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MAY 1-7, 2013
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 19
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Cheerleaders
Varsity squad honored
for its season. PAGE 2
EMS kicks off
annual fund drive
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
The Montgomery EMS kicked
off its 2013 Fund Drive recently
with its first donation from Mayor
Ed Trzaska.
This is the second year Trzaska
has helped mark the start of the
Fund Drive, which is MEMS’
biggest annual fundraiser.
“The Montgomery EMS squad
plays a key role in our public
health and safety services,” he
said. “They have been protecting
our community for 40 years, and
their professionalism and expert-
ise are second to none. During the
relief effort for Hurricane Sandy,
the squad went above and beyond
and made a difference in count-
less ways.”
MEMS is an all-volunteer or-
ganization comprised of mostly
local residents that provides serv-
ices to the township 24 hours a
day, 365 days a year. Last year, it
donated more than 37,000 hours of
service to the community.
The squad’s annual budget for
2013 is $144,000, which is mostly
paid for through donations. This
year, 24 percent of the budget is
being put in the squad’s Capital
Fund, which is used for ambu-
lance replacement and building
upkeep.
“We purchase our own ambu-
lances and are planning to pur-
chase a new one this year,” said
John Connacher, president of
MEMS.
If the town had to take over
EMS services provided by MEMS,
it would cost the taxpayers of
Montgomery more than $1 mil-
lion.
“Our annual Fund Drive makes
up the majority of MEMS’ budg-
et,” Connacher said. “The funds
we receive go toward maintaining
and replacing equipment, sup-
plies and vehicles, as well as the
continuous training of our crews.
Residents can expect MEMS’
annual Fund Drive flyer to arrive
in the mail within the next week
or so. All donations are tax-de-
ductible.
On April 21, MEMS held anoth-
er one of its annual fundraisers,
the All-You-Can-Eat Pancake
Breakfast, at its building in Belle
Mead. More than 150 people at-
tended the event, including a
handful of Montgomery High
School students who assisted the
squad members with preparation
and serving.
“Our EMS squad is one of the
best around, and everyone in
Montgomery should be proud of
them,” Connacher said. “I urge all
residents and businesses of our
township to support MEMS in
any way they can."
For more information on
MEMS, go to mems47.org.
Special to The Sun
Students from Montgomery High School helped with the preparation and serving of pancakes at the
Montgomery EMS' all-you-can-eat Pancake Breakfast on April 21. Pictured, from left, is senior Saisree
Chillara, senior Suhani Gokhru, junior Samantha Sherman and senior Jillian Kelly.
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MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 3
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Mayor, deputy mayor
running unopposed
The Montgomery Township
Republican Organization unani-
mously endorsed Mayor Ed Trza-
ska and Deputy Mayor Patricia
Graham for the two seats on the
township committee that will be
contested in November. Both are
running for reelection and a sec-
ond three-year term. Trzaska and
Graham filed petitions with the
municipal clerk and will be
placed on the ballot under the slo-
gan “Somerset County Republi-
can Organization” along with the
other county-endorsed candi-
dates, including Gov. Chris
Christie.
As of now, Trzaska and Gra-
ham are running unopposed
since no local Democrat filed peti-
tions by the primary election
deadline.
"I am surprised that Pat and I
are currently running unop-
posed, but this is likely indicative
of the quality of work we are
doing,” Trzaska said. “Over the
past few years, we have had nu-
merous successes – doing more
with less, preserving open space,
making township meetings more
accessible to the public, and im-
proving the long-term health of
Montgomery. Overall, feedback
from residents has been very pos-
itive and they like the direction
we are heading.”
“We have worked hard to make
ends meet and improve the finan-
cial health of Montgomery,” Gra-
ham said. “Every budget that we
have passed has come in well
under Gov. Christie’s property tax
cap law and we are spending less
than 2005 levels. Who else can say
that? In addition, last year we
achieved a perfect score from the
please see REPUBLICANS page 10
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 5
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POLICE REPORT
This information was provid-
ed by the Montgomery Township
Police Department.
On April 21 at 4:56 p.m., Mont-
gomery Police responded to
Route 206 north of Griggstown
Road for a motor vehicle crash in-
volving a motorcycle.
A 52-year-old male was travel-
ing southbound on Route 206 on
a 1979 Harley Davidson Sportster
when he lost control and
crashed.
A witness reported that he was
approaching a line of vehicles
that were stopping for the traffic
signal at Griggstown Road when
he skidded and lost control of the
motorcycle.
The man was treated at the
scene by Montgomery EMS and
Somerset MICU before being air-
lifted to Robert Wood Johnson
Hospital in New Brunswick,
where he was listed in critical
condition.
No other vehicles were in-
volved in the crash.
Route 206 was closed to traffic
between Griggstown Road and
Pike Run Road for approximately
2 1/2 hours while police conduct-
ed an investigation.
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
letters to the editor
in our opinion
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — MAY 1-7, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
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Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
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PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Patricia Dove
MONTGOMERY EDITOR Heather Fiore
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
M
oney is always an issue.
Families are constantly
pinching pennies, looking
for ways to reduce expenses. School
districts and municipal governments
are doing the same, hoping to help
lower, or at least stabilize, the amount
of tax money they require to live in
town.
The challenge has always been, and
will continue to be, how these entities
can control costs while still providing
high-quality services that their resi-
dents demand. The state of New Jersey
certainly isn’t helping much through
aid, and it’s unlikely that will change
any time soon.
So the onus is on the local municipal
governments and school districts to get
creative: Not only what can be cut from
expenses, but what can be added to rev-
enues.
For awhile now, the idea of private
sponsorship of public facilities has
been tossed around. Selling banners to
local businesses at Little League fields,
or having that business sponsor a
youth sports team has been the norm
for quite some time. And no one seems
to have a problem with that.
But throw in the possibility of sell-
ing naming rights at a field or, worse
even, a building or complex, and excep-
tions start to arise. “When is enough
enough?” the detractors ask. “Does
everything need to be sold?”
We agree that there is a fine line be-
tween tasteful, effective sponsorship
and over-the-line, banner-on-every-
inch-of-the-field advertising. Think
“Major League 2” here (for all you
sports movie fans).
Moorestown Township recently ap-
proved an ordinance on first reading
that, if passed, would establish an offi-
cial sponsorship program. Officials
say that the program would increase
township revenues and help with im-
provements and maintenance of recre-
ational fields.
Annual banner and sponsorship op-
portunities will be available, with nam-
ing rights being offered as five- or 10-
year deals, with minimum bids of
$5,000 and $35,000, respectively. To en-
sure proper material, businesses won’t
be allowed to advertise the sale of alco-
hol, tobacco, adult-oriented material or
other items not consistent with pro-
moting the youth sports program and
the “positive image of the township.”
We applaud Moorestown Township
for its work in this regard, and we urge
other townships to follow suit.
If done correctly, sponsorships and
naming rights can provide a huge in-
flux of cash to youth sports leagues, to
school districts and to municipal gov-
ernments.
This field brought to you by...
It’s time for governments, schools to utilize sponsorships at fields, buildings
Too much advertising?
Do you agree that sponsorship is a good
idea? Or do you think that enough is
enough? Let us know your thoughts
through a letter to the editor.
Readers opposes township
involvement with rodeos
In past years, Montgomery Township
was involved in public rodeos. Now, anoth-
er one is scheduled.
We strongly oppose this event. Rodeos
are exploitive and abusive of animals.
They play into the human appetite for
power and control over other species and
desensitize both adults and children to the
fact that animals are sentient beings, capa-
ble of emotional as well as physical suffer-
ing.
Rodeos contribute to a callous attitude
toward animals in our society. It is well
known that the cycle of domestic violence
often begins with animal abuse in child-
hood, and therefore, we must set an exam-
ple for our children of valuing and nurtur-
ing all beings.
It is greatly disturbing that some people
find a rodeo entertaining and that they
enjoy an event that causes suffering and
glorifies those who excel in it. Unfortunate-
ly, mostly every circus deserves the same
criticism.
Even if the charitable cause is worth-
while, we are sure the township can come
up with a more humane alternative. Partic-
ipation in and support for this unethical
treatment of animals is cruel and uncivi-
lized. Please put an end to this annual
event and facilitate fundraisers we can all
be proud to contribute to.
"I am in favor of animal rights as well as
human rights. That is the way of the whole
human being.” – Abraham Lincoln
Barbara and Stewart Lindenberger
We are not getting what we are
paying for with city schools
School taxes are high, but so are our
kid’s test scores. Should we really be that
please see LETTERS, page 11
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
Elks Lodge veterans
meeting lunch May 9
The Princeton Elks Lodge
monthly Veterans Day meeting
and lunch will be held on May 9
at noon. The luncheon will be
open to all and free for veterans.
All veterans in our community
are invited to attend, and all Elks
who are veterans are especially
encouraged to attend.
The event will be held at the
Princeton Elk Lodge located at
345 Route 518 in Skillman. For
more information regarding this
event or the veterans program,
contact Hugh Dyer at (908) 359-
7122.
Elks Lodge to hold
flea market May 19
The Princeton Elks Lodge an-
nual Spring Flea Market will be
held on Sunday, May 19 from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. The rain date is
June 2.
The Elks flea market is popu-
lar with the area’s antique deal-
ers who shop early looking for
that special find.
With more than 70 vendors in
past years, the market will pro-
vide a wide assortment of prod-
ucts to satisfy everyone's taste,
need or desire.
An eight-foot space with a
table is $15; without the table, the
fee is $10.
To ensure availability of a
space with a table, the fees are to
accompany the reservation.
There is no restriction on the
number of spaces that may be re-
served.
For additional information
and to secure your reservation,
call Clare at (609) 921-8972 or Jean
at (908) 217-0300. Vendor set up
starts at 7:30 a.m. on May 19.
There will be free parking for
vendors and shoppers.
The Princeton Elks lodge is lo-
cated at 354 Route 518 in Skillman
Orchestra currently
scheduling auditions
The Greater Princeton Youth
Orchestra is currently schedul-
ing auditions for all instruments
for the 2013-14 concert season.
Interested students and/or
parents can register for an audi-
tion at gpyo.org, or can contact
Mark Morris, audition manager,
at mmorris.gpyo@gmail.com.
Auditions take place on May 8
and May 9, and will be held at
Montgomery High School in
Skillman.
Trinity Church to hold
Rummage, Bake Sale
The Trinity Episcopal Church
of Rocky Hill, which is located at
1 Crescent Ave. in Rocky Hill, will
be holding a Rummage and Bake
Sale on Saturday, May 18 from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be a $5
bag sale from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m..
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Cheerleaders honored
at committee meeting
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
The Montgomery High School
varsity cheerleading team was
recognized for its outstanding ef-
forts this past season with a
proclamation from the township
committee.
The 20 cheerleaders were hon-
ored at the March 21 committee
meeting, where township offi-
cials, proud parents and their two
coaches, Tiffany Riley and Amy
Nowak, congratulated them on
their accomplishments.
"We are incredibly proud of
this team, especially since they
were such a young team," Riley
said. "We had 17 seniors that left
last year, so we weren't really
sure how this team was going to
come together, but they really
surprised us."
For the first time in MHS his-
tory, the team won the title of
Somerset County cheerleading
champions.
Along with tackling that feat,
the cheerleaders also placed sixth
in the Universal Cheerleaders As-
sociation Empire State Regionals
and competed in the National
High School Cheerleading Cham-
pionship in Orlando, Fla.
"We're looking forward to the
potential this team has moving
forward because of how great
they were this year and how
great they've become," Riley said.
But, the praise didn't stop
there. The township committee
also commended the squad for its
charitable efforts.
For the third year in a row, the
squad hosted an event known as
Cougars for Cure, which the girls
renamed this year to Cougars
Tackling Cancer.
The event raises funds for the
Steeplechase Cancer Center at
the Somerset Medical Center.
The girls turned the MHS sta-
dium pink to promote breast can-
cer awareness throughout the
month of October and raised
$2,365 this year, which was for-
mally donated to the SMC at the
committee meeting.
Donna Castronovo, director of
special events for the Somerset
Medical Center Foundation, was
present to accept the donation
and said the team has raised al-
most $8,000 for the center over
the last three years.
"Montgomery is a really spe-
cial place because all of the vol-
unteers, especially our younger
residents who go above and be-
yond," Mayor Ed Trzaska said.
"The MHS cheerleading team has
accomplished so much this year,
both on the competition stage
and through their charitable en-
deavors.
“Their teamwork and dedica-
tion to our community are ad-
mirable, and all of Montgomery
is proud of them."
The team members who were
honored included Caitlyn Ark,
Ashleigh Bobbitt, Stephanie DeR-
avel, Erin Donnellan, Peyton
Drift, Nicole Duran, Lisa Farrick-
er, Samanth Garhart, Alexa
Gilbert, Katarina Joslin, Isabel
Loaiza, Julia LoPresti, Gabrielle
Louis-Charles, Melissa Lubitz,
Jessica Missel, Emily O'Connor,
Marissa Ross, Helen Taylor,
Hope Vlacich and Jacqueline
Wang.
BRIEFS
National Youth
Crisis Hotline
(800) 448-4663
PSA
THURSDAY May 2
Montgomery Township Committee
meeting: 7 p.m. in the court
room. For more information and
to confirm meeting time, visit
www.montgomery.nj.us.
Agricultural Advisory Committee
meeting: 3 p.m. in the community
center. For more information and
to confirm meeting time, visit
www.montgomery.nj.us.
FRIDAY May 3
Rhyme Time: Ages newborn to 2. 10
a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at the Mary
Jacobs Library. Nursery rhyme
fun plus play time. No registra-
tion required. For more informa-
tion, call the Youth Services Desk
at (609) 924-7073, ext. 5.
MONDAY May 6
Crafts for Little Hands: Ages 2 to 6.
10 a.m. to 10:45 and 11 a.m. to
11:45 a.m. at the Mary Jacobs
Library. Crafting fun with a spe-
cial theme, “Puffy Painting Dress
for Mess.” Registration required.
To register, call (609) 924-7073,
ext. 5.
Montgomery Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the
courtroom. For more information
and to confirm meeting time, visit
www.montgomery.nj.us.
TUESDAY May 7
Toddler Sing with Pat: Ages 1 to 3.
10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Mary
Jacobs Library. Sing along fun
with Pat McKinley. No registra-
tion required. For more informa-
tion, call the Youth Services Desk
at (609) 924-7073, ext. 5.
Sustainable Montgomery/Environ-
mental Commission meeting: 6
p.m. in the meeting room. For
more information and to confirm
meeting time, visit www.mont-
gomery.nj.us
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 1-7, 2013
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 1330 Route 206,
Suite 211, Skillman, NJ 08558. Or by email: news@themontgomery
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.themontgomerysun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
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10 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — MAY 1-7, 2013
Great for Mom, Dad or Grad!
Governor’s Best Practices in
Local Government program,
something matched by only 4 per-
cent of New Jersey municipali-
ties.”
When asked about running for
reelection, Mayor Trzaska com-
mented, “I decided to run again
because we are in the middle of
some truly exciting initiatives.
Our energy aggregation project
may save residents up to $1 mil-
lion in electricity costs, and we
are working on several signifi-
cant opportunities to preserve
more open space. We are also re-
designing the entire organiza-
tional structure at town hall and
seeking to improve the retail dis-
trict in town by partnering with
our local business community. I
would like to see these initiatives
through to completion.”
Trzaska and his wife are 10-
year residents of Montgomery
and expecting their first child
this summer.
Trzaska works as a Director at
Daiichi Sankyo, Inc. and is a grad-
uate of Rutgers University where
he received a B.S. in Chemical
Engineering and M.B.A. in phar-
maceutical management and
marketing.
He is currently serving in his
second year as Mayor.
Graham, her husband, and
their two children have lived in
Montgomery for about 20 years.
Graham is an attorney at Her-
rick, Feinstein LLP in Princeton
and has been practicing law for 25
years.
Republicans endorse committee candidates
REPUBLICANS
Continued from page 3
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 11
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Please recycle this newspaper.
upset?
Your editorial concluded that
we get what we pay for and the
facts you use to support that con-
clusion appear to have been se-
lected carefully, but were not
complete.
A quick review of the data
available online from the N.J. De-
partment of Education reveals
that more than half of the cost to
operate the city schools in New
Jersey is provided by the state.
These funds are ultimately de-
rived disproportionately from the
suburban and rural taxpayers.
In many cases, the cost per
pupil to operate city schools is
much higher than the cost to op-
erate the Montgomery Schools,
but the results in city schools are
very disappointing. The schools
that are failing in the state are
mostly in the cities.
This leads to the conclusion
that we are not getting what we
are paying for where the city
schools are concerned. I would
challenge the view that spending
more on education will always
produce better students, grades
or education.
Parochial school costs per stu-
dent are widely believed to be
much lower than public school
costs yet the parochial schools
achieve better results, even in the
cities.
In my view, the requirement
for our public schools to be thor-
ough and efficient is not being
met throughout the state.
You accurately recognize that
some families that no longer have
school-age children move out of
the state to avoid the high taxes
that support the school systems.
This is not always an option for
many of our seniors who have
ties to the community, were born,
raised, worked and retired here
but now find they are unable to
pay their property tax bill that is
more than two-thirds school tax.
While property tax relief may
be in sight in the near future, it
will not rectify this problem.
Denis Cummings
letters to the editor
LETTERS
Continued from page 6
WE'VE G0T Y0U
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Sun Newspapers
IN PRINT:
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The South Jersey Sun
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WEST WINDS0R
L&WRENCE
H0PEWELL
Æ00REST0WN
ÆT. L&UREL
ÆEDP0RD
T&BERN&CLE
SH&Æ0NG
Æ&RLT0N
V00RHEES
CHERRY HILL
H&DD0NPIELD
108 Kings Highway East
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856.427.0933
elauwit.com
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 13
2139 Route 206 · BeIIe Mead, NJ
908-874-8360
Frederic Sterritt, D.M.D. #3413 · Richard D'Avanzo, D.M.D. #4063
Our 40 Year Anniversary Fee wiII be
S3,495
*
*To take advantage of this offer treatment must be initiated June 1, 2013 through September 1, 2013.
*This is for Full Treatment (includes retainer). *May not be combined with any previous offers or insurance discounts.
*No additional fee adjustments. *Discount not valid on previous treatments.
For those fortunate to have orthodontic coverage, your benefits will be applied to our fee.
We participate in most plans.
BELLE MEAD ORTHODONT¡C8
Princeton Fitness Center
recognized for mentoring
More than two years ago, the
Princeton Fitness and Wellness
Center in Princeton was one of
the first sites to collaborate with
Montgomery High School’s Spe-
cial Education Work Study Pro-
gram, providing local students
with special needs an opportuni-
ty to develop real life workplace
and social skills to assist them in
career preparation. The center
mentored the students and pro-
vided a job coach to assist them in
various duties as they rotated
through many different areas of
the facility, affording them train-
ing in an array of skills based on
their ability levels. Manager
Danielle McGrath, along with
past manager Katie Pettit, provid-
ed an atmosphere for learning
job-related skills to many stu-
dents over the past two school
years.
Students attended these “work
study” placements as part of
their regular school day, receiv-
ing credit and being evaluated for
the work performed. While en-
gaged at the site, students wore
the appropriate uniforms and
learned to keep track of their
time using both a time clock sys-
tem and written time sheets. The
mentors provided opportunities
along the way for the students to
reflect on their duties, experi-
ences and the job skills they
learned.
The center also supported the
Community Based Instruction ef-
forts of the school having the stu-
dents visit a few times a month to
work out and learn about fitness
and community leisure time as
another component of their
school day. Trevor Deysher, a
trainer at the center, gave up his
own free time to assist the stu-
dents with this endeavor as part
of this au gratis agreement.
please see STUDENTS, page 16
14 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — MAY 1-7, 2013
· Cosmetic Dentistry
· Zoom!" Whitening
· InvisaIign
®
InvisibIe Braces
· FamiIy Dentistry
· Emergencies WeIcome
James J. CaIIy, DMD
609-924-8300
New Patients Welcome!
Evening and Weekend
Appointments Available
Montgomery KnoII
192 Tamarack CircIe SkiIIman
www.mysmiIedoc.com
Classic Smiles
9B East Broad Street | Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-7800
www.bell-whistle.com
INNOVATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE
Lunch: Tues.-Fri. 11:30-2:30
Dinner: Wed.-Thurs. 4:30-8
Fri.-Sat. 4:30-9:30
Princeton Youth
Orchestra takes
stage May 12
The Greater Princeton Youth
Orchestra will be taking the stage
at one of the world’s most presti-
gious venues, Carnegie Hall, at 2
p.m. on May 12. Senior Division
orchestra members will perform
under the batons of Artistic Di-
rector Kawika Kahalahoe and
Concert Orchestra Conductor, Dr.
Arvin Gopal. The Carnegie Hall
program consists of Wagner’s
thrilling “Overture to Rienzi”
and Gioachino Rossini’s” Over-
ture to La Gazza Ladra.” Tickets
are available through Carnegie
Hall’s box office at (212) 247-7800.
On Saturday June 8 at 8 p.m.,
GPYO will appear as part of The
Princeton Festival in Richardson
Auditorium on the campus of
Princeton University. The Con-
cert Orchestra has programmed
selections by Holst, Rossini and
Gershwin, under the leadership
of their conductor, Dr. Arvin
Gopal. The Symphonic Orchestra
presents the works of Lalo, Ravel
and Dvo ák. The two groups will
also combine forces to reprise
their Carnegie program.
The Richardson Auditorium
performance will feature concer-
to competition winner, 12-year-old
violinist, Dallas Noble. Noble has
been playing the violin since the
age of three, when she started
Suzuki violin with Toyoko Ki-
please see CONCERT, page 17
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 15
TENNIS CLUB
2013 Summer
Tennis Camp
June 24-August 30
NassauTennis.Net
908-359-8730
TENNIS CLUB
SkiIIman,NJ
l07·l10·7171
www.aa|:aaq¡aaas|:cs.caa
aa|:aaq¡a@qaa:|.caa
MOTION GYMNASTICS
SUMMER CAMP IS BACK!
At Motion Gymnastics summer camp you
get to enjoy all the fun of summer camp,
while learning how to flip, jump, and tumble!
Come spend the summer with us from
June 24th through August 23rd.
Unionville Vineyards
to hold wine tasting
The second event the VHHS
will hold for its annual fundrais-
er, “May in Montgomery,” is enti-
tled “A Taste of the Sourlands:
Over the Hill and through the
Vine,” a grand wine-tasting that
is scheduled to be held at
Unionville Vineyards (9 Rock-
town Rd. in Ringoes) on Saturday,
June 1 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
“A Taste of the Sourlands” is a
fundraiser to benefit the replace-
ment cost of the Gulick House
cedar-shake roof.
Taste samplings of
Unionville’s fine wines and culi-
nary hors d’oeuvres from local
chefs, while surrounded by some
of New Jersey’s most beautiful,
bucolic countryside.
Tickets are $50 per person by
advance reservation only. For a
reservation form, email taste-
ofthesourlands@gmail.com or
call (609) 466-0141.
PBA hosts first annual
sporting clay fundraiser
The Montgomery PBA is host-
ing the First Annual Sporting
Clay Fundraiser to benefit the
Montgomery Township PBA
Charity Fund on Monday, May 20
at Hudson Farm Club in Andover.
Registration will begin at 8
a.m. with a 9 a.m. cannon start.
There will be a continental break-
fast with 20 stations, as well as a
pig roast luncheon.
Trophies, luncheon cocktails
and cigars will be offered on be-
half of The Tiger’s Tale in Mont-
gomery.
For more information, go to
montgomerypba.org or contact
Brian Hofacker at (609) 577-0433 or
mtpd755@gmail.com.
BRIEFS
The students learned to be ac-
tive and engaged members of the
community, taking great pride in
their achievements.
After two years of being nomi-
nated by MHS as Employer of the
Year for New Jersey, Princeton
Fitness and Wellness was recog-
nized by the State Conference, co-
sponsored by The Boggs Center
and the Association of People
Supporting Employment First, on
March 22 at the Double Tree Hotel
in Somerset.
Many other sites have joined
along with Princeton Fitness and
Wellness in this collaboration in-
cluding Shop Rite of Mont-
gomery, Friendly’s, Mary Jacobs
Library, Walgreens of Hillsbor-
ough, the Township Municipal
Building, Kiki D’s, Princeton Or-
thopaedic Associates, Joey G’s
Restaurant, Kid Connection,
Palace Tours Travel Agency,
Chartwells Food Service, the
Board of Education, and all town-
ship schools including opportuni-
ties in the MHS Media Center and
MHS Nurse’s Office.
All of these employers en-
hance the students’ skill develop-
ment, as they become contribut-
ing members of the Montgomery
community.
The “work study” program
continues to expand to meet the
diverse career goals of students
and new sites are currently being
sought for students in the areas of
office skills, data entry, ware-
house skills, newspaper training,
additional food service skills and
hospital/medical settings.
If you are interested in assist-
ing Montgomery High School in
any of these areas, please contact
Audrey Bonfiglio Rosenthal at
abonfiglio@mtsd.us.
16 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — MAY 1-7, 2013
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900
Out w|th the O|d. In w|th the NewI
For over 100 years conventional salt-based water softeners have
stripped out healthy minerals like calcium and magnesium from
water to prevent scale. While effective, salt-based water softeners
have many undesirable side effects including: hauling heavy salt
bags, briny taste, slimy-feeling showers,
health concerns, and flushing thousands
of gallons of salty waste water into our
sewers and our environment.
Please Join Dr. Roderick Kaufmann &
1r:u.crcu 1cr¤arcícq¸ ¹ssc.:arcs
in Welcoming
307 Omni Drive
Hillsborough
908-281-6633
1r. }. S.crr 1cuu:uq
&
1r. 1arsíau 'a:a¸a
BOARD CERTIFIED DERMATOLOGISTS
Dr. Henning will be at our Hillsborough office.
Dr. Vaidya will be at our Monroe and Pennington offices.
Please Call Today to Make Your Appointment
with Dr. Henning or Dr. Vaidya.
5 Centre Drive
Suite 1A
Monroe Twp.
609-655-4544
Pennington Point West
2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
Bttgt//eIæuw.It/stuyvesæmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY. All packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all
meals and accommodations at our newly remodeled lodge. Fall and
spring turkey, whitetail deer (archery, rifle, muzzleloader), pheasant
(field and tower), coyote, rabbit, waterfowl.
(888} 690-0041
Students learn to be active
STUDENTS
Continued from page 13
Send us your
Montgomery news
Have a news tip?
Want to send us a press
release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@themontgomerysun.
com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934.
Call the editor
at 609-751-0245.
MAY 1-7, 2013 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 17
Bridgewater, N.J.,
February 28, 2013 -
Merrill Lynch today
announced that Fi-
nancial Advisor El-
liott Kugel has been
nationally recognized
among the top advi-
sors in New Jersey by
Barron’s magazine in
its annual “America’s
Top 1,000 Advisors:
State-by-State” list,
published on Febru-
ary 18, 2013 based on
2012 information. In
total, 293 Merrill
Lynch advisors are in-
cluded on this year's
list, the most advisors
for any firm.
Advisors considered
for Barron’s “Ameri-
ca’s Top 1,000 Advi-
sors: State-by-State”
ranking have a mini-
mum of seven years’
financial services ex-
perience and have
been employed at their
current firm for at
least one year. Numer-
ous quantitative and
qualitative measures
(including assets man-
aged, revenue pro-
duced and quality of
practice) determine
the financial advisor
rankings. Barron’s
does not receive com-
pensation from advi-
sors, participating
firms and their affili-
ates, or the media in
exchange for rank-
ings.
“We believe Elliot’s
inclusion on Barron’s
annual ‘America's Top
1,000 Advisors: State-
by-State’ list is highly
merited and under-
scores his commit-
ment to developing
strong relationships
with clients. Barron’s
recognition of so
many Merrill Lynch
advisors on its annual
list confirms our com-
mitment to providing
clients with outstand-
ing talent and top-
quality service to help
them achieve their fi-
nancial goals,” said
Keith Henry, resident
director.
Kugel resides in
Skillman, N.J. and has
been a part of Merrill
Lynch's Bridgewater
office for 20 years.
Local Merrill Lynch Financial Advisor Elliott Kugel Is Recognized
Among the Top Advisors in New Jersey on Barron’s “America’s Top
1,000 Advisors: State-by-State” List
Advertisement
tade. Currently a scholarship re-
cipient at the renowned Settle-
ment Music School in Philadel-
phia, she studies with Lee Snyder.
Noble has been a member of the
Greater Princeton Youth Orches-
tra since 2009. She will be inter-
preting “Symphonie Espagnol,
Op. 21” (first movement) by
Edouard Lalo.
The Richardson Auditorium
performance is made possible in
part by the generous sponsorship
of the Princeton/Pettoranello Sis-
ter City Foundation.
Tickets for the Richardson Au-
ditorium performance can be
purchased at
princeton.edu/utickets, or by con-
tacting Richardson Auditorium
at (609) 258-5000.
Concert to be held
at Carnegie Hall
CONCERT
Continued from page 14
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
MAY 1-7, 2013 PAGE 18
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
Call
856-427-0933
to place your
garage sale
ad today!
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
Roofing
856-356-2775
Board Your
Dog In A
Loving Home
Not A KenneI
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
30 Years Experience • Family Owned and Operated • High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics • Professional Installation
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/13.
$1,000 BFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
10º BFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/13.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/13.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/13.
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
HeIp Wanted
EducationaI Services
Concrete Masonry
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,Ìndividualized
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SAT Reading, Writing,
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RETIREES WELCOME TO APPLY
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Pet Care
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THE SUN
CLASSIFIEDS!
CLASSIFIED MAY 1-7, 2013 - THE MONTGOMERY SUN 19
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Drop your bags conditon!
This 3 bedroom 2 bath 2nd floor
condo is located in the Gold
Coast on a fantastic block. This
property has s/s appliances (new
in 2012), hardwood floors, w/w
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views. New front door. Pro-
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offered furnished with a fantastic
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Call (609) 992-4380 for your
private showing today!
1947 ASBURY AVE
Identity
Print
Web
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www.spectdesigns.com
If you’re reading your
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(609) 751-0245
Concrete Masonry
TWO BROTHERS MASONRY
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Brick • Pointing
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609-672-4145
Free Estimates
30 Years Experience • Family Owned and Operated • High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics • Professional Installation
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/1/13.
$1,000 BFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/1/13.
10º BFF
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/1/13.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/1/13.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
UP TO