Enabling  Collaboration

Three Priorities for the New  Administration

The Fundamental Problem
“We cannot meet 21st century challenges with  a 20th century bureaucracy.” – Barack Obama
We face critical challenges:
● Rigid hierarchies and stovepipes constrain our action  and trap information ● Complacency leads us to maintain the status quo  rather than proactively innovate ● Issues evolve faster than we are able to respond
2

How It Works To many,  government  looks like this.
1. Government  makes a decision 2. Government  reveals it to  citizens 3. (Repeat.)
3

How It’s Changing
Technology is  enabling  transparency,  collaboration &  participation.
● Citizens can see inside their  government… ● …and influence it.
4

Changing The Way We Work
The Old Way The New Way
20th‐century industrial‐era  21st‐century emergent,  hierarchy agile networks The citizen at the end of a  The citizen directly involved  service delivery chain in governance Focus on doing it “faster,  Focus on doing it differently cheaper, better” Need‐to‐know Need‐to‐share
5

1. Build Open IT Infrastructure
● Government’s basic communications  infrastructure is outdated.
● Today, computing power isn’t a physical asset – it’s a  utility ● Cloud computing and SaaS mean lower costs and  greater environmental sustainability ● More managerial agility and flexibility, especially for  bringing the CIO shop into the mission ● Using these tools is the only way to stay relevant to  the citizen
6

2. Treat Data as a National Asset
● We need to incentivize sharing data instead  of controlling it.
● Use lightweight, interoperable data formats that  anyone in government or the public can understand  and use ● Data is no longer “owned” – it has to flow seamlessly  without our outmoded concept of stewardship ● Use collaborative tools to manage knowledge across  constant leadership transitions
7

3. Build a Culture of Collaboration
● Ultimately, this isn’t a technology issue;  this is a leadership issue.
● Find and celebrate success stories and best practices  to create a “safe‐fail” environment ● Give CIOs a seat at the program table – and make  sure they use it ● Resolve the legal and policy ambiguities that  empower our “inner lawyer”

8

The Result
● These three steps will build a government  that can:
● Collaborate internally across silos and through  hierarchy ● Empower citizens and civil servants with data to  make their own discoveries and conclusions ● Enable government to act on citizen input

9

How Does This Start?
● With you.
● Get engaged with MAX Community (if you’re in  government) ● Push to understand your IT environment and partner  with your CIO on your core challenges ● Learn the tools and engage the community ● Visit and add to www.collaborationproject.org

Ask not what your country can do for you…

Ask what we can do together.
10

About Us
The Collaboration Project
The Collaboration Project (www.collaborationproject.org) is an independent forum of leaders who share a  commitment to the adoption and use of collaborative technologies to solve complex problems of public  management. With the support of dedicated staff and access to the National Academy’s distinguished Fellows and  other subject matter experts, the Collaboration Project convenes members in person and online to share best  practices; produces research on the opportunities and challenges of collaboration; and assists agencies in  implementing collaborative tools and approaches.

For More Information:
Frank DiGiammarino, Vice President (202) 204‐3673 • frankd@napawash.org Lena Trudeau, Program Area Director  (202) 315‐5476 • ltrudeau@napawash.org Danielle Germain, Project Director  (202) 468‐7092 • dgermain@napawash.org

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution‐Noncommercial‐Share Alike 3.0  United States License. See http://collaborationproject.org/x/HIA4AQ for more information.

11

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful