Understanding 2003

PSAT/NMSQT

®

Scores

Who takes the PSAT/NMSQT?
Of the more than two million students who take the test, most are high school juniors. Nearly all students who take the test indicate they plan to attend college. The 20,000 high schools that test-takers attend vary greatly in size, curricula, standards, grading systems, population served, and source of support. For students who take the PSAT/NMSQT®, the score report provides a standardized view of their scholastic skills, regardless of the school attended, and helps them compare themselves to other college-bound students nationwide.

What does the PSAT/NMSQT measure?
The PSAT/NMSQT measures skills in three basic academic areas important for success in college. Ⅲ Verbal reasoning questions involve analogies, sentence completions, and critical reading. Ⅲ Math problem-solving questions deal with arithmetic, algebra, and geometry; some involve quantitative comparisons. Ⅲ Writing skills questions ask students to identify sentence errors, improve sentences, and improve paragraphs.

be the result of many factors, long-term educational preparation is the primary cause. The test itself reflects such differences but does not cause them. Ⅲ Individual student scores. Score reports show a numerical score for each area measured, as well as a range that extends from a few points below the score to a few points above. This range shows the extent to which a student’s score might differ with repeated testing, assuming that the student’s skill level remains constant. Ⅲ Differences between students. When comparing scores between students for the same measure (verbal, math, writing skills), you can determine true differences in scores by using the standard error of the difference (SED). Differences of fewer than 8 points (or 1.5 SED) are not significant, while differences of 8 points or more are likely to reflect true differences in scores.

Can PSAT/NMSQT scores be used to estimate SAT® scores?
Verbal and math questions in the PSAT/NMSQT are the same kind as those in the SAT® I: Reasoning Test. Writing skills questions are the same kind as those in the multiplechoice section of the SAT II: Writing Test. These similarities are intentional, as the PSAT/NMSQT is designed to be a practice for SAT Program tests. The PSAT/NMSQT scale of 20 to 80 is equivalent to the SAT scale of 200 to 800. Estimated SAT score ranges are included on student score reports. Two times out of three, juniors will earn SAT scores within these ranges but actual scores may be higher (or lower) than these estimates. Higher than estimated SAT scores may result from intervening activities, such as Ⅲ developing skills through rigorous academic courses Ⅲ participating in problem-solving activities Ⅲ extensive, quality outside reading Ⅲ following the advice in the “Improve Your Skills” section of Score Report Plus Ⅲ becoming familiar with test directions, types of questions, and pacing Juniors frequently take the SAT 6 or 7 months after taking the PSAT/NMSQT. Estimated SAT scores for all test-takers assume the SAT is taken within a year of taking the PSAT/NMSQT. Sophomores will usually not take the SAT for 18 months, so there may be a greater likelihood that intervening activities will influence their SAT scores. continued on back cover

How is the PSAT/NMSQT scored?
First, a raw score is computed. Students receive one point for each correct answer (regardless of difficulty). For incorrect answers to multiple-choice questions, a fraction of a point is deducted based on the number of answer choices: four choices, 1/3 point deduction; five choices, 1/4 point deduction. Nothing is deducted for unanswered questions or for an incorrect answer to a student-produced response question. Next, the raw score is converted to a score on the PSAT/ NMSQT scale of 20 to 80. This statistical procedure, called equating, adjusts for differences in difficulty between various forms, or editions, of the test. Equating makes it possible to compare the scores of students who have taken different editions of the test.

Do PSAT/NMSQT scores fairly reflect students’ skills?
Concern for fairness is an integral part of the development of the PSAT/NMSQT. Comprehensive reviews and analyses ensure that questions and tests are fair for different groups of students. Although differences in test performance may

Ⅲ PSAT/NMSQT scores should be interpreted as ranges rather than points. Ⅲ Percentiles are based on the verbal. the standard deviation is smaller than it would be for a more diverse group.88 0. 47.140 2 . Ⅲ The standard deviation is a measure of the variability of a set of scores around their mean.8 4. percentiles for juniors compare their performance with that of other juniors who took the test.4 846.87 0.2 846.431 Math 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 99 99 98 98 97 96 96 95 94 93 91 90 88 87 85 82 79 76 73 70 70 66 63 59 56 52 48 44 41 37 33 30 29 26 23 20 17 14 14 11 9 8 6 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 45. math.140 48. Ⅲ A reliability coefficient helps to show expected fluctuation in scores if a student takes a test more than once.82 Average SEM 3.6 11.0 548.0 548.6 846.9 10.2 10. and writing skills scores earned by a sample of collegebound juniors or sophomores who took the PSAT/NMSQT in 2003. JUNIORS Percentiles Score 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 Mean score Standard deviation Number of juniors in sample SOPHOMORES Percentiles Writing Skills 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 98 98 98 97 96 96 95 93 93 91 89 89 87 86 83 80 78 76 75 71 69 65 60 58 56 53 49 44 39 35 32 29 25 20 18 14 12 9 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Points to Note Writing Skills 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 98 98 98 98 96 96 95 94 93 92 91 89 86 85 83 82 79 77 73 69 67 66 63 59 54 49 46 43 39 34 29 27 22 18 14 11 10 9 6 6 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 47. Reliability shows how consistently students would earn similar scores in repeated testings.140 50.PSAT/NMSQT Percentiles and Mean Scores can be used to compare students’ performance with that of juniors and sophomores. If the test scores cluster tightly around the mean score.4 10. or no expected fluctuation. A reliability coefficient of 1. The higher the reliability coefficient. Reliability Coefficient Verbal Mathematics Writing skills 0. percentiles compare their performance with that of sophomores.2 11. Ⅲ On the score report. as they do when the group tested is relatively homogeneous.1 Points to Note Data are based on a sample of sophomores and juniors who took the PSAT/NMSQT in the previous year (2002 Tuesday and Saturday forms). The standard error of measurement (SEM) in the table above indicates that a student who took different forms of the test under identical conditions would be likely to earn scores within 4 points of one another.431 Verbal 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 98 98 97 97 97 96 95 93 92 91 90 88 85 84 82 79 77 74 71 68 64 61 57 53 49 46 42 39 35 32 28 25 22 20 17 14 11 10 8 7 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 Math 99+ 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 99 98 98 97 97 96 95 94 92 92 90 89 87 84 83 80 79 76 73 70 66 63 59 59 55 52 48 44 40 36 33 29 26 23 21 20 17 14 13 10 8 8 6 5 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 Score 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 Mean score Standard deviation Number of sophomores in sample Verbal 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99+ 99 99 99 99 98 98 97 97 96 95 94 93 91 90 89 87 85 83 80 78 75 72 68 65 62 58 54 52 48 44 40 36 33 30 26 23 19 17 15 12 10 10 7 7 5 5 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 44. Ⅲ The mean score is the statistic that describes the average performance of a group. For sophomores or younger students.5 548.00 would indicate perfect reliability. the smaller the fluctuation of scores across repeated testings.431 Ⅲ Percentiles indicate the percentage of students whose scores fall below each specified score.0 4.4 10.

000 will earn 2003 PSAT/NMSQT scores high enough to qualify them for recognition. Students who qualify to continue in the competitions for scholarships to be offered in 2005 then must meet academic and other requirements specified by NMSC in order to be considered for awards.Selection Index Percentiles and Mean Score can be used to compare students’ performance with that of juniors. Ⅲ Percentiles are based on the Selection Index earned by a sample of college-bound juniors who took the PSAT/NMSQT in 2003.7 29. For example. and awards to be offered—should be sent to National Merit Scholarship Corporation. about 55. For students and parents. These students will be notified of their standing through their high schools in September 2004. Detailed descriptions of NMSC programs are published in the Guide to the National Merit® Scholarship Program and the National Achievement Scholarship Program Information Booklet. Suite 200. Participation in NMSC’s competitions for scholarships to be offered in 2005 is determined by responses to the four program entry items on the 2003 PSAT/NMSQT answer sheet.org. mailed to high school principals each fall. Evanston. Of the more than one million NMSC program entrants. the selection process. and a writing skills score of 59 would result in a Selection Index of 177 (56 + 62 + 59). IL 60201-4897. and writing skills scores.140 3 . Both the PSAT/NMSQT Score Report Plus and the Roster of Student Scores and Plans show the student’s Selection Index.2 846.nationalmerit. JUNIORS Selection Index 240-224 223 222 221 220 219 218 217 216 215 214 213 212 211 210 209 208 207 206 205 204 203 202 201 200 199 198 197 196 195 194 193 192 191 190 189 188 187 186 185 184 183 182 181 180 179 178 177 176 175 174 173 172 171 170 169 168 167 166 165 Points to Note Selection Index 104 103 102 101 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 & below Percentile 99+ 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 98 98 98 98 98 98 97 97 97 97 96 96 96 96 95 95 95 94 94 94 93 93 92 92 91 91 90 90 89 89 88 87 87 86 85 85 84 83 82 81 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 Selection Index 164 163 162 161 160 159 158 157 156 155 154 153 152 151 150 149 148 147 146 145 144 143 142 141 140 139 138 137 136 135 134 133 132 131 130 129 128 127 126 125 124 123 122 121 120 119 118 117 116 115 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 Percentile 72 71 70 69 68 67 65 64 63 62 61 59 58 57 56 54 53 52 50 49 48 46 45 44 42 41 40 38 37 36 34 33 32 31 29 28 27 26 25 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 14 13 12 11 11 10 9 9 8 7 7 Percentile 6 6 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 Ⅲ Reported on a scale ranging from 60 to 240. How NMSC Uses the Selection Index National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) uses the Selection Index score as an initial screen of the 1. math. telephone 847 866-5100.3 million test-takers who meet program entry requirements and to designate groups of students to be honored in the competitions it conducts. Inquiries about any aspect of the National Merit or National Achievement Program—including entry requirements. 1560 Sherman Avenue. the Selection Index is the sum of the verbal. a verbal score of 56. information about the competitions is given in the PSAT/NMSQT Student Bulletin and at www. and whether the student meets participation requirements. SM Mean score Standard deviation Number of juniors in sample 146. the student’s responses to the entry items. a math score of 62.

This ensures 4 that a score of. 2003 Scores Points 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 PSAT/NMSQT FORM S — Saturday.2003 PSAT/NMSQT Score Conversion Tables show how points obtained on the test are converted to scores on the 20-80 PSAT/NMSQT scale. Ⅲ There is no advantage or disadvantage in taking either the Tuesday or Saturday form. A statistical process called equating adjusts for these small differences. October 18. . October 21. 65 on one form of the test reflects a similar level of performance as does a 65 on another form of the test. 2003 Scores Writing Skills 56 55 54 53 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 35 34 32 31 29 27 25 23 22 20 20 20 Scores Writing Skills Points 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 Scores Writing Skills Points Verbal 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 40 38 37 36 35 35 33 32 30 29 28 26 24 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Verbal 80 80 79 77 75 73 72 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50 50 49 48 47 Math Verbal 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 30 29 28 26 25 23 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Math 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 38 37 36 35 34 32 31 29 28 26 24 22 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Points 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 Verbal 80 80 78 76 75 73 71 70 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 47 Math Math 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 39 38 37 35 34 32 30 29 27 25 23 21 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Writing Skills 56 54 53 52 51 49 48 47 46 45 43 42 41 40 39 38 36 35 33 31 29 28 26 24 22 21 20 20 20 20 20 80 77 75 73 71 69 68 66 65 64 62 61 60 59 57 56 55 54 53 52 80 80 80 80 78 76 74 72 71 69 68 66 65 63 62 61 60 58 57 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9 -10 or below 80 77 74 72 71 69 67 66 64 63 62 61 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 80 80 80 78 77 75 74 72 71 70 68 67 65 64 63 61 60 59 57 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9 -10 or below Points to Note Ⅲ Points represent the total number of correct answers minus a fraction of a point for each incorrect answer to a multiple-choice question. PSAT/NMSQT FORM T — Tuesday. say. Ⅲ Points are totaled. Ⅲ Converting points to scores adjusts for slight differences in difficulty between various forms. then converted to scores on the 20-80 PSAT/NMSQT scale. Ⅲ Nothing is deducted for incorrect answers to student-produced response questions or for omitted answers of any type.

Read different kinds of argumentative writing (editorials. to explain. don’t be distracted by a shift in subject areas. While you read. V25 Recognizing similar relationships in different fields of knowledge How to improve: In an analogy question. V26 Understanding sentences or analogies that deal with scientific ideas How to improve: Read magazine articles about scientific subjects to improve your comfort level in this area. V18 Understanding and using a word in an unusual context How to improve: Work on using word definitions when choosing an answer. Use examples in your own writing. striking images. Learn to understand methods of persuasion and argumentation. V21 Understanding the exact relationship between words How to improve: In an analogy question. understandable parts. suffixes. practice summarizing main ideas and noting sentences that mark transition points. V15 Recognizing words that signal contrasting ideas in a sentence How to improve: Learn how certain words (such as “although. Expand your reading to include argumentative writing. try to determine why the author wrote what he or she wrote. When you read. such as to inform.” and “while”) are used to signal a contrast between one part of a sentence and another. Ask yourself. Pay attention to the way in which tone conveys meaning in conversation and in the media. Practice making distinctions between the main idea and supporting details. Once you establish a clear relationship sentence. quotations. Improve your knowledge of word roots to help determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. V13 Understanding complex sentences How to improve: Ask your English teacher to recommend books that are a bit more challenging than those you’re used to reading. Try not to be confused by an unusual meaning of a term. V12 Understanding how negative words. state the relationship between the first two terms in a sentence and then evaluate all the answer choices. V19 Comprehending long sentences How to improve: Practice reducing long sentences into small. point of view.” “however.” “lacks”). V16 Recognizing a definition when it is presented in a sentence How to improve: Learn how such elements as appositives. such as political commentary. V20 Choosing a correct answer based on the meaning of the entire sentence How to improve: Make sure your answer choice fits the logic of the sentence as a whole. if you establish a negative relationship between the first pair of words (relationships using words like “not. V17 Understanding sentences or analogies that deal with abstract ideas How to improve: Broaden your reading to include newspaper editorials. Practice breaking down the sentences into their component parts to improve your comprehension. formulate the relationship more precisely. pay attention to the ways in which negative words (like “not” and “never”). V3 Comparing and contrasting ideas presented in two passages How to improve: Read editorials that take opposing views on an issue. and criticism. how facts presented in the beginning of a magazine article relate to the conclusion. and main idea. V24 Recognizing a similar relationship in positive and negative contexts How to improve: In an analogy question. subordination. State the point of the examples in your own words. and suffixes (like “less”) affect the meaning of words and sentences. don’t be distracted by a shift in the connotations of the words. make sure your answer choice has an identical negative relationship. consider how an author’s choice of words helps define his or her attitudes. If more than one matches your relationship sentence. and philosophical writings. political essays. V2 Understanding tone How to improve: When reading. personal essays) and pay attention to the way examples are used.” “never. Be sure to evaluate all the choices before you select your answer. prefixes (like “un” and “im”). for example. philosophy. state the relationship between the first two terms in a sentence and then evaluate all the answer choices. V11 Understanding difficult vocabulary How to improve: Broaden your reading to include newspapers and magazines.” “but. look for such things as specific examples. V14 Recognizing connections between ideas in a sentence How to improve: Learn how connecting words (such as relative pronouns and conjunctions) establish the relationship between different parts of a sentence. V9 Distinguishing conflicting viewpoints How to improve: When reading. V8 Making connections between information in different parts of a passage How to improve: Work on figuring out the relationship between the material presented in one part of a reading passage and material presented in another part. and punctuation are used to define words in a sentence. V10 Being thorough How to improve: Don’t just pick the first answer choice you see that looks tempting. V22 Understanding negative relationships in analogies How to improve: In an analogy.Score Report Plus Skills List VERBAL SKILLS V1 Understanding main ideas in a reading passage How to improve: Read the whole passage carefully and try to determine the author’s overall message. try to determine the author’s ideas and assumptions and then think about how they might apply to new situations. Don’t choose an answer just because it sounds good when inserted in the blank. V23 Recognizing less common meanings of words How to improve: In an analogy question. criticism. and emotionally loaded words. Learn how dependent clauses and verb phrases function in sentences. if you can’t establish the relationship between the first pair of words. as well as fiction and nonfiction from before the 1900s. identifying the parts of speech of the terms might give you a useful clue. and prefixes affect sentences How to improve: When reading. Think about the connotations of specific words and why the author might have decided to use them. state the relationship between the first two terms in a sentence and then evaluate all the answer choices. V6 Applying ideas presented in a reading passage How to improve: When you read. Look for differences and similarities in tone. Pay attention to prefixes (like “il” and “im”) and suffixes (like “less”) that indicate negation. or to convince. December 2003 5 . Include reading material that is a bit outside your comfort zone. Once you establish a clear relationship sentence. V4 Understanding the use of examples How to improve: Authors often include examples in their writing to communicate and support their ideas. just as you would read an entire paragraph rather than assume its meaning based only on the first sentence. V7 Determining an author’s purpose or perspective How to improve: Authors write for a variety of purposes. V5 Recognizing the purpose of various writing strategies How to improve: Writers use a variety of tools to achieve their effects.

W5 Recognizing improper pronoun use How to improve: Learn to understand the distinction between informal. M10 Recognizing logical key words How to improve: Pay attention to key words. inequalities. W8 Understanding the structure of long sentences How to improve: As you read. When you think there is enough information to solve the problem. Make adjustments in your solution strategy when things aren’t going as well as they should. Considering different possibilities may indicate the answer cannot be determined. basic statistics. figures. Review the way you use pronouns in your own writing. M5 Using basic algebraic concepts and operations to solve problems How to improve: Review algebraic concepts and rules. Work with your teacher to become more familiar with the conventions of standard written English. Familiarize yourself with the formulas given at the beginning of math sections of the test. W3 Recognizing logical connections within sentences and passages How to improve: Use the writing process to help you revise your draft essays. Look for context clues to help you guess at the meaning of unfamiliar words as you read. such as problems that use combinations of arithmetic. break long sentences into smaller units of meaning. such as “not. Practice solving problems in which you must consider different possible cases. W6 Understanding the structure of sentences with unfamiliar vocabulary How to improve: Read material that contains unfamiliar vocabulary. divisibility. Practice developing equations. algebra. Read articles in newspapers and magazines about the arts so that you will feel more comfortable with these subjects.” “could be. Sometimes the choices can help identify a strategy for solving the problem. W2 Following conventions in writing How to improve: Review the chapters in a grammar book that cover grammatical conventions.” “at most. and finding the average (arithmetic mean). Write about the things you are learning in math and science classes. M11 Using answer choices to help solve the problem How to improve: Looking at the answer choices may help you understand the problem. or philosophy. ratio. Try not to panic if you are asked to do something that looks unusual—reading the problem carefully may show you that you have the skills to answer it. and remainders. Look for charts and graphs in newspapers and magazines. M9 Solving problems that appear unfamiliar How to improve: These problems may not look like problems found in textbooks. volume. square roots. basic counting. M7 Using logical reasoning How to improve: Break down the problem and monitor the steps as you go along. fractions. slope. exponents. and digits. Vary the sentence patterns in your own writing. angles. and graphs How to improve: Practice solving problems that involve basic probability. prime numbers. multiples. and practice interpreting the data in them. history. such as word choice. economics. or numerical data. inequalities. area. Make sure you understand subject and verb agreement. or expressions from verbal descriptions. Read articles in the science section of newspapers and magazines so that you will feel more comfortable with scientific or math content. W7 Understanding complicated sentence structures How to improve: Refer to a grammar book to identify various sentence patterns and their effective use. median. use of noun and prepositional phrases. Don’t let the form of the question keep you from trying to answer it. M2 Understanding geometry and coordinate geometry How to improve: Review geometry units in your textbook involving perimeter. W11 Understanding the structure of sentences that relate to the arts How to improve: Focus on how something is said as well as on what is said. or expressions to help solve problems How to improve: Practice solving problems by drawing or visualizing figures to help you understand the problem. W9 Understanding the structure of sentences with abstract ideas How to improve: Read newspapers. Also practice solving problems involving odd and even integers. M3 Dealing with probability. charts. M6 Making connections among mathematical topics How to improve: Practice problems that require combining skills acquired in different math courses. and geometry.” “at least. and mode. Try rewriting or rearranging the given expressions in a different form.MATHEMATICS SKILLS M1 Using basic concepts and operations in arithmetic problem solving How to improve: Practice solving problems involving positive and negative integers.” and “different. spoken pronoun usage and standard written pronoun usage. decimals. W10 Understanding the structure of sentences that relate to science or math How to improve: Focus on how something is said as well as on what is said. solving equations and inequalities.” “must be. such as those involving substitution. circumference. exponents. M12 Deciding when a problem doesn’t provide enough information to determine a single solution How to improve: Review questions that have “It cannot be determined from the information given” as an answer choice. double check by trying different values.” “possible. December 2003 6 . and sentence construction. M4 Creating either figures or algebraic equations. choose words carefully and connect them for clear meaning. place value. Work with classmates and teachers to clarify meaning in your writing. W4 Using verbs correctly How to improve: Make sure that you can identify the subject and verb of a sentence. In your writing. percent.” These words determine the meaning of the question and therefore must be understood to correctly solve the problem. M8 Recognizing patterns and equivalent forms How to improve: Try recognizing a pattern by considering a simpler case. and combining algebraic expressions. WRITING SKILLS W1 Being precise and clear How to improve: Learn to recognize sentence elements that are ambiguous and confusing. lines. Ask your teacher to help you identify and correct pronoun errors in your own writing. keeping in mind what the question is asking. and books that deal with subjects such as politics. magazines. It may help to look at the problem from different perspectives.

or for schools that have some juniors or sophomores who tested elsewhere Ⅲ System Summary Report. also plays a role in the selection. eastern time Fax: 609 530-0482 E-mail: PSAT@info. October 16. How should schools use PSAT/NMSQT score reports? The PSAT/NMSQT is intended to help students: evaluate skill levels in three critical academic areas. and State Data. Several optional reports are available for a fee: Ⅲ Summary of Answers and Skills. This approach gives students a better opportunity to improve.collegeboard. What PSAT/NMSQT reports do schools receive? The following basic reports are provided to all schools: Ⅲ PSAT/NMSQT Score Report Plus for each student tested (one for the student and one for the school) Ⅲ Score labels. NJ 08541-6720 Phone: 888 477-PSAT (7728) (for educators only) 609 771-7070 8 a. Box 6720. providing score statistics and student-reported information for juniors and sophomores. Also referenced are test questions that contain the skills and that the student answered incorrectly. go online: www. the score report notes up to three skills each in verbal and math and up to two writing skills in which the student needs to improve. compare their readiness for collegelevel work with that of their peers. provided that the copyright notice appears on all reproduced materials. PSAT/NMSQT scores are not for use by colleges as part of their admission criteria. See the complete list of skills on pages 5–6. October 13. Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. Regional. rather than overwhelming them with their shortcomings.com/school/. parents.collegeboard.org Plan Ahead for 2004 PSAT/NMSQT Dates Wednesday. the three in which they have the best chance to improve with extra work are reported. combining score data from all schools in a system Ⅲ Electronic Data Reports. All rights reserved. Based on a student’s individual performance across the questions. For students who are weak in more than three verbal skills. This information is derived from analyzing individual performance across test questions. the weekday test date will be on Wednesday. Score reports should be used for counseling students about educational plans. and enter scholarship programs.collegeboard.m. listing studentreported information and scores for each student Ⅲ School Summary Report (provided if at least 50 of a school’s juniors or sophomores tested at the school).O. and staff. summarizing score data for schools that test fewer than 50 juniors/50 sophomores. Permission is hereby granted to any nonprofit school to reproduce this publication in whole or in part in limited quantities for distribution to students.collegeboard. Are the reported skills the student’s weakest areas? Not necessarily. . Princeton. summarizing score statistics and student-reported information Ⅲ Summary Statistics Report with summary score data for each grade in which 25 or more students of the same sex tested Ⅲ PSAT/NMSQT Summary Report: National. for example.com. Inform students of their right to withhold these scores from admission or athletic offices. including final mean scores. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. determined with the advice of panels of expert educators.com for additional data on the technical characteristics of the test. Scores should not be included on student transcripts that will be reproduced and sent to colleges unless the student (age 18 or older) or parent/ guardian has granted permission. Score Report Plus gives highest priority to those skills that appear most attainable. practice for SAT Program tests. even when requested.m. including all student-provided data as well as scores and skills (in disk format) To order. aggregating student responses to each test question and providing information on skills that need improvement Ⅲ Special Summary Report. 2004 • Saturday.What is reported in the “Improve Your Skills” section of the score report? The “Improve Your Skills” section of Score Report Plus gives students a personalized analysis of their areas of weakness as well as specific suggestions for how to improve. Each test question contains a different combination of skills. Or contact the PSAT/NMSQT program at: Mail: P. summarizing the basic score information (one set of labels) Ⅲ Roster of Student Scores and Plans. The educational importance of the skills. to 4 p. Questions? Visit www. 2004 Note: Beginning in 2004. but not for sale. Reports for 2003 will be available in the spring of 2004 on www. College Board and SAT are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board.

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