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DRAKE UNIVERSITY LESSON PLANNING TEMPLATE

GENERAL INFORMATION Name: Elizabeth Fiedler Lesson Title: Introduction & Review of 3-D shapes Grade level(s)/Course: Sophomores Date taught: March 25 INFORMATION ABOUT THE LESSON Content Standards: G.MG.1: Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder). Enduring Understanding and/or Essential Question: Visualizing and thinking about shapes in 3-Dimensional space help students structure their thinking about real-world objects. Instructional Objectives: After reviewing common three-dimensional shapes, students will begin to discuss what shapes they see in the world around them and why it is important to know properties of 3-D shapes. Prior Learning/Prior Thinking The students have encountered 3-D shapes in previous classes. We will be reviewing what they have learned to set up for the rest of the unit. They will have prior knowledge with 3-D shapes and 2-D shapes. They will also know what the face of a shape is. LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Anticipatory Set/Elicit Prior Knowledge Start the PowerPoint and ask the question What is 3-D? What does it mean if something is in 3D? Let the students share their answers and ideas. Focus/Purpose Statement Everything around us is made up of 3-Dimensional shapes. We study these shapes in class so that we can better understand how they apply to the objects in the world around us.

DRAKE UNIVERSITY LESSON PLANNING TEMPLATE


Procedures 1. Start the PowerPoint and ask the question What is 3-D? What does it mean if something is in 3-D? Let the students share their answers and their ideas. Talk about 3-D movies, ask if the students have seen any recently. Ask what kinds of things around them are 3-D objects. To give each student an opportunity to answer, go around the class and have everyone share 1 or 2 3-D objects from the real-world. Then, ask students if there is anything that is not 3-D around themno, everything is 3-D! Finish off asking students what the three dimensions are (length, width, height/depth) 2. Move on to the different types of 3-D shapes. Have the students tell you common types of 3-D shapes. We will focus on 6 in this unit: cube, prism, pyramid, sphere, cylinder, and cone. 3. Go through each of the six shapes using the PowerPoint. With each shape, ask the students what are its distinguishing characteristics. What makes it different than all of the rest of the shapes? Discuss how many faces each 3-D shape has and what 2-D shapes the faces are. For prisms and pyramids the number of faces will depend on the base(s) of the shape. Also discuss real-world examples of each shape. You can use some of the examples that students listed off earlier and have them decide which of the shapes fit into the different categories. Differentiation I will have note sheets available for students who need more guided assistance when they are taking notes over the lecture. The note sheet includes blanks for the students to fill in and pictures to help them reference the material. Closure Once you have gone through the PowerPoint, make sure that students dont have any big questions about the material that was just reviewed. Finish up the lecture by asking the students to think about how the world around them is made up of 3-D shapes and why it is important to understand properties of 3-D shapes. Materials and Resources Models of 3-D shapes PowerPoint presentation Note worksheet for students who need more guided notes Writing Prompt to put on the board and have students answer. (Found below in the Assessment of learning.)

Classroom Management/Democratic Practices Because this is a lecture class, students will be expected to listen quietly and pay attention to the PowerPoint and the review of 3-D shapes.

DRAKE UNIVERSITY LESSON PLANNING TEMPLATE


ASSESSMENT Before the lesson Informal With the introduction to the lesson, I will know how well the students understand the idea of threedimensions. This will tell me how abstract we can think about shapes or if we have to focus on solid real figures as models. During the lesson Informal Formative Assessment I will prompt the students with questions throughout the lecture. For a few of the questions, I will ask all students to go around the class and answer the questions. This will help me see how individual students are grasping concepts. At the end of the lesson Formative Students will perform a writing assignment to a prompt: Describe some examples of 3-D shapes in the real world. Explain how understanding 3-D properties will help you understand real-world objects. Summative The summative assessment will not happen until the end of the unit.