Volume 125 Issue 111 kansan.

com Thursday, April 25, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Classifieds 2B
Crossword 5a
Cryptoquips 5a
opinion 4a
sports 1B
sudoku 5a
Clear. Winds from the
West at 5 to 10 mph
shifting to the SSW in the
afternoon.
According to Miss Rhode Island from “Miss
Congeniality,” April 25 is the perfect date.
Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
“All you need is a light jacket.”
HI: 61
LO: 46
pARTy TIMe
tyler roste/kansan
Friends at their house located on Ohio street drink some beers and enjoy the nice weather. With spring here and the weather getting nicer, people are beginning to spend
more time drinking outdoors on their front porches and in their yards.
day drinkin’
a preview
inside this issue
4a
5a
pg.
pg.
opinion
the morning Brew
operation
wildlife
BaseBall
reCap
jayhawk ChoiCe awards
end of golf season exCess hollywood
2B
pg.
1B
8a
7a
4B
pg.
pg.
pg.
pg.
Take a drive down Tennessee
or Kentucky streets on a warm
Saturday afternoon, and you will
find dozens of students socializing
on a porch or lawn. Porch drinking
is a popular pastime for students
in Lawrence, especially during the
spring and summer months when
the weather is warm enough to
spend a few hours outside.
For Travis Seipel, a junior from
San Francisco, the warm spring
weather reminds him of home. He
said he is taking advantage of his
first-floor apartment’s porch locat-
ed just a block north of Memorial
Stadium.
“This is the first time since foot-
ball season that it’s been warm
enough to drink outside,” Seipel
said. “I’m definitely utilizing the
nice weather.”
Seipel has been at his residence
since August, and his apartment
proved to be a popular spot dur-
ing football and basketball games.
Recently, his apartment has been
a popular hangout for his friends
to meet up and enjoy a few drinks
outside.
“It’s not as busy here as it was
during football season, but I imag-
ine graduation will bring out more
people,” Seipel said.
Seipel has a custom-made beer
pong table that he and a friend
made out of a door a couple of
years ago. He has the table set
up on the lawn most Fridays and
Saturdays for anyone who wants
to challenge Seipel and his room-
mates to a game of beer pong.
One of Seipel’s friends, Joey
Lamping, a junior from Wichita,
frequents Seipel’s house because
of its location: There are plenty
of other students around, and it’s
close to a liquor store.
“We drink out here pretty much
any time it’s over jacket weather,”
Lamping said.
Lamping said that when the
weather is nice enough, he usually
spends his Saturdays drinking out-
side with friends.
“We’ll play beer pong, washers,
some other drinking games,” he
said. “It’s just nice to enjoy the
mild spring weather because it will
be ungodly hot in a few weeks.”
Seipel and Lamping have made
friends with Seipel’s neighbors, and
usually the three residencies will
join into one large get-together.
They will share beer, cups and food
and usually play several rounds of
beer pong.
“It’s definitely a plus having
neighbors that are cool with what
we’re doing,” Seipel said.
Although porch drinking might
seem like a Saturday afternoon
activity, Seipel admits to drinking
during the weekdays on occasion.
“But only if I have
classes late the next
day,” Seipel said.
After a long day
— and usually night
— of drinking, Seipel
picks up the cans, bot-
tles and cups that are
scattered across his
lawn and throws them
into his trashcan out-
side, which is nearly
filled to the brim with
trash. He said it only
gets really messy when
there’s a large amount
of people.
Seipel and Lamping
plan on spending most
of their Saturdays
enjoying a few drinks
with the company of
their friends outside
on the porch and
lawn.
“There’s just some-
thing about nice
weather that makes
drinking outside so
relaxing,” Seipel said.
— Edited by Megan Hinman
Students take their parties outside
when the weather gets warm enough
jenna jakowatz
jjakowatz@kansan.com
Page 2a Thursday, aPril 25, 2013
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
weather,
Jay?
Overcast with
thunderstorms and
rain showers. Winds
from the South at
10 to 15 mph.
Friday
Get your umbrella back out.
HI: 66
LO: 43
Partly cloudy. Fog
early. Winds less
than 5 mph.
Saturday
It’s getting warmer.
HI: 72
LO: 52
Clear. Winds from
the SSW at 5 to 10
mph.
Sunday
Turn up the AC; It’s toasty.
HI: 77
LO: 52
— wunderground.com
What’s the
calENdar
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He had already been turned
down once. As he asks one of her
female friends to dance again, he
doesn’t notice Alexa Roy make
eye contact with her friend who
casually but purposefully adjusts
the collar of her blouse.
“Oh, I really need to go to the
bathroom,” Roy says before grab-
bing her friend’s arm and leading
her away. “Can we go?”
Pulling on her shirt may seem
like an insignificant act, but the
simple signal has helped Roy, a
sophomore from Shawnee, and
her group of female friends save
each other from countless unde-
sired, “weird” experiences with
men. They stick together, they
communicate and they keep to
a plan.
Now, they have a default plan
— thanks to their smartphones.
Circle of 6 is a free iPhone and
Android application designed to
combat sexual assault.
This mobile buddy system
allows the user to discretely send
a text to six friends asking for a
safe ride home with a link to her
location on Google Maps, asking
for them to call and pretend it’s
important to provide an interrup-
tion or asking for advice to pre-
vent relationship abuse. An excla-
mation point icon dials a national
rape or sexual assault hotline, a
relationship abuse hotline and a
programmable custom number.
“If you’re in a bad situation, a
lot of the time it’s not as easy as
picking up your phone and calling
911,” Roy said. “A lot of the times,
you don’t really know what to do;
you don’t know who to call; maybe
it’s not an emergency. Circle of 6 is
great because it provides options.”
Roy likes the app because she
believes that if she weren’t think-
ing logically or wasn’t sure what
she should do next, Circle of 6
would think for her to help her
make the right and safest deci-
sion.
When Christine Corbett Moran,
the programmer who created the
application, awoke in the middle
of the night to find an acquain-
tance-turned-stalker staring at her
from the floor next to her bed, she
was flustered. After she rushed
him out the door, a Google search
eventually landed her on a suicide
hotline rather than with the sup-
port she really needed.
As Vice President of
Philanthropy for Alpha Chi
Omega Sorority, Phi Chapter
at the University, Roy works to
make her peers recognize dat-
ing violence and sexual assault.
Nationally, Alpha Chi Omega sup-
ports domestic violence aware-
ness and prevention. Locally, the
sorority’s fundraisers benefit the
Willow Domestic Violence Center,
headquartered in Lawrence.
“Any funds that we raise go
directly into the community,” Roy
said. “They help women who we
might see at the grocery store.”
Brian Hillix, a junior from
Camden Point, Mo., believes that
men and women should be aware
of the prevalence of sexual vio-
lence if they hope to prevent it. If
one of his friends contacts him in
the middle of the night, he’s pre-
pared to get out of bed and give
him or her a ride.
“Without questioning them
further, I would head to my car
immediately,” Hillix said.
The deceptively simple applica-
tion targets college-age women,
attempting to combat the statistic
that one in five women report
being sexually assaulted before
they graduate.
“If we can get just six people
taking care of each other, taking
care of their friends, how many
instances of sexual assault would
that prevent?” Roy said. “It’s like
the butterfly effect — maybe
everyone has each other in their
circles, and it just becomes a lot
safer on campus.”
— Edited by Megan Hinman
Friday, April 26 Thursday, April 25
whaT: The State of Art Criticism & Art
Blogging with Meg Onli
where: Spencer Museum of Art
when: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
aBouT: Join Chicago-based artist and
writer Meg Onli in a discussion on the
state of art criticism in the Internet age.
whaT: Lawrence Arts & Crafts Group
where: Community Mercantile, 901
Iowa St.
when: 7 to 9 p.m.
aBouT: Get together with fellow crafters
at this on-going event. Bring supplies
for crafting.
whaT: Friday Night at the Kino: “Kom-
missar”
where: Bailey Hall, 318
when: 7 p.m.
aBouT: Catch this 1967 Soviet flm
based on short stories by Vasily Gross-
man.

whaT: KU School of Music presents
“Helianthus”
where: Robert Baustian Theatre, 102
Murphy Hall
when: 6 to 7 p.m.
aBouT: Hear music students jam out to
“Helianthus” at this free event.
Saturday, April 27 Sunday, April 28
whaT: Lawrence Farmers Market
where: 824 New Hampshire St.
when: 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.
aBouT: Pick up fresh fruits, veggies
and other home-grown treats in
downtown Lawrence.
whaT: Free State Film Festival:
Panels
where: Lawrence Arts Center, 940
New Hampshire St
when: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
aBouT: Panels at 11 a.m. and 1
p.m. will discuss flm acting and
local flmmaking, respectively.
whaT: Lawrence in Arabia:
A Celebration of Arab Culture
where: Burge Union
when: 6 to 8:30 p.m.
aBouT: Enjoy Arabic music, food,
dance and more at this event hosted
by the KU Arab Student Union.

whaT: Worldwide Vegan Bake Sale
in Lawrence
where: South Park
when: 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
aBouT: Pick up vegan sweet treats
at the South Park gazebo this Sun-
day. All proceeds go to the Lawrence
Humane Society.
SAFETy
HEALTH
Phone app combats sexual assault
eMily donoVan
edonovan@kansan.com
China home to new lethal fu
BEIJING — A new strain of
bird flu that emerged in China
over the past month is one of the
“most lethal” flu viruses so far,
worrying health officials because
it can jump more easily from
birds to humans than the one that
started killing people a decade
ago, World Health Organization
officials said Wednesday.
Scientists are watching the
virus closely to see if it could
spark a global pandemic but say
there is little evidence so far that
it can spread easily from human
to human.
WHO’s top influenza expert,
Dr. Keiji Fukuda, told reporters at
a briefing in Beijing that people
seem to catch the H7N9 virus
from birds more easily than the
H5N1 strain that began ravaging
poultry across Asia in 2003. The
H5N1 strain has since killed 360
people worldwide, mostly after
contact with infected fowl.
Health experts are concerned
about H7N9’s ability to jump to
humans, and about the strain’s
capacity to infect birds without
causing noticeable symptoms,
which makes it difficult to moni-
tor its spread.
“This is definitely one of the
most lethal influenza viruses we
have seen so far,” Fukuda said.
But he added that experts are still
trying to understand the virus,
and that there might be a large
number of mild infections that
are going undetected.
The H7N9 bird flu virus has
infected more than 100 people
in China, seriously sickening
most of them and killing more
than 20, mostly near the eastern
coast around Shanghai. Taiwan
on Wednesday confirmed its
first case, a 53-year-old man who
became sick after returning from
a visit to the eastern Chinese
province of Jiangsu.
In comparison, the earlier bird
flu strain, H5N1, is known to kill
up to 60 of every 100 people it
infects.
Wednesday’s briefing came
at the end of a weeklong joint
investigation by WHO and
Chinese authorities in Beijing and
Shanghai.
Experts said they still aren’t
sure how people are getting
infected but said evidence points
to infections at live poultry mar-
kets, particularly through ducks
and chickens. They said it was
encouraging that reported infec-
tions appeared to slow down after
the closure of live poultry mar-
kets in affected areas.
assoCiaTed Press
Follow
@udK_news
on Twitter
wanT news
uPdaTes
all day
long?
where To Turn
CirCle of 6
circleof6app.com
The willow doMesTiC
ViolenCe CenTer, 24-hour
Crisis line
(785) 843-3333
gadugi safeCenTer, 24-hour
suPPorT
(785) 843-8985
safe ride
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Thursday, april 25, 2013
information based on the
douglas County sheriff’s Office
booking recap.
A 22-year-old male was arrested
Tuesday on the 3600 block of 25th
Street on suspicion of aggressive
battery. A $2,000 bond was paid.
A 33-year-old female was ar-
rested Tuesday on the 400 block of
Ames Street on suspicion of oper-
ating a vehicle under the influence
and transporting an open contain-
er. A $600 bond was paid.
A 23-year-old female was ar-
rested Tuesday on the 100 block of
11th Street on suspicion of culti-
vation or distribution of controlled
substance, possession of drug
paraphernalia and no tax stamp. A
$10,000 bond was paid.
paGE 3a ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
Mike Getto, assistant KU football
coach in the ‘30s and ‘40s, brought
the Jayhawk back to his hometown of
Jeannette, PA, where it was adopted
by the high school and remains their
mascot to this day.



Police rePorTS
100Th birThdAy
weddinG bellS
cAMPUS
reAd A booK
University celebrates anniversary
40th annual book sale will
be at county fairgrounds
From romance to graphic novels, students
can choose from a selection of 50,000 to
60,000 books costing $2 or less beginning
Thursday afternoon at the biannual Friends
of the lawrence Public library book sale.
The selection comprises 65 genres of
books including many classics required in
philosophy, history and english classes at
the University, said ruth dewitt, Friends of
the lawrence Public library coordinator. At
a cost of $1 for paperbacks and $2 for hard-
backs, students can fnd a bargain on the
variety of books, whether they are mysteries,
science fction novels or children’s books,
dewitt said. dVds, cds and video games will
also be on sale.
“you can walk out with an armload of
books for $10,” dewitt said. “instead of pay-
ing $24 for a copy of, say, Moby dick, they can
get it here for one or $2.”
now in its 40th year, the sale will be at the
douglas county Fairgrounds, on harper St.
between 19th and 23rd Street, and will open
only to Friends members Thursday from 4 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Membership can be purchased for
$10 at the door. The sale will then be open to
the public and continue Friday and Saturday
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., and the remaining
selection will be half price on Sunday from 12
p.m. to 6 p.m.
dewitt said the books on sale are dona-
tions from the public throughout the year to
the Friends of the lawrence Public library.
“All the money we raise goes back to the
library,” dewitt said.
— Marshall Schmidt
leave your Mark at the rec
The leave your Mark mural contest, spon-
sored by the Ambler Student recreation Fitness
center, is a chance for students to be a part of
campus and give back to the student-funded
building.
rebecca Goering, communications coordi-
nator for the rec, said they created the contest
to get students involved while honoring dr.
david Ambler, whom the building was named
after.
“we want students to be able to add to it in
a fun and cool way and still have a tie-in with
dr. Ambler,” she said.
Any student is able to submit a design. The
rules specify that the design must incorporate
a non-abstract Jayhawk and a quote by Am-
bler: “remember your nest; return to it often.
And never forget this unique bird that has set
you free!”
entries should include an explanation of the
design, including what symbolism is incorpo-
rated and the inspiration for the design, and
the participant’s name, phone number and
email. entries must be submitted to the rec’s
offce by June 12 at 5 p.m.
The winning entry will be painted on a
34-by-8-foot cinderblock wall at the rec.
Goering is hoping the contest draws a lot of
student participation.
“it’s a fun way to get the students involved
in another way besides coming here to work
out,” she said.
For more information and contest guide-
lines, visit http://recreation.ku.edu/mural_
contest.shtml.
— Emma LeGault
One of John Guenther’s favor-
ite quotes by Winston Churchill
reads: “We shape our buildings;
thereafter they shape us.”
Much like the buildings men-
tioned, Guenther, a 1977 graduate
of the KU School of Architecture,
believes that the faculty over the
past century
has helped
to shape his
education and
professi onal
career.
“They have
been formed
through a vari-
ety of experi-
ences from
their own
teachers, and
they came to Kansas to in turn
educate us and shape us and form
us,” he said. “When I think about
the University of Kansas and my
experience there, it’s sort of like
this wonderful quiltwork of peo-
ple and experiences.”
That quilt extends 100 years,
and this weekend, the School
of Architecture Planning and
Design will commemorate a cen-
tury of being one of the most
highly regarded programs in the
Midwest.
When Stephen Grabow, a pro-
fessor at the school, came to the
school 40 years ago, he was sur-
prised to see faculty from all over
the country as well as overseas.
As he became the school’s unof-
ficial historian, he realized the
“diverse and cosmopolitan” fac-
ulty were well-versed in the field.
“I realized
how many
amazing con-
nections there
were to some of
the most famous
and significant
people in the his-
tory of modern
architecture,” he
said. “So this lit-
tle school on the
prairie is actually
incredibly well-connected.”
In fact, the school’s first profes-
sor, Goldwin Goldsmith, was an
apprentice to Stanford White, one
of the most famous architects in
New York.
“What’s distinct about the place
is that it is from the very begin-
ning made up of people who are
highly recognized within the
field,” Grabow said.
Since 1912, thousands of faculty
members and students have come
and gone, but lately, Grabow has
noticed a “generational change” in
the school. However, the new fac-
ulty are equipped with new points
of view and experiences.
”They bring the same variety
of skills and experiences and so I
think the future is with that new
generation of both students and
faculty,” he said. “They’re differ-
ent, but they’re just as diverse.”
Looking back on his time at the
school, Guenther remembers a
certain professor, Fount Smothers,
having an impact on him during a
studio project at Lake Perry.
Teams of three to five designed
a shelter to live in for a weekend at
the lake, incorporating elements
of environmental design. During
the project, Guenther said heavy
rains turned their peninsula into
an island.
While professors debated to
save them, Smothers said they
must see it through to the end.
“It was absolutely the most
incredible educational experience,
it was an experience with com-
munity to be literally with all of
your classmates on this island,
no one can really get to you, so to
speak,” he said. “It’s just this won-
derful weekend of community,
and design and camaraderie and
fellowship. I’ll never forget it.”
In his career, Guenther said
environmental design has been
most important to himself and his
practice in St. Louis.
“It’s just fascinating to me as
I reflect upon how we’ve been
shaped and formed by our profes-
sors at the University of Kansas,
it has influenced us and inspired
us to go forward,” he said. “It’s a
beautiful continuum if you really
stop and think about that students
there today are having those same
kinds of experiences.”
Andrew Kloppenburg, a sec-
ond-year M-Arch student and
student of Grabow’s from St.
Louis, said the school goes beyond
teaching technical skills.
“What impresses me is how
our studio professors teach us to
see, think, and plan differently,”
he said. “We are taught to focus
on broad concepts objectively, but
also instructed to apply concepts
in practical applications, doing so
artfully.”
Events to commemorate the
100th anniversary of the school
include a birthday party, reception
and alumni banquet on Friday
and tours of Marvin Hall and Joe’s
Donuts on Saturday.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
EMMa lEGaulT
elegault@kansan.com

“what’s distinct about the
place is that it is from the
very beginning made up of
people who are highly rec-
ognized within the feld.”
STePhen GrAbow
Professor of Architecture
State passes gay marriage legislation
assOCiaTEd prEss
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rhode
Island is on a path to becoming
the 10th state to allow gay and
lesbian couples to marry afer a
landmark vote in the state’s Sen-
ate on Wednesday.
Te Senate passed gay mar-
riage legislation by a comfortable
26-12 margin, following a House
vote of approval in January. Te
bill must now return to the House
for a largely procedural vote, like-
ly next week, but the celebration
began Wednesday.
Hundreds of people flled the
Statehouse with cheers following
the vote.
“I grew up in Rhode Island and
I’d like to retire in Rhode Island,”
said Annie Silvia, 61, who now
lives with her partner of 30 years
just across the border in North
Attleboro, Mass. “No. 10 is a nice
round number, but I’d like it to be
bigger. Fify sounds good to me.”
Heavily Catholic Rhode Island
is the last remaining New Eng-
land state without gay marriage.
Marriage legislation has been
introduced in the state for nearly
two decades, only to languish on
the legislative agenda.
Supporters mounted a renewed
push this year, and the Senate
vote was seen as the critical test
afer the House easily passed the
bill. Gov. Lincoln Chafee, an in-
dependent, called Wednesday’s
vote historic.
“I’m very much looking for-
ward to signing this,” he told Te
Associated Press as he congratu-
lated supporters.
Te frst gay marriages in
Rhode Island could take place
Aug. 1, when the legislation
would take efect. Civil unions
would no longer be available to
same-sex couples as of that date,
though the state would continue
to recognize existing civil unions.
Lawmakers approved civil unions
two years ago, though few couples
have sought them.
Hundreds of opponents also
gathered at the Statehouse for the
vote, singing hymns and holding
signs as the Senate deliberated.
Rev. David Rodriguez, a Provi-
dence minister, said he was dis-
appointed by the vote. He said he
planned to continue to stand up
for traditional marriage.
PAGE 4A thursdAy, APril 25, 2013
O
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STaTe poliTicS
Governor’s actions speak louder than words
Jimmy Kimmel makes music
snobs look completely foolish
Anti-gay groups lose
legitimate argument
muSic Human RigHTS
how do you feel about the
Ku Parking changes?
Follow us on Twitter @uDK_opinion. Tweet us your
opinions, and we just might publish them.
@Priskittle
@udK_Opinion just another way to
get more money out of us.
Hannah wise, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
sarah mccabe, managing editor
smccabe@kansan.com
nikki wentling, managing editor
nwentling@kansan.com
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dlysen@kansan.com
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efarrington@kansan.com
Jacob snider, sales manager
jsnider@kansan.com
malcolm Gibson, general manager and news
adviser
mgibson@kansan.com
Jon schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
tHe editOriAL bOArd
members of The Kansan editorial Board are Hannah Wise,
Sarah mccabe, nikki Wentling, Dylan lysen, elise Farrington
and Jacob Snider.
@ColinKarr
@udK_Opinion i feel like the parking
department is trying to make us
afraid to actually park anywhere.
@Kaydubbed
@udK_Opinion Still doesn’t change
my personal vendetta against the
parking Department’s ticketing. They
at least owe me a steak dinner.
G
ood ol’ Sam Brownback
has been touring the
Regent Schools and
stopped by the University this
week to tell us all how important
it is to fund these institutions. It
was a bold move to be sure.
Brownback has been trying to
drum up support for his “flat-
funding” strategy that would
maintain the level of funding cur-
rently received at these universi-
ties. The current level of funding
is under siege from the legislature
that Brownback has praised but
has also noted has a dangerous
mindset on education.
The legislature has mentioned
the amount of private fund-
raising done as a part of “Bold
Aspirations” as a reason why the
University could pick up the slack
if funding from the state was cut.
Gee, that kind of sounds a lot
like penalizing someone for suc-
ceeding in a capitalist environ-
ment, which would just be mildly
hypocritical given their conserva-
tive philosophy.
As Brownback himself said this
additional fundraising was meant
to be just that – supplemental. It
should not have to be a substitute
for the funding from the state.
Bold Aspirations doesn’t work
that way. Otherwise it would be
called something like “Dedication
to Stabilization” (or No Child Left
Behind).
According to Brownback the
legislature also wants to hold the
University accountable for years
of rising tuition, a noble pursuit
of course. However, Chancellor
Bernadette Gray-Little has said
that increasing tuition again
would be one of the first mea-
sures taken to cope with these
state funding cuts.
But Brownback doesn’t get off
the hook. Making the legislature
sound bad does not qualify as a
plan.
The legislature would not be
pushed to be making these new
cuts if it were not for his plan to
further reduce taxes. He has said
that with his plan we can keep
the current level of funding and
cut taxes. That plan isn’t ideal to
me, but I would certainly take it
over a cut to funding on top of
the reduced taxes.
But if Brownback’s plan does
not win out and the legislature
decides that because of the tax
revenue decrease that they will
have to cut funding to the uni-
versities, he needs to showcase
his aforementioned dedication to
state institutions and prioritize
their interests.
While it is nice of the governor
to tell us how important it is for
us to be funded, action would be
much more meaningful.
If Brownback were to say that
he will not go forward with his
plan for tax cuts without approval
of his budget which includes sta-
bilizing funding, that would show
some teeth. An actual display of
where education lies on his prior-
ities would be worth much more
than another pep talk. That is the
great thing about political office
holders. As much as they talk, the
actual way that they spend money
is real tangible evidence of what
matters to them the most.
A real commitment to educa-
tion like that is the only way to
prove that students and the insti-
tutions are a priority. Although it
seems they all say it, many fewer
back it up.
Brownback has said cutting
funding to our universities will
threaten plans for economic
development. I hope he does
something about it.
Cosby is a sophomore majoring in
economics and political science
from Overland Park. Follow him on
Twitter @claycosby
By Clay Cosby
ccosby@kansan.com
T
here is no longer a legiti-
mate policy argument
against gay marriage. If
you can find me one, please con-
tact me, I’d be very interested to
hear it. The anger and political
discontent is no more than fuel
to get constituents riled up and
gather them to the political base.
European streets were filled
with masked men, and riot police
volleying gas canisters over mas-
sive crowds. Many had been
beaten out in the open streets.
Letters filled with gunpowder
have been sent to members of
parliament. This wasn’t a Greek
protest against austerity or a ter-
rorist plot. These were scenes
from Paris in the days leading
up to a vote on gay marriage last
week.
Presented with events like that,
it really is time to take a break
from congratulating the LGBTQ
movement in France and spend
a few minutes scrutinizing the
global anti-gay movement and its
true motives.
It’s weird how, in a world of
drone strikes, Syrian civil war,
and bomb plots left and right,
the issue that consistently brings
the public out in droves is letting
two people in love get married.
This anti-gay movement has
characterized marriage equal-
ity as an “assault on traditional
marriage,” but here’s a friendly
reminder: fewer than 5 percent
of Americans identify as LGBTQ,
according to a Williams Institute
study from 2012. This isn’t some
gay Gestapo bearing down on
innocent straight people and
melting their rings down. There
isn’t an LGBTQ counterpart to
the Koch Brothers, spending
millions out of pocket to make
everyone get gay married. This
is a wildly successful grassroots
movement on the side of truth
that is finally hitting pay dirt.
Even the progressive Mecca
of Paris has its enclaves of far-
right activists scrabbling to spark
political unrest. The conservative
party is crumbling in France.
With Sarkozy gone and infight-
ing completely devastating their
political viability, the issue of gay
marriage has been the conserva-
tive’s chance to unify.
Yes, it’s true: The freedom and
rights of millions are being held
hostage to maybe help win an
election a few years ahead. That’s
not such a shocking thing to hear
anymore.
This phenomenon isn’t iso-
lated to France. Conservatives in
America are on their last rope –
According to USA Today, Rhode
Island will soon allow gay mar-
riage – and holding out on what
has become a major part of their
platform gives them the illusion
of unity. The more bombastic
and insane the dialogue they can
generate around the issue, the
more constituents they can pull
onto the bandwagon. That’s why,
according to Associated Press,
Michigan Republican National
Committee Leader Dave Agema
continued to defend an article
he shared that claimed that gays
and lesbians account for “half
the murders in major cities.”
What was his reason for holding
his ground? He was just try-
ing to maintain the traditional
Republican platform.
Good on you, President
Hollande and the French parlia-
ment, for calling a political bluff
when you see one. Bowing to a
maneuver like that would have
just proven that if you can get
angry enough, the debate around
an issue doesn’t matter. I hope
that when the time comes in
America, we’ll do the same.
If Rhode Island is any indica-
tion, we’re on the right track.

Kenney is a freshman majoring in
political science and journalism
from Shawnee
By Wil Kenney
wkenney@kansan.com
To the smokers by the Haworth load-
ing dock: There’s a dumpster next to you.
Throw your butts away.
i concur to having the “game of
Thrones” theme song play from the bell
tower. That would be a+.
Yeah, man. Sunglasses are so main-
stream. i don’t wear them, i just squint
at the sun all day and damage my eyes.
Hey, what if maybe we didn’t just
automatically judge everyone from
Johnson county.
i agree leggings are great, but who
needs pants?
The only time i see decent, attractive
men is when i’m drenched in sweat at
the gym. #foreveralone
You shouldn’t just get in the FFa be-
cause you want to before you graduate.
#WorkForit
all of the fowers at the chi o fountain
look sad and that makes me sad.
“Harry potter” and “game of
Thrones?” consider them a work in
progress. - a “bell tower” player.
To the person who said they bet gats-
by was in a frat, have you ever even read
the novel? #pretentiousenglishmajor
To Student Housing: please turn the
heating back oFF. Sincerely, schol hall
residents.
a little kid said to me while walking
down the Boulevard, “congrats! You
don’t go to K-State!” my faith in every-
thing just got renewed!
i pregame for the pregame.
oh, you hate on people from Johnson
county? You must have a lot of friends
here at Ku.
@ffaeditor big fan its my birthday
plz RT
To the person upset with my 420 FFa,
i meant we wake up before dawn to start
smoking and continue to smoke all day
until the next morning. chill out bro.
note to all professors: Bringing your
kid to class is unprofessional. So stop
doing it.
But you’re not the creeper lawrence
needs.
pleaSe pleaSe STop TalKing aBouT
leggingS. We all know girls wear them
to make their butts look good.
if you think gatsby was in a frat you
haven’t read the book.
Foe? at Ku it’s more like poe.. pedes-
trians over everything. #RightofWay
Some advice to those looking to get
into the FFa: try not to look desperate. it
makes you look bad.
alright so we’ve got these beautiful
fowers planted just in time for spring...
Boom WinTeR... annnnnnnd they’re
gone.
The best pants are no pants.
nothing kills classy quicker than
cargo pockets.
L
ate night talk-show host
and habitual button-
pusher Jimmy Kimmel is
pretty good at making people
look stupid.
Over the last few years, he’s
mastered the art of viral videos,
too. His show “Jimmy Kimmel
Live” is most known for its
hilarious, unrehearsed segments
involving regular people. For
example, last year, he encour-
aged his viewers to tell their
children they had eaten all their
Halloween candy, tape the reac-
tion and post it to YouTube. The
compilation — which was some-
how both hilarious and ador-
ably heartbreaking — racked up
millions of viewers on YouTube
(it was all a joke and the kids
still got their Halloween candy
in the end… I think). He made
a similar video by asking people
to unplug the television during
a pivotal play in the Super Bowl.
People understandably flipped
out and it turned into comedic
gold.
Another one of his popular
segments is called “Liewitness
News,” in which Kimmel sends
a cameraman and reporter out
on the street to ask passers by
trick questions. This week, he
sent the cameras to Coachella,
a California music festival and
worldwide music snobbery sum-
mit, to ask festivalgoers about
which bands they planned on
seeing. If you’ve never been to a
big music festival, tons and tons
of obscure bands play the smaller
stages throughout the day before
the headliners play at night. Most
of them you haven’t heard of.
So Kimmel’s reporter made
up a bunch of ridiculous, fake
band names — like “The Chelsea
Clintons,” or “Get the F**k Out
of my Pool” — and asked patrons
what they thought about each
band. The result? Many lied and
said they’d heard of each band,
adding all-too-familiar lines
about how “unique” and “inno-
vative” each bands’ sound is. The
idea was a success; almost every-
one spewed out elaborate lies
to the camera without so much
as batting an eye. It went viral
instantly.
Though watching unsuspect-
ing people rattle off ad-libbed
B.S. is funny in its own right, the
reason this particular edition of
“Liewitness News” is so funny is
because it’s so dead-on — it’s so
real that it hurts. If you don’t get
that, you’ve probably never met a
music snob.
If you’re “really into music,”
nine times out of 10, you’re going
to be a music snob. That’s just
the way it goes; I’m a music snob,
too. Most of us began our jour-
ney in snobbery when we first
went through a type of “phase”
as young teenagers. For me, it
started when my cousin gave me
a Rancid album, thus beginning
my years-long love affair with
punk rock. Other people started
off with an emo phase, or a metal
phase.
In those days, we developed a
sense of pride in finding obscure
bands that none of our friends
— those damn mainstreamers —
had ever heard of. If that band
made it big and everyone started
listening to them, we got pissed.
That’s why, if you ask a music
snob if they like Green Day,
they’ll say something along the
lines of, “Yeah, but I stopped lis-
tening to them around the time
when they put out ‘American
Idiot.’” That’s what I say, and
that’s why I’m a music snob.
Though it pains me to admit
it, there have been plenty of
times where I’ve pulled the same
B.S. routine as the Coachella
fans in the video; someone will
have asked me, “Hey man, have
you heard of [blank]?” Since I’m
a music snob and don’t want to
come off as being out-of-the-
loop, I’d lie and say I had when
I actually hadn’t. My go-to line
was always, “I’ve heard some of
their older stuff. They’re pretty
good.”
Music snobs are people,
though, and people eventually
grow. As I got older, I stopped
feeling resentment towards some
of my favorite bands when-
ever they put out a hit song and
everyone started listening to
them. I began to understand that
it’s perfectly acceptable to have
never heard of a particular band;
no matter how “cool” they may
be at that particular moment.
Eventually, you start to realize
that no one is capable of being
completely in-the-loop. You can’t
win ‘em all.
That’s OK, though. It’s OK to
say that you’re not cool enough
to have heard of some new band.
It sucks, but it’s OK. This realiza-
tion is part of our evolution as
music snobs. The first step to
recovery is admitting you have
a problem, and I, like many of
my fellow music snobs, have that
problem. It’s time to fix it.
And, for the record, I always
liked “American Idiot.” Don’t tell
my friends.
Barbosa is a junior majoring in
journalism from Leawood.
Follow him on Twitter @AJBARBROSA
By AJ Barbosa
abarbosa@kansan.com
Thursday, april 25, 2013 page 5a
HOROSCOPES
Because the stars
know things we don’t.
Crossword
sudoku
check ouT
The answers
http://bit.ly/ZJezZh
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
aries (March 21-april 19)
Today is an 8
Figure out your finances. If you
asked for a tax filing extension,
now may be a good time to com-
plete your return. don’t wait for
october. Get it done and celebrate.
Taurus (april 20-May 20)
Today is an 8
Vivid expressions of love and cre-
ativity bubble forth. Your team is
on fire with productivity, and your
leadership capabilities impress.
It’s a good time to get messages
across. Haste makes waste.
gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 9
Get inspired by your work. The
action may be backstage, but you
can still participate. It’s a great
time to write your novel. Craft
the infrastructure. Be bold, and
prosper.
cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is an 8
stifle outrage for now. distrac-
tions are abundant. keep focusing
on what you want, especially your
financial objectives. relax with
friends and something tasty later.
You’ll have an entertaining story.
leo (July 23-aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Put your own oxygen mask on so
you can help others. keep your
nest tidy. someone surprises you
by acknowledging you for the
value you provide. don’t gloss over
it. Take it in.
Virgo (aug. 23-sept. 22)
Today is an 8
It’s all so clear now. handle
priorities first, and explain it to
co-workers. Accept a creative as-
signment. Also offer your support
for another’s project. upgrade
workplace technology. Expect
another great learning experience.
libra (sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is a 9
It’s getting lucrative, but it’s too
easy to spend new income. shop
to get the best deal. Act quickly,
but not impulsively. Love is all
around; share your dreams and
everything looks possible.
scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
Today is an 8
The next few days get active and
fun. A turning point regarding
home and career keeps you busy.
use your experience wisely. Get
what you need from far away. It’s
refreshing.
sagittarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
Today is a 7
Curtail spending for now, and
review priorities and plans. dead-
lines are looming; keep your focus.
Clean out closets, and discover
something that was missing. You
have plenty, distribute it wisely.
capricorn (dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
A new money-making scheme
tempts, and a scheduling tool
opens new possibilities. Your
public life interferes with privacy.
some things may have to be left
behind. Enjoy the attention.
aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an 8
Take responsibility. Choose strate-
gies and budget. Accept coaching
from the competition. Imagine it
flowing perfectly.
pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
You’d rather play than work; take
advantage of the mood for future
planning. Communication around
scheduling eases crankiness. You
don’t always have to say “yes.” A
great burden lifts.
Zombie’s ‘Lords of Salem’
conjures up limited freights
B
eneath the dreadlocked
tresses and the inky armor
of his many, many tattoos,
Rob Zombie has always been a
movie geek at heart, a fanboy
trapped in the body of a motley
shock-rocker. White Zombie, the
now-defunct metal band he co-
founded in 1985, took its name
from a 1932 Bela Lugosi voodoo
thriller, and songs like “Living
Dead Girl” and “Never Gonna
Stop (The Red Red Kroovy)” are
littered with loving allusions to
sci-fi and horror classics like “The
Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” and “A
Clockwork Orange.”
After years of directing his own
music videos, Zombie shambled
into cinema with the backwoods
creepshow “House of 1,000
Corpses” and its gleefully demon-
ic successor “The Devil’s Rejects.”
The latter established him as a
legitimate filmmaker with a knack
for blending gruesome violence
with kooky referential humor, like
his decision to name every mem-
ber of the murderous Firefly fam-
ily after a different Groucho Marx
character. The critical and com-
mercial success of “Devil’s Rejects”
led to a glut of new projects,
including a gratuitous remake of
“Halloween” and its sequel, as well
as collaborations with the likes
of Quentin Tarantino and Robert
Rodriguez.
As a longtime fan of the man’s
work and his obvious rever-
ence for the horror genre (he
was the original host of TCM
Underground), it saddens me to
report that Zombie’s latest offer-
ing, “The Lords of Salem,” rep-
resents a rare creative misfire: a
glacially paced, grossly overpro-
duced 101-minute music video
masquerading as a serious stab
at slow-burn suspense. Despite all
his gifts, Zombie doesn’t have a
subtle bone in his body, and “The
Lords of Salem” tries so hard to
seem artful and restrained that it
eventually just becomes tiresome.
The languorous plot centers on
Heidi (the director’s real-life bride
Sheri Moon Zombie), a radio DJ
and recovering drug addict from
Salem, Mass. who becomes the
unwitting target of an ancient
coven of witches after playing a
cursed vinyl record on her late
night call-in show. Soon her apart-
ment is overrun by gruesome new
tenants, including a trio of cack-
ling crones, a shadowy Yeti-type
creature and, most ridiculous of
all, a solemn, stump-like monster
baby who communes with Heidi
via two floppy umbilical cords.
Zombie, perhaps mindful of his
material’s shortcomings, franti-
cally references everything from
Mario Bava’s “Black Sunday” and
Benjamin Christensen’s “Häxan:
Witchcraft Through the Ages”
to Roman Polanski’s apartment
trilogy (“Repulsion,” “Rosemary’s
Baby” and “The Tenant”) while
failing to replicate even an ounce
of what made those films so
engrossing and terrifying in the
first place. Yes, the scene where
the painting in Heidi’s bathroom
starts vomiting blood is a nifty
homage to David Lynch’s early
short “Six Figures Getting Sick,”
but in context its inclusion feels
about as random and forced as a
bad “Family Guy” cutaway gag.
Another problem with “The
Lords of Salem” is its star. Sheri
Moon Zombie is an attractive
character actress (she spends
most of the film in various states
of undress) who demonstrated
unexpected dramatic chops as
the Squeaky Fromme-esque Baby
in “The Devil’s Rejects” and later
as the tragic mother of Michael
Myers in 2007’s “Halloween.” Yet
she struggles to convincingly por-
tray the comparatively normal
Heidi, whose apartment’s groovy
décor (including an impres-
sive wall-size still from Georges
Méliès’ “A Trip to the Moon”) sug-
gests a rich interior life the script
never finds the words to properly
convey. As a rule, it’s never a good
idea to let your film’s set design
out-act your leading lady.
Aside from some memorably
depraved visuals in the third act
– ahem, dildo-stroking demon
priests – the only reason to see
“The Lords of Salem” is to wit-
ness the gloriously over-the-top
performances of its titular witches,
especially the otherworldly Meg
Foster (“They Live”) as the ageless,
sexless Grand High Witch and
Kansas City native Dee Wallace
(best known as the mom from
“E.T.”) as an exceptionally bubbly
bride of Satan. The rest is merely
a gilded showcase for the banality
of evil.
— Edited by Megan Hinman
By Landon McDonald
lmcdonald@kansan.com
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Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 6a ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
With celebrities announcing
their pregnancies left and right
these days, it seems as if having a
baby bump is the hottest accessory.
That, or there must be something
in the water in Hollywood. Stars
such as Kim Kardashian, Fergie,
Halle Berry and Penelope Cruz
have all refused to let fashion slide
as their pregnancies proceed.
The bump trend is even popular
overseas. Kate Middleton, European
supermodel Eva Herzigova and
heiress Peaches Geldof were all on
Vanity Fair’s list of Top-10 Best-
Dressed Pregnant Ladies. Who
ever thought that a large belly
could be so stylish?
The mothers-to-be seem to have
one thing in common (besides
being pregnant). Each of the
famous beauties is taking mater-
nity fashion to a whole new level.
The gals are dressing to impress,
always showing their pregnancy
rather than hiding it. What you’d
think would be time for oversized
tops and sweats has instead now
turned into a time for form-fitting
garments. Dresses seem to be the
go-to garment. Whether it’s mini
or maxi length, pregnant women in
the lime light are making sure their
bump is the main feature.
The ladies aren’t even letting
their shoe game slide. Being that
one of the biggest complaints from
pregnant women is foot pain, you’d
think that sky-high pumps would
be the last shoe choice for a woman
expecting. That doesn’t stop
Kardashian from stomping around
in her Louboutins, or Fergie from
wearing neon heels from her very
own shoe line. Hold for applause.
Of course, the best thing about
maternity fashion is the glow
that comes with it. Does anyone
remember Amber Rose at the
Grammy’s earlier this year? Wiz
Khalifa’s fiancée was not just glow-
ing, but rather radiating in a form-
fitting black Donna Karan gown.
Rose was about to pop at the event,
and gave birth to her and Khalifa’s
son just days later.
There couldn’t possibly be any-
thing more beautiful than a woman
embracing her pregnancy through
high fashion. What used to seem
to be nine months of torture now
doesn’t seem to be too bad (with
the help of good styling). Women
everywhere should take after this
year’s expecting celebrity mothers
and their fashion sense. After all,
you are dressing for two.
— Edited by Megan Hinman
fashion health
associaTEd prEss
the Black eyed Peas songstress still dresses to impress
despite being pregnant. fergie wore this printed mini dress
and neon sandals from her own shoe line, fergie shoes, at
the 2013 Kid’s Choice awards.
associaTEd prEss
a very pregnant Kim Kardashian sports a form-ftting black mini
dress with sheer sleeves backstage at the Kid’s Choice awards
in Culver City, Calif. on april 14.
McclaTchy TribuNE
Celebrities faunt pregnancy
the Rock’s surgery successful
callaN rEilly
creilly@kansan.com
Dwayne Johnson had an emer-
gency operation for three hernial
tears he suffered while wrestling
John Cena during WrestleMania
earlier this month.
The actor-wrestler, better known
as “The Rock,” underwent surgery
Monday, which is why he missed
the Los Angeles premiere for his
latest flick, “Pain & Gain,” E! News
reported. The movie costars Mark
Wahlberg and opens Friday.
But the 40-year-old is doing fine
now, saying that the surgery was
successful.
“Surgery a success! Dr repaired 3
hernial tears (fun pain). Superman
is on the mend.. #WeFallWeRise,”
Johnson tweeted Tuesday with a
photo of himself in a hospital bed,
flexing in a Superman T-shirt.
His publicist Alan Nierob told
the Associated Press that he is now
recovering at home.
Johnson, 40, wrestled with Cena
on April 7 at Wrestlemania 29 to
defend his championship title, but
he lost the match, and his midsec-
tion suffered an even greater loss.
“In the middle of last night’s
Wrestlemania match I tore my
abdomen & abductor muscles
off the bone. Just part of the
job,” he wrote April 8, adding,
“But as we know... It’s all about
#JustBringIt. WWE Universe,
THANK YOU for all the love &
well wishes. Means everything to
me. #LeaveItAllInTheRing.”
On Sunday, Johnson announced
that he’d be having the surgery
this week and tweeted that his
doctor had to “push my intestines
back thru the tear in my abdomen.
Kinda romantic.”
The actor plays a workout-
obsessed body builder in the
upcoming film, and “Pain & Gain”
director Michael Bay gave his apol-
ogies for the Rock’s absence on the
red carpet Monday.
“Dwayne’s hurt tonight,” Bay
said “He was pushing it too hard.
(He) needs to grow up and stop
wrestling 300-pound men.”
It doesn’t seem as if Johnson
is shying away from the hulk-like
roles any time soon: He has already
been cast in the titular role of Brett
Ratner’s “Hercules: The Thracian
Wars.”
coNTribuTEd phoTo
Dwayne Johnson, better known as the Rock, tweeted this photo tuesday after his successful surgery to mend hernial tears.
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PAGE 7A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013
Two individuals and seven
student groups were honored
last night at the Jayhawk Choice
Awards. Sponsored by the Student
Involvement Leadership Center
(SILC), the banquet recognized
outstanding leaders and student
organizations on campus.
The AwArds
educATionAl ProgrAm
of The YeAr
This award honors a student
organization that sponsors a pro-
gram that provides students with
the opportunity to expand intellec-
tually and culturally in a learning
environment.
AwARDED to:
Dole Institute of Politics Student
Advisory Board — Gun Control:
Freedom vs. Safety
MEEtING tIMES:
Four to five times per semester,
all students are welcome
whY StUDENtS ShoULD joIN:
Networking opportunities
“We have a student-run pro-
gram every semester and this is
the first time we’ve been award-
ed. We are thrilled to be honored
with this,” Student Advisory Board
Coordinator Lexie Clark said.
sociAl ProgrAm of The YeAr
This award is given to a student
organization that sponsors a pro-
gram that brings students together
on campus and provides a sense of
community and unity.
AwARDED to:
Brazilian Student Association —
Brazilian Week
The Brazilian Student
Association kicked off Brazilian
Week with a movie night. Other
events included a Brazilian dinner,
discussions with guest speakers
and a Brazilian dance workshop.
Carnival, an annual festival, con-
cluded Brazilian Week. More than
600 people attended the Carnival
celebration hosted at Abe and Jake’s
Landing, on 8 East 6th St.
MEEtING tIMES:
Every Friday at 5:30 p.m. at
Cielito Lindo, 815 New Hampshire
St., all students are welcome
whY StUDENtS ShoULD joIN:
Brazilian experience, finding
friends
sociAl JusTice ProgrAm of The
YeAr
This award is given to a stu-
dent organization that sponsors a
program that raises awareness of
an important issue in society and
engages students.
AwARDED to:
Sigma Kappa Sorority — Circle
of Sisterhood Foundation program
PRoGRAM:
Raises awareness and funds for
women’s education, supports gen-
der equity
MEMbERS:
160
“Supporting this foundation is
something we feel strongly about
and being recognized for our
efforts is very humbling,” said Ariel
Puccetti, a senior from Leawood.
communiTY service ProgrAm of
The YeAr
This award is given to a student
organization that sponsors a
program, which engages students
in community service and sets an
example for the University.
AwARDED to:
KU Enactus and KU Fashion
Club - Dresses for a Difference
Enactus members: seven, open
to all students
whY StUDENtS ShoULD joIN:
Inclusive and beneficial to all
majors
Fashion Club members: 12-15,
open to all students
whY StUDENtS ShoULD joIN:
New organization, always look-
ing for new ideas and students to
get involved
PRoGRAM:
Held a pillow case drive on cam-
pus, hosted a campus wide sewing
event and created dresses out of the
pillow cases and donated them to
young women in Kenya
Ann eversole Advisor of The
YeAr
This award is given to an advi-
sor of a student organization who
demonstrates dedication and
impact while promoting students’
personal growth.
AwARDED to:
Dot Nary, advisor of AbleHawks
and Allies
MEMbERS:
20
Nary was the advisor with
AbleHawks and Allies when it
emerged about 10 years ago. She
has remained active with the group
its entire course and returned as
advisor recently. She said the group
is active and self-directed.
“I was very surprised,” Nary said.
“It’s especially meaningful because
it came from students.”
member of The YeAr
This award is given to a student
member of an organization who
demonstrates commitment and
provides a positive impact to the
group through that dedication.
AwARDED to:
Fatoumata Bayo, senior from
Warren, Mich.
INVoLVEMENt:
President of the Black Student
Union, member of Delta Epsilon
Mu, Chemistry Club and African
Students Association
Bayo is a transfer student who
immediately got involved when she
came to the University. She was
very involved at her first school
and knew that she wanted to be
just as involved at the University
as soon as she stepped on campus.
She said she wanted to help wher-
ever she could.
“I’m definitely honored that they
picked me out of so many great stu-
dent leaders,” Bayo said. “It helps
me grow more and makes me want
to help the KU community more.”
new orgAnizATion of The YeAr
This award is given to an orga-
nization created within the past
academic year that demonstrates
contribution to the campus envi-
ronment.
AwARDED to:
Jayhawk Initiative for Student
Theatre
MEMbERS:
10 active, about 25 during pro-
ductions
FIRSt YEAR:
Raised $7,000, produced nine
student-run live performing arts
events
“We’ve known all our hard work,
but being recognized on the cam-
pus level is rewarding, and we are
grateful for that,” said Associate
Director Charlie Stock, a senior
from Topeka.
sTudenT orgAnizATion of The
YeAr for AcAdemic enrichmenT
This award is given to a student
organization that provides services
and programs that enhance the aca-
demic life of the larger University
community.
AwARDED to:
Alternative Breaks
PARtIcIPANtS:
About 500 students participated
in alternative breaks this year
whY StUDENtS ShoULD joIN:
Academic enrichment through
service
“It’s one of the best ways to con-
textualize academics,” said Bailey
Reimer, a senior from Shawnee.
sTudenT orgAnizATion of The
YeAr for sTudenT life
enrichmenT
This award is given to a student
organization that provides services
and programs that maximize stu-
dent experience on campus.
AwARDED to:
KU Hillel
MEMbERS:
750, open to all students
Hillel aims to enrich the lives of
Jewish students at the University to
in return enrich not only the Jewish
community but the community in
general. They host various events
throughout the year ranging from
large-scale dinner programs to
smaller education discussions.
“It’s a building community
to connect students,” said Cory
Gutovitz, senior executive intern
from Overland Park.
— edited by elise reuter
hANNAh bARLING
hbarling@kansan.com
campus
Jayhawk choice Awards honor silc organizations
ERIN bREMER/KANSAN
AboVE:
Representatives of the Brazilian student association accept the Jayhawk choice award for so-
cial program of the Year on wednesday in the Kansas room of the student union. The student
Involvement and Leadership center presented nine awards to honor great work by student
organizations throughout the year.
LEFt:
Representatives for alternative Breaks accept the Jayhawk choice award for student Organi-
zation of the Year for academic Enrichment on wednesday in the Kansas room of the student
union. The student Involvement and Leadership center presented nine awards to honor great
work by student organizations throughout the year.
ERIN bREMER/KANSAN
Representatives of sigma Kappa sorority accept the Jayhawk choice award for social Justice program of the Year on Wednesday in the Kansas
Room of the union. The student Involvement and Leadership center presented nine awards to honor great work by student organizations
throughout the year.
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PAGE 8A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013
The State of Kansas boasts a
plethora of native wildlife, which is
as diverse as any other state in the
country. However, unlike domesti-
cated pets, when a wild animal is
injured or orphaned, more often
than not, there is no place to take
it to be rehabilitated. Despite this
oversight, there is an organization
called “Operation Wildlife”, based
out of Linwood, Kan., that is help-
ing to remedy this issue.
“Our organization covers nine
Kansas counties or 4,500 sq. miles.”
said Diane Johnson, Executive
Director of Operation Wildlife.
The facility houses anywhere from
75 to 100 animals at a time and
operates purely through donations
and volunteers. The facilities are
staffed around the clock in order to
administer the needed care to the
“patients.”
Outside of simply taking in and
rehabilitating animals, the facility
also houses a number of “Public
Education Birds.” These animals
are birds of prey that have been
deemed unfit for survival in the
wild and are now used for edu-
cational purposes. After Kansas
Wildlife and Parks has approved
the birds, Operation Wildlife uses
them to provide wildlife education
to the public while asking only for
donations in return.
The fact that the organization is
run by volunteers offers a unique
opportunity to students here at
the University. Students studying
Environmental Studies or Biology
can apply to an internship program
offered by the organization, which
will give them not only experience
in the field but an independent
study credit with the University.
“This opportunity allowed me to
learn more about local wildlife that
I would otherwise not have known
since I’m from the city,” said Laura
Florick, a student volunteer.
Those who don’t necessarily
want to be directly involved are still
open to come in and visit the staff
or bring in any animals they may
come across that need assistance.
Although it is a little off the beaten
path, it is well worth the trip for
the wealth of wildlife housed there
that one would be hard-pressed to
come across while driving around
town. Their facilities house every-
thing from common squirrels and
rabbits to peregrine falcons and
even a bald eagle.
“This experience has not only
educated me on biodiversity and
how to deal with wildlife, it has also
given me a greater respect for life
in general,” Florick said.
Students who are interested
in getting involved, visiting the
facility, or simply donating to the
cause are welcome to visit www.
owl-online.org or contact them at
(785)-542-3625.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
for the birds
Operation Wildlife keeps critters safe
DANIEL PALEN/KANSAN
Courtney Quick, an intern from Lenexa, feeds an owl at operation Wildlife, an organization that provides rehabilitation services for injured and orphaned wild animals.
DANIEL PALEN/KANSAN
Volunteers at operation WildLife bottle-feed a baby squirrel. When the squirrel is
older, it will be released back into the wild.
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csisk@kansan.com
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PAGE 9A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013
illicit drugs
cocaine
marijuana
hallucinogens
psycotherapeutics
A
v
e
r
a
g
e

p
e
r
c
e
n
t

u
s
i
n
g

m
o
n
t
h
l
y
Year
’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10
KAtIE KUtSKo/KANSAN
This chart from the NIDA survey shows the national average monthly usage history for 18- to 25-year-olds over a
period of 8 years. Opiates are higher than marijuana in this example, and this only measures to 2010. While there is
an increased regional problem, there continue to be problems on the national scale as well, making opiate abuse one
of the largest drug issues Americans face.
NAtIoNAL DRUG tRENDS
Opiate addiction among 18-to
25-year-olds is a growing problem
spreading throughout southwest
Missouri and northeast Kansas.
Opiates include prescrip-
tion painkillers like morphine,
OxyContin, hydrocodone, and
Codeine. Illegal opiates like heroin
are also abused.
People of all ages are affected by
opiate abuse, but college students
are in an environment where drugs
are easily accessible, so there is
an increased risk. A report by the
National Institute on Drug Abuse
(NIDA) shows the rates of abuse
and addiction for 18-25 year olds.
The rates of abuse range from 10
to 12 percent, which is an increase
from past reports and puts opiate
abuse second only to marijuana
in the U.S. The recent spike in
opiate abuse is harmful to experi-
menting students as prescription
drugs become less accessible and
users turn to heroin as a cheaper
alternative.
Mission Missouri, located in
Scott County, Mo., works with
rehabilitation centers to develop
preventative strategies for stop-
ping observable drug trends. Jane
Pfefferkorn, the director of the
organization, said heroin use has
increased during the past eight
years in the St. Louis area.
Statistics for Mission Missouri
show an average of four out of
five incoming patients dealing with
opiate abuse. The number of opi-
ate-related deaths in Scott County
has increased from three to 14 in
about five years.
“In 2007, the percentage of opi-
ate abusers coming in was around
5 percent,” Pfefferkorn said. “By
the end of 2011, those rates had
increased to 60 percent.”
Johnson County Deputy Tom
Erickson had similar statistics.
Erickson said the problem with
opiates was almost non-existent in
Johnson County, Kan., before 2007,
and since then, there have been
more than 60 overdoses and 14
deaths from prescription and illicit
opiate use.
The issue both counties face is
users turning to heroin because
it’s cheaper and more convenient.
When users can’t afford or get
access to enough prescriptions,
they turn to an illicit drug with no
idea of the drug’s dosage.
“What we’re finding is that it’s
mostly young, active, intelligent
students who end up involved in
these overdose cases,” Erickson
said. “When the kids turn to her-
oin, they could be dealt a product
with anything from zero percent
potency, all the way to 100 percent
potency.”
Thomas Prisinzano is a profes-
sor and chair in the Department
of Medicinal Chemistry at the KU
School of Pharmacy. His field of
study deals with the opium poppy
and deriving opiates that can be
used to treat addiction to other
drugs, such as methamphetamine.
Prisinzano found the poppy to have
a non-addictive effect on subjects.
Through his research, he explains
how common opiates, such as mor-
phine and OxyContin, lack certain
health benefits because of their
high potential for addiction.
Prisinzano conducted a study of
the salvia divinorum plant, a highly
potent, hallucinogenic opiate out-
lawed in Kansas.
Prisinzano said that the ben-
efits of common prescription opi-
ates are limited by dependency
and addiction users get from the
drug. Despite this, opiates such as
OxyContin, morphine and hydro-
codone are still the most prescribed
drugs of their class.
Deputy Erickson makes it clear
that the problem is not limited
to any one demographic, but he
said the rates of overdoses by high
school to college-aged users are
among the highest. These statistics
show abuse with opiates is becom-
ing more of an issue in this part of
Kansas.
— Edited by Elise Reuter
tREVoR ottERStEIN
editor@kansan.com
KAtIE mcbRIDE
editor@kansan.com
Increase in opiate abuse trends
in parts of Kansas and Missouri
sTATe
cAmpus
A group of University students
had the chance to gain in-depth
knowledge about Mexico and
experience what it is like to be a
Mexican diplomat through one of
their classes this semester.
The University’s Center of Latin
American & Caribbean Studies
offers a Model Organization of
American States (MOAS) class,
which is open to students from
any major or background and
engages them in issues related to
the Americas. The students have
the chance to play the role of the
political officials and diplomats of
the Member States of the MOAS
in order to debate current matters
affecting the hemisphere.
Through representing the views
of a country other than their own,
students have the chance to famil-
iarize themselves with a global
perspective that varies from their
home country.
“Different countries look at the
world in different ways,” said Jorge
Soberón, the instructor for the
class. “It is a rich experience for
the students to learn to see the
world from someone else’s eyes.”
In order to familiarize them-
selves with the wide range of top-
ics they would be discussing, the
students learned about the history,
laws, economics and politics of
Mexico, which is the country that
they represented at the MOAS
conference in Washington D.C.
The conference was attended by
students from universities from
Latin America, the United States
and Canada.
“South of the border, the con-
cerns and needs are very different
from what they are here,” Joey
Hentzler, a sophomore majoring
in political science from Topeka
in the class, said. It becomes a
challenge for the students to be
able to understand the complexi-
ties of the issues and the signifi-
cance they have from the Mexican
perspective.
“You have to put yourself in
the diplomat’s shoes in order to
understand where they’re coming
from, what their goals are and
why they want to achieve them,”
Hentzler said.
Soberón discussed his involve-
ment in Mexican diplomacy with
the students to aid in their under-
standing.
“I use the real world experienc-
es I have to tell the students about
more subtle things that they don’t
see in books,” Soberón said.
The exercises that the students
have participated in during the
semester have allowed them to
think about the world in a broader
sense, and have led to their appre-
ciation for more global coopera-
tion among different countries,
said Hentzler.
“The challenge for some is
changing your mindset; it’s some-
thing you’re not used to,” said
Garrett Wolfe, a junior major-
ing in international studies from
Meridian, Idaho, in the class.
“You learn what it means to be
an American in the sense of the
hemisphere. We’re all of the hemi-
sphere; we’re all of the Americas.”
— Edited by Hayley Jozwiak
class gains cultural experience at D.c. conference
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
Volume 125 Issue 111 kansan.com Thursday, April 25, 2013
COMMENTARY
By Ben Ashworth
bashworth@kansan.com
out of the park
Raising the bar
for coach Weis
Jayhawks hit their way to a 7-1 victory against the Baker Wildcats
Senior jumpers lead team to victory
Colin Wright
cwright@kansan.com
BatteR up
tRack and field
PAGE 5B
Baseball
Preview
PAGE 4B
Softball Preview
L
et’s hope Charlie Weis en-
joyed his frst year coaching
Kansas football, where as long
he didn’t pull a Mike Rice or a Bob-
by Petrino, his frst season would be
considered a success. Because that
passive fan attitude is as good as
gone.
Let’s put it this way: Te Jay-
hawks won one game against a team
whose mascot was the Jackrabbits.
Tey won as many Big 12 games as
Missouri has Final Four appearanc-
es. Tey allowed 56 points against
Kansas State, and the number was
only that low because the Wildcats
stymied their ofense early in the
fourth quarter. Bill Synder could
have entered the game himself and
at least gotten a frst down before his
body crumbled.
Even so, the love for Weis has
been almost unconditional.
Every time he is introduced as he
is watching a game at Allen Field-
house, the crowd erupts in applause.
When confronted about his record,
Kansas fans are quick to defend
him.
“Look at what Turner Gill lef
him with. Wait until he recruits his
own talent.”
“We could have won against TCU,
Northern Illinois, Oklahoma State,
Texas, and Texas Tech last year.”
For the most part, these state-
ments are true. Gill lef the program
in bad shape. He didn’t ever appear
to truly connect with the players
and struggled with recruiting. And
it is accurate to say that Kansas was
competitive in all fve of those games
against superior opponents.
However, this acceptance of me-
diocrity ends now.
If Weis fails to drastically improve
upon last year’s record, the same
people who are currently defending
him will be the ones demanding his
fring papers. Tat is just the way
collegiate athletics works. Te fans
think they are being generous by
giving a coach one year of leeway
before releasing the hounds a year
later.
No one is asking Weis to turn the
team into a Big 12 contender over-
night. However, simply being com-
petitive in about half of the games
will no longer be sufcient. And
Weis certainly needs to avoid those
games that are not competitive. Get-
ting blown out again by the likes of
Oklahoma and West Virginia will
cause Weis to meet the same fate as
most of the pour souls on Donald
Trump’s “Te Apprentice.”
Weis has tools at his disposal to
make improvement happen. Jake
Heaps, unlike Dayne Crist before
him, appears to value the idea of
the completed forward pass. Justin
McCay gives the team a dynamic
receiver who can actually create
separation in the passing game. Te
running game, the strength of last
year’s team, should continue to be
an asset.
His recruiting class is nothing to
sneeze at either. Weis, realizing he
needs to win now, brought in a class
of solid junior college players, led by
defensive tackle Marquel Combs.
No longer can you say that he is
saddled with Gill’s feeble attempts to
build a football team. Tis is clearly
Weis’ team now.
Te low expectations ended with
the conclusion of last season.
We will see if Weis and his players
can rise to the occasion.
— Edited by Elise Reuter
The Kansas women’s track and
field squad has been breaking
records and winning awards both
during the indoor and outdoor
season. Senior horizontal jump-
ers Andrea Geubelle and Francine
Simpson have helped the Jayhawks
get where they
are today.
Geubel l e,
who hails from
Un i v e r s i t y
Place, Wash.,
has plenty of
hardware to
boast but isn’t
satisfied yet.
While she captured the individual
NCAA indoor championship titles
in both the long jump and the
triple jump last month, she has her
eyes on the team NCAA outdoor
Championship.
“Winning an indoor national
championship would have been
awesome,” said Geubelle. “But out-
door is just track season. That is
what everyone
sees as the sea-
son.”
Si mps on’s
hometown is
Cha p e l t on,
Jamaica, and
she is mak-
ing a name
for herself in the
long jump. Simpson has the far-
thest jump in school history in the
long jump, with a leap of 21’10.75”
last year at the Big 12 outdoor
championship.
“I feel great so far,” said Simpson.
“I’ve been training hard, I’m happy
with how things are going right
now. My main focus for the out-
door season is to stay healthy.”
They both have aspirations of
becoming professional track and
field athletes when their careers at
the University come to an end after
this season.
The teammates share a unique
relationship by both refusing to
lose and cheering each other on
when they face each other in the
long jump. They are often room-
mates when they travel to meets
as well, always spending time with
one another.
“No matter what, she’s my team-
mate,” said Geubelle. “She’s become
like a sister to me. To see her win,
I’m excited about that, but I’m not
happy that I just lost.”
For Simpson, the feeling is
mutual. “I love Andrea. She’s a
great person, I love working with
her, and I’m happy that I’m here.”
The women’s team, which has
been ranked in the top-five in
the nation by the U. S. Track &
Field and Cross Country Coaches
Association (USTFCCCA) for all
of the indoor and outdoor seasons,
and has received NCAA runner-
up finishes at the 2012 and 2013
indoor championships. They also
finished fourth at the 2012 outdoor
NCAA championship.
“It puts a target on our backs,”
said Geubelle. “There’s a much
higher standard held at practice
now. It’s just, we’re working hard
every day to hopefully achieve No.
1 because it doesn’t come all the
time.”
To show how dominant they
are, the two best long jumps in
the NCAA in the 2013 indoor
season belonged to Geubelle and
Simpson. They placed first and
third respectively at the NCAA
indoor championships to earn 16
points for the Jayhawks and have a
goal to make it a one-two finish at
the NCAA outdoors next month.
The ultimate goal for the seniors
in their remaining time is to claim
the NCAA team outdoor cham-
pionship, and they are outspoken
about that dream becoming a real-
ity.
“You kind of feel it at practice,”
said Geubelle. “Everybody is just
working really hard to hopefully
stand up to that expectation. We
have everything that we need to
win it.”
The Big 12 outdoor champion-
ships are May 3-5 in Waco, Texas,
on the Baylor University cam-
pus. The NCAA outdoor cham-
pionships will take place at the
University of Oregon’s campus in
Eugune, Ore., on June 5-8.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
Geubelle
Simpson
kansan file photo
Junior andrea Geubelle sprints down the lane before her fnal jump in the in the
triple jump during last year’s Jayhawk classic at anschutz pavilion. Geubelle
broke her previous record with her jump moving her into ninth place top-10 of the
all-time ncaa list in triple jump, at 13.91 meters at the tyson invite.
trevor graff
tgraff@kansan.com
george Mullinix/kansan
Senior infelder alex deleon runs around the bases after he muscled a pitch over left-center feld in the Jayhawks’ 7-1 win over Baker. the Jayhawks are now 25-15 overall and 9-6 in the Big 12.
Kansas senior first baseman
Alex DeLeon’s three-run home
run in the bottom of the fourth
jump started the Jayhawks’ 7-1
victory over the Baker Wildcats in
Hoglund Ballpark last night.
The three-run shot, DeLeon’s
team-leading sixth of the season,
carried high into the trees beyond
the left field wall.
“I wasn’t looking for any one
pitch,” DeLeon said. “I was just
looking for something up in the
zone that I could get into the out-
field. I ended up getting a slider
that was up and I put a good swing
on it.”
DeLeon’s shot might be the lon-
gest hit in Hoglund Ballpark this
season.
“Well, the ball was still going
up when it hit the trees,” senior
shortstop Kevin Kuntz said. “I just
put my head down when he hit,
because it probably one-hopped
Watson over there. I think it was
a curveball too. He did a good job
of just staying back and using his
hands.”
The Wildcats opened the game’s
scoring with a run scored off of
a sharply hit single to left field
from senior third baseman Bryan
Kindle.
The scoring quickly turned in
favor of the Jayhawks, who scored
seven unanswered, beginning
with an RBI single from junior
centerfielder Tucker Tharp and a
sacrifice fly from sophomore sec-
ond baseman Justin Protacio.
Senior shortstop Kevin Kuntz
scored Tharp on an RBI single
before DeLeon’s three-run homer
broke the game open in the fourth
inning. The Jayhawks rounded out
their scoring night on a wild pitch
that allowed freshman first base-
man Marcus Wheeler to score.
The Jayhawks struggled with
the lower velocities thrown by
Baker pitchers.
“Obviously the velocity wasn’t
what we’re used to playing in our
league,” coach Ritch Price said.
“There were so many off-speed
pitches. I was just disappointed
in the number of strikeouts.
We should’ve had a two strike
approach every time we stepped
in the box.”
Kansas hitters struck out nine
times but reached base via the
walk eight times and were hit
by pitches in four at-bats on the
night.
Kansas senior right-handed
pitcher Tanner Poppe continued
to battle tightness in his throwing
shoulder. In two innings pitched,
Poppe recorded three hits and
three strikeouts giving up one run
on 37 pitches.
“I was disappointed in his
effort,” Price said. “He’s a little sore
and he’s a really important guy to
us. Obviously we’ve had two dis-
appointing starts from him over
the last couple of weeks. We’ve got
two huge games against Wichita
State coming up that are just as
important as the weekends.”
Coach Price said after the game
that the Sunday spot in the rota-
tion will remain in flux entering
the weekend. He did say, however,
that junior right-handed pitcher
Frank Duncan could reenter the
rotation depending on his role as
a reliever over the weekend.
The Jayhawks start another crit-
ical weekend Big 12 series against
the West Virginia Mountaineers
Friday at 5:30 p.m. in Beckley,
W. Va.
— Edited by Elise Reuter
W
ould I be wrong to say that
the NFL is truly something
amazing? I mean there really
is nothing like spending a Sunday with
friends, having a couple of beers and
watching the testosterone levels of grown
men soar through the roof. Nothing
about the NFL seems to aggravate us,
even the Super Bowl’s blackouts. Well,
except for one thing. One thing does
aggravate me: the amount of publicity the
NFL receives.
The NFL Draft starts tonight, and I
was unfortunate enough to be reminded
about it because of all the coverage media
outlets like ESPN have being giving it.
At times, we forget that there are more
important things that should be covered
in the sports world — like the NBA
playoffs, or how the city of Boston is still
recovering from the bombings.
As an example of how much the NFL
is publicized, let’s take a look at the Super
Bowl. Year after year, sports fans, aver-
age people, everyone gathers around the
television for nearly five hours to sit on
the couch and watch something so over-
hyped that it makes nearly all other news
go unnoticed.
People often state that the Super Bowl
is the biggest game in all of sports, as
it is one of the most watched television
events all year. Yet, it is because we as a
society allow it to be. We make sure that
everyone watches it, regardless of their
interest level, and we practically make it
a national holiday.
Here’s another example regard-
ing: the NFL Draft. Every year, ESPN’s
SportsCenter does a segment called
“Gruden’s QB Camp,” where analyst Jon
Gruden meets with the top quarterbacks
of that year’s draft and breaks down film
with them. However, this year was a little
different. Gruden brought in players like
Manti Te’o, a defensive player, because
apparently there were not enough “top
quarterbacks” in this year’s draft.
Is that what it really game down to,
bringing in players that do not even fit
the title of the segment to keep the hype
and anticipation of the draft? I guess that
is what happens when you build a certain
standard and expectation for your audi-
ence. Regardless of what kind of players
appear on the segment, there is so much
information thrown at the average sports
fan through all of the in-depth analysis,
they cannot even comprehend what they
are listening to.
I understand I might just be saying all
of this because I am from Los Angeles,
so I did not grow up with a professional
football team in my city. Nonetheless, I
have never understood why not just the
NFL but football in general receives so
much publicity and attention. It is just
another sport. Maybe I will understand
when the NFL comes to Los Angeles, if it
ever does.
— Edited by Megan Hinman
!
?
Q: Which team once lost four Super
Bowls in a row?
A: Buffalo Bills

— thebestsportsblog.com
TriviA of The dAy

“Why is the NFL overhyped, over-
commercialed and downright dull?”
— Cincinnati Enquirer
columnist Paul Daugherty
With a rating of 48.1, this year’s
Super Bowl was the most watched
television event in U.S. history.
— LA Times
fAcT of The dAy
The MorNiNG BreW
QuoTe of The dAy
This week in athletics
Too much attention goes to the NFL
By Ryan Levine
rlevine@kansan.com
Wednesday Saturday Friday Sunday Thursday Monday
Baseball
West Virginia
5:30 p.m.
Beckley, W. Va.
Softball
Baylor
6 p.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Tennis
Big 12 Championship
All Day
Norman, Okla.
Women’s Soccer
UMKC
10 a.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Soccer
Arkansas
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Baylor
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Baseball
West Virginia
3 p.m.
Beckley, W. Va.
Softball
Baylor
Noon
Lawrence
Baseball
West Virginia
Noon
Beckley, W. Va.
Women’s Tennis
Big 12 Championship
All Day
Norman, Okla.
Baseball
Baker
6 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Wichita State
6 p.m.
Lawrence
No events scheduled
Women’s Tennis
Big 12 Championship
All Day
Norman, Okla.
Baseball
Wichita State
6 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Tuesday
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HIGHPOINTE APARTMENTS
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Part time help needed in busy doctors of-
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day & 2 Saturday mornings a month
7am-12pm. Job duties include phone,
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call (785)749-0130 to come fll out an ap-
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ARKANSAS VILLAS
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walking distance to campus, laundry,
porches & parking. Available for current
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3 BR and 4BR Available August.
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Call 785-766-7518.
4 and 7 BR houses.
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thomasd@sunfower.com NOW LEASING FALL 2013!
CAMPUS LOCATIONS!
Studios, 1 & 2 bedrooms
OFFICE: Chase Court Apartments
1942 Stewart Ave, 785-843-8220
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POSITION AVAILABLE
A local mortuary desires to hire a person
to work every other night and weekend.
Duties include: answering the phone &
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with the public. This individual needs to
be neat, have good communication
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For additional information and an
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888-844-8080, apply: campcedar.com

AAAC Tutoring Services is hiring Tutors
for Fall 2013! To apply, visit www.tutor-
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2903 University Dr. 3 BR with studio or 4
BR available Aug. 1,2013. W/D
Included. 2 bath, 1 car garage. On bus
route. New carpet. $900/mo.Contact us
at 785-218-6590 or 785-841-9646.
1, 2, 3 or 4 BR, W/D included, owner
managed and maintained, pets possible,
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Acro Teacher Needed Starting in
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Email or call if interested
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AVAILABLE JUNE 1ST, Candle Tree
Townhome, 2 BR, 2BA, basement,
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Call Sara 785-832-0101
Help wanted for custom harvesting.
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or email jason.christiansen@covan.com
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Looking for fun, active guy or girl to
watch our 7 and 12-year old boys this
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Call or text 785-760-0059 to get more
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Now Hiring Student Graphic Design-
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Town Homes and Houses
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KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
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ThurSdAy, APriL 25, 2013 The uNiverSiTy dAiLy KANSAN PAGe 2B
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 3B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
The Kansas softball team defeat-
ed UMKC 11-0 in the run-short-
ened first game of Wednesday’s
doubleheader.
Kansas’ offense was hot from the
start of the game as the Jayhawks
scored two runs in the first, eight
in the second and one in the
third. Freshman utility player Alex
Hugo led the way with a three-
run homerun and three RBIs on
the game. Senior outfielder Maggie
Hull went 3-4 with two RBIs and
sophomore catcher Maddie Stein
went 2-3 with two RBIs. The other
Kansas players with RBIs were
shortstop Chaley Brickey, first
baseman Mariah Montgomery,
pinch hitter Kylee Kennedy and
second baseman Ashley Newman.
Hugo and Hull also reached
University milestones during
this game, with Hugo breaking
the Kansas freshman homerun
record with 12 and Hull tying the
Jayhawkscareer RBI record with
135. The current record holder for
career RBIs at Kansas is Liz Kocon
(2008-12).
Alicia Pille was sensational on
the mound for the Jayhawks in the
first game with 10 strikeouts and
one hit allowed over five innings
of work.
Pille says her dominant perfor-
mance on Wednesday was a team
effort.
“A lot of it has to do with our
defense and everyone is playing
really well together,” Pille said. “It
also helps to know that we always
have each other’s backs out there.”
UMKC pitcher Cinda Ramos
took the brunt of the Jayhawks’
offensive firepower as she gave 10
earned runs on nine hits over 2 1/3
innings of work. Katie Kelley came
in relief of Ramos and was able to
slow the Jayhawks down by only
giving up one earned run over 1
2/3 innings.
The first game of Wednesday’s
doubleheader was the 19th run-
ruled game of the season and the
first since an 11-1 victory over
Furman on April 14.
The Jayhawks’ offense wasn’t as
potent in the second game of the
doubleheader, but their four runs
were enough to defeat UMKC for
the second time on Wednesday.
Coach Smith said that
Wednesday’s sweep was important
for the team.
“Those are two good wins.
UMKC always plays us tough;
they have a really good offense
and a really good team. That first
game, we just caught fire and didn’t
stop so that first game was really
good for us. In the second game,
I thought their pitcher did a really
good job. She bounced back and
held us, but we worked extremely
hard and I thought Pille was the
star tonight.”
Pille was sensational in her sec-
ond start of the evening pitching
another complete game and struck
out eight batters. Her performance
on the mound also helped the
Kansas bullpen rest up for this
weekend’s series against Baylor,
who’s currently third in the Big
12 behind Oklahoma and Texas.
Pille also entered Kansas’ top-10
for most shutouts, but she says that
these accomplishments aren’t the
most important thing to her.
“It’s always really exciting to
hear things like that and I try not
to pay too much attention it,” Pille
said.
Stein and Hugo, who went
2-3 and 1-3, again led the team’s
offense and drove all four of the
team’s runs. The game was score-
less until the third inning when
the Jayhawks scored three runs on
RBI-doubles by Hugo and Stein.
Three runs were all Pille needed to
hold the Kangaroos in check and
bring Kansas its second victory of
the evening.
Stein said she was impressed
with how the team bounced
back after losing two of three to
Oklahoma State last weekend.
“I think the team bounced back
great,” Stein said. “This week in
practice we’ve been talking about
our struggles on offense, so going
into today’s game our biggest thing
was making sure our offense was
there. When our offense is there,
we really can’t be beat.”
Despite two victories over
UMKC, the Jayhawks are in for a
battle against Baylor, who is ranked
14 in the ESPN.com/USA Softball
poll.
This weekend’s games are sched-
uled for Friday at 6 p.m., Saturday
at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 12 p.m.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
get the brooms out
Clay Court
TraVis youNs/KaNsaN
senior outfelders maggie hull slides into home plate during the softball game against umKC. Kansas defeated the ‘roos 4-0.
Jayhawks sweep Kangaroos
Chris sChaEdEr
cschaeder@kansan.com
A common cliché is that his-
tory repeats itself. With that in
mind, the chance for the Kansas
tennis team to repeat history has
presented itself. The Jayhawks have
not made it out of the first round of
the Big 12 tournament in 5 years.
The last time the team advanced, it
came at the hands of the Iowa State
Cyclones, another team that has
struggled in the past.
As coincidence would have
it, Kansas plays the Cyclones for
the second time in a week — the
first meeting was won by Kansas
— when they take the court in
Norman, Okla., 10 a.m. Thursday.
Kansas won its last two matches of
the regular season and have only
been defeated by Iowa State once in
the last 37 meetings. While Kansas
has history on its side, it will take
significantly more effort to advance
in the upcoming tournament.
The strength of the Jayhawks
comes from doubles play, and if
Kansas is able to get the doubles
point against the Cyclones, the
team won’t have the pressure of
playing from behind going into sin-
gles play. With help from the con-
sistent play of the duo Maria Belen
Ludueña and Paulina Los, Kansas
won the doubles point in both
matches last weekend and went on
to earn the win with solid perfor-
mances in singles play. Ludueña
was also named to the Academic
All-Big 12 First Team this week,
joining 24 other women student-
athletes from various schools in
the Big 12.
Los and freshman Maria Jose
Cardona helped the Jayhawks in
singles play, winning against West
Virginia and Iowa State.
Kansas ended the regular season
by climbing two spots in the Big
12 standings to eighth, and now
faces a team that has not been
particularly troublesome in recent
history. If the Jayhawks are able to
take care of business early, then the
singles play should stay at the level
set last weekend and help advance
the Jayhawks to the second round,
where they would face 1-seed
Baylor on Friday.
Thursday’s match against
Iowa State begins at 10 a.m. at
the University of Oklahoma’s
Headington Family Tennis Center.
— Edited by Dylan Lysen
tennis team poised to get
past Isu in big 12 tournament
TylEr CoNoVEr
tconover@kansan.com
EriN BrEmEr/KaNsaN
Junior Paulina los competes against
Iowa state at the Jayhawk tennis Center
sunday afternoon. Ku defeated Iowa
state with a fnal score of 4-3.
The Student Legislative Advisory Board is bringing state
legislators from across Kansas for a forum with KU students.
Take this chance to speak with these elected officials about
higher education's future in the state of Kansas.
The forum will be from 7-8pm this Tuesday in the Woodruff
Auditorium of the Union. For more information, contact SLAB
at senategovrel@ku.edu.
This ad was paid for by the KU Student
Senate. If you would like to run an ad,
contact us at senateoutreach@ku.edu
CAPITOL ON YOUR CAMPUS
LEGISLATIVE FORUM
GET TO KNOW YOUR STATE REPS THIS TUESDAY!
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 4B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
softball par for the course
The Kansas softball team will
be taking on the nationally ranked
Baylor Bears in a three-game series
at Arrocha Ballpark in Lawrence
this weekend
Kansas is
coming off
an impressive
doubl ehe ader
sweep of UMKC
on Wednesday,
while Baylor split
a doubleheader
at home against
Houston.
The Jayhawks
enter the weekend with a 29-13
(4-5) record, and Baylor is 35-12
(6-5). Kansas sits within striking
distance in the Big 12 standings,
with the Bears in third, Jayhawks
in fourth and both sitting behind
Oklahoma and Texas.
Pitcher Alicia Pille said that the
Jayhawks are ready for the chal-
lenge of facing a ranked team.
“I think the key to beating
Baylor is just rallying and work-
ing together as a
team,” Pille said.
“They are very
beatable, and it
should be a good
weekend.”
These two
teams faced
each other in a
weekend series
in Waco, Texas,
with Baylor
winning two of the three games.
Kansas’ victory in the last game
of that series was the first over the
Bears since April 10, 2010.
Catcher Maddie Stein said the
team needs to play their game in
order to beat Baylor.
“I don’t think it will take any-
thing out of the ordinary to beat
them,” Stein said. “I think if we
play our game, we will be abso-
lutely fine. We just have to make
sure that we’re consistent at the
plate, we have our solid defense
that we always have and pitching
that helps keep us in the game.
A series win against Baylor
could propel Kansas in the Big 12
standings and give the team confi-
dence that they can compete with
anyone in the conference.
This weekend’s series begins
on Friday at 6 p.m., with the other
two games on Saturday at 2 p.m.
and Sunday at 12 p.m.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
The Kansas golf team has had
a lot of repeat experiences this
year. Attempting to climb out of
a hole is one of them, and that’s
the exact situation the Jayhawks
encountered Wednesday at the Big
12 Championship Tournament at
Prairie Dunes Country Club in
Hutchinson. After a field-worst
second round score of 308, the
Jayhawks carded a closing day 302,
which was only enough for an
eighth place finish.
“We had a good lead after 27
holes, but from there, it just kept
getting worse,” coach Jamie Bermel
said. “We just didn’t finish the sec-
ond round and just stumbled home
from there.”
Kansas was tied for last in the
nine-team field to start the day,
and junior Stan Gautier was the
only one carrying the Jayhawks.
Gautier had the field’s fifth best
final-day score, and it was enough
to keep the Jayhawks from fall-
ing into a last-place tie with Iowa
State.
“He was fairly consistent today
and nothing really fancy,” Bermel
said. “But he did a lot of things
well today.”
Not leading for the Jayhawks,
unusually, was senior Chris
Gilbert. After shooting the best
opening round in the field and
sitting at a T-3 individual posi-
tion the second day, Gilbert blew
up on the way to the clubhouse.
Gilbert double-bogeyed his 15th
hole and triple-bogeyed his 17th
hole to finish five-over in four
holes. Gilbert, however, was the
only Jayhawk to shoot over-par in
single-digit numbers.
“He struggled today for the most
part. He was trying to grind it out
to get up and down and just finish,”
Bermel said. “But he just made a
couple bad swings coming down,
and he paid the price.”
Gilbert finish the tournament
tied for tenth indivudally, while
Texas’ Brandon Stone won the
tournament with an even-par 210.
Texas also won the tournament
with a 19-over-par team scorecard,
well ahead of Kansas’ 59-over-par
finish.
“Going in, we were probably the
eighth seed out of nine,” Bermel
said. “We had just got a win, and
we were playing with a lot of con-
fidence, so I had thought if we
played well, we could get in the
top-five.”
The Jayhawks don’t have the
resume for a postseason, and won’t
be booking a trip to any of the
NCAA regional sites. The season
is over for the Jayhawks, however,
Gilbert played well enough through
the season to qualify as an indi-
vidual for the NCAA Regionals.
Gilbert will be placed into compe-
tition at one of six regional sites.
Regional play will be May 16-18.
Bermel’s inaugural year as
Kansas golf head coach has come
to a close. Bermel took over a badly
bleeding program to start the year,
and he does have more progress to
show for than a one-place improve-
ment from the team’s last-place
finish at the Big 12 tournament last
year. The team’s win April 14 at the
Hawkeye Invitational was the sea-
son’s biggest highlight; It was the
team’s first win since 2010.
“We won the tournament in
Iowa and beat a pretty good field,”
Bermel said. “We were more con-
sistent in the spring than we were
in the fall, and I thought the guys
played with a little more heart in
the spring — a little more just
started to believe in themselves a
little more.”
— Edited by Megan Hinman
TraVis youNG/KaNsaN
freshman infoelder chaley brickey dives for home plate during the softball game against the uMKc roos. Kansas defeated the
roos 4-0.
Chris sChaEdEr
cschaeder@kansan.com
Chris hyBl
chybl@kansan.com
Kansas to face No. 14 Baylor
for another shot at revenge

“I think the key to beat-
ing baylor is just rallying
and working together as a
team.”
alIcIa pIlle
sophomore pitcher
Kansas golf struggles through
fnal tournament of the season
CoNTriBuTEd By JEff JaCoBsoN
senior stan Gautier golfs in the Men’s big 12 championship in hutchinson.
Grad Grill
11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Stop Day, Friday, May 10
Adams Alumni Center
Join us for free Bigg’s BBQ and music on
Stop Day, as our way of saying
“Congratulations on your graduation!”
All graduating students
are invited.
Commencement
Open House
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Commencement Day, Sunday, May 19
Adams Alumni Center
Stop by the Adams Alumni Center on
Commencement Day for a champagne
toast and a light snack!
The entire family is welcome.
Congratulations
Class of 2013!
Visit www.kualumni.org
to learn more about what the
KU Alumni Association has to ofer you.
Questions? Call 785-864-4760.
Celebrate graduation with the KU Alumni Association!
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 5B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
baseball
9 - Tucker Tharp, Jr.
24 - Jacob Rice, Jr. 3 - Dakota Smith, So. 23 - Brady Wilson, Sr.
20 - Justin Protacio, So. 10 - Billy Fleming, So.
34- Alex DeLeon, Sr.
13 - Ryan McBroom, Jr.
22 - Ka’iana Eldredge, Jr.
48 - Alan Filauro, Sr.
11 - RHP, Thomas Taylor, Sr. 12 - LHP, Wes Benjamin, So. 11 - LHP, Harrison Musgrave, So. 22 - RHP, Dan Dierdorff, Sr. 43 - LHP, John Means, So.
Kansas (22-13, 7-5) West Virgina Mountaineers (23-18, 6-6)
HaWley field, 5:30 P.M., BecKly, West Virginia
fielding fielding Hitting PitcHing PitcHing Hitting
Jayhawks take on Mountaineers in big 12 showdown
17- Michael Suiter, So.
4 - Bobby Boyd, So.
1 - Kevin Kuntz, Sr. 3 - Taylor Munden, Jr.
10 - Jordan Dreiling, Sr. 12 - Ryan Tuntland, Jr.
KaNsas VisiTs wEsT VirGiNia
West Virginia’s rotation features a
solid opening night starter in sopho-
more left-handed pitcher Harrison
Musgrave. The lefty enters the weekend
series with a 6-1 record and 2.70 eRa.
by striking out 46 batters and walking
only 21 in 63 1/3 innings on the sea-
son, Musgrave has elevated himself as
one of the best pitchers in the big 12
conference early in his career.
Thomas Taylor’s 2.47 eRa and 4-0
record will face off with Mountaineer’s
starter Harrison Musgrave in a game to
foreshadow the weekend. sophomore
left-handed pitcher Wes benjamin
holds down the saturday start, while
the sunday spot is still in question.
Kansas junior closer Jordan Piche’
was named to the National Collegiate
baseball Writers’ association stopper
of the Year watchlist for his NCaa lead-
ing 8 saves and .47 eRa.
The Mountaineers are hanging
steadily in the middle of the big 12
pack with their 6-6 record this season.
Their lineup features a .284 team bat-
ting average and three players touting
averages higher than .300. Junior third
baseman Ryan Tuntland leads the team
at the plate with a .366 average, 49 hits
and 23 RbIs. look for the Mountaineers
to be fairly aggressive on the basepaths
with 51 stolen bases recorded on the
season.
The Jayhawks are looking to be suc-
cessful as usual on the road in West
Virginia. The Jayhawk lineup continues
to feld two players above the .300
mark while batting .279 as a team.
sophomore left felder Michael suiter
continues to lead the Jayhawks in bat-
ting average while senior frst base-
man alex Deleon leads the team with
fve home runs after a three-run shot to
left feld against the baker Wildcats.
The Mountaineers have committed
54 errors on the season good for a .964
felding percentage. Junior frst base-
man Ryan Mcbroom and junior third
baseman Ryan Tuntland have com-
mitted a team high seven errors on the
year. The Mountaineers are generally a
solid felding club that relies on grind-
ing out runs offensively and pitching to
contact on defense.
The Jayhawks continued to take
care of business in the feld against
the baker Wildcats. The Jayhawks sub-
stituted several young players in the
late stages of the game. The Jayhawks’
team felding percentage is hovering
just above 97 percent for the season.
The outfeld and middle infeld contin-
ue to play solid defense long into the
stretch of the conference season.
There is No Place like this Home Court
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Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 6B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
KNO5621 / KS Apartment Fest Ad / 11.333 x 20 / 4-4-13
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Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 7B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
The show NaTioNal league
WASHINGTON (AP) — The St.
Louis Cardinals’ first batter, Matt
Carpenter, got it started against
Stephen Strasburg by stretching a
single into a double when Bryce
Harper’s throw to second base was
bobbled.
One out later, Matt Holliday sin-
gled. Carlos Beltran walked. Yadier
Molina delivered a two-run sin-
gle. And then a throwing error on
Daniel Descalso’s grounder padded
the score.
Just like that, 23 pitches in, the
Cardinals built a three-run lead
against Strasburg’s Washington
Nationals. And that was enough.
On the strength of that half-inning,
the Cardinals beat the Nationals
4-2 Wednesday to complete a
sweep and give Washington’s All-
Star ace the only four-start losing
streak of his young career.
Needing to be nearly perfect
given Washington’s lack of offense,
Strasburg (1-4) improved consid-
erably after that 12-minute first
inning. Getting ahead in the count,
he threw 110 pitches over seven
innings, giving up no other runs
and a total of five hits, along with
seven strikeouts.
“I was trying to throw the per-
fect pitch. I tell myself going into
the game, ‘Don’t do that.’ And I
go out there and I do it,” said
Strasburg, who hasn’t won since
opening day against Miami. “So
I was really happy I was able to
make the adjustment, get the feel-
ing back. My velocity came back
up, I was throwing a lot more
strikes, and they weren’t taking as
good swings.”
That initial inning, though, was
precisely the sort of “scratch and
claw” offense that Cardinals man-
ager Mike Matheny spoke about
before the game.
“People hate our ‘small ball’
theory,” Matheny said, “but when
we’re not banging balls into the
stands every single night, we’ve got
to do other things, whether people
like it or not.”
His club used that style to add
an insurance run in the eighth off
Drew Storen — who blew a ninth-
inning lead against St. Louis in
Game 5 in October — on Holliday’s
chopped single that didn’t leave the
infield.
“The thing that the Cardinals
did is, they’ve got their boppers
in the middle, but then they’ve
got guys like Descalso and (Shane)
Robinson and Kozma,” Strasburg
said. “They grind you out. They’re
not going to give in. They’re not
just going to strike out.”
Trying to generate something for
Washington’s slumbering offense,
Ian Desmond bunted for a base
hit with one out in the second,
then stole second and advanced
to third on a flyout to the warning
track. But rookie third baseman
Anthony Rendon struck out to end
the inning.
Strasburg actually was the one
who got Washington going at
the plate, grounding a single up
the middle to lead off the sixth.
Denard Span followed with a sin-
gle, and Jayson Werth’s groundout
moved the runners up for Harper.
He grounded out to second, but at
least that got Strasburg home to
make it 3-1.
In the seventh, a pair of singles
put runners at the corners with one
out, but Kelly got out of that jam
when pinch-hitter Lombardozzi
struck out and Jhonatan Solano,
taking off from first on a hit-and-
run, was thrown out at second by
catcher Molina.
Werth’s fourth homer, off
Trevor Rosenthal in the eighth,
gave Washington its second run.
But that was too little to stop the
Nationals from dropping below
.500 for the first time since finish-
ing the 2011 season 80-81.
“Somebody said last night it feels
like we’re 0-20. But it’s not that bad.
We’re only one game under .500,
and it’s April. We’ll be all right,”
Werth said. “What we’re going
through: It’s the first time this team
has dealt with expectations, and
there’s something to be said about
that. But we’ll adjust.”
Nat’s all-star still slumping
associaTEd prEss
associaTEd prEss
associaTEd prEss
washington Nationals second baseman Danny espinosa, left, can’t hang onto the
ball as st. louis Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter (13) is safe at second with a double
during wednesday’s game.
associaTEd prEss
Chicago Cubs third baseman Cody Ransom felds an infeld hit by Cincinnati Reds’ Zack Cozart in the ffth inning of a
baseball game, wednesday, april 24 in Cincinnati.
Reds beat Cubs, take eight
of 10 in an early homestand
CINCINNATI — Todd Frazier
gave Mat Latos all the run support
he needed, and Latos gave the
Cincinnati Reds exactly what they
needed to finish off a 10-game
homestand in style.
Latos retired the first 10 batters
and 15 of the first 16 he faced
and mostly spared an overworked
bullpen, and Frazier hit a long
home run and the Reds beat the
Chicago Cubs 1-0 Wednesday.
“This is what we wanted so
bad,” Reds manager Baker said.
“This sets us straight for a couple
of days.”
With one out in the sixth inning
of a scoreless tie, Frazier blasted a
2-1 pitch from Jeff Samardzija 480
feet to straightaway center field to
increase his team-leading home
run total to six.
Latos (1-0), the victim of two
blown saves among his first four
starts this season allowed four hits
and a walk with four strikeouts.
He had to rely solely on his two-
and four-seam fastballs, too.
It turned out not to be a prob-
lem.
“In the bullpen, I had a really
good slider and changeup,” said
Latos, who’s strung together 11
consecutive scoreless innings. “I
don’t know what the hell hap-
pened. It’s tough. Everybody in
the big leagues can hit the fastball.
I had to focus on hitting spots,
keeping the ball down and away
and getting them to hit it on the
ground.”
Jonathan Broxton replaced
Latos with two runners on base
and nobody out in the eighth.
Both runners moved up on
Cody Ransom’s sacrifice bunt,
but pinch-hitter Alfonso Soriano
struck out and shortstop Zack
Cozart went deep behind second
base to flag down David DeJesus’s
grounder and throw him out to
end the inning.
“I was going to throw it regard-
less, because there were two outs,”
Cozart said. “I saw out of the
corner of my eye that he wasn’t
too close to the bag. I’ve been
struggling at the plate lately, so to
make a play like that makes you
feel pretty good.”
The Reds wrapped up the home
stand, one of two of 10 games
on their schedule this season,
with eight wins despite playing
two games that lasted 13 innings,
another that went 10, a third that
was suspended almost 19 hours
from one night to the next day
by rain, and Wednesday’s game,
the start of which was delayed 89
minutes by rain. They won eight
games on a homestand of 10 or
fewer games for just the sixth
time in franchise history and the
second in two years.
B
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GGG GGG GGG GGG GG
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741 MASS ST LAWRENCE, KS 741 MASS ST LAWRENCE, KS
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 8B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
nba aL CentraL
OKC Thunder too much for Rockets
royals drop frst of
road series in Detroit
associaTEd prEss
Detroit tigers’ Victor Martinez, right, hits a one-run double against the Kansas City
royals in the third inning of the game in Detroit, Wednesday, april 24.
associaTEd prEss
Oklahoma City thunder guard russell Westbrook (0) shoots over Houston rockets center Omer asik (3) in the frst quarter of Game 2 of their frst-round nba basketball
playoff series in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, april 24.
associaTEd prEss
associaTEd prEss
OKLAHOMA CITY — Russell
Westbrook relishes the moments
when an opponent challenges him
and his Oklahoma City Thunder
teammates and it becomes time
to respond.
Rookie Patrick Beverley showed
a willingness to go toe-to-toe with
the Thunder’s All-Star point guard,
and the Houston Rockets didn’t
back down despite a 15-point def-
icit in the fourth quarter.
Then it was up to Westbrook
and the Thunder to come up with
an answer.
Westbrook and Kevin Durant
each scored 29 points, and
Oklahoma City recovered after
squandering its big lead to beat
Houston 105-102 on Wednesday
night and take a 2-0 series lead.
“It’s fun. During this time of the
year, as a team we’ve got one goal
and we can’t let nobody get in the
way,” Westbrook said. “That’s how
I feel and that’s how I want my
team to respond as well.”
Durant hit the go-ahead
3-pointer with 2:28 to play after
the Rockets had turned a 15-point
deficit into a four-point lead, and
the Thunder didn’t relinquish the
lead. Durant missed a free throw
with 1 second left, but Houston
was out of timeouts and Carlos
Delfino couldn’t connect on a des-
peration shot at the final buzzer.
“It’s frustrating and it hurts real-
ly bad right now,” said Chandler
Parsons, who scored 17 points for
Houston. “But you’ve got to take
some positives out of it. It’s a long
series.”
Game 3 is Saturday night in
Houston.
The Thunder’s big lead melted
away with nine straight empty
possessions as the Rockets mixed
in a zone defense. James Harden
spearheaded a 21-2 Houston
comeback by getting into the lane
to create his own opportunities,
and he also kicked the ball out to
set up two 3-pointers by Delfino.
His second 3, from the right wing,
provided a 95-91 lead with 3:27
to go.
But the Rockets couldn’t keep
it up.
Oklahoma City came back to
tie it before Harden knifed to the
basket for a layup to give Houston
its last lead at 97-95 with 2:42 to
play. Durant answered right away
with a deep 3 from the left wing at
the opposite end, and the Thunder
came up with back-to-back stops
before Thabo Sefolosha’s 3 pro-
vided a little breathing room at
101-97.
Serge Ibaka added a long jump-
er to make it 103-98 after Durant
was forced to give up the ball.
Durant and Kevin Martin, both
in the top 5 in the league in free-
throw percentage, both went 1 for
2 at the foul line in the final 12
seconds to give the Rockets one
last chance.
“We all stuck together,”
Westbrook said. “They made a
run when we weren’t able to make
shots, but I thought everybody
had a big role toward the end of
the game and we came up with
the win.”
DETROIT — Jose Valverde re-
turned to Detroit with a save and
Victor Martinez drove in a pair
of runs to help the Tigers beat the
Kansas City Royals 7-5 Wednes-
day night.
Max Scherzer (2-0) got the win,
allowing fve runs in fve innings,
with three Tigers relievers fnish-
ing the game. Valverde, called up
earlier in the day, returned to the
Tigers with a perfect ninth inning.
Valverde lost the closing role dur-
ing the postseason and wasn’t of-
fered a contract, but signed a mi-
nor-league deal earlier this month
and returned to Detroit afer a
short minor-league stint.
Wade Davis (2-1) gave up seven
runs — but only three earned — in
3 2-3 innings. Davis allowed eight
hits and four walks while only get-
ting 11 outs.
Te Tigers took the lead on
Omar Infante’s RBI single in the
second, but Kansas City respond-
ed with four runs in the third.
Salvador Perez and Chris Getz
started the inning with singles,
and Alex Gordon tied the game
with a double. Alcides Escobar
and Billy Butler made it 3-1 with
RBI singles, giving the Royals fve
straight hits, and Eric Hosmer
drove in the fourth run with a long
sacrifce fy.
Te Tigers added two more in
their half of the third on Marti-
nez’s RBI double and Jhonny Per-
alta’s run-scoring single. Martinez
tried to score from second on
Peralta’s double, and was beaten
so badly by Jef Francoeur’s throw
from right that he just veered of
toward the dugout and was called
out for leaving the basepath.
Detroit took control in the
fourth when Infante scored on a
Mike Moustakas error and Miguel
Cabrera followed with a tie-break-
ing sacrifce fy. Martinez added an
RBI single, chasing Davis, but Luis
Mendoza walked the next two bat-
ters to force in a seventh run.
Te Royals loaded the bases
with no one out in the ffh, but
only scored once, and couldn’t get
anything afer putting two runners
on in the seventh.
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 9B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
The Jayhawks are headed to
West Virginia for the first time in
program history in the midst of a
hotly contested Big 12 conference
race.
Kansas’ 9-6 record lands them
alone in second place with a soli-
tary half-game deficit separating
the Jayhawks from the first place
Oklahoma Sooners. Without much
knowledge of West Virgina, the
Jayhawks aren’t overlooking their
trip to Appalachia.
“They’ve been doing pretty well.
Sitting in the middle of the Big 12
isn’t easy,” senior shortstop Kevin
Kuntz said. “It’ll be fun and excit-
ing to play a new Big 12 team, just
like TCU. They have a few guys
swinging the bats well and their
pitching is tough. They did well
against Texas so it should be fun to
take them on.”
The Mountaineers lineup fea-
tures three hitters batting higher
than the .300 mark. Junior third
baseman Ryan Tuntland leads the
lineup with his .366 average, 49
hits and 23 RBIs. Sophomore out-
fielder Bobby Boyd, hitting .333
on the year, and junior outfielder
Jacob Rice, hitting .331, complete
the .300 plus club.
With a bit of pop in the
Mountaineer lineup and a solid
Friday starter, the Kansas pitching
staff is focused on getting wins
early in the weekend series.
“It all starts on Friday,” junior
closer Jordan Piche’ said. “We’ve
got the best guy out there to start
with Thomas. He’s had a really
good year this year and the way
our bats are looking and our short
game as well, we should be look-
ing pretty good. Expectations are
high.”
Friday’s pitching matchup pres-
ents a key battle for the Jayhawks.
The Mountaineers sophomore left-
handed pitcher Harrison Musgrave,
currently tied for fourth in the Big
12 with six wins on the season, has
lost just one game this season. His
2.70 ERA, 46 strikeouts and 21
walks have the attention of Big 12
hitters.
“Their Friday pitcher is doing
really well,” Piche’ said. “If we can
get Friday, we’ll be looking really
good coming into Saturday and
Sunday. Winning there would kind
of set the tone for our team and
build some more momentum on
the weekend.”
Kansas’ Friday starter, senior
pitcher Thomas Taylor, is currently
sixth on the Big 12 strikeout list
with 49 strikeouts on the season.
Taylor leads the weekend rotation
with his 4-0 record and 2.47 ERA.
Sophomore left-handed pitcher
Wes Benjamin continues to fill the
Saturday spot in the rotation with
a 4-4 record and 4.50 ERA. The
Sunday spot in the rotation remains
a question for the Jayhawks.
Coach Price said the Sunday
spot in the rotation is still in ques-
tion entering the weekend.
The Jayhawks’ travel to West
Virginia won’t change the approach
for a Kansas team firmly engrossed
in the routine down the stretch run
of their season.
“We just go about our business as
usual,” Piche’ said. “We’re pumped
to be on the road again. A lot of
guys like it and we’re expecting a
good outcome with this season.”
The Jayhawks start the week-
end series against West Virginia
in Beckley, W. Va., at 5:30 p.m.
Friday.
— Edited by Tyler Conover
Pitching matchups key in road trip
Big 12 BaseBall
TrEVor Graff
tgraff@kansan.com
GEorGE MulliNix/KaNsaN
senior infelder alex Deleon is congratulated by his teammates after his three-run
home run in the 4th inning. Deleon’s home run put the Jayhawks up 6-1.
GEorGE MulliNix/KaNsaN
Freshman frst baseman Marcus Wheeler hurries back to frst after the pickoff move. The Jayhawks stole six bases in Monday’s
7-1 win over Baker.
GEorGE MulliNix/KaNsaN
sophomore outfelder Dakota smith tries to beat out the throw to frst after a hard hit to the shortstop.
Thursday, april 25, 2013 paGE 10B ThE uNiVErsiTy daily KaNsaN
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