
Netherwood Knoll Ele-
mentary and OHS, replac-
ing a boiler for the com-
munity pool and replacing
flooring or carpeting in
parts of Brooklyn, OMS
and OHS.
The board vot ed not
to allocate a remaining
$100,000 that could be
used for other projects
that arise or to plug budget
gaps.
Also on Monday, the
board:
• welcomed new mem-
bers Dan Krause and Rae
Vogeler, who were the top
two vote-getters among
four candi dat es i n t he
April 2 election.
• elected officers. Court-
ney Odorico remains presi-
dent, Wayne Mixdorf is
vice president, Jeff Ramin
is clerk and Lee Chris-
tensen is treasurer.
• accepted an anony-
mous $1,750 donation to
help the district implement
its personalized learning
initiative.
• accepted the resigna-
tions of Mebbie Land-
sness, science teacher at
OHS since 2007, and Judy
Fard, speech and language
pathologist at OMS.
• took a two-hour tour of
OHS that included demon-
strations by students and
staff
• designated the Oregon
Observer as the district’s
official newspaper.
If you go
What: 17th annual Depot
Days festival
Where: Various locations
around Brooklyn
When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
April 27 and 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. April 28
Info: Call 455-3121,
email info@DepotDays.info
or go to depotdays.info
Village of Brooklyn
Depot Days returns this weekend
Upgrade: Money coming from reserve fund
Continued from page 1
Pet profiles
The Oregon Observer
is looking to profile a few
pets and their owners for
the upcoming Pets special
section. We’d love to hear
about all sorts of pets from
cats to dogs to reptiles to
birds and more. We’re also
looking for photos.
Go to ConnectOregonWi.
com to fill out the form to
submit to us under the link
“Submit an item” that’s at
the top of the site. Ques-
tions? Contact Victoria Vli-
sides at communityreport
er@wcinet.com.
6
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
845 Market St., Oregon
(608) 835-9030
www.communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
Weekly Life Groups
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Celebratory Worship
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger, Leah
Lonsbury
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 & 10:15 am Worship service at
the Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community
Worship (10:00 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Al-Anon meet-
ing at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, April 25
• 1-2:30 p.m., Organic gardening class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 5-6 p.m., Market Day pickup, Oregon Senior Center,
835-8501
• 7 p.m., “Beauty and the Beast,” Performing Arts
Center at Oregon High School, $10/$5, 827-5863
Friday, April 26
• 7 p.m., “Beauty and the Beast,” Performing Arts
Center at Oregon High School, $10/$5, 827-5863
Saturday, April 27
• 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Depot Days, Brooklyn
• 4-6 p.m. Town of Dunn Arbor Day, Town Hall, 838-
1081 ext 201
• 7 p.m., “Beauty and the Beast,” Performing Arts
Center at Oregon High School, $10/$5, 827-5863
Sunday, April 28
• 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Depot Days, Brooklyn
• 7 a.m. – noon, Pancake breakfast, Oregon Masonic
Lodge, 201 Park St.
• 1-3 p.m., Open house birthday party - Caryl Farrell’s
90th birthday, Oregon Senior Center
• 11 a.m., Garden talk, First Presbyterian Church
Monday, April 29
• 6:30 p.m., Village/Towns meeting for Fire/EMS
District, Oregon Town Hall
Tuesday, April 30
• 1:15- 2 p.m., Continuing piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 2:15- 3 p.m., Beginning piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 7 p.m., Trout streams talk, Oregon Public Library,
835-3656
Wednesday, May 1
• 4-6 p.m., listening session with OSB member Rae
Vogeler, Firefly Coffeehouse
Thursday, May 2
• 1-2:30 p.m., Organic gardening class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 6:30 p.m., Optimist Club, Oregon Senior Center
• 6:30 p.m., Village of Oregon planning, Village Hall
• 7 p.m., Town of Oregon board, Town Hall
Saturday, May 4
• 9 a.m. - noon, Safety day, Prairie View Elementary
School
Sunday, May 5
• 2:30 p.m., Joe Shear Classic, Madison International
Speedway, madisoninternationalspeedway.com
Community calendar
Thursday, April 25
Joint Oregon Village Board/
Planning Comm. (of Apr. 22)
Friday, April 26
“Birding” Talk @ Oregon
Library (of Apr. 23)
Saturday, April 27
“Mark Krushaar” Author-
Poet @ Oregon Library (of
Apr. 24)
Sunday, April 28
Worship Service: Holy
Mother of Consolation Catholic
Church
Monday, April 29
“Uncle Ozzie” Music @
Oregon Senior Center (of
Oct.’10)
Tuesday, April 30
Movie: Bridge on the River
Kwai” (1957)
Wednesday, May 1
“Dancing with the Stoughton
Stars” (of Apr. 6)
Thursday, May 2
Joint Village/Towns Meeting
(of Apr. 29)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, April 29
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 RSVP Sewing
1:30 Bridge
Tuesday, April 30
9:15 Movement & Balance
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 Piano Class
2:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, May 1
AM—Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:15 Zumba Gold
10:00 Shopping Walmart
East
11:00 One-on-One
Computer Help
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
6:00 VFW Meeting
Thursday, May 2
9:00 Legal Counsel
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Movement & Balance
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
1:00 Diabetic Support
1:00 Organic Gardening
6:00 Optimist Club
Friday, May 3
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
1:00 Legal Counsel
Monday, April 29
Stuffed Green Pepper
Soup/Crackers, Turkey &
American Cheese on Small
Croissant, Apricots, Cookie
VO: Meatless Soup & Egg
Salad
Tuesday, April 30
Polish Sausage, German
Potato Salad, California
Blend, Mandarin Oranges,
W.W. Bread, Jell-O Cake
VO: Veggie Sau-sage/
Potato Salad
Wednesday, May 1
Hamburger on Bun, Green
Beans, Mandarin Oranges,
Cake
VO-Veggie Patty
Thursday, May 2
Baked Chicken, Mashed
Potatoes/Gravy, Beets, Fresh
Fruit, Multi Grain Bread, Ice
Cream
VO – Egg Salad
SO-TexMex Bean Salad
Friday, May 3
Hearty Vegetable Soup,
Crackers, Tuna Salad on
Whole Wheat Bun, Banana,
Cookie
VO-Cottage Cheese w/
Garnish
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, April 25
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Apr. 22)
Friday, April 26
“The Rogers Rundown”
Sports Talk
Saturday, April 27
“Blue Sundays” Rock Band
(of Apr. 16)
Sunday, April 28
“Cam Schellor-Suitor &
Friends” Rock Band (of Apr.
17)
Monday, April 29
OHS Fine Arts Week Event:
Percussion Ensemble (of Apr.
17)
Tuesday, April 30
OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs
Monona Grove (of Apr. 25)
Wednesday, May 1
OHS Fine Arts Week Event: A
Leap Above Dance (of Apr. 18)
Thursday, May 2
OHS Fine Arts Week Event
: Music Composition (of Apr.
18)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings
Senior center
Calling Out Evil
The philosopher who composed Ecclesiastes advises us “Do not
be over righteous, neither be over wise, why destroy yourself?”
(Ecclesiastes 7:16) Accusing others of wrongdoing, especially
when there is any chance that we might be mistaken, is almost
always folly, and we are likely to have the lens of criticism focused
on us as a result. But, there are times when it is appropriate to be
assertive in calling someone out. When someone is mistreating us
our “moral alarm bells” are usually loud and clear and we should
speak up about it. It may take courage to do so, but it usually
prevents a lot of future mistreatment. It’s even more important to
stand up to bullies and haters when they are picking on someone
who is weaker or too timid to stand up for him or herself. Students
at Ohio State University and the University of Nebraska recently
created web sites intended to “call out” people who posted racist,
sexist, or otherwise hateful comments on Twitter and other social
media web sites. Courage is central to the moral life because it
requires courage to speak up for what is right. But, we should
remember also to be circumspect about our criticism. It is often
easier to see the speck of dust in your neighbor’s eye than the log
in your own.
“Stop judging by mere appearances, and make a right judg-
ment.”
John 7:24
Dunn Arbor Day
The annual Town of Dunn Arbor Day
celebration will take place from 4-6
p.m. Saturday, April 27, at the Town
Hall.
This year one of the presenters will
be a regional forest health specialist. He
will also make the Tree City USA pre-
sentation. Free trees will be given out.
Stan Solheim will receive the stew-
ardship award for his work on lake
preservation. Ed Minihan will be our
guest speaker and will talk about the
history of the town.
Following the presentation will be a
pot luck dinner. Paper plates, napkins,
eating utensils and beverages will be
supplied. Bring a favorite dish to pass.
Call Mary at 838-1081 ext. 201 for
more info.
Pancake breakfast
Oregon Masonic Lodge is having a
pancake breakfast Sunday, April 28,
7 a.m. to noon. Breakfast will include
pancakes, French toast, eggs, sausage,
coffee, milk and juice. Cost is $6 for
adults, $3 for kids ages 5-10 and youth
5 and under are free. The Masonic
Lodge is located at 201 Park St.
90th birthday party
Celebrate Caryl Farrell’s 90th birth-
day with her at an open house, from 1-3
p.m., Sunday April 28, at the Oregon
Area Senior Center.
Guest garden speaker
First Presbyterian Church will have a
guest speaker to talk about creating out-
door spaces using native plantings at 11
a.m. Sunday, April 28.
Molly Fifield-Murray, Outreach
and Education Manager from the UW-
Madison Arboretum, will share a power
point presentation and ideas for incor-
porating native plants into church and
other properties. This cuts down mow-
ing, invites nature, and creates visual
interest.
My favorite trout streams
Mike Miller is an avid angler and a
stream ecologist with the Department
of Natural Resources who will share
details of his favorite streams and tell
his favorite stories about trout fishing
and fisherman.
The presentation takes place at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 30, at the Oregon Public
Library.
The program is part of the Armchair
Field Trips series and is funded by
Beyond the Page, the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities, and the Madi-
son Community Foundation.
Board member hosts meeting
New Oregon School Board member
Rae Vogeler is hosting a listening ses-
sion to hear from any residents about
school district issues from 4-6 p.m.
Wednesday, May 1, at the Firefly Cof-
feehouse.
Joe Shear Classic
Madison International Speedway will
host the Joe Shear Classic, featuring the
ARCA Midwest Tour and INEX Leg-
ends.
The races will be held 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, May 5.
Find out more at madisoninternation
alspeedway.com.
Safety Day
Parents/children will have the oppor-
tunity to meet emergency personnel and
staff from some local businesses and
organizations at a free safety day from
9 a.m - noon Saturday, May 4, at Prairie
View Elementary School.
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care
Just like the other health care professionals at Oakwood Village,
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individual. For him, helping people isn’t just a job—it’s a way to
make significant differences in the lives of the people he serves,
as well as his own. It’s also not just something he wants to do,
it’s something he feels he needs to do. And, to us, that’s how a
health care professional should be.
It’s your health. It’s our calling.
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to visit us online at www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care.
Meet Larry,
a person who loves making others happy.
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Madison, WI 53705
5565 Tancho Drive
Madison, WI 53718 Find us on
Facebook.
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we get done, we get done
and what we don’t we’ll
work on in the future. But
we will get to Madison via
the Badger State Trail.”
The fi rst segment of
the trail, from the busi-
ness park to Fish Hatchery
Road, will be a little more
than three miles in length
and is expected to cost
about $1.2 million.
Trustee Jerry Bollig not-
ed the cost to village tax-
payers would be only about
$118,000.
Staton, Bollig and trustee
Jeanne Carpenter voted
to approve the resolutions
while Phil Harms opposed
them. Trustees David Don-
ovan, Eric Poole and Dar-
lene Groenier were absent
from the meeting.
Harms said he is not
opposed to building the
trail but wanted to know
its cost before voting in
favor of applying for more
grants.
“I vot ed agai ns t i t
because the village cost
is $118,000 if we get the
grants, but we’ve commit-
ted to the project without
knowing what the final cost
to the village would be,”
Harms said. “It’ll be a good
project, but I’d feel more
comfortable supporting it
knowing what we’ll have
to spend on it.”
Vi l l age admi ni st rat or
Mike Gracz said the plan a
few weeks ago was to build
the trail in three segments
over the course of three
years, but officials decided
instead to apply for all the
grants and, with luck, build
the entire project next year.
Below said the village
won’t learn if its applica-
tion for the DNR grant is
successful until late August
or September, which rules
out the possibility of get-
ting started this year.
Staton said the nature
of bike paths is that you
build segments when you
can “and connect them and
eventually they go some-
place.”
“It’s going to be a great
t rai l , ” he sai d. “There
will be some observation
points out there that bring
in another dimension of
conservation and nature
and wildlife and that type
of thing. That’s all impor-
tant.”
Trail: First part expected to cost $1.2 million
Continued from page 1
Map courtesy of Vierbicher Associates
A revised map of the proposed recreation trail northwest of the village shows the trail skirting north of Alpine Dairy property and cutting
across U.S. Fish and Wildlife land via a boardwalk. About 1,300 feet of boardwalk will be required under the new plan, increasing the
cost by as much as $700,000. The trail extends from the Alpine Business Park to Fish Hatchery Road.
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
A group that wants to
help develop a major new
Dane County park in the
Town of Oregon is looking
for volunteers.
The “Friends of Ander-
son Park” group will hold
its first meeting at 10:30
a.m. Saturday at the Oregon
Public Library.
Located just south of
the village of Oregon, the
Anderson Farm Count y
Park has been in the works
for years and could even-
tually convert several hun-
dred acres of mostly farm-
land into a park replete with
hiking and biking trails, a
40-acre off-leash area for
dogs, a baseball diamond
and start-up plots for small-
scale vegetable farmers.
The park is named for
Lyman Ander s on, t he
revered politician and local
farmer who died in 2005
after a long career in town,
county and state govern-
ment.
In a news release, group
founder and town resident
Roe Parker said the group
will focus on the restora-
tion or preservation of the
land’s woodlands and prai-
rie areas, under guidance
from county officials.
“The or gani zat i on’ s
activities will work to pre-
serve the area’s rural and
agricultural heritages for
present and future genera-
tions,” Parker said in the
release.
Dane County in 2009
paid the Anderson family
$1.52 million for a 127-acre
strip of land east of Union
Road that runs north to
south from the village’s
southern border to County
Highway A. The county
holds an option through
2013 of buying another 207
nearby acres for $2.4 mil-
lion.
A master plan for the park
was developed in 2011-12
and still requires approval
from the county’s Board of
Supervisors, though county
executive Joe Parisi last
December predicted the
board would support it.
The plan could take 20
years to fully implement.
If you go
What: first meeting of
the “Friends of Anderson
Park” group
When: 10:30 a.m. to
noon Saturday, April 27
Where: Oregon Public
Library
Why: Learn more
about the master plan for
Anderson Farm County
Park and how you can help
More info: Contact Roe
Parker at 835-3580 or roe.
parker@frontier.com
Town of Oregon
Volunteer
group
forming for
Anderson
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April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer
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serving samples of alcohol,
a server is required to check
IDs for anyone who appears
to be under the age of 30, said
Village President Steve Sta-
ton.
“We also made our appli-
cations for licenses much
more complete and thorough,
which also sends a message
that you need to do things
right,” he said.
Last year the Village Board
also passed a tough “social
host” policy that applies not
to liquor licenses and busi-
nesses but to parents and oth-
er adults.
Staton said while the
board’s actions do not repre-
sent sweeping changes to the
law, he thinks they have gen-
erated lots of discussion and
awareness locally about what
he sees as a significant soci-
etal problem.
“Throughout the process,
people have asked, ‘What
difference will this make in
Oregon?’” Staton told the
Observer. “And you can’t
say that it will, except what
we did was research-based.
It’s been shown in other plac-
es that it has had an impact.
“Over time it might, but
also there’s a chance that it
might spread to other places,
just like the smoking ban.
That started in isolated plac-
es, and it spread, too.”
He added that in conjunc-
tion with the schools doing
the “Parents Who Host Lose
the Most” campaign, and the
social host ordinance, advo-
cates of tighter regulations on
alcohol sales and consump-
tion are making headway.
“Stoughton and Middle-
ton have passed social host
ordinances, and I have also
been to Cottage Grove to
speak about it, and in May I
go to Sun Prairie, Monona
and Waunakee,” Staton said.
“There are four counties
that have passed social host
for unincorporated areas, so
things are progressing.”
He compared the effort
to curb alcohol abuse to the
state’s smoking ban, which
“took 25 or 30 years before
it went statewide. I hope
this doesn’t take that long
because I read that the finan-
cial impact in the state of
Wisconsin was $6.8 billion
from alcohol. In 2011, over
28,000 people were arrested
for drunk driving in Wiscon-
sin.”
Curbing the culture
The local effort to rein in
what some consider a “cul-
ture of alcohol” began pub-
licly when Walgreens applied
for a liquor license in 2009
and was denied in the spring
of 2010. At that time, Staton
and trustee Phil Harms were
the most vocal opponents of
the company’s application.
But Staton, a retired school
principal and alcohol and
other drugs counselor, said
his concern for what he views
as an overly permissive atti-
tude toward drinking stems
from his work with students
and families.
After the Walgreens epi-
sode, in which the Village
Board first approved the
liquor license application on
a 4-3 vote but reversed that
decision when another vote
was required because of a
technicality, Staton began to
look into research and efforts
in the state to curb alcohol
use.
He contacted UW-Madison
Law School professor Julia
Sherman, who led a work-
group that developed rec-
ommendations for changing
Wisconsin’s alcohol environ-
ment “to promote safe and
healthy lives.” The group
produced a report, “Alcohol,
Culture and Environment
Workgroup Recommenda-
tions,” which Staton used to
educate other board mem-
bers.
Staton also invited Sher-
man and others active with
the Wisconsin State Council
on Alcohol and Other Drug
Abuse Prevention Committee
to address the board.
Business concerns
Staton also met with mem-
bers of Oregon’s business
community, including attend-
ing a meeting of the Econom-
ic Development Commis-
sion. He encountered some
resistance to his ideas, but
earlier this week Chamber
of Commerce director Brett
Frazier said he and chamber
members were satisfied with
the new ordinance.
“I think there’s a balance
to be struck between public
safety in the public policy
and not hindering respon-
sible business owners,” Fra-
zier said. “And I think that
some of the things we were
most worried about were not
enacted. The way that our
members have done business
will be largely the same.”
He called the final docu-
ment a “pretty easy compro-
mise” for business owners
and “probably the good bal-
ance that we were looking
for.”
“President Staton listened
to the concerns of longtime
business owners here in
town, and I think the board
took their concerns into con-
sideration and figured out
what’s right for Oregon,”
Frazier said.
“I think it’s indicative of
the strong leadership that we
have in the business commu-
nity and our elected officials.
I think it’s a good outcome.”
Staton said the adoption of
the ordinance does not neces-
sarily mean that the village’s
efforts for more regulation
and control of liquor sales has
ended. And he believes there
is support in the community
for further action.
“I know the Chamber had
some issues with regard to
the impact on economic
development,” he said, “but
there was a lot of support out-
side of that for doing things.
I heard from a lot of parents
who have had concerns about
their kids and alcohol use,
and other parents supplying
alcohol to kids. The alcohol
culture needs to change in
this state.”
Alcohol: Cultural changes?
Continued from page 1
‘The big change
will be not selling
the single-serving
containers. At the
end of the day of
course everybody
would like to sell
the things that
make them money,
but that’s a pretty
easy way to make a
compromise.’
Brett Frazier
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, April 25, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Photos submitted
The Oregon High School rugby club is in
its inaugural season this year, and it has
24 members. Head coach and founder Rich
Bergemann said he has goals to have around
30 members next spring and hopes to sus-
tain a consistent conference champion/state
qualifier in the future.
Resident starts Oregon High School’s first rugby club
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Oregon resident Richard Berge-
mann has been playing rugby since
1984, but he didn’t think about
starting a high school club until his
son Richie became a freshman this
year.
Bergemann’s son watched his
father play a couple of times and
began pushing him to start it up.
Now in its inaugural season, the
Oregon High School rugby club
already has 24 players and looks to
grow even more.
“I think it is the greatest sport
around, and Oregon doesn’t have
it,” Bergemann said. “So I have
always wanted to bring rugby to
Oregon.”
But starting a club is the easy
part, he said. The hard part is get-
ting the needed numbers.
Senior Ryan Hale helped with
that somewhat, and Bergemann
said the players are a big part of the
recruiting process, attempting to
involve friends.
Out of the 24 players, only two
are seniors, allowing visions of 30
or more next season and every sea-
son after that.
“Once they get out on the field
to play their first game, they’re
hooked,” Bergemann said. “Once
they learn the game, they’re
hooked. It is just getting them out
to play.
“I think that once people see the
game and know it is town to stay,
the players will start coming to us.”
From player to coach
Bergemann is no stranger to the
sport. He started playing out of
college after playing football and
wrestling in high school.
“Rugby uses the best of both of
those sports, so when I got done
with high school, there was really
nothing else,” Bergemann said.
Fun in the scrum
Turn to Rugby/Page 12
Girls soccer
If you go
What: OHS rugby home
games
When: 5 p.m. May 3 and May
13
Where: Oregon Middle School
Photo by Josh Smith/Jefferson Daily Union
Senior Lauren Hughes dribbles through three defenders Tuesday at Fort Atkinson. The
Panthers won 6-2 to improve to 4-1 on the season.
Brien, Urben score twice in victory
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Freshman forward Jen Brien was
the hero for the Oregon girls soccer
team not once, but twice Tuesday
in a 6-2 win over Badger South
Conference foe Fort Atkinson.
Brien scored with under eight
minutes to go to break a 2-2 tie
and knocked in a second goal 23
seconds later to give the Panthers a
commanding lead.
The goals were especially
huge since senior forward Lauren
Hughes went down with an ankle
sprain.
“Jen does not play like a fresh-
man. She stepped up and took it to
them,” head coach Julie Grutzner
said. “She scored the two goals, and
that opened it up.”
The Panthers (4-1 overall, 1-0 in
the Badger South) were supposed
to open the conference season on
April 11 against Monroe, but the
game was postponed.
After falling behind twice, Ore-
gon’s attempt at a second straight
conference championship might
have seemed in jeopardy, but it had
an advantage with shots on goal.
Oregon not only scored six times
but had 11 other shots on goal.
“We haven’t been outside a
whole lot, and we didn’t have a
ton of chances to shoot on a goal,”
Grutzner said. “But we attacked the
goal a lot today.”
The girls finally broke through
after tying the game twice before
running away with the win.
Sophomore forward Kelsey Jahn
tied the game first in the 26th min-
ute, and after Fort grabbed a 2-1
lead, freshman midfielder Taylor
Martin knotted the game again with
an assist to Brien.
“We made some defensive errors
and they capitalized,” Grutzner
said. “The good news is that the
girls kept pressuring.”
Senior forward Aimee Urben
also scored twice for the Panthers,
both goals coming at the end of the
game. Jahn assisted her on the first
one, while Erin Peterson assisted
on the final goal.
Senior goalie Britt Peckham fin-
ished with three saves.
Oregon plays at 7 p.m. Thursday
against Monona Grove, also 1-0 in
the Badger South, and it finishes up
on the road Monday and Tuesday.
Oregon travels to Madison La
Follette at 7 p.m. Monday and at
Mount Horeb at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Hughes is expected to miss all
these games to recover.
Boys tennis
Panthers go
3-1 at East
Side Invite
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
In a weekend that bodes
well for the future of the
Oregon boys tennis pro-
gram, the Panthers swept
all seven flights in its first
two duals over the week-
end at the East Side Invite,
blanking Madison East and
Pewaukee.
Oregon closed out the
tournament with a 7-0 loss
at the hands of Verona –
one of just two duals the
Panthers will have this sea-
son with sectional-seeding
ramifications – assuming
they can make-up Friday’s
dual against Madison La
Follette.
“Verona was just a little
better at each spot,” Oregon
head coach Ben Conklin
said.
The Panthers forced a
third set at No. 3 singles
where Dakota Tollakson
fell to Verona’s Philip Rud-
nitzky.
Oregon’s No. 3 doubles
team of Drew Christoffer-
son and Jackson Wilhelm
also dropped a close match,
falling 7-5, 7-6 (7).
Jackson Schneider and
Alec Onesti were closer
than the score would show
at No. 1 and 2 singles,
as were 1 and 2 doubles,
Conklin said.
Brady Behrend had a
solid first set at No. 4 sin-
gles against freshman Alex
Pletta, but couldn’t finish
things off, losing 6-4, 6-2.
“Like we coaches kept
saying, one step at a time,”
Conklin said. “We’re get-
ting closer to Verona –
hopefully at some flights
we can catch them by the
end of the year.
“Either way, the Verona
match was a good warm-
up f or our conf er ence
match with Edgewood on
Turn to Tennis/Page 11
On the web
For more information and
photos
OHSRugby.com
10
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon boys golf
team hosted Monroe at Fox-
boro Golf Course Tuesday,
April 16 in its first Badger
South Conference dual and
won 224-254.
Grant O’Donnell finished
with a 40 to lead Oregon,
while sophomore Crason
Torhorst shot a 44.
Brandon Michek also shot
a 44, and senior Collin Bun-
dy finished the scoring with
a 46.
Oregon continues the sea-
son at 3:30 p.m. Thursday
against Fort Atkinson at
Koshkonong Mounds Coun-
try Club.
The Panthers travel to
Evansville Golf Club at noon
Friday for an invite, and
they close the week at 3:30
p.m. Tuesday at Stoughton
Country Club to take on the
Vikings.
Oregon, Milton (PPD)
The Oregon and Milton
conference dual at Foxboro
was moved to Wednesday,
April 24, which didn’t meet
the Observer’s deadline.
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
The Badger South Conference meet is
roughly three weeks away and the Oregon
boys and girls track and field programs have
only seen the outdoors twice so far this sea-
son.
Boys
Though Tuesday’s Mono-
na Grove triple dual only
offered up a high in the mid
40s to start the meet, sopho-
more Christian Alcala and
the Panthers were simply
happy to get back outside
and compete.
Alcala was a large part of
Oregon taking both parts of
the triple dual, winning both
the 300-intermediate (46.62 seconds) and
110-high hurdles (:17.73), as the Panthers
shot past Monona Grove, 82-64, and Fort
Atkinson, 77-69.
Junior Jawon Turner and senior Graham
Otis paced Oregon in the field events, claim-
ing the triple jump (40-1 1/4) and high jump
(5-10), respectively.
Seniors Jeff Jaeggi and Jared Novinska,
junior Joe Milz and freshman Chris Cutter
capped the victory by claiming the 4x400
relay in 3:49.
With each victory the Panthers boys and
girls programs collect the optimism grows
little bit more, girls head coach Kathy Men-
tink said.
“We don’t think it’ll come easy, but we’re
hopeful to be right in the mix at conference,”
she said. “We have a lot of kids on both
teams that can do a lot of things well.
“Hopefully, we can get in some meets and
practices in better weather conditions, and
who knows?”
Girls
Junior Valerie Jones ran a 5:49 mile as
the girls posted a 73-69 win
over Monona Grove and a
77-60 victory against Fort
Atkinson on Tuesday.
Juniors Katie Boehnen
and Ruby Carpenter helped
Oregon take a pair of field
events.
Boehnen paced the discus
with a toss of 85-7, while
Carpenter cleared 8-6 to take the pole
vault.
The Panthers opened the meet with
senior Lydia Russell, freshmen Cait-
lin Lucas, Allyson Norland and junior
Rebekah Zerbe winning the 4x8 relay,
though Mentink didn’t have the official
time.
With temperatures dropping below 40
early on Tuesday, competitors struggled to
get warmed up and to stay warm through-
out the competition.
“That wears on you after awhile,” Men-
tink said. “It doesn’t get any easier by hav-
ing to continually do it.”
Mentink said her athletes have handled
the weather in stride though. “They’re
dealing with it better than the coaches do,”
she joked.
Oregon hosts its annual relay meet 4:30
p.m. Friday with Madison Edgewood, Por-
tage, Belleville and Madison East.
The Panthers then host Monroe at 4:30
p.m. Tuesday, April 30 in another Badger
South Conference dual meet.
Stoughton’s annual invitational is right
around the corner on May 3 – right before
the Panthers square off against the Vikings
and Fort Atkinson on May 7.
Oregon hosts this season’s conference
meet Tuesday, May 14.
Simpson Relays
Oregon track had already moved the
Simpson Relays meet in Monroe from Fri-
day to Thursday last week before heavy
rains forced a cancelation.
Track and field
Expectations grow with another victory
Alcala
Jones
Boys golf
Panthers win first conference dual
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April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Oregon softball has had nearly as many
make-up dates than outdoor practices. It was
a trend that continued last week with three
doubleheaders in four days as the Panthers
played DeForest and then Badger South
Conference rivals Milton and Madison Edge-
wood.
Oregon, Milton (DH)
Though the Panthers have 22 girls between
their JV and varsity rosters, most have seen
time for both teams this season as head coach
Mike Derrick tries to find a right lineup.
Oregon got out to a shaky start once again
in the first game against the Red Hawks.
Falling behind 3-0 in the first inning, pitcher
Mackenzie Kressin and the Panthers settled
in after that though, holding Milton scoreless
for the next five innings.
That was until the Red Hawk bats came
alive with seven runs in the sixth for a 10-0
victory.
Kressin allowed four earned runs in the
loss, while striking out three and walking
three.
Despite a third-straight lopsided loss, Der-
rick said the Panthers played their best game
to date in the nightcap, falling just a run shy
in a 2-1 loss.
“I don’t know how you explain going from
a 10-0 loss to playing as well as we did in the
second game against one of the better teams
in the conference,” Derrick said.
Trailing by a run in the sixth, Oregon load-
ed the bases in the top of the seventh and
knotted the score when Alyssa Damon scored
on a wild pitch.
Milton fought back to take the game with a
walk-off single from Kayla Negus in the bot-
tom of the seventh.
Oregon, Madison Edgewood (PPD)
The Panthers were supposed to welcome
Madison Edgewood on Tuesday in the last of
three straight doubleheaders.
For better or worse, Mother Nature once
again had other ideas, forcing Oregon to post-
pone yet another game.
Eventually the number of games that are
piling up are going to become an even bigger
problem.
“Pitching and depth is definitely going to
be our downfall with all these doublehead-
ers,” Derrick said. “We’re going to have a
hard time with getting enough arms.”
Oregon, DeForest (DH)
The Panthers were outscored 32-9 and
committed more than 10 errors during Sat-
urday’s doubleheader at non-conference
DeForest.
Oregon dropped the first game 19-3 and
the nightcap 13-6.
Allie Greene and Sarah Anderson got the
visitors out to a good start, drawing a pair of
walks before scoring off a 2-run double from
Kressin.
DeForest answered by pounding out a
game-high 19 hits to put consistent pressure
on the Panthers’ defense.
Derrick was pleased with the character his
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon boys base-
ball team built a two-run
lead but were unable to
hold it in a 5-3 loss at Fort
Atkinson Monday.
The Blackhawks scored
three runs in the bottom of
the fourth and shut Oregon
out the rest of the way in
the Badger South Confer-
ence matchup.
The Panthers scored first
and added two in the top of
the third.
Senior Simon Maurice
was 3-for-4 with an RBI.
Senior Adam Brauns also
added an RBI.
J uni or Loga n La s ki
pi cked up t he l oss. He
went s i x i nni ngs and
allowed four earned runs
on 10 hits. He struck out
one and walked one.
Or egon ( 1- 2 over al l
and in conference) hosts
Fort Atkinson at 5 p. m.
Thur s da y a nd Mount
Horeb at 5 p.m. Friday.
It finishes the week at 5
p.m. Tuesday at Monroe.
Oregon, Edgewood
The Panthers traveled to
Warner Park to play Madi-
son Edgewood Tuesday
but results were unavail-
abl e by t he Observer’s
deadline.
Look for results in next
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday.”
The Panthers travel to
Waunakee at 4 p. m. on
Monday, April 29.
Oregon follows that up at
4:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 30
at Monroe.
Monona Grove travels
to Oregon at 4:30 p.m. on
Thursday, May 2.
The Panthers head for
the Stoughton Invitational
at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, May
4 before closing out the
dual-meet season Tuesday,
May 7 at home against the
Vikings and Friday, May 10
at Milton.
Oregon’s two-day Bad-
ger Conference tournament
is slated to begin at 9 a.m.
inside the Nielsen Tennis
Stadium on May 17-18.
Oregon, Madison
Edgewood (PDD)
The Panthers were unable
to get their dual in on Tues-
day, hosting Madison Edge-
wood in a Badger South
Conference match to deter-
mine early-season suprem-
acy.
Oregon, Portage (PPD)
Heavy rains forced the
Panthers to rescheduled
Thursday dual at Portage to
4:15 p.m. May 6.
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Softball
Tennis: Showdown with Crusaders postponed
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Junior Dakota Tollakson hits a serve during his No. 3 singles victory
during last weekend’s East Side Invite against Madison East inside
Cherokee Country Club. Tollakson and the Panthers both finished
3-1 over the weekend.
Continued from page 9
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Center fielder Allie Greene tracks down a fly
ball in the second inning of Oregon’s first game
Monday against Milton. The Panthers fell 10-2
and 2-1 to the Red Hawks.
Doubleheaders become
norm for Panthers softball
Baseball
Tough fourth inning costs Panthers at Fort
Photo by Josh Smith/Jefferson Daily Union
Senior Simon Maurice attempts to block second base during a steal attempt Monday at Fort Atkinson.
The Panthers fell 5-3 to the Blackhawks to fall to 0-2 in the Badger South Conference.
Turn to Softball/Page 12
Sport shorts
Be my caddy classic
benefits Oregon golf
The Be My Caddy Classic
auction and tournament is this
weekend.
The auction (at 8 p.m. Sat-
urday) and the tournament (at
8 a.m. Sunday) will be held at
the Legend of Bergamont and
all proceeds will go to Oregon
High School golf.
There are other prizes
besides golf-related ones that
can bid on at the auction,
including a Kohl Center Suite
with 16 tickets to a womens
basketball game.
For more details or to play
in the tournament, contact Ben
Cowan at ben@wigolffed
eration.com or 608-575-
6915.
12
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
“Not too many people go
on to play football. Not
too many people go on
and wrestle, but you can
play rugby forever. I found
my sport when I got out of
high school, and I wished I
found it when I was in high
school.”
Bergemann played for
the Fort Knox Rugby Club
and later played for Bam-
berg Germany. In 1988, he
joined the Wisconsin Rugby
Club and played until 2004.
After his son expressed
interest, he enlisted the help
of former Wisconsin rug-
by players, one a coach at
Madison West and the other
at Middleton, and Berge-
mann, Jeff Woods (forwards
coach) and Eric Zoglmann
(backs coach) now run the
club.
Recruiting
Bergemann said that to
gain numbers, like any other
sport, the club will need a
youth program. In June and
July, flag rugby begins.
He would also like to
get nei ghbor i ng t owns
involved.
“I really miss out not
having Stoughton players
involved,” he said. “Our
entire team is Oregon. To
get the numbers up and the
size up, we really need help
from the Stoughton play-
ers.”
But Bergemann also has
the other varsity sports to
compete with as well. With
athletes playing a sport for
many years and having set
positions, he said it isn’t
possible to do so. But he
hopes to garner interest with
the promise of playing time.
“I am hoping that traction
outweighs the varsity pro-
grams, but a youth program
will be huge,” Bergemann
said.
Safety misconception
Bergemann also talked
about the false belief that
rugby is more dangerous
than other sports, which
hurts recruiting.
He mentioned that foot-
bal l has a hel met t hat
becomes a weapon and that
a tackle in football can be
from any angle and without
wrapping the opponent.
He also added that the
mentality of stopping a
running back is different.
Instead of forcing a colli-
sion, which he admitted still
happens sometimes, players
do not care if a running back
gains a few yards on a carry.
“You are not going to
have that sudden collision
to stop him in his tracks. ...
You just can’t go flying into
guys,” he said. “You have to
wrap around, and that takes
a lot of the concussions and
injuries away because of
how the game is played.”
Club league setup
The Wi s cons i n hi gh
school league is broken
down into two conferenc-
es, the Badgerland and the
Northeastern Conference.
Each conference has two
divisions and each division
has six teams.
Aft er t he season, t he
teams are ranked and a con-
ference playoff begins. In
the Badgerland for example,
the No. 1 West team plays
the No. 1 East team and so
on until the No. 4 teams.
The winners of those games
move on to the playoffs.
In the playoffs, the teams
are ranked again, and the
No. 1 Badgerland team
plays the No. 4 Northeast-
ern team and the No. 1
Northeastern team plays the
No. 4 Badgerland team. The
No. 2 and No. 3 seeds also
split up like this.
The winners make state
and are ranked again into
semifinals match-ups, fol-
lowed by the championship.
Bergemann sees the team
winning its next three games
– Wednesday, next Monday
and next Friday – and being
No. 4 in the conference
playoffs. But next year, he
sees the team winning the
division, conference and
possibly making state.
“I think it is sustainable
too,” he said. “The rugby
club needs 30 good people
out there, and if they can get
that, they can be very com-
petitive statewide.”
A little about rugby
Bergemann’s son didn’t
have any ideas of what
rugby was until he joined
his father at the club, and
some might not know the
rules or what the sport actu-
ally is. Here are a few quick
rules and definitions:
Rugby is a style of foot-
ball named in the 19th cen-
tury after Rugby School in
the United Kingdom, and
in 1845, William Delafield
Arnold, Walter Waddington
Shirley and Frederick Leigh
Hutchins developed the first
set of rules.
Teams can score by plac-
ing the ball with downward
pressure on the goal line,
scoring four points, and can
add two more with a placed
kick over the goal post,
known as a conversion.
Teams can also score two
points on a penalty kick and
one point on a drop goal or
field goal. A team has six
chances to score. On a pos-
session, a team can pass the
ball laterally or behind until
they are tackled to halt play.
There may al so be a
scrum awarded – when the
two teams form two rows
of forwards and try to pass
the ball through the legs of
their teammates to a back
on the outside of the scrum
– when there is a turnover
or knock on, a forward pass
or if the ball goes over the
sideline.
For more rules, visit ther-
fl.co.uk/a_guide_to_the_
game/official_laws/12_the_
scrum.
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A Force on the pitch
The U16 Force Oregon Soccer Club team won the PUMA Champions Cup College Showcase (Gold Flight Division) April 6-7 in
Rockford, Ill.
Team members (front, from left) are: Spencer Weeden, Drew Christofferson, Elliot Moravec and Spencer Pearson; (middle)
Zach Hanson, Zach Stone, Coach Kevin Gowrie, Erik Hansen, Josh Christensen and Michael Frisque; (back) Kjetil Odden,
Andrew Nelson, AJ Breitbach, Dylan Wenker, Ben Kaeppler, Colin Hughes, Chris McGuine and Zach Rampetsreiter; (not pic-
tured) asstistant coach Shawn Kaeppler.
Rugby: Bergemann looks to be build sustainable success in the next few years
Continued from page 9
team showed in the final game,
battling back from a 9-1 deficit to
within three runs as the Panthers
batted around in a 5-run fifth. Hai-
ley Morey and Kresssin highlight-
ed the inning with an RBI single
and 2-run single, respectively.
The host Norskies however
tacked on four more runs in the
sixth to close things out 13-6.
Oregon, MG (PPD)
Oregon softball added another
make-up game to its growing list,
postponing Thursday’s game at
hope against Monona Grove.
Softball: Games piling up
Continued from page 11
Girls lacrosse starts season
with pair of scrimmages
Oregon girls lacrosse started its
season with a scrimmage against
Waukesha at Carroll College on
Saturday.
Kari Bertler scored two goals
and McKenzie Torpy added one
as Oregon fell 13-3. Tasha Martin
had 18 saves.
Oregon lost a second scrimmage
to Sun Prairie on Sunday, 12-4.
Torpy led with two goals, while
Hunter Klus and Bertler each
added one. Immediately following
that they beat Oconomowoc 9-8 in
Sun Prairie.
Torpy paced the team with a hat
trick. Heather McAnulty, Kayla
Whip, Katie Glover, Molly Bollig,
Bertler and Klus all added a goal.
Aubrey Bruner and Abbey Arm-
strong had four saves a piece.
The Lady Panthers traveled
to Sun Prairie for a 5 p.m. game
Wednesday against the Cardi-
nals, while the boys headed to La
Crosse at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday.
Sports Shorts
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO
CREDITORS (INFORMAL
ADMINISTRATION) IN THE
MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ROSE M. ENDICOTT
Case No. 13 PR 244
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for Informal Admin-
istration was fled.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
June 2, 1920 and date of death March
27, 2013, was domiciled in Dane County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing ad-
dress of 400 Waterman Street, Oregon,
WI 53575.
3. All interested persons waived no-
tice.
4. The deadline for fling a claim
against the decedent’s estate is July 5,
2013.
5. A claim may be fled at the Dane
County Courthouse, Madison, Wiscon-
sin, Room 1005.
Lisa Chandler
Probate Registrar
April 4, 2013
Jonathan M. Hajny
708 East Main Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
608-877-4081
Bar Number: 1014429
Published: April 11, 18 and 25, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
VILLAGE OF OREGON
PLAN COMMISSION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Vil-
lage of Oregon Plan Commission will
hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on
Thursday, May 2, 2013, on an ordinance
to amend Sections 17.802(4), 17.807 and
17.808(1) of the Village of Oregon Code of
Ordinances, relating to Community Ser-
vice Signs. The hearing will be held at the
Village Hall, 117 Spring Street, Village of
Oregon. A copy of the ordinance is avail-
able at the Village Clerk’s offce.
Any person who has a qualifying
disability as defned by the Americans
with Disabilities Act that requires the
meeting or materials at the meeting to
be in an accessible location or format
must contact the Village Clerk at (608)
835-3118, 117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wis-
consin, at least twenty-four hours prior
to the commencement of the meeting so
that any necessary arrangements can be
made to accommodate each request.
Peggy Haag
Village Clerk
Published: April 25 and May 2, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON REQUEST FOR
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT,
AT 117 SPRING STREET,
OREGON WISCONSIN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2013, in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the application of Brett Fra-
zier – Oregon Chamber of Commerce,
for a conditional use permit permitting
two signs in the Planned Business (PB)
Zoning District located at 893 North Main
Street and 989 Park Street pursuant to
Section 17.802(4), 17.808(i) and 17.905 of
the Village Code.
Parcel #: 165/0509-012-3062-1 Lot 1
CSM 11548
Parcel #: 165/0509-124-1512-2 Lot 2
Park Street Plat
The property is presently zoned PB,
Planned Business
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Any person who has a qualifying
disability as defned by the Americans
with Disabilities Act that requires the
meeting or materials at the meeting to
be in an accessible location or format
must contact the Village Clerk at (608)
835-3118, 117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wis-
consin, at least twenty-four hours prior
to the commencement of the meeting so
that any necessary arrangements can be
made to accommodate each request.
Peggy Haag
Village Clerk
Published: April 25 and May 2, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
GENERAL
DEVELOPMENT PLAN
201 CONCORD DRIVE
VILLAGE OF OREGON
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2013 in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the approval of the General
Development Plan submitted by Jamie
Bush acting agent and Union Bank &
Trust Company, Property Owner, of the
property described as follows:
201 Concord Drive, Village of Or-
egon, Dane County
Parcel No. 165-0509-124-6650-1
A copy of the General Development
Plan is on fle at the offce of the Village
Clerk. Offce hours of the Clerk are 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Any person who has a qualifying
disability as defned by the Americans
with Disabilities Act that requires the
meeting or materials at the meeting to
be in an accessible location or format
must contact the Village Clerk at (608)
835-3118, 117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wis-
consin, at least twenty-four hours prior
to the commencement of the meeting so
that any necessary arrangements can be
made to accommodate each request.
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village Clerk
Published: April 25 and May 2, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
GENERAL
DEVELOPMENT PLAN
101 CONCORD DRIVE
VILLAGE OF OREGON
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
Planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2013 in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the approval of the General
Development Plan submitted by Jamie
Bush acting agent and Union Bank &
Trust Company, Property Owner, of the
property described as follows:
101 Concord Drive, Village of Or-
egon, Dane County
Parcel No. 165-0509-124-6604-1
A copy of the General Development
Plan is on fle at the offce of the Village
Clerk. Offce hours of the Clerk are 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village Clerk
Published: April 25 and May 2, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF BOARD OF
REVIEW FOR THE
VILLAGE OF OREGON
MAY 16, 2013 FROM
4:00 P.M. TO 6:00 P.M.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Village of Oregon, Dane County, Wis-
consin, shall hold its Board of Review
meeting on the 16th of May, 2013, from
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (or until adjourned)
at Village Hall, lower level, 117 Spring
Street, Oregon, Wisconsin.
Please be advised of the following
requirements to appear before the Board
of Review and procedural requirements if
appearing before the Board:
No person shall be allowed to ap-
pear before the Board of Review, to
testify to the Board by telephone or to
contest the amount of any assessment
of real or personal property, if the person
has refused a reasonable written request
by certifed mail of the Assessor to view
such property.
After the frst meeting of the Board
of Review and before the Board’s fnal
adjournment, no person who is sched-
uled to appear before the Board of Re-
view may contact, or provide informa-
tion to a member of the Board about the
person’s objection except at a session of
the Board.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board by
telephone or contest the amount of the
assessment unless, at least 48 hours
before the frst meeting of the Board or
at least 48 hours before the objection is
heard if the objection is allowed because
the person has been granted a waiver
of the 48-hour notice of an intent to fle
a written objection by appearing before
the Board during the frst two hours of
the meeting and showing good cause for
failure to meet the 48-hour notice require-
ment and fles a written objection, that
the person provides to the clerk of the
Board of Review notice as to whether the
person will ask for removal of any Board
members and, if so, which member will
be removed and the person’s reasonable
estimate of the length of time that the
hearing will take.
When appearing before the Board of
Review, the person shall specify, in writ-
ing, the person’s estimate of the value of
the land and of the improvements that are
the subject of the person’s objection and
specify the information that the person
used to arrive at that estimate.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board or
by telephone or object to a valuation; if
that valuation was made by the Assessor
or the Objector using the income method
of valuation; unless the person supplies
the Assessor all the information about in-
come and expenses, as specifed in the
Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03(2a),
Wis. Stats., that the Assessor requests.
The Village of Oregon has an ordinance
for the confdentiality of information
about income and expenses that is pro-
vided to the Assessor under this para-
graph which provides exceptions for per-
sons using information in the discharge
of duties imposed by law or the duties
of their offce or by order of a court. The
information that is provided under this
paragraph, unless a court determined
that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the
right of inspection and copying under
Sec. 19.35(1) Wis. Stats.
The Board shall hear upon oath, by
telephone, all ill or disabled persons who
present to the Board a letter from a physi-
cian, surgeon or osteopath that confrms
their illness or disability. No other per-
sons may testify by telephone.
Respectfully submitted,
Peggy Haag, Clerk
Village of Oregon
Published: April 25, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
AGENDA
OREGON TOWN BOARD
MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2013
6:00 P.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
6:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Discussion and possible Action
re: Revisiting 2013 Road Work Bids.
3. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: April 19, 2013
Published: April 25, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PARK COMMITTEE AGENDA
MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2013
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WISCONSIN
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Reading and approval of minutes
from the last meeting.
3. Public Comments and Appear-
ances.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: Eagle Scout Project.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: recommendations/decisions from the
Town Board.
6. Review of potential work projects.
7. Set next meeting date.
8. Adjournment.
Note: Requests from persons with
disabilities who need assistance to par-
ticipate in this meeting or hearing should
be made to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200
with 48 hours notice.
Steve Root, Chairperson
Posted: April 16, 2013
Published: April 25, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE
REGULAR MEETING OF THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF THE
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
HELD ON APRIL 8, 2013
The regular meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District was
called to order by Ms. Courtney Odorico,
the President at 6:32 PM in the Rome Cor-
ners Intermediate School in the Village of
Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin. Upon
roll call, the following board members
were present: Mr. Wayne Mixdorf, Dr. Lyn-
da Farrar, Mr. Lee Christensen, Mr. Jeff
Ramin, Mr. Steve Zach and Ms. Courtney
Odorico. The following board members
were absent: Mrs. Pam Hughes. Admin-
istrators present: Dr. Brian Busler, Mr.
Andy Weiland, Dr. Anita Koehler, Mrs.
Candace Weidensee, Mr. Jim Pliner, Ms.
Heather Sveom, Mr. Dan Rikli, Ms. Mi-
chelle Gard, Mrs. Shannon Anderson,
Dr. Leslie Bergstrom, Mr. Jon Tanner, Ms.
Jina Jonen, Ms. Sarah Boatman, Ms. Tori
Whitish, Ms. Kelly Meyers and Ms. Kerri
Modjeski.
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Zach moved and Dr. Farrar sec-
onded the motion to proceed with the
meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed 6-0.
A. CONSENT CALENDAR:
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr. Ra-
min seconded the motion to approve the
following items on the Consent Calendar.
1. Approve minutes of the March 11,
2013 meeting;
2. Approve vouchers in the amount
of $ 1,764,285.22;
3. Treasurer’s Report for February
28, 2013;
4. Staff Resignation of Jessica Holi-
day and Staff Retirements of Stan Eddy,
Deanna Fischer and Chris Antonuzzo
from RCI;
5. Staff Assignments - none;
6. Field Trip Request: 2014 OHS
Choir trip to New York City April 10 - April
13, 2014;
7. Acceptance of Donations: From
Ken Lalk, wheel chair, crutches and a
walker; From Gayle Bintliff $100 for the
OMS Westward Bound-Forge Further
Program.
8. Open Enrollment Exception Ap-
plication.
Motion passed 6-0.
B. COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-
LIC: None.
C. ACTION ITEMS:
1. From Policy:
a. Policy 351 Instructional Materials
- Copyright Policy/Intellectual Property
(old 6.22): On behalf of the policy com-
mittee, Dr. Farrar made a motion to de-
lete old policy 6.22 and combine this old
policy with 351 Instructional Materials-
Copyright Policy/Intellectual Property
and adopt the combination with policy
numbered 351 as presented in the board
packet be approved. This combined
policy is presented to abide with current
laws and to clarify the previous policies.
In a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes: Dr. Farrar, Mr. Christensen,
Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Mr. Ramin and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 6-0.
b. Policy 360 Selection of Play/Musi-
cal Productions: On behalf of the policy
committee, Dr. Farrar moved to adopt
Policy 360 Selection of Play/Musical Pro-
ductions as presented in the board pack-
et with corrections noted. This policy is
to clarify the selection of District plays
and musical productions. In a roll call
vote, the following members voted yes:
Dr. Farrar, Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf,
Mr. Zach, Mr. Ramin and Ms. Odorico. Mo-
tion passed 6-0.
c. Policy 441 Electronic Communi-
cation Devices: On behalf of the policy
committee, Dr. Farrar moved to adopt
Policy 441 Electronic Communication
Devices as presented in the board pack-
et. At a future meeting Policy 771 Elec-
tronic Communications will be presented
to the Board with updated changes also.
Policy 441 is being updated to allow stu-
dents to bring their own electronic com-
munication devices to school for use
within the guidelines. In a roll call vote,
the following members voted yes: Dr.
Farrar, Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr.
Zach, Mr. Ramin and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 6-0.
d. Policy 414 Defnitions of a Credit,
G.P.A., Cum Laude and Honor Point Fac-
tors: On behalf of the policy committee,
Dr. Farrar moved to adopt Policy 414
Defnitions of a Credit, G.P.A., Cum Laude
and Honor Point Factors as presented in
the board packet. Much of this Policy
has appeared in the Student Handbook.
Policy 414 explains what a credit is, the
defnition of a grade point average and
how it is calculated, the Laude system
and the student honors. In a roll call vote,
the following members voted yes: Dr.
Farrar, Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr.
Zach, Mr. Ramin and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 6-0.
2. Contract Issuance:
a. Teachers: Mr. Zach made a motion
and Dr. Farrar seconded the motion to ap-
prove the issuance of 2013-2014 teacher
contracts consistent with Wisconsin
State Statue Chapter 118 and the OEA/
Board Collective Bargaining Agreement
with the exception of those retiring, on
interim contracts and non-renewals. In
a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes: Mr. Zach, Dr. Farrar, Mr. Chris-
tensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ramin and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 6-0.
b. Licensed non-represented: Mr.
Zach made a motion and Dr. Farrar sec-
onded the motion to approve the issu-
ance of contracts for the 11 positions
under the Licensed Non-representative
Group for the 2013-2014 school year. In
a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes: Mr. Zach, Dr. Farrar, Mr. Chris-
tensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ramin and Ms.
Odorico. Motion passed 6-0.
c. Administrators: Mr. Zach moved
and Mr. Christensen seconded the mo-
tion to approve the contract extensions
for Oregon Administrators through June
30, 2016 consistent with the information
shared at the April 1, 2013 Human Assets
Committee meeting. In a roll call vote, the
following members voted yes: Mr. Zach,
Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ra-
min, Dr. Farrar and Ms. Odorico. Motion
passed 6-0.
3. 2013-2014 Staffng Plans: Mr. Zach
moved and Mr. Ramin seconded the mo-
tion to approve the 2013-2014 staffng
plan as presented without the shaded
items included. In a roll call vote, the fol-
lowing members voted yes: Mr. Zach, Mr.
Ramin, Dr. Farrar, Mr. Christensen, Mr.
Mixdorf and Ms. Odorico. Motion passed
6-0.
4. Request to WASB for Amicus
Brief: Mr. Zach recused himself from
the discussion as a potential confict of
interest. Mr. Christensen moved and Mr.
Mixdorf seconded the motion to adopt a
resolution asking WASB to submit an am-
icus brief in the case described. In a roll
call vote, the following members voted
yes: Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Ra-
min, Dr. Farrar and Ms. Odorico. Mr. Zach
recused himself. Motion passed 5-0.
D. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Student
Achievement - (This item was moved up
in the meeting after the Communication
section.)
1. Personalized Learning Student
Summit Update - OHS; Mr. Bruce Nelson
and Mr. David Keane, along with OHS stu-
dents, Ben Leake, Kristen Odorico, Da-
vid Shillingstad, Morgan McCorkle, and
OMS students, Kim Gehrmann and Pearl
Beach and RCI students, Ryan Taplic,
Grayden Gruchow, and Tyler Markhm up-
dated the board on a personalized learn-
ing summit they attended.
2. Science Olympiad Students -
OMS; Mr. Tim Paneitz along with his stu-
dents, Mya Lebakken, Kim Gehrmann,
and Sam Miess shared their experiences
at the regional and state competitions.
E. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Other Topics
None.
F. INFORMATION ITEMS:
1. School Board Election Results:
The school board election results were
shared. Ms. Rae Vogeler and Mr. Dan
Krause won for Area I, the Village of Or-
egon, each for a three year term. Their
frst meeting will be April 22nd at the high
school beginning at 5 PM.
2. From OEA President - no items.
G. CLOSING:
1. Future Agenda was established.
2. Check Out: Board members
thanked Dr. Farrar for her six years on
the board.
H. EXECUTIVE SESSION ITEMS:
Consideration of Adjourning to
Closed Session on Item H.1 & H.2 as Pro-
vided Under Wisconsin Statutes 19.85
(1) (c) & (e). Dr. Farrar moved and Mr.
Mixdorf seconded the motion to go into
closed executive session. In a roll call
vote, the following members voted yes:
Dr. Farrar, Mr. Mixdorf, Mr. Zach, Mr. Ra-
min, Mr. Christensen and Ms. Odorico.
Motion passed 6-0. Closed session be-
gan at 8:18 p.m.
1. Negotiations: Discussion held.
2. Personnel Matter: Discussion
held.
I. ADJOURNMENT:
Dr. Farrar moved and Mr. Mixdorf
seconded the motion to adjourn the
meeting. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote. Meeting adjourned at 9:02
p.m.
, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: April 25, 2013
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Crowns, Bridges,
Implants, Veneers
Tooth Colored Fillings,
Whitening, Emergencies
New Patients Always Welcome
Mueller Dental Clinic
978 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for 15 Years!
U
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2
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Oregon City-Wide
Garage Sales
Saturday, May 11
th
Your garage sale ad will appear in the
Great Dane Shopping News on Wednesday, May 8th
and in the Oregon Observer on Thursday, May 9th.
Only
$
18
Includes 15 words. Additional words 40¢ each.
Deadline to advertise your garage sale is
Friday, May 3rd at 12:00 Noon
Ads must be placed by fax, e-mail or in person.
No phone calls.
Fax: 835-0130 • E-mail: ungclassifed@wcinet.com
125 N. Main Street, Oregon • 835-6677
Offce Hours: Monday- Friday 9am-3pm
Payment must be made at time ad is placed.
Brooklyn
Village-wide Garage Sales
Friday, April 26 & Saturday, April 27
201 Church Street: Saturday, Brook-
lyn Methodist Parsonage. Bake sale,
brats, hot dogs, soda, jewelry, misc.
small items, books.
231 Easy Street: Thursday & Fri-
day 8am–4pm, Saturday 8am–noon.
Tupperware Inventory Reduction
Sale! Boys (size 0-7), Girls (size 0-12)
clothes, shoes, snowsuits, boots,
bottles, pumps, crib bedding, play
mat, mobiles, toys, books, puzzles,
games, movies, adult clothes, crafts,
household, kitchen items and more.
11010 Highway 14: between Brook-
lyn and Evansville. HUGE multi-fami-
ly barn sale. See craigslist ad.
349 Juniper Street: Thursday-Saturday,
8am-4pm. Multi-family, men’s, women’s,
baby clothing and equipment, books,
crafts, quilting fabric, holiday décor,
kitchen & household items, much more.
204 S. Kerch St. April 26-27 7am-4pm.
Household items, kitchen appliances and
gadgets, tv and stands, miscellaneous
accessories, luggage, much more.
135 Marcie Drive: Fri-Sat 7am-5pm
Clothes: Men’s L- XL, Women’s XS-
M, Boy/Girl 2T -7, shoes, toys: Fisher
Price, trucks, dolls/animals, games,
V-Tech, books all ages! stereo cabi-
net, bedsets T/F. pictures, rugs, blan-
kets, décor, Christmas decorations,
lights, small animal cages, 18 speed
bike, speakers, electronics.
128 Marcie Drive: April 26th 8am-
4pm, April 27th 7am-11am. Household
decorations, men & womens clothing,
sporting goods, furniture, wedding
decorations, prom dresses, TV!
102 S. 1ST Street: Friday-Saturday,
8am-5pm. Moving Sale! Kids toys,
clothes, household items, books, in-
fant clothes.
198 S. Rutland Avenue: Thursday-
Saturday, 8am-5pm. Furniture, tools,
yard tools, reclining wheelchair,
dresser, shelves, entertainment cen-
ter, more.
111 Teddy Street: April 26-28, 8am-
5pm. All handmade crafts 50% off!
Tracker scooter lift wheelchair.
Legals
14
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
935 Farm: Land For rent
FARM LAND LOW COST. 9+ acres.
Town of Verona. 608-848-5641.
970 Horses
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 Livestock
REGISTERED HOLSTEIN bulls red and
white - black and white, dams on site,
record available. 608-934-5012 or 608-
558-7559
990 Farm: service
& mercHandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
340 autos
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck of Boat to
Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vaca-
tion. Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All
paperwork taken care of! 888-439-5224
(wcan)
342 Boats & accessories
$9995+ FSD for a new boat or pontoon
pkg-both w/lots of standard features! New
16' pontoon w/furniture & 25HP or new
16' boat, locator, trailer & 25HP. Your
Choice $9995+FSD. American Marine
& Motorsports Shawano- 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New and Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye boats, Cudd-
ys, Cruisers up to 33 feet and Outboards
@ Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline
Axis Malibu Triton Alumacraft Mirrorcraft
Misty Harbor & more! American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center Shawano-
where dreams come true 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 recreationaL veHicLes
ATVS SCOOTERS & GO KARTS, YOUTH
ATVs & SCOOTERS (80mpg) @ $49/MO.
SPORT & 4x4 ATVs @ $69/MO. AMERI-
CAN MARINE & MOTORSPORTS,
SHAWANO=SAVE=866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com. (wcan)
360 traiLers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
ALL ADS SUBMITTED SUBJECT TO
APPROVAL BY PUBLISHER OF THIS
PAPER.
390 auto: Wanted to Buy
WANTED: Autos, heavy trucks,
equipment and scrap iron.
Steve's Recycling. Hollandale, WI.
608-574-2350 (cell)
508 cHiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton/Pleasant-Springs Licensed Child-
care. Openings available. 22 yrs exp.
- Quiet acre lot. Best area summer trip
program. Location-Experience-Referenc-
es. Indoor Slide- Competitive Rates. 873-
0711 www.browndeerdaycare.com
COLLEGE GIRL with childcare experi-
ence, available for the summer to watch
your children in your home. Flexible
schedule Mon-Fri. Please email there-
seh854@yahoo.com
NEW SCHOOL-AGE only care in Ore-
gon! Kids' Club and Learning Center
opening in June for kids ages 5-12. Great
location, affordable rates. 835-5468 or
kidscalc@gmail.com
516 cLeaning services
CLEANING SERVICES Weekly, Bi-
weekly or Monthly will also organize with
great references. 608-774-3170
DEEP CLEANING SERVICE Specialists!
If you need a one time cleaning, weekly,
bi-weekly, monthly, turnover cleaning.
Home or Office. References available,
fully insured. www.madisongreenclean-
ers.com samantha@greencleanersllc.
com 608-219-5986
EXPERIENCED CLEANING Lady look-
ing for houses to clean. References.
608-609-1762
REASONABLE HOUSE CLEANING
available. Monthly, bi-weekly, weekly,
one time only. Great Rates, References,
Honest & Trustworthy, Reliable. Call Jas-
mine 906-4969
532 Fencing
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 Home improvement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
Interior-Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
spring discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to
join in the fight against cancer, as a
portion of every job is donated to cancer
research. Free estimates, fully insured,
over 20 years of experience. call 608-
270-0440
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a
sensible price. Free estimates,
Insured, Polite, Professional.
608-873-9623
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

550 insurance
SAVE $$$ ON Auto Insurance from the
major names you know and trust. No
forms. No hassle. No stress. No obliga-
tion. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 Landscaping, LaWn,
tree & garden Work
AFFORDABLE QUALITY Services LLC:
Lawn Mowing & trim, Spring Clean-up.
Landscaping, Reseeding, Aeration,
Mulch, Decorative Stone, Shrub Trim-
ming, Dethatching & Gutter Cleaning.
Call Matt Nardi for estimate, 608-609-
3600 or snowplowing@tds.net. Experi-
enced and Fully Insured.
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
JEFF'S LAWN CARE, spring/fall clean-
up, mowing, and much more 608-220-
4025
LAWN MOWING Good Work Reason-
able. 608-873-5216
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
LAWN MOWING Rototilling, Aerat-
ing Dethatching Tree/Bush Trimming,
Spring/fall clean-ups landscaping, &
more. Quality work Reasonable. Price
608-219-4606
MAGIC LAWN CARE Residential, com-
mercial, lawn mowing, trim bushes,
dethatching, aeration, and spring clean-
ups. Over 20 years experience. Fully
Insured. Call Phil 608-235-9479
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, and
Lawnmowing. Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
Fill Dirt
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 proFessionaL services
BOOKKEEPING SERVICES: Accounts
Payable & Receivables
For your small business. Call now!
Joy's Bookkeeping Services
608-712-6286
MY COMPUTER WORKS! Computer
problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer issues, Bad Internet Connections
- Fix It Now! Professional, US Based
Technicians. $25 off service. Call for
Immediate Help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
576 speciaL services
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. "We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! Are you
a 2-parent family over age 25 with 1
stay-at-home parent able to work with
youth 10-17 years of age?
Call 866-776-3760 or
CommunityCareResources.com/now-
recruiting. (wcan)
FREE COMPUTER RECYCLING DROP
OFF Six days a week all year long. All
data destroyed. Wisconsinfamily owned
business. File 13, 4903 Commerce Ct,
McFarland, WI 608-838-8813 More info
at www.file13usa.com
586 tv, vcr &
eLectronics repair
ELECTRONICS RECYCLING PICK UP
SERVICE. $25 covers up to 100 lbs.
Additional lbs $.35/lb + tax. Wisconsin
family owned business. File 13,
4903 Commerce Ct, McFarland, WI
608-838-8813 More info at www.
file13usa.com
590 Wanted: services
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Int'l
608-583-2412 www.
reflectionsinternational.org (wcan)
115 cemetery Lots
& monuments
3 MAJESTIC lots together. Riverside
Cemetary Stoughton. $1400/OBO 608-
201-7114
143 notices
FLEA MARKET VENDORS needed.
Green County Pickers Antique & Flea
Market, Monroe, WI Fairgrounds. June
8 & 9th and Sep 7 & 8th. Booths starting
$30. Application at: www.greencounty-
fair.net or call 608-325-9159.
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL BUILDS
PEACE & understanding through
education. For more info visit www.
rotary.org. This message provided by
PaperChain & your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 pLaces to go
36TH ANNUAL AUTO Parts
Swap meet & Car Show! April 26-28 at
Jefferson County Fairgrounds. Swap
meet and car corral ALL THREE DAYS!
Show Cars Sat/Sun Only! Adm. $7. No
pets. Fri 10-6pm, Sat-Sun 6am-4pm.
608-244-8416 madisonclassics.com
(wcan)
ASHLAND GUN-KNIFE Show April
26-28 Ashland Civic Center Fri 4-8pm
Sat 9-4 Sun 9-3. Adm $5 good for all
days! Info call Ray 866-583-9083 (wcan)
GUN SHOW April 26-28. Players Choice
Sports & Expo- Hwy JJ, Appleton Fri 3-8,
Sat 9-5 Sun 9-3 Adm $6. 14 & under free.
608-752-6677 bobandrocco.com (wcan)
163 training scHooLs
AIRLINE CAREERS: become an Avia-
tion Maintenance Tech. FFA approved
training. Financial aid if qualified. Hous-
ing available. Job placement assistance.
Call AIM 888-242-3193 (wcan)
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
SATURDAYS! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on FACEBOOK! Next class
begins 3/30/ 2013. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
632 cLotHing: FormaLWear
STORE CLOSING SALE
All Prom Dresses 20-75% off
Over 400 dresses
Princess Prom
410 Mall Drive, Appleton
920-933-4500, ediths.com (wcan)
648 Food & drink
100% GUARANTEED Omaha Steaks
- Save 69% on the Grilling Collection.
Now Only $49.95. Plus 2 Free Gifts &
to-the-door-delivery in a reusable cooler.
Order today. 1-888-676-2750 Use Code:
45102DJW www.OmahaSteaks.com/
gcoffer83 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES- delight all of your
Valentine's with our freshly dipped straw-
berries, decadent truffles and hand-craft-
ed sweets! SAVE 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouth-
watering gifts for any occasion! Save
20% on qualifying gifts over $29! Fresh
Dipped Berries starting at $19.99! Visit
www.berries.com/happy or Call 888-479-
6008 (wcan)
652 garage saLes
OREGON 5387 HWY CC Saturday-April
20 and 27. John Deere lawn-tractor,
gas space heater, tools, large oak desk,
snowblower, table saw, dead weights/
bench. 608-235-6175
STOUGHTON- 1937 W Main Huge
Garage Sale. 4/25 12-6, 4/26 7am-6pm,
4/27 7:30-? Furniture, clothing all sizes.
Household items, entertainment center-
misc
STOUGHTON- 324 N Harrison St. 4/27
9-2. Spring Fever Gift & Plant Fair, over
30 vendors with gift items, perennials and
baskets of annuals for sale, proceeds
benefit St Ann's youth mission group.
STOUGHTON HUGE Garage Sale: 1936
W Main (corner of Hoel and Main) 4/25
Noon-6pm 4/26 7am-5pm, 4/27 7am-?
See Craigslist
VERONA 109 Faircrest Ct. Friday, April
26-Saturday, April 27 9am-4pm. Boys
clothes, newborn-2T like new, even
namebrand. Adult clothes, gently used,
name brand. 15+ purses, some name
brand.
VERONA 311 Thompson St.
Thurs-Fri. Apr 25-26. 8am-4pm.
VERONA EASTVIEW Heights/Military
Ridge, Annual Neighborhood Sale.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday. April 25-27.
Old Cty PB to Whalen Rd or Forest View
Dr. Watch for signs.
664 LaWn & garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 medicaL & HeaLtH suppLies
ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Suf-
ferers: Clinically proven all-natural sup-
plement helps reduce pain & enhance
mobility. To try HydrAflexin Risk Free for
90 days. Call 888-550-4066 (wcan)
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFER-
ERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP
Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus
FREE Home Delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection! 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free ship-
ping. Nationwide Services. $29.95/month
Call Medical Guardian today. 877-863-
6622 (wcan)
676 pLants & FLoWers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Prices starting at
just $19.99. Plus take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
PROFLOWERS -THRILL MOM Enjoy
50% Off the All the Frills Bouquet $19.99.
Plus take 20% off your order ovwer $29!
Go to www.Proflowers.com/Act-Now or
call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sporting goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - Tas Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
and Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where available)
SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installa-
tion! Call 888-719-6981(wcan)
HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERY-
WHERE By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up). Start-
ing at $49.95/mo. Call Now & Go Fast!
888-709-3348 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell
used parts. Monday through Friday 8 am
- 5:30 pm. Newville
Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59,
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stough-
ton $775/mo includes utilities. No Pets.
Security deposit and references are
required. Available Now for an approved
applicant. Call 608-241-6609
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON - 3 bedrooms, 1 bath duplex.
W/D-S/R, near schools. NO pets, NO
smoking $750/mo. 608-843-9185.
STOUGHTON- 115 Hillside lower 3 bed-
room, 680+ utilities also 2 bedroom upper
630+ utilities and 626 Oak Street, upper
2 bedrooms, $630+ utilities. 608-455-
7100.
STOUGHTON- 1 bedroom upper, W/D,
stove and refrigerator inc. No Pets.
$525+ utilities+ security deposit. 608-
873-6711
STOUGHTON 721 S Monroe. Upper of
2-flat. 2-bdrm, hardwoods, washer-dryer
in unit, lrg yard, lrg kitchen. Cats/Dogs
ok. Available now. $790. incl heat and
electric. Call Jim 608-444-6084
STOUGHTON AVAILABLE May 1 Con-
venient location, safe neighborhood, 304
King St 2-Bedroom, 1 Bath, approx. 850
sq. ft., very clean and well maintained,
off-street parking and A/C. Laundry
and storage lockers available. No Cats.
Smoke Free Building. $726/mo with dis-
count plus electric heat. 608-293-1599
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM unit
in quiet, owner managed 10 unit. All
appliances, C/A, gas heat. Close to
shopping, off street parking, large yard.
Laundry. $665/month. Water included,
elec/gas extra. Approx. 850 sq ft.
Available June 1. Call
608-772-0234
STOUGHTON- LARGE 2 BR + Den in
award winning Restored Victorian. Beau-
tiful refinished woodwork, French doors,
family kitchen, appliances, laundry, C/A.
No smokers. 608-238-1692
VERONA 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
($545-$690) in a small 24 unit building.
Includes heat, hot water, water & sewer,
off-street parking, fully carpeted, 2 bed-
rooms have dishwasher , and coin oper-
ated laundry and storage in basement.
Convenient to Madison's west side. Call
KC at 608-273-0228 to view your new
home.
720 apartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
STOUGHTON ONE Bedroom Upper +
garage. $550/month plus utilities. 608-
576-7037 please leave message
750 storage spaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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TOWN OF MONTROSE - $35,500. Elaine Holpin, (608) 278-4180.
MLS# 1660776.
TOWN OF BROOKLYN - $109,000. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324.
MLS# 1665437.
OREGON - $129,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677794.
OREGON - $130,000. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677392.
BROOKLYN - $147,000. Marge Van Calligan, (608) 219-8918.
MLS# 1672498.
VERONA - $149,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1680669.
OREGON - $164,900. Mark Riese, (608) 235-5458. MLS# 1680334.
OREGON - 4 BED, 2 BATH - $192,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199.
MLS# 1669712.
OREGON - $199,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677773.
OREGON - $235,900. John Norwell, (608) 698-5246. MLS# 1666650.
OREGON - $235,900. John Norwell, (608) 698-5246. MLS# 1666649.
FITCHBURG - $244,900. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1680559.
OREGON - $285,000. Marge Van Calligan, (608) 219-8918. MLS# 1672050.
FITCHBURG - $299,000. Sharon O. Christensen, (608) 843-9185.
MLS# 1671705.
FITCHBURG - MVP $299,900 - $312,900. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324.
MLS# 1672480.
WHISPERING OAKS, TOWN OF OREGON - $324,900. Brenda Cuta,
(608) 278-4199. MLS# 1675027.
FITCHBURG - $334,000. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1676056.
OREGON - $339,900. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1677744.
OREGON - $449,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1679825.
FITCHBURG - $69,900. Randy Hess, (608) 276-5211. MLS# 1667869.
OREGON - $269,000. Barb Dawson, (608) 575-3290. MLS# 1652766.
SPRINGDALE - $295,000. Pam Birschbach, (608) 576-9206. MLS#
1655806.
OREGON - $310,000. Patricia Sternad, (608) 216-5749. MLS# 1670262.
OREGON - $550,000. Brendan McGrath, (608) 219-3675. MLS# 1650808.
OREGON - MVP $700,000 - $800,000. Laurie Howard, (608) 469-6710.
MLS# 1674715.
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• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $3997.00- MAKE & SAVE
MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HOLTGER BROS., INC. UTILITY CONTRACTOR
Immediate Opportunities for Field Positions in the
Telephone Industry. Training Offered. Travel Required
for All Positions. 800-831-0754 www.holtger.com EOE
by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Drivers: Inexperienced? Get on the road to a Successful
Career with CDL Training. Regional Training. Locations.
Train and WORK for Central Refrigerated (877) 369-
7893 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (CNOW)
GORDON TRUCKING CDL-A Drivers Needed! Up to
$3,000 Sign On Bonus. Home Weekly Available! Up to .44
cpm w/10 years exp. Benefts, 401K, EOE, No East Coast.
Call 7 days/wk! Team GTI.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
TOP COMP For Hard Work! We Train The Right People.
Overnight Travel Required, Mon-Thurs. Apply today!
866-775-3775; email: starttoday@pltnm.com (CNOW)
April 25, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Units in all sizes
5x10 thru 10x30
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10'x5', 10'x10', 10x15', 10x20, 10'x30'
24/7 access, security lit. Short/long term
leases. Call Jim:
608-334-1191 or fax 608-845-7165
760 moBiLe Homes
WE PAY CASH for your used Mobile
Home. Home Source One. Call today
920-889-7440 or Barbara.Schauf@
assetdevelopment.com (wcan)
770 resort property For rent
LOG CABINS for rent: Forest Co. ATV
trail, lake access, dock. $350/week 715-
674-7752 gilliganlodging.com (wcan)
780 rooms For rent
ON LAKE KEGONSA Home to share
with single person w/private bedroom.
Cable & internet, utilities, included.
No/Smoking/Pets. $465/mo.
815-238-1000
793 Wanted to rent
OREGON-BROOKLYN AREA 3+ bed-
room home. Relocating to area. Beth
715-205-5476 anytime.
801 oFFice space For rent
BEST LOCATION in Stoughton. Retail
space for rent. 211 E Main 4,000+ sq
ft. Beautifully renovated. Available Now
$1900/mo.Call Connie 608- 271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
805 commerciaL &
industriaL Lots
VERONA INDUSTRIAL Park 2600 sq ft.
shop, warehouse, office space. Available
April 1, 2013 845-7630
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895
402 HeLp Wanted, generaL
EXPERIENCED DELI/WAITRESS want-
ed. Apply in person. Sugar & Spice
Eatery, 317 Nora St. Stoughton.
HOUSEKEEPER/LAUNDRY AIDE Part-
time 1st shift positions with
alternating weekends.
General cleaning, dusting, vacuuming
and bathrooms. Facility and personal
linens. Please email resume to
rschickert@bsgmaint.com or call
Rebecca at 262-335-2746 for an
application. EOE
440 HoteL, Food & Beverage
BIG SKY RESTAURANT is now except-
ing applications for line cooks, dish/
prep and front house staff, Experience
preferred, will train. Located on Main St
Stoughton Contact Sean at 608-234-
0486
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Oregon Observer
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
444 construction,
trades & automotive
Seeking Licensed-Journeyman Plumb-
er to work on residential and commercial
projects. Experience running multi-family
apartment buildings required. Qualifica-
tions: Journeyman License, strong work
ethic and excellent workmanship. Ability
to run a work crew. Clean driving record
required. We offer competitive wages,
health & dental insurance and retire-
ment. Please forward resume, project
history and professional references to:
mtarrant26@aol.com or mail to: Terry
Kahl Plumbing, Inc. 305 Industrial Circle
Stoughton, WI 53589 608-873-7651
SEEKING PLUMBING-LABORER to
work on residential and commercial proj-
ects. High school diploma or GED cer-
tificate required. Working knowledge of
operating power tools and construction
experience as well as a current valid
driver’s license. Must be reliable, hard-
working and able to follow instruction. We
offer competitive wages, health & dental
insurance and retirement. Please forward
resume and professional references to:
mtarrant26@aol.com or mail to: Terry
Kahl Plumbing, Inc. at 305 Industrial Cir,
Stoughton, WI 53589 608-873-7651
447 proFessionaL
OTR TEAM and SOLO DRIVERS
* Above Average Mileage Pay
*Teams Avg 6000 Miles per Week*
*Solos Avg 2500-3500/wk*
* Flexible Home Time
* 100% No Touch/Drop&Hook
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
* 12 Months Exp. Preferred
1-888-545-9351 Ext. 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Oregon Observer
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
451 JanitoriaL & maintenance
CONTRACT CLEANING Service: The
Town of Rutland seeks a local resident
to provide cleaning services on an as-
needed basis for the newly renovated
Rutland Center Church, 687 Hwy 14,
Oregon. Work will include sweep-
ing, vacuuming and dusting all surfaces,
including the porch, prior to a scheduled
event. Occasional window and wall
washing, fan blade cleaning and more
may be required. Bid should quote an
hourly rate. Service should be insured
and provide all cleaning equipment and
supplies, including water. Send bid no
later than May 7, 2013 to Dawn George,
Clerk, Town of Rutland, 4177 Old Stage
Rd., Brooklyn, WI 53521.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
453 voLunteer Wanted
JOIN US April 26, 27 & 28 for this year’s Global
Youth Service Day! This is an annual event
that highlights and celebrates the contributions
of youth to their communities through volunteer
service and is celebrated in more than 100
countries in every region of the world. Visit
our website for more information. Help our
high school seniors Cross the Finish Line to
graduation! The Urban League of Greater
Madison is currently looking for adults who have
the knowledge, ability and time to help our youth
complete missing assignments and prepare
for final exams. The Schools of Hope tutoring
program loses many UW student tutors in May
when their semester ends. We need people
in the community who are willing to fill the gap
through June 13th. Remember the thrill of taking
those training wheels off for the first time? Help
children master the art of the 2-wheeler as a
MSCR Learn 2 Ride event-day volunteer. You
can be a Helmet Fitter, Bike Course Trainer,
Bike Inspector, or even Crash Helmet, the
bike safety mascot! We will host the event at 5
Madison elementary schools from May-July. Call
the Volunteer Center at 246-4380 or visit www.
volunteeryourtime.org for more information or to
learn about other volunteer opportunities.
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a new nursing experience
We are a highly respected senior services corporation
that operates beautiful assisted living & memory care
residences in south central WI. We want to talk with
nurses interested in leadership roles. Competitive
salary and benefits package offered.
Day Hours  Great Atmosphere
No Scheduled Weekends
to download an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:

Not j ust car i ng. . . but l i vi ng!
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Kuhn North America, Inc. in Brodhead, WI is a global
leader in the agricultural machinery industry!
Painter (4th/Weekend Shift) – This position involves
painting parts and units with an electrostatic spray gun
while conforming to established quality standards. A
vocational diploma in auto body and paint technolo-
gy, with knowledge of coatings, coating systems, and
electrostatic spray coating is preferred. Ability to read
basic blueprints and measuring devices and wear a
fully enclosed hood type air supplied respirator is re-
quired.
Welder (2nd Shift) - Seeking skilled welders to weld
units shells, sub-assemblies and components. A
vocational diploma in welding or a minimum of two
years production welding experience is required.
Experience in GMAW and fux cored arc welding,
blue print reading and operating material handling
equipment is preferred.
Visit our website at www.kuhnnorthamerica.com to
view professional employment opportunities!
Second shift runs Monday–Thursday, 3:15 p.m.-
1:15 a.m. and 4th/Weekend shift runs Friday-Sunday,
5:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. A high school diploma or GED is
required for all positions. We offer a competitive wage
and complete beneft package (health, life, dental,
and disability insurance, paid vacations and holidays,
401(k), and tuition reimbursement) for this full-time
positions. Pre-employment drug screening is required.
Complete application at:
Kuhn North America, Inc.
1501 West Seventh Avenue
Brodhead, WI 53520
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** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
FOR REGIONAL WORK
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s
Private Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI.
Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s
stores within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND,
SD). Workweek is Tuesday-Saturday. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
• Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
• Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
• 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
• Paid Holidays and Vacation
• Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min.
2 yrs. tractor-trailer exp. & meet all DOT require-
ments. Send resumé to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755.
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YMCA of Dane County
Child Care Lead Teachers
Realize your dream to make a
difference in a child’s life.
Part time and full time positions
available. Experience in licensed child
care preferred. Child Development,
Child Psychology, or related
coursework may be required.
Locations in Madison, Sun Prairie,
Oregon, Middleton, Verona
and DeForest.
Contact Stephanie Murphy at
stephanie.murphy@ymcadanecounty.org
or 608-664-9622 x1016.
More info and application on
www.ymcadanecounty.org
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Register to Win
a Hanging Basket Daily or:
OUR GRAND PRIZE:
$
200 KOPKE’S SHOPPING SPREE
RUNNER UP:
$
100 KOPKE’S SHOPPING SPREE
3RD & 4TH PRIZES:
$
50 KOPKE’S GIFT CERTIFICATE
Grand Prize drawing to be held 4/29/2013
April Hours:
Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sunday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
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CTY. M
Directions fromStoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions fromFitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood
Road. Turn left and go through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions fromVerona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn
right and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left
at Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
Come visit Wisconsin’s premier grower of quality
bedding plants and hanging baskets
Recycle your pots & containers at our farm location
Support local agriculture!
Shop outside the
box store.
GRAND OPENING
April 23-29, 2013
1828 Sandhill Rd.
Oregon, WI
608-835-7569
Quality Bloomers,
Reasonable Prices
KOPKE’S KOUPON
FLOWER, VEGETABLE & HERB
SEEDS
50
¢
off each packet
Expires 4-29-13
NO LIMIT!
Kopkesgreenhouse.com • Like us on Facebook
KOPKE’S KOUPON
50
¢
off each
PERENNIAL SPECIAL
Expires 4-29-13
SAVE UP TO $6
Limit 12 per Koupon per day.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
$
2
00

OFF
HANGING BASKETS
Expires 4-29-13
2 per Koupon, 1 Koupon per Kustomer per day.
16 - The Oregon Observer - April 25, 2013

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