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Screening
BOE adopts alcohol testing
for students. PAGE 3
HEATHER FIORE/The Hopewell Sun
A Hopewell Valley Central High School JV lacrosse player goes to scoop up the ball at CHS' game against West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School North on April 18 where CHS took the win, 7-2.
Hopewell takes win against West Windsor-Plainsboro North, 7-2
Annual
plant expo
set for
Saturday
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The Master Gardeners of Mer-
cer County will be hosting its an-
nual Spring Plant Expo and Gar-
den Market on Saturday, May 4
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Mercer
Educational Gardens in
Hopewell.
The group is comprised of
trained volunteers who provide
horticultural information and
programs to the community, and
was created by the Rutgers Coop-
erative Extension of Mercer
County.
For more than 10 years, the
MGs have been hosting the Expo,
which is the groups largest
fundraiser.
It started in the early days as
just a sale within the organiza-
tion, said Carol Bencivengo, co-
chair of the event and nine-year
MG. Then, they started adding
pieces that they dug up from
members gardens and some they
purchased from local nurseries.
After that, they added a second-
hand sale, where they sell various
please see GARDNERS, page 11
MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Tues.-Fri. 8 to 6 Sat. & Sun. 9 to 6 teaattheroses@gmail.com
Soup, Salad, Sandwich,
Scone & A Pot of Tea
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BOE adopts alcohol screening
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Despite much parent and stu-
dent opposition, the Hopewell
Valley Regional School District
Board of Education adopted a pol-
icy that requires alcohol screen-
ing for all students at Hopewell
Valley Central High School dur-
ing certain school-sponsored
events.
The policy was adopted at the
BOE's April 22 meeting. It author-
izes the use of a passive breath al-
cohol sensor device, a tool compa-
rable to that of a Breathalyzer.
The PBASD enables school dis-
trict staff to check an approxi-
mate alcohol level quickly and ef-
ficiently without requiring the
students active participation, ac-
cording to the policy.
When the BOE introduced this
policy at its March 25 meeting,
the policy's language said that all
students would be subject to
screening "before, during, and
after any co-curricular or ex-
tracurricular activities and
events including, but not limited
to dances, athletic events, proms,
class trips, overnight trips, school
assemblies, drama productions or
graduation ceremonies."
However, after meeting with
the president of the student coun-
cil, various parents, CHS faculty,
CHS students, the township po-
lice, the Municipal Alliance,
board committees and student
representatives, the board decid-
ed to revise the language.
"We did tighten it up," said Lisa
Wolff, board president. "The poli-
cy was a little bit loose and, based
on the feedback of our student
council and our student represen-
tative on the board, we added
some extra safeguards."
The revised policy states that
students can be screened before,
during and after "specified"
events and eliminated athletic
events, class trips, school assem-
blies, drama productions or grad-
uation ceremonies.
The policy added that students
may be screened "when the build-
ing principal or designee has rea-
son to believe the use of alcohol
please see STUDENTS, page 4
by pupils may be present and that
a case-by-case basis would be inef-
fective and can articulate that rea-
son, in speech or writing, to the
superintendent or designee."
The board's student representa-
tive, Ryan Kuchinski, was a key
factor in revising the language of
the policy, Wolff said.
"This is all about student safety,
first and foremost," superintend-
ent Tom Smith said. "We have con-
cerns about at-risk behaviors ex-
hibited by our students, and we've
participated in a Municipal Al-
liance survey last spring, and
some of those results were very
concerning to us.
In addition, we've had past in-
cidents at both our prom and
back-to-school dance, which
caused us to reconsider how we're
working through the process."
Smith said the intent of the pol-
icy isn't to catch kids, but to act as
a deterrent.
"Our hope is that no one tests
positive through this," he said.
The school's current policy of
pulling kids aside brought up
questions of bias and profiling in
the past, which the PBASD will
eliminate.
The main concerns voiced by
parents who attended the meeting
included the speedy implementa-
tion of the policy, driving drink-
ing underground, students feeling
uncomfortable, and students feel-
ing not trusted by school officials.
"This is a misguided approach
to this problem," resident Bar-
bara Reale said. "I think when the
kids themselves have said to you
that this will make them feel not
trusted, that they're speaking
very honestly to you.
CHS principal Michael Daher
assured parents and students that
the policy is in place to help stu-
dents.
"I look at this with two primary
goals," he said. "To do everything
we can to keep students safe and
for the device to serve as a deter-
rent so students make good deci-
sions."
If a student refuses to submit to
the PBASD, he or she will be de-
nied access to the event and will
be subject to disciplinary actions,
including suspension.
Hopewell is the third munici-
pality in Mercer County to adopt
this policy.
"This is not an easy decision,
and one we don't take lightly,"
Smith said. "But, we feel it's an
important one and a necessary
one."
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 1-7, 2013
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Students to have alcohol screenings
STUDENTS
Continued from page 3
MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Special to The Sun
Childrens author and illustrator, Steven Kellogg, left, who has au-
thored more than 100 books, visited Stony Brook Elementary School
in Pennington in April. In anticipation of Kelloggs visit, the school
hosted an illustration contest for first- and second-graders. Kellogg
is shown with the winning students, Lucas Zapata-Sanin, Brielle
Schilling, Riya Mishra, Rory Danieluk and Stony Brook librarian
Marci Thomas.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
in our opinion
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 1-7, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Hopewell Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium including
electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Patricia Dove
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
M
oney is always an issue.
Families are constantly
pinching pennies, looking
for ways to reduce expenses. School
districts and municipal governments
are doing the same, hoping to help
lower, or at least stabilize, the amount
of tax money they require to live in
town.
The challenge has always been, and
will continue to be, how these entities
can control costs while still providing
high-quality services that their resi-
dents demand. The state of New Jersey
certainly isnt helping much through
aid, and its unlikely that will change
any time soon.
So the onus is on the local municipal
governments and school districts to get
creative: Not only what can be cut from
expenses, but what can be added to rev-
enues.
For awhile now, the idea of private
sponsorship of public facilities has
been tossed around. Selling banners to
local businesses at Little League fields,
or having that business sponsor a
youth sports team has been the norm
for quite some time. And no one seems
to have a problem with that.
But throw in the possibility of sell-
ing naming rights at a field or, worse
even, a building or complex, and excep-
tions start to arise. When is enough
enough? the detractors ask. Does
everything need to be sold?
We agree that there is a fine line be-
tween tasteful, effective sponsorship
and over-the-line, banner-on-every-
inch-of-the-field advertising. Think
Major League 2 here (for all you
sports movie fans).
Moorestown Township recently ap-
proved an ordinance on first reading
that, if passed, would establish an offi-
cial sponsorship program. Officials
say that the program would increase
township revenues and help with im-
provements and maintenance of recre-
ational fields.
Annual banner and sponsorship op-
portunities will be available, with nam-
ing rights being offered as five- or 10-
year deals, with minimum bids of
$5,000 and $35,000, respectively. To en-
sure proper material, businesses wont
be allowed to advertise the sale of alco-
hol, tobacco, adult-oriented material or
other items not consistent with pro-
moting the youth sports program and
the positive image of the township.
We applaud Moorestown Township
for its work in this regard, and we urge
other townships to follow suit.
If done correctly, sponsorships and
naming rights can provide a huge in-
flux of cash to youth sports leagues, to
school districts and to municipal gov-
ernments.
This field brought to you by...
Its time for governments, schools to utilize sponsorships at fields, buildings
Too much advertising?
Do you agree that sponsorship is a good
idea? Or do you think that enough is
enough? Let us know your thoughts
through a letter to the editor.
Hopewell resident honored with Music Award
Hopewell Township resident Lauren
Marsh was honored with the Jersey
Acoustic Music Award for Top Indie
EP/Single Release for her debut EP Ready
For Takeoff at the 2013 JAMawards cere-
mony on April 7 at the Jersey Shore Arts
Center in Ocean Grove.
Marsh was recognized with nomina-
tions in four additional award categories,
including Top Female Vocalist, Top Female
Listening Room Act, Top Indie/Pop/Rock
Act and Top New Female Act. She released
her debut EP Ready For Takeoff on
iTunes on Oct. 30, 2012, and quickly re-
ceived positive reviews. Anthony Galasso
of Creative Recklessness rated the album
Excellent and wrote, Armed with her
piano and ukulele and her amazing voice,
Marsh is a born and bred singer/song-
writer from Princeton. Shes got a crisp
voice that complements her unique style so
flawlessly that her distinct skills are ri-
valed by few and most likely envied by
many.
Marsh is a 2010 graduate of Hopewell
Valley Central High School and currently
attends William Paterson University ma-
joring in Pop Music Studies. A
singer/songwriter at heart, she incorpo-
rates jazz, pop and indie influences in a
style that is uniquely her own.
Following up on her JAMaward as Top
Indie EP/Single, she released her music
video for the EP single Dangerous Love
on April 9.
Screenvision, which provides pre-show
entertainment at over 7,500 movie theaters
nationwide, selected Laurens EP single
Home for their March 2013 playlist.
More information about Marsh and her
music can be found on her website, lauren-
marshmusic.com.
MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Hopewell Valley HS
spring concert May 10
Hopewell Valley Central High
School senior Eric Brownstein
won the chorus annual scholar-
ship and will sing at the chorus
spring concert on Friday, May 10
at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Univer-
salist Church, which is located at
268 Washingtons Crossing-Pen-
nington Road in Titusville.
Tickets for the concert are
available from chorus members
or at the chorus website:
princetonol.com/groups/hvcho-
rus. Advance purchase tickets
are $10 for seniors and students
and $12 general admission. Ad-
mission at the door is $15.
Titusville State History
Fair May 11 rain or shine
Experience five centuries of
New Jerseys history all in one
place at the SPIRIT of the JER-
SEYS State History Fair, a his-
torical festival for all ages that
will take place on Saturday, May
11 at Washington Crossing State
Park in Titusville.
This free, award-winning
event, which runs from 11 a.m. to
5 p.m. rain or shine, draws
more than 5,000 visitors
annually.
This year, visitors will be en-
tertained by Phydeaux's Flying
Flea Circus and Wahoo Medicine
Show a throwback to the trav-
eling medicine shows of the 19th
century.
Washington Crossing State
Park is located on the Delaware
River, just eight miles north of
Trenton.
For more information and a
complete list of activities about
the Fair, visit njhistoryfair.org or
call (609) 737-0623.
A parking donation of $5 per
vehicle is suggested.
BRIEFS
WEDNESDAY May 1
Hopewell Seniors Connect: Search
Google Like a Pro. 10 a.m. to 11
a.m. at the Hopewell Library.
Google is one of the prime tools
to help you tame the Web. This
demonstration will provide tips
and tricks to use Google more
efficiently with Google's special
search tools and advanced
search techniques. No registra-
tion needed. Contact Karen Tay-
lor-Ogren at (609) 737-2610 or
ktayloro@mcl.org. Thursday,
THURSDAY May 2
Crochet Corner. 3 p.m. at the
Hopewell Library. Needle crafters
who already know the basic cro-
chet stitches are invited to drop
in to socialize and work on a proj-
ect of their choice. Experienced
needle crafter Margaret Woo will
be available to assist individuals.
Registration suggested. Call
(609) 989-6920.
FRIDAY May 3
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.
at the Hopewell Library. Come
make a craft or enjoy a story with
a caregiver. No registration
required. For more information,
call (609) 989-6921.
SUNDAY May 5
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell. Sunday,
May 5 St. Alphonsus Roman
Catholic Church: Mass at 7:30, 9
and 11:15 a.m. 54 East Prospect
St., Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY May 6
Mother's Day Kids' Open Craft:
Ages 3 to 8. 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at
the Hopewell Library. Children
may stop by the childrens activi-
ty room to make a special craft
for Mother's Day. A staff member
will be present to aid with the
craft. The projects can usually be
easily adapted to meet a variety
of age and skill levels.
Adult Chess Club: Ages 16 and old-
er. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the
Hopewell Library. Hone your skills
and have a game at our first-ever
adult chess club. All skill levels
welcome. Bring your own board
and clock. No registration
required. For more information,
contact Karen Taylor-Ogren at
(609) 737-2610 or
ktayloro@mcl.org.
TUESDAY May 7
Baby Time: Ages newborn to 2. 11
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Hopewell
Library. This program is a great
way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets, and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After 20 minutes of structured
group time, there is time for play
and for socializing. Adult supervi-
sion required.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 1-7, 2013
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WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 1330 Route 206,
Suite 211, Skillman, NJ 08558. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
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The following reports are on
file with the Hopewell police de-
partment:
On April 10 at 3:30 p.m., Officer
Alexis Mirra responded to a
Brandon Road address for the re-
port of criminal mischief. Some-
time between 3 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.,
someone scratched the driver
side front and rear doors of a
black BMW parked on the street.
The scratch was approximately
inches in length. An estimate of
the damage was unavailable.
On April 13 at 9:01 p.m., Officer
Robert Voorhees responded to
Route 29 for the report of an er-
ratic driver. Officer James Hoff-
man located the car and observed
it weaving in and out of its lane of
travel. The car was stopped and
Voorhees spoke with the driver, a
55-year-old female, who had the
odor of alcohol on her breath.
After performing field sobriety
tests, the woman was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing.
She was charged with DWI,
reckless driving and failure to
maintain lane, and was later re-
leased to an acquaintance. This
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On April 18 at 1:29 p.m., Det.
Daniel McKeown charged a 50-
year-old male with theft.
This charge was filed in refer-
ence to the theft of 250 wooden
pallets from the Roll Tech busi-
ness, which was reported on Feb.
28. This case will be forwarded to
the Mercer County Prosecutors
Office for review.
POLICE report
Send us your
Hopewell news
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Call
the editor at (609) 751-0245.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 1-7, 2013
Let us know you heard about us in the Hopewell Sun
and bring in this ad to save $5 per adult/$3 per child!
Dress for Success Walk May 11
Dress for Success Worldwide,
an international non-profit or-
ganization that promotes the eco-
nomic independence of disad-
vantaged women, announces The
Power Walk for Dress for Suc-
cess, which will take place in
more than 35 cities in May, in-
cluding Pennington on Saturday,
May 11.
The 5K Walk and Fun Run,
which is scheduled to be held at
Bank of Americas Merrill Lynch
Hopewell Campus, located at 410
Scotch Road in Pennington, will
promotes active, healthy lifestyle
choices for women and families,
and serves as a testament to the
link between personal health and
professional success.
Registration will begin at 8
a.m. and run until 10:25 a.m.
The walk will begin at 9 a.m.;
yoga stretch and opening ceremo-
ny will be held from 9:30 a.m. to
10 a.m. The Fun Run will begin at
10:30 a.m.
The Health Fair will be held
from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Dress for Success Mercer
County is one of 35 affiliates to
host this years fundraising walk
and fun run toward wellness, em-
powerment and economic inde-
pendence for women in Central
New Jersey.
The event includes fitness ac-
tivities, a health fair, music and
entertainment by New Jersey
101.5, a kids corner with arts,
crafts and games, and a Mothers
Day flower sale to celebrate the
special women in your life.
The first 100 participants will
receive a T-shirt. Healthy snacks
and water will be provided but
people are encouraged to eat a
nutritious breakfast before they
arrive.
The Power Walk is open to the
public and participants are en-
couraged to create a team of
friends, walk with family, or par-
ticipate as a virtual walker on-
line. Children under 12 are admit-
ted free.
Speakers include Dr. Jeff
Levine, director of Women's
Health Programs in the Depart-
ment of Family Medicine at the
UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson
Medical School, inspirational
speaker and former contestant
on The Biggest Loser; and
George Ruthauser, announcer for
the New Jersey Jackals a profes-
sional, independent baseball club
that plays at Yogi Berra Stadium
on the Montclair State University
campus.
All funds raised will support
the image enhancement and ca-
reer development programs. The
funds will also benefit the servic-
es of Dress for Success Mercer
County.
Register yourself or team at df-
spowerwalk.org/mercercoun-
ty2013. Become a virtual walker
or support a team if you cant at-
tend.
garden and yard items that people
want to donate, such as rakes,
garden books and other equip-
ment, which has become very
popular.
For this years event, the Gar-
deners are introducing a new
garden market, which will fea-
ture a selection of eight vendors
from New Jersey and Pennsylva-
nia.
Over the years, weve been
going to the same growers to get
plants because our access to gar-
deners is very limited, Benciven-
go said. This year, we decided we
really wanted to do something dif-
ferent and supply plants that the
public and MGs havent normally
had access to. So, we changed it
up and are having handpicked
vendors who wed like to see and
who are bringing things we
havent been able to offer in the
past.
These specialty vendors will be
selling a variety of plants, includ-
ing native perennials, annuals,
vines, trees, shrubs, succulents,
herbs, terrariums, ferns and wild
plants.
In this area, you dont get
these vendors all together in one
spot; its very rare, Bencivengo
said. Were thinking that this
years event could be even better
than it normally is for us.
One of the vendors is Wild
Ridge Plants, a Hillsborough-
based company located in the
Sourlands that is owned by
Hopewell residents Jared Rosen-
baum and Rachel Mackow.
The couples experience in-
cludes land stewardship and field
botany, teaching and writing
about native plant ecology, and
the use and preparation of edible
and medicinal plants.
This is their first plant sale of
the year. They will be bringing an
abundance of early spring wild-
flowers such as columbines, Vir-
ginia waterleaf, rue anemone,
ragwort and others, as well as na-
tive meadow flowers and fruiting
shrubs.
The event will also include an
interactive Q&A with Mercer
County Horticulturist Barbara
Bromley, as well as advice from
various MGs, who will be walking
around to assist customers in
choosing the right plant for the
right spot, the MG motto.
We try to educate the public
about responsible gardening,
Bencivengo said. Theres a push
from our organization to plant na-
tive plants. If theyre native, it
makes sense that theyre going to
grow the best here.
Nancy Putnam, a MG who was
very involved with the planning
of the Expo this year, said the
most important part of the event
is meeting the expectations of the
public.
For the past 12 years, the MGs
have held this event and won high
praise from loyal attendees for
the organization of the event, as
well as the exceptional quality
and value of the plant material
available, she said. Its impor-
tant that we continue that.
The Plant Expo will be held,
rain or shine, at Mercer Educa-
tional Gardens, which is located
at 431A Federal City Road in
Hopewell, adjacent to the Mercer
County Equestrian Center. The
event is free and open to the pub-
lic.
For more information, go to
mgofmc.org or mercer.njaes.rut-
gers.edu.
MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
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Gardeners show new market
GARDENERS
Continued from page 1
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 1-7, 2013
BRAKES / WHEEL SERVICE
Alignment
Suspension Work
Shocks & Struts
FLEET SERVICE AVAILABLE
Belts & Hoses
Radiators
Lube
Oil Filters
EXHAUST SYSTEMS & REPAIR
Make Your
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$10 OFF service over $100
$15 OFF service over $150
$25 OFF service over $250
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Mount & Balance
of 4 New Tires
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$49.99
Wheel Alignment
Valid on most cars
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$105.99
*
Brake Job
(per axle)
New Disc Pads or Shoes
Ceramic Extra. Resurface Rotaries.
*Most cars. Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 8/31/13.
$20.99
*
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Oil & Filter Change.
Free Brake Inspection.
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any other offer. Must present coupon. Exp 8/31/13.
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Store Hours: Mon-Tues 7:30am-5pm, Wed 7:30am-6pm
Thurs-Fri 7:30am-5pm Sat 7:30am-2pm
and many more!
Only minutes from the Pennington Circle
Immunizations to take
place on May 15
Immunizations will take place
on Wednesday, May 15 from 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Hopewell
Valley Senior Center, which is lo-
cated at 395 Reading Street.
Dr. Jabbar Zafar, family practi-
tioner at Princeton Healthcare
System, will discuss types of im-
munizations. Contact Hopewell
Valley Senior Services at (609)
737-0605, ext. 692 or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
There will be a blood pressure
screening at the lower level of
the Hopewell Township Munici-
pal Building on Tuesday, May 21
from 10 a.m. to noon.
Pennington Dance Co.
to perform on May 18
The Pennington Dance Compa-
ny will perform at Pennington
Day on Saturday, May 18 at noon
at the Crossroads, the intersec-
tion of Main Street and Curlis
Avenue in Pennington.
The companys 45-minute pro-
gram includes ballet, tap, jazz,
hip hop, tap and pre-school dance
numbers to Broadway, swing,
classical and Latin music.
More than 70 dancers ranging
in age from 4 to 18 years old will
perform. Choreographers in-
clude Pennington Dance teachers
Jessica Furlong, Jenna Schott-
lander, Jenny Gladney, Crystal
Moore and Nancy Warner.
Student choreographed pieces
will be performed by Morgan
Schragger, Anna Hyson, Claire
Cirullo, Grace McGeeney, Lind-
sey Corrado and Ariana Cruz.
For more information, visit
the Pennington Dance booth/tent
at the Crossroads during
Pennington Day, call (609) 737-796,
or visit penningtondance.
com.
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MAY 1-7, 2013 THE HOPEWELL SUN 13
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5 Centre Drive
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Monroe Twp.
609-655-4544
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2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
School hosts 22 Japanese
students and a teacher
Hopewell Valley Central High
School hosted 22 Japanese high
school students and a Japanese
teacher for the first time in
March.
The students, who came from
three high schools in Nagano Pre-
fecture in central Japan, took
part in a program run by the Cen-
ter for International Training
(CIT), an exchange program with
offices in Osaka, Japan, and in
East Lyme, Conn.
From March 16 to March 29,
the students lived with host fami-
lies in Hopewell Valley, attended
English as a Second Language
(ESL) classes, as well as other
high school classes, and traveled
to Trenton, Princeton, New York
City and Philadelphia.
At a farewell dinner at Central
High School on March 28, one of
the students, Kaori Shimazu,
with some help from a translator,
said she had noticed that Ameri-
can students participate more in
class than her counterparts at
home.
Students are very active in
classes here; it was interesting to
watch, said Kaori, who wore a
kimono as part of the cultural ex-
change planned for the night,
which included demonstrations
of the Japanese arts of origami,
calligraphy and Japanese tea cer-
emony. In Japan, students most-
ly listen to lectures.
Having a Japanese student at
our house was such a positive ex-
perience for all of us, said
Hopewell Borough mom Jen
Davis, whose family hosted one of
the Japanese teens. Our guest,
Miho, was so incredibly positive,
enthusiastic, helpful and sweet.
From going to the market to
watching Harry Potter with us,
she seemed truly to enjoy every
new experience. I would definite-
ly do it again.
We really enjoyed having her
here, said CHS junior Sophie
Davis. She was only here two
weeks, but her English improved
a lot.
Principal Michael Daher said
there are no immediate plans to
send CHS students to Japan, but
that he hoped to host another
group in the future.
The Japanese students we
hosted were terrific, he said.
They were bright and very en-
gaging.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MAY 1-7, 2013 PAGE 14
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THE SUN
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CLASSIFIED MAY 1-7, 2013 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
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