What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Valid Until: Product Version: Reviewed by: Latest Content:

Service Pack 1 Exchange Server 2003 Exchange Product Development

www.microsoft.com/exchange/library Author: Exchange Documentation Team

What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Published: May 2003 Updated: October 2003 Applies To:
Exchange Server 2003

Copyright
This document is provided for informational purposes only and Microsoft makes no warranties, either express or implied, in this document. Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, is subject to change without notice. The entire risk of the use or the results of the use of this document remains with the user. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place or event is intended or should be inferred. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property. © 2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Active Directory, ActiveSync, ActiveX, FrontPage, Outlook, Windows, Windows Server, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

Contributing Writers: Patricia Anderson, Teresa Appelgate, Susan Hill,
Jon Hoerlein, Aaron Knopf, Jyoti Kulkarni, Michele Martin, Joey Masterson, John Speare, Randy Treit, Christopher Budd, Tammy Treit

Editors: Brendon Bennett, Lindsay Pyfer, Cathy Anderson Technical Reviewers: Exchange Product Team Graphic Design: Kristie Smith Production:
Sean Pohtilla, Joe Orzech

Table of Contents
What's New in Exchange Server 2003.........................................1 What's New in Exchange Server 2003.........................................2 Introduction...............................................................................1
What Is Updated in This Book? ..................................... ............................1 Updated Chapters............................................................... .................1

Chapter 1.....................................................................................3 Overview of Exchange 2003......................................................3
Exchange 2003 Test Environments........................................ ....................3 Operating Systems.............................................................................. .4 Coexistence and Upgrade from Previous Versions................................4 What Features Have Been Removed................................................. .........5 Connectors for Lotus cc:Mail and MS Mail............................................5 Real-Time Collaboration Features.......................................... ...............5 M: Drive................................................................... ............................6 Key Management Service................................................................ .....6

Chapter 2.....................................................................................7 Client Features..........................................................................7
Outlook Improvements...................................................... ........................7 Cached Exchange Mode and Synchronization Improvements .............7 Outlook Performance Monitoring............................................... .........10 RPC over HTTP.......................................................... .........................10 Outlook Web Access Improvements................................................ .........19 Outlook Web Access Versions ...................................................... ......19 Logon and Logoff Improvements............................................... .........29 New User Interface........................................................................... ..32 Support for Rules.................................................. .............................41 Spelling Checker...................................................... ..........................42 Tasks............................................................................... ...................44 Message Signatures......................................................... ..................46 Viewing User Properties........................................... ..........................47 Easier Removal of Recipients....................................... ......................48 Adding a Sender or Recipient to Contacts .........................................48 Selecting a Default Font......................................................... ............49 Reply Header and Body Not Indented................................................49

ii What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Web Beacon Blocking ............................................................... .........49 Blocking Attachments ............................................... ........................50 Junk E-mail Filtering.............................................. .............................51 Sensitivity and Reply/Forward InfoBars..............................................51 Item Window Size........................................................................... ....51 Meeting Requests.............................................................................. .52 Composing Messages to Recipients From the Address Book..............52 Improved Performance............................................................ ...........53 Outlook Web Access Compression..................................................... .53 S/MIME Support......................................................................... .........54 Mobile Services for Exchange.............................................. ....................66 Exchange ActiveSync......................................................... ................67 Outlook Mobile Access .......................................... ............................69

Chapter 3...................................................................................74 Administration Features..........................................................74
New Mail-Enabled Objects for Managing Recipients.................................75 InetOrgPerson............................................................. .......................75 Query-Based Distribution Groups..................................... ..................77 Improved Ability to Restrict Submissions to Users and Distribution Lists (Restricted Distribution Lists).................................................................. .88 Enhanced Exchange Features on User Properties ...................................90 Moving Mailboxes in Exchange System Manager.....................................92 Enhancements to Queue Viewer.................................................... ..........93 Disabling Outbound Mail................................................ ....................95 Setting the Queue Viewer Refresh Rate ............................................96 Finding Messages.................................................................. .............96 Viewing Additional Information About a Queue..................................98 Viewing Previously Hidden Queues ...................................................99 Improved Public Folder Referral.......................................... ...................101 Improved Public Folder Interfaces.................................................. ........102 Manually Starting Replication ...................................... .........................104 Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool....................................105 Mailbox Recovery Center.................................................... ...................106 Improved Message Tracking ................................................................ ..110 Enhanced Control of Message Tracking Logs in Exchange System Manager................................................................................... ........110 Enhanced Message Tracking Capabilities.........................................111 Including Bcc Recipients in Archived Messages.....................................112 Step 1: Enabling Archiving on a Mailbox Store.................................113

Table of Contents iii

Step 2: Setting the Registry Key .................................................... ..113 Step 3: Restarting Services........................................... ...................114

Chapter 4.................................................................................115 Performance and Scalability Features...................................115
Improved Distribution List Membership Caching............................... .....115 Suppressing Out of Office Messages to Distribution List Members......... 116 Enhanced DNS-Based Internet Mail Delivery....................................... ...116 Improved Outlook Synchronization Performance ..................................117 Improved Outlook Web Access Performance................................ ..........118 Monitoring Outlook Client Performance.................................................118 Link State Improvements.............................................................. .........120 Virtual Address Space Improvements ...................................................120 Changing the MTA File Directory Location Using System Manager.........122 Changing the SMTP Mailroot Directory Location Using System Manager ........................................................................................... ...................122 Tuning Exchange 2003 ..................................................................... .....123 Removing Exchange 2000 Tuning Parameters................................ ..123

Chapter 5.................................................................................127 Reliability and Clustering Features........................................127
Reliability Features................................................... .............................127 Improved Virtual Memory Management...........................................128 Mailbox Recovery Center.................................. ...............................129 Recovery Storage Group.......................................... ........................130 Improved Error Reporting...................................................... ...........130 Clustering Features......................................................................... .......133 Support For Up to Eight-Node Clusters................................... ..........135 Support for Volume Mount Points ................................... .................136 Improved Failover time..................................... ...............................136 Security Improvements..................................................... ...............137 Checking Clustering Prerequisites....................................... .............140 Exchange 2003 Cluster Requirements................................. ..................140 Exchange Server 2003 Setup Requirements....................................140 Upgrading an Exchange 2000 Cluster and Exchange Virtual Server to Exchange 2003 ......................................................................... ............141

Chapter 6.................................................................................143 Transport and Message Flow Features...................................143
Link State Improvements.............................................................. .........144 Improved Link State Availability ....................................... ...............145

iv What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Link State Improvements for Oscillating Connections......................145 Configuring Cross-Forest SMTP Mail Collaboration.................................145 Enabling Cross-Forest Authentication......................................... ......147 Enabling Cross-Forest Collaboration by Resolving Anonymous Mail. 151 Internet Mail Wizard......................................................................... ......157 Configuring an Exchange Server to Send Internet Mail....................158 Configuring an Exchange Server to Receive Internet Mail................168 Configuring an Exchange Server to Send and Receive Internet Mail 177 Configuring a Dual-Homed Exchange Server for Internet Mail.........190 DSN Diagnostic Logging and DSN Codes...............................................204 Configuring DSN Diagnostic Logging......................................... .......205 DSN Codes Available in Exchange Server 2003................................206 Moving the X.400 (MTA) and SMTP Queue Directory Locations..............208 Connection Filtering.................................................................... ...........210 How Connection-Filtering Rules Work................................. ..............211 How Block List Providers Match Offending IP Addresses...................211 Understanding Block List Provider Response Codes.........................212 Specifying Exceptions to the Connection Filter Rule.........................213 Enabling Connection Filtering...................................................... .....214 Inbound Recipient Filtering............................................ ........................222 Enabling Recipient Filtering................................................... ...........222 Understanding How Enabled Filters Are Applied ...................................225 Improved Ability to Restrict Submissions to an SMTP Virtual Server......228 Improved Ability to Restrict Relaying on an SMTP Virtual Server...........229

Chapter 7.................................................................................231 Storage Features...................................................................231
Shadow Copy Backup .............................................. .............................231 Using Shadow Copy Backup............................................ .................232 Recovery Storage Group.......................................... ........................232 Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Merge Wizard............................................237 Improved Public Folder Store Replication..................................... ..........237 Improved Virus Scanning API ............................................. ...................238

Chapter 8.................................................................................239 Development Features..........................................................239
New Development Technologies...................................... ......................239 Managed Wrappers for SMTP and Transport Sinks............................241 Supported Development Technologies............................................ .......241 Data Access Methods........................................................ ...............241

Table of Contents v

Events and Notifications................................... ...............................242 Application Technologies.................................................... ..............242 Monitoring................................................................................ ........242 Specialized Programs........................................................ ...............242 Developing .NET Applications for Exchange Server 2003......................243 Active Directory Classes and Attributes.................................. ...............243 Deprecated Exchange Development Technologies................................. 243 Deprecated MAPI Technologies......................................... .....................244

Chapter 9.................................................................................245 Deployment Features............................................................245
New Exchange 2003 Deployment Features........................................... .245 Exchange Server Deployment Tools.................................................246 ADC Tools........................................................................ .................246 Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool..............................247 Exchange Server 2003 Setup Improvements...................................248 Installing Exchange System Management Tools Only.......................250 Windows Server 2003 Benefits ....................................................... .251 Prerequisites.............................................................................. ............252 Hardware Requirements.............................................................. .....252 File Format Requirements................................................................. 252 Operating System Requirements.....................................................252 Upgrading Front-End Servers................................ ...........................255 Upgrading Active Directory Connector.............................................256 Removing Mobile Information Server Components...........................256 Required Components for Mobility Support......................................257 Removing Instant Messaging, Chat, ccMail, MSMail, and Key Management Service Components................................................. ..257 Third-Party Software....................................................................... ..257 Installing Exchange 2003 or Upgrading from Exchange 2000................258 Upgrading from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2003 .................................258

Appendix ..............................................................................................260 Appendix.................................................................................261 Exchange 2003 Schema Changes.........................................261

Introduction

This document provides important information about using Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003. The purpose of this document is to outline the new features in Exchange Server 2003 and provide the basic information necessary to begin using these new features. This is not a comprehensive document about Exchange, but a guide for getting started with testing and running Exchange 2003. This document supplements the release notes document (releasenotes.htm), and should be read only after reviewing the release notes. The release notes contain critical information about known issues with Exchange 2003. This document is designed to benefit Exchange administrators who will be testing and deploying Exchange 2003. Furthermore, this document assumes that you have an excellent working knowledge of Exchange 2000 Server. It is structured based on Exchange components; specifically, each chapter explains what the new component features are and how to begin using them. Provide feedback about this document to exchdocs@microsoft.com.

What Is Updated in This Book?
Since the previous version of this book was released, the following additions, deletions, or modifications were made.

Updated Chapters
The following chapters are updated: • Chapter 2 "Client Features." Added clarifications to "Steps to Enable RPC over HTTP" section. Added information about non-SSL configurations, as well as clarifications to the "Configuring the RPC Proxy Server to Use Specified Ports" Section. Chapter 3, "Administration Features." Updated description of the failed message retry queue.

2 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Chapter 4, "Performance and Scalability Features" Updated the "Log Buffers" and "Max Open Tables" sections. This information clarifies that edits are done using ADSI edit, and specifies the location of the object to be modified. Chapter 5, "Reliability and Clustering Features." Updated the "Exchange 2003 Cluster Requirements" and "Exchange 2003 Setup Requirements" sections. This information includes references to more in-depth resources and steps to upgrade an Exchange 2000 cluster and Exchange Virtual Server to Exchange 2003. Chapter 7, "Storage Features." Updated the procedure "To restore a mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group." Chapter 9, "Deployment Features." Expanded the "Exchange Server Deployment Tools" section. Updated location of the Public Folder Migration Tool. Consolidated the sections "Windows Server 2003" and "Upgrading Windows 2000 Server to Windows Server 2003" into a new section "Upgrading the Operating Systems."

• •

C H A P T E R

Overview of Exchange 2003

1

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 builds on the Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server code base, providing many new features and improvements in areas such as reliability, manageability, and security. Exchange Server 2003 is the first Exchange release designed to work with Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003. Running Exchange 2003 on Windows Server 2003 provides several benefits, such as improved memory allocation, reduced Microsoft Active Directory® directory service replication traffic, and rollback of Active Directory changes. Running Exchange 2003 on Windows Server 2003 also allows you to take advantage of new features, such as the Volume Shadow Copy service and cross-forest Kerberos authentication. Exchange 2003 also runs on Microsoft Windows® 2000 Server Service Pack 3 (SP3) or later. Exchange 2003 works with Microsoft Office Outlook® 2003 to provide a range of improvements, such as cached mode synchronization, client-side performance monitoring, and support for RPC over HTTP (which allows users to connect directly to their Exchange server over the Internet without needing to establish a virtual private network (VPN) tunnel). When combined with Windows Server 2003 and Outlook 2003, Exchange 2003 provides a robust, feature-rich end-to-end messaging system that is both scalable and manageable.

Exchange 2003 Test Environments
This section provides information about the test environments that you can use to deploy Exchange 2003. Keep in mind, however, that because this document is designed to get you up to speed on new features, it does not provide detailed instructions about how to deploy Exchange 2003 in a production environment. For basic instructions about how to get Exchange 2003 up and running in a test environment, see Chapter 9, "Deployment Features."

4 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Operating Systems
Exchange 2003 runs on Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 Server SP3 or later. Exchange 2003 has been optimized to run on Windows Server 2003; in fact, several Exchange 2003 features require Windows Server 2003 functionality. Exchange 2003 is supported in all Active Directory forest environments: native Windows 2000, native Windows Server 2003, or mixed Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 forests. When running in an environment with Windows 2000 domain controllers and global catalog servers, the domain controllers and global catalog servers that Exchange 2003 uses must all be running Windows 2000 SP3 or later. This requirement affects both Exchange 2003 servers and the Exchange 2003 version of Active Directory Connector (ADC). ADC does not work with domain controllers or global catalog servers that are running a version of Windows 2000 earlier than SP3. Note
Although Exchange 2000 SP2 and later is supported in an environment with Windows Server 2003 domain controllers and global catalog servers, Exchange 2003 is the first version of Exchange that is supported when running on Windows Server 2003. Exchange 2000 is not supported on Windows Server 2003.

Coexistence and Upgrade from Previous Versions
Exchange 2003 can coexist with Exchange 2000 and, when running in Exchange mixed mode, with Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 servers. For Exchange 2000, Exchange 2003 supports in-place upgrades. In-place upgrades are not supported for Exchange 5.5 servers. To upgrade from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2003, you must join an Exchange 2003 server to the Exchange 5.5 site, then move Exchange resources, such as mailboxes, to the Exchange 2003 server. Use the Exchange Server Deployment Tools to migrate from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2003. For information about the Exchange Server Deployment Tools, see "Exchange Server Deployment Tools" in Chapter 9. Although Exchange 2000 did support in-place upgrades from Exchange 5.5, the "moveresources" scenario is the recommended Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2000 upgrade path.

Chapter 1: Overview of Exchange 2003 5

What Features Have Been Removed
While the bulk of this document discusses what is new in Exchange 2003, there are several Exchange 2000 features that have either been discontinued or moved to other product lines. The following features have been removed: • • • • Connectors for Lotus cc:Mail and MS Mail Real-time Collaboration Features M: Drive Key Management Service

Connectors for Lotus cc:Mail and MS Mail
The Connector for Lotus cc:Mail and Connector for MS Mail components are not supplied with Exchange 2003. Using Exchange 2003 System Manager to manage MS Mail or cc:Mail connectors on Exchange 2000 servers is not supported. If you need to manage these connectors, use the Exchange 2000 SP3 or later version of System Manager. If you want to upgrade an existing Exchange 2000 server to Exchange 2003 and either of these connectors is installed, you must use the Exchange 2000 Setup program to remove the connector before upgrading. If you want to retain these services in your organization, you should not upgrade the Exchange 2000 servers that are running these components. Instead, you should install Exchange 2003 on other servers in your organization.

Real-Time Collaboration Features
Exchange 2000 supports numerous real-time collaboration features such as chat, Instant Messaging, conferencing (using Microsoft Exchange Conferencing Server), and multimedia messaging (also known as unified messaging). These features have been removed from Exchange 2003. A new dedicated real-time communications and collaboration server (currently under development—code-named Greenwich) will provide these real-time collaboration features. As with the cc:Mail and MS Mail connectors, you cannot upgrade a server with Exchange 2000 real-time collaboration features installed. You must remove these components prior to upgrading.

6 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

M: Drive
The Exchange store (which uses the \\.\BackOfficeStorage\ namespace) has traditionally been mapped to the M: drive on an Exchange server. M: drive mapping provided file system access to the Exchange store. The M: drive is disabled, by default, in Exchange 2003. You can still use the file system to interact with the Exchange store, but you must enter the path directly using the \\.\BackOfficeStorage\ namespace. For example, to view the contents of the mailbox store on an Exchange server in the mail.adatum.com domain, you would type the following at a command prompt: dir \\.\BackOfficeStorage\mail.adatum.com\mbx The reason for removing the M: drive mapping is because, in some cases, the mailbox store would become corrupted from file system operations, such as running a file-level virus scanner on the M: drive or running file backup software on the drive. For Exchange 2000, you should consider disabling the M: drive-mapping feature. For information about how to disable this feature, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 305145, "HOW TO: Remove the IFS Mapping for Drive M in Exchange 2000 Server" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=305145).

Key Management Service
Exchange 2000 includes Key Management Service, which works with Windows 2000 Certificate Services to create a public key infrastructure (PKI) for performing secure messaging. With PKI in place, users can send signed and encrypted messages to each other. Exchange 2000 Key Management Service provides a mechanism for enrolling users in Advanced Security, and manages key archival and recovery functions. Exchange 2003 no longer includes Key Management Service. Exchange 2003 supports standard X.509v3 certificate implementation, and works with PKI solutions that support X.509v3 certificates. For example, you can use the PKI included with Windows Server 2003 in place of Key Management Service. Specifically, Windows Server 2003 PKI includes the ability to manage the key archival and recovery tasks that are performed by Key Management Service in Exchange 2000.

C H A P T E R

Client Features

2

This chapter focuses on the new client features for accessing Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003. In addition to taking advantage of new Microsoft Office Outlook® 2003 features, Exchange 2003 includes an improved Microsoft Outlook Web Access client, as well as new built-in mobile device support.

Outlook Improvements
Outlook 2003, in conjunction with Exchange 2003, offers many enhancements. This section discusses these enhancements, including Outlook 2003 improvements and new features.

Cached Exchange Mode and Synchronization Improvements
Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003 allow users to read e-mail or perform other messaging tasks in low-bandwidth networks and in situations where network connectivity is lost. Request for information notifications from the Exchange server are eliminated on the user's Outlook client, thereby allowing the user to work without interruption in low-bandwidth, high-latency networks. Furthermore, Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003 significantly improve client performance by reducing remote procedure calls (RPCs) and conversation between the Outlook client and the Exchange server. This is accomplished in three ways: Cached Exchange Mode When possible, Outlook 2003 uses the local Exchange mailbox data file stored on the users computer, thereby reducing the number of requests to the server for data and improving performance for items that are stored in the cache. This new functionality eliminates the need to inform users of delays when requesting information from Exchange servers. Kerberos authentication protocol Exchange 2003 allows Outlook 2003 clients to authenticate to Exchange 2003 servers using Kerberos authentication.

8 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Synchronization Improvements To reduce the amount of information that is sent between the Outlook 2003 client and Exchange 2003 servers, Exchange 2003 performs data compression. Exchange 2003 also reduces the total requests for information between the client and server, thereby optimizing the communication between the client and the server. The addition of Cached Exchange Mode, coupled with the synchronization and optimization improvements, significantly enhances the remote end-user's experience with Outlook. For example, in previous versions of Outlook, dialog boxes would display requests for information from an Exchange server; however, in Outlook 2003, these requests no longer appear on a user's Outlook client because the user works primarily from their local Exchange mailbox data file (this functionality also reduces the total load on your Exchange servers). More importantly, if network connectivity is lost between the Outlook client and the network, Outlook 2003 will operate without interruption.

Configuring Cached Exchange Mode
By default, new installations of Outlook 2003 use Cached Exchange Mode. If you are upgrading from previous versions of Outlook to Outlook 2003, you must manually configure the Outlook client to use Cached Exchange Mode. To do this, modify a user's profile to use the local copy of their Exchange mailbox.

To enable Cached Exchange Mode for Outlook 2003 upgrades
1. 2. On the computer running Outlook 2003, click Start and then click Control Panel. In Control Panel, perform one of the following tasks: • • 3. 4. 5. If you are using Category View, in the left pane, under See Also, click Other Control Panel Options, and then click Mail. If you are using Classic View, double-click Mail.

In Mail Setup, click E-mail Accounts. In the E-mail accounts wizard, click View or change existing e-mail accounts, and then click Next. On the E-mail Accounts page, highlight your account, and then click Change.

Chapter 2: Client Features 9

6.

On the Exchange Server Settings page, select the Use local copy of Mailbox check box (Figure 2.1).

Figure 2.1 wizard 7.

The Exchange Server Settings page in the E-mail Accounts

Click Next, and then click Finish to save the changes to your local profile.

Kerberos Authentication
Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003 can now use Kerberos authentication to authenticate users to Exchange 2003 servers. If your network uses Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 domain controllers, your users can authenticate cross-forest to the domain controllers in trusted forests, thereby allowing user accounts and Exchange servers to exist in different forests. Exchange 2003 uses Kerberos delegation when sending user credentials between an Exchange front-end server and Exchange back-end servers. In previous versions of Exchange, when users used applications such as Outlook Web Access, Exchange used Basic authentication to send the user's credentials between an Exchange front-end server and Exchange back-end servers. As a result, companies had to use a security mechanism such as IPSec to encrypt the information.

10 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Outlook Performance Monitoring
Exchange 2003 now includes the ability to monitor client-side performance with Outlook 2003. For information about how to monitor client-side performance, see Chapter 4, "Performance and Scalability Features."

RPC over HTTP
Exchange Server 2003 and Microsoft Outlook 2003 support the use RPC over HTTP feature in Microsoft Windows® to access Exchange. Using the RPC over HTTP feature eliminates the need for remote office users to use a virtual private network (VPN) to connect to their Exchange servers. Users running Outlook 2003 can connect directly to an Exchange server within a corporate environment over the Internet. The Windows RPC over HTTP feature provides an RPC client (such as Outlook 2003) with the ability to establish connections across the Internet by tunneling the RPC traffic over HTTP. Because standard RPC communication is not designed for use on the Internet and does not work well with perimeter firewalls, RPC over HTTP makes it possible to use RPC clients in conjunction with perimeter firewalls. If the RPC client can make an HTTP connection to a remote computer running Internet Information Services (IIS), the client can connect to any available server on the remote network and execute remote procedure calls. Moreover, the RPC client and server programs can connect across the Internet—even if both are behind firewalls on different networks.

Configuring RPC over HTTP for Outlook 2003
When you deploy RPC over HTTP in your corporate environment, you have two main deployment options to choose from, based on where you locate your RPC proxy server: • Option 1 (recommended) Deploy an advanced firewall server such as Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server in the perimeter network and position your RPC Proxy server within the corporate network. Note
When you use ISA Server as your advanced firewall server, you have several deployment options. For information about how to install ISA Server as an advanced firewall server, see the book, Using Microsoft Exchange 2000 FrontEnd Servers (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=14575&clcid=0x409).

Option 2 Position the Exchange 2003 front-end server acting as an RPC Proxy server in the perimeter network.

For more information about the two options for deploying RPC over HTTP, see Chapter 4 in the book Planning an Exchange 2003 Messaging System (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

Chapter 2: Client Features 11

Option 1: Using ISA Server in the Perimeter Network and Positioning the RPC Proxy Server in the Corporate Network
This is the recommended option. By using ISA Server in the perimeter network to route RPC over HTTP requests and positioning the Exchange front-end server in the corporate network, you only need to open port 80 or port 443 on the internal firewall for Outlook 2003 clients to communicate with Exchange. Figure 2.2 illustrates this deployment scenario.

Figure 2.2 Deploying RPC over HTTP using ISA Server as a reverse proxy server in the perimeter network When located in the perimeter network, the ISA server is responsible for routing RPC over HTTP requests to the Exchange front-end server acting as an RPC Proxy server. In this scenario, the RPC Proxy server uses specified ports to communicate with other servers that use RPC over HTTP.

Option 2: Positioning the RPC Proxy Server in the Perimeter Network
Although not recommended, you can position the Exchange Server 2003 front-end server acting as the RPC Proxy server inside the perimeter network. In this scenario, you specify a limited number of ports that the RPC Proxy server needs. Figure 2.3 illustrates this deployment scenario. Note that in the following example, your Exchange front-end server will still need all of the standard ports to communicate with the internal corporate network in addition to the ports for RPC over HTTP.

12 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Figure 2.3 Deploying RPC over HTTP on the Exchange front-end server in the perimeter network For information about how to configure RPC over HTTP deployment options 1 and 2, see "Deploying RPC over HTTP" later in this chapter. Again, in this scenario, the RPC Proxy server uses specified ports to communicate with other servers that use RPC over HTTP.

RPC over HTTP System Requirements
To use RPC over HTTP, you must run Windows Server 2003 on the following computers: • • • All Exchange 2003 servers that will be accessed with Outlook 2003 clients using RPC over HTTP. The Exchange 2003 front-end server acting as the RPC Proxy server. The global catalog server used by Outlook 2003 clients and the Exchange 2003 servers configured to use RPC over HTTP.

Exchange 2003 must be installed on all Exchange servers that are used by the computer designated as the RPC proxy server. Additionally, all client computers running Outlook 2003 must also be running Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1) or later with the "Windows XP Patch: RPC Updates Needed for Exchange Server 2003 Beta" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16687) update installed.

Deploying RPC over HTTP
This section provides detailed steps about how to deploy RPC over HTTP in your Exchange 2003 organization. Complete the steps in the following order. 1. 2. Configure your Exchange front-end server as an RPC Proxy server. Configure the RPC virtual directory in Internet Information Services (IIS) on the Exchange front-end server.

Chapter 2: Client Features 13

3. 4. 5.

Configure the registry on the Exchange 2003 computer that communicates with the RPC proxy server to use the specific ports for RPC over HTTP communication. Open the specific ports on the internal firewall for RPC over HTTP, as well as the standard ports for Exchange front-end communication. Create a profile for each of your users to use with RPC over HTTP.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections. After you have completed these steps, your users can begin using RPC over HTTP to access the Exchange front-end server.

Step 1: Configuring Your Exchange Front-End Server to Use RPC over HTTP
The RPC Proxy server processes the Outlook 2003 RPC requests that come in over the Internet. In order for the RPC Proxy server to successfully process the RPC over HTTP requests, you must install the Windows Server 2003 RPC over HTTP Proxy networking component on your Exchange front-end server.

To configure your Exchange front-end server to use RPC over HTTP
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. On the Exchange front-end server running Windows Server 2003, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs. In Add or Remove Programs, click Add/Remove Windows Components in the left pane. In the Windows Components Wizard, on the Windows Components page, highlight Networking Services, and then click Details. In Networking Services, select the RPC over HTTP Proxy check box, and then click OK. On the Windows Components page, click Next to install the RPC over HTTP Proxy Windows component.

Step 2: Configuring the RPC Virtual Directory in Internet Information Services
Now that you have configured your Exchange front-end server to use RPC over HTTP, you must configure the RPC virtual directory in IIS.

To configure the RPC virtual directory
1. 2. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager. In Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager, in the console tree, expand the server you want, expand Web Sites, expand Default Web Site, right-click the RPC virtual directory, and then click Properties.

14 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3.

In RPC Properties, on the Directory Security tab, in the Authentication and access control pane, click Edit. Note
RPC over HTTP does not allow anonymous access.

4. 5.

Under Authenticated access, select the check box next to Basic authentication (password is sent in clear text), and then click OK. To save your settings, click Apply, and then click OK.

Your RPC virtual directory is now set to use Basic authentication. If you plan to use SSL, skip the following procedure For non-SSL configurations, however, the RPC proxy server must be configured to allow non-SSL sessions to be forwarded. The non-SSL sessions are able to be forwarded by adding a specific registry value to the server. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To allow non-SSL encrypted traffic with RPC over HTTP
1. 2. 3. 4. On the RPC Proxy server, start Registry Editor (regedit). In the console tree, navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Rpc\RpcProxy In the details pane, right-click and add a new DWORD Value named AllowAnonymous, and then right-click it and choose Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, in the Value data box, enter 1.

The RPC proxy server is now configured to allow requests to be forwarded without the requirement to first establish an SSL-encrypted session. The setting to enforce authenticated requests is still controlled in the Authentication and access control settings. For more information about configuring computers to use RPC over HTTP, see the MSDN® topic "Configuring Computers for RPC over HTTP" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19313).

Step 3: Configuring the RPC Proxy Server to Use Specified Ports
After you enable the RPC over HTTP networking component for IIS, you should configure the RPC proxy server to use specific port numbers to communicate with the servers in the corporate network. In this scenario, the RPC proxy server is configured to use specific ports and the individual computers that the RPC proxy server communicates with are also configured to use specific ports when receiving requests from the RPC proxy server. When you run Exchange 2003 Setup, Exchange is automatically configured to use the ncacn_http ports listed in Table 2.1. Step 3 involves the following two procedures.

Chapter 2: Client Features 15

1. 2.

Configure the RPC Proxy server to use specified ports for RPC over HTTP requests to communicate with servers inside the corporate network. Configure the global catalog servers to use specified ports for RPC over HTTP requests to communicate with the RPC Proxy server inside the perimeter network. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To configure the RPC Proxy server to use the specified default ports for RPC over HTTP
The following ports are the required ports for RPC over HTTP. Table 2.1 Required ports for RPC over HTTP Server Exchange back-end servers Ports (Services) 593 (end point mapper) 6001 (Store) 6002 (DS referral) 6004 (DS proxy) Global catalog server 1. 2. 593 and 6004

On the RPC Proxy server, start Registry Editor (regedit). In the console tree, navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Rpc\RpcProxy

16 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3.

In the details pane, right-click the ValidPorts subkey, and then click Modify (Figure 2.4).

Figure 2.4 4.

The RPCProxy registry settings

In Edit String, in the Value data box, type the following information:
ExchangeBEServer:593;ExchangeBEServerFQDN:593;ExchangeBEServer:6001­ 6002;ExchangeBEServerFQDN:6001­ 6002;ExchangeBEServer:6004;ExchangeBEServerFQDN:6004; GlobalCatalogServer:593;GlobalCatalogServerFQDN:593;GlobalCatalogServer:60 04;GlobalCatalogServerFQDN:6004

• •

ExchangeBEServer and GlobalCatalogServer are the NetBIOS names of your Exchange back-end server and global catalog server. ExchangeBEFQDN and GlobalCatalogServerFQDN are the fully qualified domain names (FQDNs) of your Exchange back-end server and global catalog server.

Chapter 2: Client Features 17

In the registry key, continue to list all servers in the corporate network with which the RPC Proxy server will need to communicate. Important
To communicate with the RPC Proxy server, all servers accessed by the Outlook client must have set ports. If a server, such as an Exchange public folder server, has not been configured to use the specified ports for RPC over HTTP communication, the client will not be able to access the server.

To configure the global catalog servers to use specific ports for RPC over HTTP
1. 2. On the global catalog server, start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\NTDS\Parameters 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. From the Edit menu, point to New, and then click Multi-String value. In the details pane, create a multi-string value with the name NSPI interface protocol sequences. Right-click the NSPI interface protocol sequences multi-string value, and then click Modify. In Edit String, in the Value data box, type ncacn_http:6004 Restart the global catalog server.

Step 4: Create an Outlook Profile to Use With RPC over HTTP
In order for your users to use RPC over HTTP from their client computer, they must create an Outlook profile that uses the necessary RPC over HTTP settings. These settings enable Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) communication with Basic authentication, which is necessary when using RPC over HTTP. Although optional, it is highly recommended that you use the "Use Cached Exchange Mode" option for all profiles that will connect to Exchange using RPC over HTTP.

To create an Outlook profile to use with RPC over HTTP
1. 2. Click Start and then click Control Panel. In Control Panel, perform one of the following tasks: • • 3. 4. If you are using Category View, in the left pane, under See Also, click Other Control Panel Options, and then click Mail. If you are using Classic View, double-click Mail.

In Mail Setup, under Profiles, click Show Profiles. In Mail, click Add.

18 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

5. 6. 7. 8.

In New Profile, in the Profile Name box, type a name for this profile, and then click OK. In the E-mail Accounts wizard, click Add a new e-mail account, and then click Next. On the Server Type page, click Microsoft Exchange Server, and then click Next. On the Exchange Server Settings page, perform the following steps: a. b. c. d. In the Microsoft Exchange Server box, type the name of your back-end Exchange server where your mailbox resides. Check the check box next to Use Cached Exchange Mode. In the User Name box, type the user name. Click More Settings.

9.

On the Connection tab, in the Exchange over the Internet pane, select the Connect to my Exchange mailbox using HTTP check box.

10. Click Exchange Proxy Settings. 11. On the Exchange Proxy Settings page, under Connections Settings, perform the following steps: a. b. c. d. e. Enter the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the RPC Proxy server in the Use this URL to connect to my proxy server for Exchange box. Select the Connect using SSL only check box. Select the Mutually authenticate the session when connecting with SSL check box next. Enter the FQDN of the RPC Proxy server in the Principle name for proxy server box. Use the format: msstd:FQDN of RPC Proxy Server. As an optional step, you can configure Outlook 2003 to connect to your Exchange server using RPC over HTTP by default by checking the check box next to On fast networks, connect to Exchange using HTTP first, then connect using TCP/IP.

12. On the Exchange Proxy Settings page, in the Proxy authentication settings window, in the Use this authentication when connecting to my proxy server for Exchange list, select Basic Authentication. 13. Click OK 14. Enable RPC over HTTP by configuring your user's profiles to allow for RPC over HTTP communication with Outlook 2003. Alternatively, you can instruct your users on how to manually enable RPC over HTTP for their Outlook 2003 profiles. Note
If you have configured the client to communicate using SSL, you must add the complete SSL certificate chain to the Trusted Root Certificate Authorities on the client machine.

Your users are now configured to use RPC over HTTP.

Chapter 2: Client Features 19

Outlook Web Access Improvements
The new version of Outlook Web Access in Exchange Server 2003 represents a significant upgrade from Outlook Web Access in Exchange 2000. The new version is a full-featured e-mail client, with support for rules, spelling checker, signed and encrypted e-mail, and many other improvements. The interface is also redesigned to provide an enhanced user experience similar to that of Outlook 2003, including a new Reading Pane (previously called the Preview Pane in Outlook) and improved Navigation Pane.

Outlook Web Access Versions
Exchange 2003 now includes two versions of Outlook Web Access: Outlook Web Access Premium Outlook Web Access Premium is designed for Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 or later. Outlook Web Access Premium includes all Outlook Web Access features, including the new enhanced features for Exchange 2003. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 is required for some features. Outlook Web Access Basic Outlook Web Access Basic is designed to work in browsers that support the HTML 3.2 and the European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA) script standards. It provides a subset of the features available in Outlook Web Access Premium. Table 2.2 lists the new Outlook Web Access features, including the version that supports them. Table 2.2 Summary of new Outlook Web Access features Feature Description Outlook Web Access Premium Outlook Web Access Basic

Logon/Logoff Improvements Logon page New customized form for logging on to Outlook Web Access—includes cookiebased validation where the Outlook Web Access cookie is invalid after user logs out or is inactive for predefined amount time. Yes, with choice of using Outlook Web Access Basic. Yes, but only allows use of Outlook Web Access Basic.

20 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Feature

Description

Outlook Web Access Premium

Outlook Web Access Basic No

Clear credentials cache After logoff, all credentials in Yes, in Internet on logoff Internet Explorer 6 Service Explorer 6 SP1. Pack 1 (SP1) credentials cache are cleared automatically. Public or shared computer and Private computer logon options To provide organizations with Yes more protection, two logon page security options can be used. The private option can be set to provide a longer period before user is logged off because of inactivity.

Yes

General User Interface Improvements User interface updates New color scheme, reorganized toolbars. Yes, plus new View menu, default user interface font, and bidirectional support. Yes Yes, but only one color scheme is available.

Item window sizing

During an Outlook Web Access session, item windows open at the last window size set by the user instead of always opening at 500x700 pixels. A status bar is now available on item windows so a user can see URL of hyperlinks in e-mail messages. To view the URL, move the pointer over the hyperlink.

No

Item window status bar

Yes

No. Items do not open in a separate window, however the status bar is still available.

Chapter 2: Client Features 21

Feature View Improvements Two-line mail view

Description

Outlook Web Access Premium

Outlook Web Access Basic

New view orients message list vertically instead of horizontally; works well with Reading Pane. Resizable Reading Pane now appears to right of message list by default; attachments can be opened directly from Pane. Additionally, user has option to determine if items are marked items as read when viewed in Reading Pane. Command enables users to mark unread messages as read or vice versa. Command enables users to assign follow-up flag to messages. Context Menu available in mail view; special context menu also available on quick flag.

Yes

No

Reading Pane (previously called the Preview Pane in previous versions of Outlook Web Access)

Yes

No

Mark as read/unread

Yes

No

Quick Flagging

Yes

No

Context Menu

Yes

No

Keyboard shortcuts

Common actions such as new Yes message, mark as read/unread, and reply and forward are available when focus is in message list. Users can determine how many items appear per page in E-mail, Contacts, and Tasks views. Yes

No

Items per page

Yes

22 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Feature Mail icons

Description Icons display state and type of messages. The view is auto-refreshed only after 20 percent of messages are moved or deleted from a page, not after each deletion. This results in increased performance.

Outlook Web Access Premium Yes

Outlook Web Access Basic Yes

Deferred view update

Yes

No

Navigation Improvements New Navigation Pane Unified user interface contains module shortcuts, full folder tree, refresh item count button, customizable width. Yes Shortcuts only

Search folders

Outlook-created search Yes folders are displayed in folder tree. These must be created in the Outlook Online mode. New e-mail and reminder notifications are displayed in Navigation Pane. Public folders are displayed in new window. Log Off option is now on the view toolbar, not in the Navigation Pane. Yes

No

Notifications

No

Public folders

Yes

No

Log Off option on toolbar

Yes

No

Mail Workflow Improvements Spelling checker Spelling checker is provided for e-mail messages. New integrated look; easier deletion of recipients. Yes No

New addressing wells

Yes

No

Chapter 2: Client Features 23

Feature Global Address List Properties sheets

Description Property sheets now display name, address, and phone information for resolved Global Address List (GAL) users.

Outlook Web Access Premium Yes. Available in received items, draft items, Check Names dialog box, and Find Names dialog box. Yes, feature in Properties sheets or context menu on resolved names.

Outlook Web Access Basic Yes; only available in received items and draft items.

Add to Contacts

Users can add resolved recipients in received mail or drafts to main Contacts folder.

No

Send mail from Find Names

Users can send new messages Yes to addresses found in the Find Names dialog box when it is opened from an e-mail view. Users can open Find Names from a message and use it to add new recipients to a draft message; also used to add recipients to a contact distribution list. Users can search main Contacts folder in Find Names. The results in Find Names and Check Names now are sorted in alphabetical order. Users can create a signature that is automatically included in e-mail messages. Already available in previous versions of Outlook.

No

Open Find Names from message

Yes

Contacts in Find Names

Yes

No

Sorted results in Find Names and Check Names Auto signature

Yes

Yes

Yes, HTML-based formatting; also ondemand insertion.

Yes, plain text formatting; no on-demand insertion. No

Default mail editor font

User-customizable default font is provided for e-mail editor.

Yes

24 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Feature Navigate after delete

Description Users can open the next or previous item after deleting an item. Users can use or ignore readreceipt requests.

Outlook Web Access Premium Yes

Outlook Web Access Basic No

Read receipts

Yes. Users can also send receipts even when the option is set to ignore requests.

Yes. Users are not able to l send receipts when option is set to ignore requests. Yes

"Web Beacon" blocking

Users can control options for blocking external content in e-mail. Administrator options restrict access to some or all attachments in messages. Options to set up safe- and blocked-sender lists. Sensitivity information is displayed in Infobar.

Yes

Attachment blocking

Yes

Yes

Junk mail filtering

Yes

Yes

Sensitivity Infobar

Yes

Yes

Reply/Forward InfoBar No indenting replies

Reply/Forward information is Yes displayed in InfoBar. The reply header and reply body are no longer indented. Yes

Yes

Yes. Outlook Web Access Basic never indented. Yes

Reply to messages/posts in Public Folders

When accessing public folders through a front-end server, users can reply by email to messages or posts in public folders.

Yes

Chapter 2: Client Features 25

Feature

Description

Outlook Web Access Premium Yes, Internet Explorer 6 on Microsoft Windows 2000 or later.

Outlook Web Access Basic No

Encrypted/signed mail Sending and receiving encrypted and/or signed email is supported.

Rules Improvements Rules Users can create and manage server-based e-mail-handling rules. Yes No

Task Improvements Personal tasks Users can create and manage personal tasks and receive reminders for these items. Yes Yes, but no reminders.

Calendar Improvements Reply/Forward Meeting Requests Users can now reply to senders of Meeting Requests and/or forward Meeting Requests to other users. Attendees can set own reminder times from received meeting requests. Yes Yes

Attendee reminder

Yes

No

View Calendar from a meeting request Customized meeting cancellation notice

Attendees can open Calendar Yes from a meeting request. Users can now provide a response in a meeting cancellation notice. Meeting attendees can set their own reminder times from meeting requests. Yes

No

Yes

Attendee reminder

Yes

No

26 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Feature View Calendar from Meeting Request

Description

Outlook Web Access Premium

Outlook Web Access Basic Yes

Meeting attendees can open Yes their Calendar from a meeting request

Performance Improvements Bytes over the wire Fewer bytes sent over the Yes wire from server to browser. Additionally, when data is sent from the server to browser during initial logon has been reorganized to speed up rendering the Inbox. Administrators can configure compression support for Outlook Web Access and provide a performance improvement of nearly 50 percent for most actions on slow network connections. Yes, when accessed with Internet Explorer 6 SP1 + Q328970 or later. Yes

Compression support

Depends on the browser.

Use of Browser Language
When using Internet Explorer 5 or later to access Outlook Web Access, new installations and upgrades of Exchange 2003will use the browser' language settings to determine the character set to encode information such as e-mail messages and meeting requests.

Chapter 2: Client Features 27

If you upgrade an Exchange 2000 server that was modified to use a browser's language setting, Exchange 2003 will continue to function in the same manner. Table 2.3 lists the language groups and respective character sets. Table 2.3 Outlook Web Access language group and character sets Language Group Character Set Arabic Baltic Chinese (simplified) Windows 1256 iso-8859-4 Gb2131

Chinese (Traditional) Big5 Cyrillic Eastern European Greek Hebrew Japanese Korean koi8-r iso-8859-2 iso-8859-7 windows-1255 iso-2022-jp ks_c_56011987 windows-874 iso-8859-9 windows-1258 iso-8859-1

Thai Turkish Vietnamese Western European

If you expect Outlook Web Access users in your organization to send mail frequently, you can modify registry settings so that users who are running Internet Explorer 5 or later can use UTF-8 encoded UNICODE characters to send mail. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

28 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To modify the default language setting for Outlook Web Access
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeWEB\OWA\UseRegionalCharset 3. 4. 5. 6. Create a DWORD value called UseRegionalCharset. Right click on the UseRegionalCharset DWORD value, and then click Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, in the Value data box, type 1,and then click OK. Close Registry Editor to save your changes.

Selecting an Outlook Web Access Version
If users are running Windows Internet Explorer 5.01, the logon page will allow them to select Outlook Web Access Premium or Basic. Premium will be the default selection. For users who have a slow network connection and simply want to accomplish tasks such as checking their Inbox or searching for an appointment, the Outlook Web Access Basic client may be a preferable option. However, Outlook Web Access Basic does lack useful features available in the Outlook Web Access Premium.

Browser Support
Outlook Web Access Basic supports any browser that is fully compliant with the HTML 3.2 and European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA) script standards. However, because some browsers are not fully compliant with these standards, it is recommended that you use Internet Explorer 5.01 or later, or Netscape Navigator 4.7 or later. These browsers have been tested with Outlook Web Access. In addition, Outlook Web Access has been optimized for screen resolutions of 800x600. Using Pocket Outlook with Microsoft Exchange Server ActiveSync® and/or Outlook Mobile Access is recommended for devices with a small screen size, such as the Pocket PC 2002 device. Using Outlook Mobile Access is recommended for hand-held mobile devices with limited screen sizes. For more information about Outlook Mobile Access and built-in mobile device support for Exchange, see "Mobile Services for Exchange" later in this chapter.

Chapter 2: Client Features 29

Logon and Logoff Improvements
You can enable a new logon page for Outlook Web Access that will store the user's name and password in a cookie instead of in the browser. When a user closes their browser, the cookie is cleared. Additionally, after a period of inactivity, the cookie is cleared automatically. The new logon page requires users to enter their domain \user name and password or their full user principal name (UPN) e-mail address and password to access their e-mail (Figure 2.5).

Figure 2.5 Outlook Web Access logon page This logon page represents more than a cosmetic change; it offers several new features. To enable the Outlook Web Access logon page, you must enable forms-based authentication on the server. The following procedure describes how to enable forms-based authentication.

To enable forms-based authentication
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

30 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In the console tree, expand Servers. Expand the server for which you want to enable forms-based authentication, and then expand Protocols. Expand HTTP, right-click Exchange Virtual Server, and then click Properties. In Exchange Virtual Server Properties, on the Settings tab, select the Enable Forms Based Authentication for Outlook Web Access check box. Click Apply, and then click OK.

Cookie Authentication Timeout
Outlook Web Access user credentials are now stored in a cookie. When the user logs out from Outlook Web Access, the cookie is cleared and is no longer valid for authentication. Additionally, by default, the public computer cookie is set to expire automatically after fifteen minutes of user inactivity. The automatic timeout is valuable because it helps to protect a user's account from unauthorized access. However, although the automatic timeout greatly reduces the risk of unauthorized access, it does not completely eliminate the possibility that an unauthorized user could access an Outlook Web Access account if a session is left running on a public computer. Therefore, it is important that you educate your users about these risks and take precautions to avoid them.

Logon Page Security Options
The Outlook Web Access logon page allows the user to select the security option that best fits their needs. The Public or shared computer option (selected by default) provides a short default timeout option of 15 minutes. Users should select the Private computer option only if the user is the sole operator of the machine, and the machine adheres to that user's organizational security policies. When selected, the Private computer option allows for a much longer period of inactivity before automatically ending the session—its internal default value is 24 hours. Essentially, this option is intended to benefit Outlook Web Access users who are using personal computers in their office or home. To match the security needs of your organization, an administrator can configure the inactivity timeout values. Note
The default value for the public computer cookie timeout is fifteen minutes. If you want to change this, you must modify the registry settings on the server.

Chapter 2: Client Features 31

Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To set the Outlook Web Access Forms Based Authentication public cookie timeout value
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeWeb\OWA 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. From the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. In the details pane, name the new value PublicClientTimeout. Right-click the PublicClientTimeout Dword value, and then click Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, under Base, click Decimal. In the Value Data box, type a value (in minutes) between 1 and 432000. Click OK.

To set the Outlook Web Access Forms Based Authentication trusted computer cookie timeout value
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeWeb\OWA 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. From the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. In the details pane, name the new value TrustedClientTimeout Right-click the TrustedClientTimeout Dword value, and then click Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, under Base, click Decimal. In the Value Data box, type a value (in minutes) between 1 and 432000. Click OK.

Clearing the Credentials Cache at Logoff
For users who do not access Outlook Web Access through the new logon page, Outlook Web Access logoff functionality is now more secure if the users are running Windows Internet Explorer 6 SP1. With Internet Explorer 6 SP1, the browser's credentials cache is cleared upon

32 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

logoff from Outlook Web Access. Users no longer have to close the browser window to clear the credentials cache.

New User Interface
Outlook Web Access now more closely matches the Outlook 2003 user interface (Figure 2.6). This section provides detailed information about the new user interface features and options.

Figure 2.6 New Outlook Web Access interface (Outlook Web Access Premium)

Chapter 2: Client Features 33

Selecting a Color Scheme
Outlook Web Access now allows users to select a color scheme for their Outlook Web Access experience. Figure 2.7 shows the available color schemes.

Figure 2.7 Outlook Web Access color schemes • • • • • 1. 2. 3. Olive Green Burgundy Silver Dark Blue Default (Blue) In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click the Options icon. Under Appearance, select a color from the drop down list. Click Save and Close to save your color scheme.

To change the color scheme for Outlook Web Access

Reading Pane
The improved Reading Pane (previously called the Preview Pane in Outlook) displays the e-mail message in the right pane. Essentially, the Reading Pane enhances readability and provides the user with more information on the page. Users can easily switch to the classic bottom Reading Pane or turn the pane off entirely. Reading Pane options are accessed on the Toolbar by clicking the Show/Hide Reading Pane button. Note
The Reading Pane is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

34 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

New Two-Line View
Outlook Web Access in Exchange Server 2003 includes a new view for listing the messages in a folder. This new Two-Line view (Figure 2.8) displays the message information on two different lines, which allows more information to be displayed for each message without being cut off. This is especially useful when using the new Reading Pane. The following message information is displayed in Two-Line view: • • • • • From Subject Received Importance Attachments

Figure 2.8 The Two-Line View

To select the Two-Line View
1. 2. In Outlook Web Access, click the View drop-down list. This list shows the currently selected view and is located above the Toolbar next to the folder name. Click Two-Line View.

Chapter 2: Client Features 35

Message Flagging
In Outlook Web Access, you can now flag messages for follow-up. The new flag column appears to the right of the message list and allows users to flag a message, mark a flag as complete, or clear a flag. Six flag colors are supported (Figure 2.9).

Figure 2.9 Message flagging You cannot set a reminder for these follow-up flags. These flags simply provide a visual indicator of which items in the mailbox a user has marked as needing further action. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

To flag a message for follow-up
1. 2. 3. Click the flag next to the message you want. The flag turns red, indicating that the message has been flagged. To mark a flag as complete, click it again. Alternatively, you can right-click the flag to display a shortcut menu with more options. Use the shortcut menu to select a different flag color, clear a flag, or mark a flag as complete. Note
You must use the shortcut menu to clear a flag.

36 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Shortcut Menus
Shortcut menus are now available in Outlook Web Access. You can right-click on messages, folders, and other objects to display shortcut menus from which you can select relevant commands (Figure 2.10). Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Figure 2.10 Message shortcut menu The following sections list the new commands featured in the message and folder shortcut menus.

Chapter 2: Client Features 37

Message Shortcut Menu
When you right-click a message in the message list, the following commands are available: • • • • • • • • • • • Open Reply Reply to all Forward Follow Up Flag Complete Clear Flag Mark as Unread Create Rule Delete Move/Copy to Folder

Folder Shortcut Menu
When you right-click a folder in the folder list, the following commands are available: • • • • • • • Update Folder Open Open in New Move/Copy Delete Rename New Folder

Setting the Number of Messages Displayed per Page
Exchange 2003 Outlook Web Access users can specify how many items are listed in a view, such as the number of messages listed when viewing a mail folder. By default, twenty-five items are listed. You can view as few as five to as many as one hundred items at a time. For users connecting to Outlook Web Access using a dial-up modem, the number of items should be set to 25 or fewer to maximize performance. This option also affects the number of contacts and tasks that display per page.

38 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To set the number of items listed in a view
1. 2. 3. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. Under Messaging Options, in the Number of items to display per page list, select the number of messages that you want to appear in a view. Click Save and Close.

Deferred Refresh of Views
With the version of Outlook Web Access that shipped with Exchange 2000, every time a user deletes, moves, or copies a message, the server refreshes the entire view. For example, if a user has twenty-five messages in their Inbox, and the user then deletes a message, Outlook Web Access deletes the message, and then refreshes the view so that twenty-five messages are again listed. With the version of Outlook Web Access that ships with Exchange 2003, deleted or moved items are still removed from the message list, but the refresh of the entire list (in other words, the addition of new items to the view) is deferred until a twenty percent of the items are deleted or moved. Reducing the number of refresh requests helps to reduce network traffic and enhances the overall user experience. The twenty percent threshold is based on the total number of items set to display per page (as set by the user in Outlook Web Access Options), not the actual messages count on a page. For example, if a user requests one hundred messages to display per page, the message list does not automatically refresh until twenty-one messages are deleted. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Accessing Search Folders (Saved Searches)
In Outlook 2003, you can create special Search Folders that are saved searches for specific content in your mailbox. For example, you can perform a search that finds messages from a particular sender, and then save the search results as a Search Folder for later use. Search Folders appear in a special section of the Outlook Folder List. In Outlook Web Access, Search Folders appears in the Folders pane. Search folders only appear in Outlook Web Access if a user creates them while running Outlook 2003 in online mode against an Exchange 2003 server. You cannot create search folders in Outlook Web Access. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Chapter 2: Client Features 39

Notifications
If you configured Outlook Web Access to notify you of new e-mail or reminders, the Navigation Pane now notifies you when new items arrive in your Inbox or active reminders are waiting to be dismissed or set to snooze. To configure notifications, click Options, and then select the appropriate options under Messaging Options and Reminder Options. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Public Folders
Public folders are now displayed in their own window. In the Navigation Pane, click Public Folders to launch a new browser window that contains only public folders. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Log Off
The Log Off feature has been moved from the Navigation Pane. It is now located on the right side of the toolbar.

Keyboard Shortcuts
Outlook Web Access now supports more keyboard shortcuts. Table 2.4 lists the supported shortcuts. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Table 2.4 Keyboard shortcuts for Outlook Web Access Command Inbox View Open a new message window Mark selected message as read Mark selected message as unread Reply to selected message Reply all to selected message CTRL+N CTRL+Q CTRL+U CTRL+R CTRL+SHIFT+R Keyboard Shortcut

40 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Command

Keyboard Shortcut

Forward selected message Message Read Form Reply to selected message Reply-all to selected message Forward selected message View the next message in the list

CTRL+SHIFT+F

CTRL+R CTRL+SHIFT+R CTRL+SHIFT+F CTRL+>

View the previous message in the list CTRL+< Message Compose Form Save the message Send the message Check spelling Check names CTRL+S CTRL+ENTER F7 CTRL+K or ALT+K in S/MIME

Tasks View Create a new task Public Folders View Create a new post Reply to a post CTRL+N CTRL+R CTRL+N

Chapter 2: Client Features 41

Right-to-Left Layout
Outlook Web Access now supports right-to-left layouts in the Arabic and Hebrew versions of the client. Note that the only Internet Explorer 6 and later supports both Arabic and Hebrew. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Support for Rules
In Outlook Web Access, you can now create and manage server-based rules for the most common mail-management scenarios, such as moving e-mail from a particular sender or with a particular subject to a specific folder. Outlook Web Access allows users to edit simple server-side rules created in any version of Outlook. If an Outlook-created rule is too complex for Outlook Web Access to render it properly, the rule appears shaded in the Outlook Web Access user interface for rules management. Although these rules cannot be edited, they still function. One or more of the following criteria are used to define the rule in Outlook Web Access: • • • • • • • • Who the message is from The message subject The importance of the message Who the message was sent to Move the message to a specified folder Copy the message to a specified folder Delete the message Forward the message to a specified recipient

Based on these criteria, the following actions can be specified:

In addition to creating a new rule, users can create a rule from within an e-mail message, which creates the rule parameters with information from the message, such as the subject and sender information. This allows uses to quickly and easily create rules. Warning
Because of interoperability limitations with Outlook, before an Outlook Web Access user can create or modify any rules, Outlook Web Access deletes any rules that have been disabled through Outlook. This does not happen automatically. When you modify a rule, you receive a warning indicating that disabled rules will be deleted if you proceed.

42 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

If you modify rules from Outlook Web Access, the next time you use Outlook, you may be prompted to choose between client and server-side rules. To retain the rules that you created in Outlook Web Access, select server-side rules. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

To create a new rule from Outlook Web Access
1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Rules. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to rules button. On the Rules page, click New. On the Edit Rule page, fill out the criteria and desired action for the rule. Click Save and Close. With a message opened, click the Create Rule icon. Alternatively, you can right-click a message in the message list, and then click Create Rule. On the Edit Rule page, some criteria are filled in automatically based on the message contents. Modify the criteria and select a desired action for the rule. Click Save and Close.

To create a new rule from within a message

Spelling Checker
Outlook Web Access now includes a spelling checker. The spelling checker is built into Exchange 2003, so users do not need to run any client-side code or download additional software. The spelling checker feature is available whenever users compose a message. The following languages are supported for Exchange 2003: • • • • • • • English (Australia) English (Canada) English (United Kingdom) English (United States) French German (post-reform) German (pre-reform)

Chapter 2: Client Features 43

• • •

Italian Korean Spanish

Users select the language for the spelling checker to use. When spelling checker is first run, users are prompted to select the preferred language. The language can also be configured at any time. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

To set the spelling checker language
1. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to options button (Figure 2.11).

Figure 2.11 2. 3.

The Go to options button

Under Spelling Options, in the Select the language of the dictionary to use while checking spelling list, select the preferred language. Click Save and Close.

44 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To check the spelling in a message
1. When composing a message, click the Spelling button (Figure 2.12).

Figure 2.12 2.

The Spelling button

As with other spelling checker software, you are prompted about words that are not found in the spelling checker dictionary. Choose whether to ignore the word in question, change it manually, or select from a list of suggested alternatives.

Tasks
The version of Outlook Web Access that shipped with Exchange 2000 did not support tasks. Although you could view existing tasks, they were displayed as e-mail messages and could not be edited. In Exchange 2003, Outlook Web Access now supports tasks (Figure 2.13). You can create and manage new tasks or manage tasks that have already been created in Outlook.

Chapter 2: Client Features 45

Figure 2.13 Outlook Web Access Tasks view Some of the task features that are now available include: • • • • • • • • • • • 1. 2. 3. Support for recurring tasks Mark tasks complete Modify percent complete Task status Due date Attachments Priority Start date Mileage Billing information Work hours In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Tasks. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to tasks button. Click New to create a new task, or right-click an existing task and click Open. On the Task page, edit the desired fields, and then click Save and Close. If you have worked with tasks in Microsoft Outlook, the new task support in Outlook Web Access should be very familiar.

To work with tasks in Outlook Web Access

46 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Deleting and Skipping Tasks
In Outlook, when a user attempts to delete a recurring task, the user must decide whether to delete a single occurrence or the entire recurring series. In Outlook Web Access, the delete command always deletes the entire task series. However, you can skip an individual occurrence by clicking the Skip Occurrence button on the Task toolbar.

Task Requests Not Supported
In Outlook, you can use the Task Request feature to assign tasks to other users. Outlook Web Access does not support this feature. Furthermore, in Outlook Web Access, users cannot process Task Requests sent from Outlook or update any delegated tasks they have already accepted in Outlook. Outlook Web Access does allow you to delete Task Requests or previously accepted delegated tasks; however, the task assigner does not receive notification that the deletion occurred.

Message Signatures
With Outlook Web Access for Exchange Server 2003, you can create a personal signature that can be added to outgoing messages automatically or inserted into individual messages manually. To customize your signature, you can modify the font color, style, and alignment. Note
You can only have text for signatures in Outlook Web Access Basic.

To create your signature
1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. • In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to options button. Under Messaging Options, click Edit Signature. On the Signature page, edit the signature text and style. Click Save and Close. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to options button. Under Messaging Options, select the Automatically include my signature on outgoing messages check box. Click Save and Close. With the desired message open, on the toolbar, click the Insert Signature button.

To add your signature to all outgoing messages automatically

To insert your signature into a specific message

Chapter 2: Client Features 47

Viewing User Properties
Outlook Web Access now allows you to view user name properties that were resolved from the Exchange global address list (GAL). The property information is a subset of what is displayed in Microsoft Outlook. The following properties are displayed in Outlook Web Access: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • First Name Initials Last Name Display Name Alias Address City State Postal Code Country/Region Title Company Department Office Phone Mobile Phone Whether the user has a valid Digital ID for receiving encrypted messages (available when S/MIME is installed)

Simple SMTP addresses or addresses from the Contacts folder still display the same information (display name and SMTP address) that was available in previous versions of Outlook Web Access.

48 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To view a resolved user's properties
There are several methods you can use to view a user's properties: • • • Right-click the resolved user name and choose Properties. Double-click the resolved user name – even in the Reading Pane. (This method is available only in Outlook Web Access Premium.) Click the Address Book button to search for users in the GAL. This will open the Find Names dialog box. After locating the user you want, click the user name, and then click Properties.

Easier Removal of Recipients
In the version of Outlook Web Access that shipped with Exchange 2000, to remove a recipient from an e-mail you were composing, you had to double-click the user name, which opened a dialog box, and then click Remove. This process is simplified in Exchange 2003. Now, you can highlight the resolved user name and then press the DELETE key. Alternatively, you can right-click the resolved user name and then click Remove. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Adding a Sender or Recipient to Contacts
In Outlook Web Access, it is now easy to add a sender or recipient of an e-mail message to your Contacts folder; you no longer need to enter the address manually. For information about using other methods to create contacts, see "Creating New Contacts" in the Outlook Web Access online Help. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

To add a sender or recipient of an e-mail message to your Contacts folder
1. 2. 3. In Outlook Web Access, open an e-mail that contains a sender or recipient that you want to add to your Contacts folder. In the upper pane of the e-mail message, right-click the name you want, and then click Add to Contacts. In Untitled Contact, on the General tab, in the Last Name and First Name boxes, type the last name and first name of the new contact. Then, on both the General and Details tabs, use the remaining boxes to fill in any other information you want to include about the contact.

Chapter 2: Client Features 49

4.

Click Save and Close. Note
You can also use the user name Properties dialog box to add the contact to your Contacts folder.

Selecting a Default Font
Outlook Web Access allows you to select the default font type, size, and color you want to use for new e-mail mail messages. Instead of the browser's default font, Outlook Web Access uses Arial 10 pt. by default (in the U.S. user interface).

To change the default font for new messages
1. 2. 3. 4. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to options button. Under Messaging Options, click Choose Font. In Font, select the font and any other options you want, and then click OK. On the Options page, click Save and Close.

Reply Header and Body Not Indented
Many users find their names added to an e-mail thread that already contains many messages. In these cases, the users usually scroll through the thread to understand the history of the issue that is being discussed. However, as they reach the beginning of the thread, it becomes difficult to read the messages. The earliest message contents are often illegible because each reply indents the previous message body, thereby consolidating the earliest message text. Outlook Web Access no longer indents the messages in an e-mail thread (although other e-mail clients may do so). Instead of an indentation, a horizontal line offsets the reply header and body from the new content.

Web Beacon Blocking
In Exchange 2003, Outlook Web Access makes it more difficult for people who send junk e-mail messages to use beacons to retrieve e-mail addresses. Now an incoming message with any content that could be used as a beacon, regardless of whether the message actually contains a beacon, prompts Outlook Web Access to display the following warning message: To help protect your privacy, links to images, sounds, or other external content in this message have been blocked. Click here to unblock content.

50 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

If users know that message is legitimate, they can click Click here to unblock content. Users can delete a message without triggering beacons that alert a sender of junk mail to send more junk mail. To disable this option, on the Options page, under Privacy and Junk E-mail Prevention, clear the Block external content in HTML e-mail messages check box.

Blocking Attachments
Outlook Web Access now provides the following attachment-blocking features: Blocking Outlook Web Access users from accessing certain file type attachments This feature is particularly useful in stopping Outlook Web Access users from opening attachments at public Internet terminals, which could potentially compromise corporate security. Furthermore, to allow Outlook Web Access users who are working in their offices or connected to the corporate network from home to open and read attachments, administrators can allow full intranet access to attachments. If an attachment is blocked, a warning message indicating that the user cannot open the attachment appears in the InfoBar of the e-mail message. By default, blocking certain file types attachments is enabled on all new Exchange 2003 installations. Blocking Outlook Web Access users from sending or receiving attachments with specific file extensions that could contain viruses. This feature matches attachment-blocking functionality in Outlook. For received messages, a warning message indicating that an attachment is blocked appears in the InfoBar of the email message. For sent messages, Outlook Web Access does not allow users to upload any files with extensions that appear on the block list. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To enable attachment blocking
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeWeb\OWA 3. 4. 5. From the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. In the details pane, name the new value DisableAttachments. Right-click DisableAttachments, and then click Modify.

Chapter 2: Client Features 51

6. 7.

In Edit DWORD Value, under Base, click Decimal. In the Value data box, type one of the following numbers: • • • Enter the value 0 if you want to allow all attachments. Enter the value 1 if you want to disallow all attachments. Enter the value 2 if you want to allow attachments from only back-end servers.

8.

Click OK.

Junk E-mail Filtering
Outlook Web Access on Exchange 2003 allows you to manage your Junk E-mail safe senders, safe recipients and block senders lists that are also created by Outlook 2003. Both Outlook Web Access and Outlook 2003 create a special folder in your mailbox called Junk E-mail. The Exchange 2003 junk e-mail rule uses information in your block senders list to move junk e-mail to this folder.

Sensitivity and Reply/Forward InfoBars
The following information now appears on the InfoBar of an e-mail message: • • Sensitivity settings, such as Confidential. The date and time a user replied to or forwarded a received message.

Item Window Size
Whether a user wants to read an item or create an item, the version of Outlook Web Access that shipped with Exchange 2000 launches all windows at the set size of 500x700 pixels. Even if the user resized the item window, the next window would still open at 500x700. With Exchange 2003, during a session, if a user resizes an item window, Outlook Web Access retains that size and opens all future item windows at that size. This works for all item windows opened within a session, including e-mail messages, Calendar, Contacts, or Tasks. However, the new window size is not persisted to future Outlook Web Access sessions. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

52 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Meeting Requests
Outlook Web Access includes several new meeting request features.

Setting Reminders
You can now set reminders on meeting requests you have received. With a meeting request open, select the Reminder check box, select the length of time from the Reminder list, and then click Save and Close. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

Forward Meeting Requests
Outlook Web Access now allows you to forward meeting requests. You can also reply to the meeting organizer, or reply to the meeting organizer and all recipients.

To forward or reply to a meeting request
1. 2. In Outlook Web Access, open the meeting request. Do one of the following: • • • To reply to the meeting organizer only, click the Reply icon. In your reply, the To line is preaddressed to the meeting organizer. To reply to the meeting organizer and all recipients, click the Reply to all icon. In your reply, the To and Cc lines are preaddressed to the meeting organizer and all recipients. To forward the meeting request, click the Forward icon. Fill in the address fields, just as when you address a new message.

Composing Messages to Recipients From the Address Book
Using Outlook Web Access with Exchange Server 2003, you can now open the Address Book, select a recipient, and then compose an e-mail message to that person. Note
This feature is not available with Outlook Web Access Basic.

To create a new e-mail message from the Address Book
1. On the Outlook Web Access toolbar, click the Address Book button.

Chapter 2: Client Features 53

2. 3.

In Find Names, search for the desired recipient. In the details pane, select the recipient you want, and then click New Message. The recipient's name will appear in the To line of a new message window.

Improved Performance
By reducing the amount of information that must travel from the server to the browser, the speed of Outlook Web Access has been increased. Also, to speed up the logon experience, the order in which scripts and other essential files for Outlook Web Access are downloaded to the browser at first logon has been improved. Overall, even with the enhanced user interface and multitude of new features, Outlook Web Access should seem faster, especially over slow connections, and appear far more responsive to user interactions.

Outlook Web Access Compression
Outlook Web Access supports data compression, which is optimal for slow network connections. Depending on the compression setting you use, Outlook Web Access compression works by compressing static and/or dynamic Web pages Table 2.5 lists the compression settings that are available in Exchange Server 2003 for Outlook Web Access. Table 2.5 Available compression settings for Outlook Web Access Compression Setting High Description High compression compresses both static and dynamic pages. Low compression compresses only static pages. No compression is used.

Low None

Using data compression, your users can see performance increases of up to fifty percent on slower network connections, such as traditional dial-up access.

54 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Requirements for Outlook Web Access Compression
To use data compression for Outlook Web Access in Exchange Server 2003, you must verify that you have the following prerequisites: 1. 2. The Exchange server that users authenticate against for Outlook Web Access must be running Windows Server 2003. Your user's mailboxes must be on Exchange 2003 servers. (If you have a mixed deployment of Exchange mailboxes, you can create a separate virtual server on your Exchange server just for Exchange 2003 users and enable compression on it.) Client computers must be running Internet Explorer version 6 or later; the computers must also be running Windows XP or Windows 2000, with the following security update installed: 328970, "Cumulative Patch for Internet Explorer" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16694). Note
If a user does not have a supported browser for compression, the client will still behave normally.

3.

4.

You may need to enable HTTP 1.1 support through proxy servers for some dialup connections. (HTTP 1.1 support is required for compression to function properly.) Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the details pane, expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then expand Protocols. Expand HTTP, right-click Exchange Virtual Server, and then click Properties. In Exchange Virtual Server Properties, on the Settings tab, under Outlook Web Access, use the Compression list to select the compression level you want (None, Low, or High). Click Apply, and then click OK.

To enable data compression
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

S/MIME Support
Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) increases the security of Internet e-mail by enabling digital signing of messages as well as message encryption. Digital signatures provide authentication, non-repudiation, and data integrity. Message encryption provides confidentiality and data integrity. Outlook Web Access in Exchange 2000 did not support signed and encrypted e-mail. Now, with the new Microsoft Outlook Web Access S/MIME ActiveX® control, users can digitally sign and encrypt e-mail messages. The S/MIME control works in conjunction with any X.509v3-based public key infrastructure (PKI) to provide the signing and encryption capabilities.

Chapter 2: Client Features 55

In most cases, before enabling S/MIME support with Outlook Web Access, you should have a good understanding of cryptography and PKI, for example Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 PKI. For information about cryptography and Windows PKI, see the technical article Cryptography and PKI Basics (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=15060).

Outlook Web Access S/MIME Architecture
When Outlook Web Access handles an S/MIME message, various public certificates must be retrieved from Microsoft Active Directory® directory service or from the Personal Contacts folder on the Exchange server. After these digital certificates are retrieved, they are parsed and verified against the certificate revocation list (CRL) and the trust chain. This process could potentially involve a lot of traffic between the Outlook Web Access client and the PKI. Therefore, to reduce this traffic, the public key parsing, CRL look up, and trust chain verification are all performed on the Exchange server rather than on the Outlook Web Access client (Figure 2.14). Processing certificate validity on the server makes Internet-based access faster and more reliable, and can also greatly reduce bandwidth requirements.

Figure 2.14 Outlook Web Access architecture

Handling Private Keys
Another important consideration in Outlook Web Access design is security. At no time does a private key, in any form, get passed between the user's computer and the Exchange server. In fact, the Outlook Web Access S/MIME control that runs in Internet Explorer does not directly handle the private key either, leaving all private key parsing and handling to the Windows CryptoAPI (CAPI). The Outlook Web Access S/MIME control transfers a message to the CAPI, which then transfers the encrypted message back to the Outlook Web Access client. For a more secure S/MIME solution, this separation and isolation of the private key is critical, especially because the client and the server communication may span the Internet. It is also important to note that the public key is used for encryption, while the private key is used for decryption and signing. Note
In regard to private key separation and isolation, the full Outlook client, including Outlook Express, operates in the same way as Outlook Web Access.

56 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Signing and Encrypting E-mail
This section explains, at a high level, the process of signing and encrypting mail with S/MIME. Specifically, you will learn how an S/MIME client uses certificates.

Signing E-mail Messages
In Outlook Web Access, all messages are Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) messages. When a message is signed, the e-mail client uses the body of that MIME message to generate a hash value by applying the appropriate signing algorithm, which is found on the user's private key (the private key is stored either on a smart card or in the certificates store on the local computer). Using the sender's private key, the hash value is then encrypted and appended to the message. The result is referred to as a digital signature. The message is then sent—sometimes a copy of the sender's public key is included in the message. When the recipient opens the message, in accordance with the signing algorithm on the sender's public key, another hash value is generated from the message contents. The hash value of the original message is decrypted using the sender's public key. The two hash values are then compared with each other. If they match, the signature is considered valid.

Encrypting E-mail Messages
When a message is encrypted, the data is encrypted using a session key. Next, that session key is encrypted using the recipient's public key. The message is then sent as a MIME message with no body and a Public Key Cryptography Standards #7 (PKCS-7) attachment. PKCS-7, developed by the Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) cryptography system, defines cryptographic syntax as it applies to messaging. To send an encrypted message, the sender must be able to retrieve the recipient's public key; the public key must also be associated with a valid certificate. When the recipient opens an encrypted message, their private key (either stored locally or on a smart card) is used to decrypt the message.

Certificate Validation with Outlook Web Access
For some organizations, such as legal organizations, the most important feature of S/MIME is the ability to ensure non-repudiation and authenticity of the sender. To guarantee these two aspects, the certificate that signs the recipient's e-mail must be proven valid. In this context, that means the sender's certificate cannot have been revoked, and it cannot be expired; it must be a certificate that is intended for signed e-mail messages, and the Exchange server must trust the certification authority (CA) that issued the sender's certificate. These same attributes are also important to validate certificates for encryption.

Certificate Revocation Check
Each certificate may have a CRL Distribution Point (CDP) attribute. In cases where the issuer does not revoke certificates, the CDP may not be present on the certificate. This attribute points

Chapter 2: Client Features 57

to a URL, generally an LDAP string or HTTP path; to access the Certificate Revocation List (CRL) for the given certificate, the requesting client needs to query this URL. For the requesting client to successfully retrieve the CRL, the CDP must be accessible. In most cases, this means the CDP must be accessible across the Internet. If the CDP is not network-accessible, any attempts to automatically retrieve the CRL will fail. In this situation, the administrator must retrieve and distribute the CRL manually. Each certification authority (CA) and intermediate CA manages a CRL for its domain. As the name implies, the CRL of a given CA contains a list of certificates that were revoked by that CA. To ensure that the certificate of the CA itself was not revoked, client software must query the CRL of the parent CA that originally issued the given CA's certificate, and so on, until the root CA is reached. Depending on the complexity of the PKI, this process can be time consuming. For this reason, caching mechanisms are generally used during CRL verification. Outlook and Outlook Express stores the CRL until it expires (expiry information is included with the CRL). In Outlook Web Access, the Exchange server stores the CRL on behalf of the clients for the duration of its validity. Exchange attempts to authenticate to the CDP by using the Exchange server's LocalSystem account by means of Integrated Windows authentication. You should configure the CDPs throughout your organization to allow access by the appropriate Exchange servers. Alternatively, if you do not want to configure your CDPs to allow Exchange access by means of the LocalSystem account, it may be easier to simply configure your CDPs to allow anonymous access. This will enable Exchange to access the CRL on behalf of Outlook Web Access users. If Exchange cannot validate the CRL, Outlook Web Access displays a warning message. In the case where a CDP is offline or otherwise inaccessible, Exchange will not continually check the inaccessible CDP to abate incoming requests until a specific time has passed. The retry interval is a sliding scale that begins at 15 seconds and increases towards 30 minutes each time a client requests a CRL verification from the CDP.

Time Validity Verification
When a CA creates a certificate, the certificate is marked with a validity period. The validity period is specified by two attributes on the certificate: Valid to and Valid from. Typically, the mail client validates these attributes. In Outlook Web Access, the Exchange server validates the expiry information. If the certificate has expired, or the date precedes the Valid from attribute, Outlook Web Access displays a warning message to the client.

58 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Trust Verification
Trust verification refers to the act of determining whether a public certificate comes from a trusted source. There are two ways a trust is established between a sender and a recipient: • The first is by virtue of having the certificate issued by the same trusted root CA. In this scenario, the trust chain, or hierarchy, on the sender's certificate is derived from the same root CA as the recipient's issuing CA. The second is by means of an explicit trust. In this scenario, a user opens a public certificate and selects an option to trust the issuing CA explicitly.

Outlook and Outlook Express perform trust verifications from the user's desktop. For Outlook Web Access clients, however, the Exchange servers perform the verification on behalf of the clients. In both cases, the logic is the same: in cases where the trust chain is included in the mail, on some public certificates, the trust chain (or hierarchy) is specified; in cases where the trust chain is not specified, trust verification is done while traversing the CRL hierarchy. Because the Exchange server performs the trust validation on behalf of Outlook Web Access S/MIME clients, for each CA with which users interact, you may have to add the appropriate trusted CAs to the machine account certificate store on the Exchange server .If users exchange S/MIME e-mail messages through Outlook Web Access in the following cases, you must add trusted CAs to the Exchange server computer's certificate store: • • • Between different Active Directory forests. If there are multiple root CAs in your organization. If S/MIME mail is sent between separate organizations with different CAs.

If the Exchange server does not trust a CA, users will receive warning messages when opening signed e-mail and when attempting to send encrypted e-mail. Setting up a CA trust must be done on each back-end Exchange mailbox server where Outlook Web Access S/MIME users reside. You can manually add the trusted CAs to each Exchange certificate store, or you can use a group policy. In general, to ensure consistency across all servers, it is advisable to use group policies to manage trusted roots throughout an organization.

Handling Public Keys
When sending an encrypted message, Outlook, Outlook Express, and Outlook Web Access search Active Directory, the personal certificate store, or the Contacts folder for a recipient's public certificate. User settings determine where the client searches for the certificate. By default, Outlook and Outlook Web Access search Active Directory first. If the recipient does not exist in Active Directory, or if the Active Directory user or contact object does not have a key associated with it, then the sender's personal contacts are searched. In Outlook and Outlook Web Access, the personal contacts are stored on the sender's Exchange mailbox. Outlook Express stores the contacts locally. If a public certificate, suitable for encryption, is stored on the contact, then that certificate may be used for sending the encrypted e-mail. In addition, if the sender of the encrypted message is replying to a message that was signed, and the signed message includes the signer's public key, that key can be used to encrypt the reply.

Chapter 2: Client Features 59

Both Outlook and Outlook Express allow the user to specify LDAP directories in which user information (including public certificates) can be accessed. In Outlook, the default directory in which user information is gathered is the local (log on) Active Directory; additional directories can be specified for each profile. For Outlook Express, you can specify generic LDAP search directories for each account. Outlook Web Access uses Exchange to proxy Active Directory searches on its behalf. Outlook Web Access can only search for recipients and certificates that exist in Active Directory and user's contacts.

Certificate Enrollment
For users to be able to sign or encrypt outgoing messages, they must first be issued certificates, referred to as digital IDs, which support the signature and encryption security functions. A single certificate may provide both functions, or a separate certificate may provide each function. The necessary certificates are issued by a CA, which generates the necessary public and private key pair needed for encryption and decryption. The public key is then stored in Active Directory, which allows other users to encrypt messages intended for the user, while the private key is typically stored locally on the user's computer or on a smart card. The process of obtaining a certificate from a CA is called "enrollment."

Configuring Outlook Web Access S/MIME
This section provides the basic steps necessary to configure S/MIME support for Outlook Web Access. Specifically, the following scenario and corresponding steps show you how to use the Windows Server 2003 Certification Authority console to get S/MIME support up and running— this is one of the simplest methods. Use these steps as a guide to test the new S/MIME functionality. Do not use these steps in an attempt to deploy a secure messaging infrastructure in your production environment. The Outlook Web Access S/MIME control does not require Windows Server 2003 certificates—any X.509v3 certificate can be used. Deploying a production PKI and more secure messaging infrastructure requires careful planning and consideration of topics such as CA topologies, key archival and recovery strategies, autoenrollment, smart cards, and so on. Although these topics are outside the scope of this document, they are discussed in the Windows Server 2003 documentation Note
Several of the following steps also apply to using S/MIME with Microsoft Outlook. If your users are already using encryption and signing with Outlook, you can skip to the Outlook Web Access configuration steps.

60 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Existing Topology
This procedure assumes that you have the following topology configured: • • 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. At least one Windows Server 2003 domain controller At least one Exchange 2003 server Install Windows Server 2003 certification authority (CA). Configure the CA as an enterprise root. Have users enroll. Install the Outlook Web Access S/MIME control. Configure default secure messaging settings. Send test messages.

Perform the following steps to deploy S/MIME with Outlook Web Access:

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections.

Step 1: Installing a Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Certification Authority
You must install a certification authority on your network that can issue the necessary certificates to users. To provide the greatest ease of deployment, it is recommended that you deploy a Windows Server 2003 Server CA. Although you could use a Windows 2000 certificate server, Windows Server 2003 offers some important additional features, including auto enrollment through group policy and key archival and recovery capabilities. An Enterprise CA (as opposed to a stand-alone CA) facilitates deployment because it integrates with Active Directory for public key storage. Storing the public keys in Active Directory allows users to automatically look up another user's public key when encrypting a message.

To install a Windows Server 2003 enterprise CA
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. On a computer running Windows Server 2003, click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs. In Add or Remove Programs, click Add/Remove Windows Components. In the Windows Components Wizard, under Components, select Certificate Services. Read the warning about domain membership, and then click Yes. Click Next. On the CA Type page, click Enterprise root CA, and then click Next. On the CA Identifying Information page, in the Common name for this CA box, type a name for the CA. Complete the remaining steps in the wizard.

Chapter 2: Client Features 61

Step 2: Configuring the CA
After installing the CA, you may want to change the default settings. For testing purposes, you can use the default settings, but you may want to change some of the following configuration settings: Recovery agents To archive users' private keys and retrieve them in case they are lost, you must configure a recovery agent. The recovery agent is used to recover an archived key. To configure a recovery agent, you must install a recovery agent certificate on the CA. Certificate templates After you install the enterprise CA, a number of default certificate templates are available. For Outlook Web Access S/MIME purposes, the standard User certificate template offers both encryption and signature functions, and is therefore sufficient for message signing and encryption. However, you may want to require separate certificates for signing and encryption. To do this, create two new templates, one for signature and one for encryption. Request handling With the default settings on the CA, certificates are issued automatically upon request, unless the certificate template specifically requires an administrator to grant the request. The User certificate does not require administrator approval. If you want an administrator to approve each certificate request, you can configure Request Handling to require administrator approval before a certificate is issued.

Step 3: Allowing Users to Enroll
After the CA is configured, users can request the certificate (or certificates) necessary for message signing and encryption. The following procedure assumes you are using the standard User certificate template, which offers both signing and encryption functions. If you configured your own certificate templates, users will need to issue an advanced certificate request and request the custom certificates. Important
By default, the user certificate template allows for the exporting of digital certificates and does not have strong key protection. In a production environment, you should be aware of this. If this does not conform to your security policy, consider creating custom certificate templates that do conform to your security requirements.

To request a certificate
1. Browse to http://ca-server/certsrv where ca-server is the name of the Windows Server 2003 Enterprise CA. Note
You can also use the Certificates snap-in in Microsoft Management Console (MMC) to request a certificate.

2. 3. 4.

After authenticating (if necessary), click Request a certificate. On the Request a Certificate page, click User Certificate. On the User Certificate - Identifying Information page, click Submit.

62 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

5. 6. 7.

The CA Web site will request a certificate on your behalf. In Potential Scripting Violation, click Yes. On the Certificate Issued page, click Install this certificate. In the remaining dialog boxes, click Yes after reviewing the information.

The certificate is now installed on the local computer from which the user requested the certificate. You must install this same certificate on any computer from which the user will use S/MIME in Outlook Web Access. To install the certificate on other computers, the user must export the certificate and then import it on the other computers.

To export a certificate
Note
Key Management Service certificates are commonly used in Outlook for S/MIME. Because Key Management Service certificates can only be exported in the Outlook format, Outlook must be installed.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

On the computer that has the certificate installed, open Microsoft Management Console (MMC): At a command prompt, type MMC. Click File, and then click Add/Remove Snap-in. In Add/Remove Snap-in, on the Standalone tab, click Add. In Add Standalone Snap-in, click Certificates, and then click Add. In Certificates Snap-in, click My user account, and then click Finish. In MMC, expand Certificates - Current User, expand Personal, and then click Certificates.

Chapter 2: Client Features 63

7.

In the details pane, right-click the certificate you want, point to All Tasks, and then click Export (Figure 2.15).

Figure 2.15 8. 9.

Exporting the user certificate

On the Welcome to the Certificate Export Wizard page, click Next. On the Export Private Key page, select Yes, export the private key. This is necessary to read encrypted messages from the computer where the key will be imported.

10. On the Export File Format page, leave the default settings, and then click Next. 11. On the Password page, type a password for the private key. 12. On the File to Export page, type the path and name for the exported certificate file. This is the file that will be imported on other computers. 13. Complete the remaining steps in the wizard. The file is saved as a .pfx extension with the name you specified. The next step is to import the certificate to the other computers.

To import a certificate
1. 2. 3. 4. From the computer on which the certificate is to be installed, browse to the .pfx file that was exported (for example on a floppy disk). Right-click the file, and then click Install PFX. On the Welcome to the Certificate Import Wizard page, click Next. On the File to Import page, click Next. On the Password page, in the Password box, type the password for the private key, and then click Next. Because you already have an exported copy, you do not have to make the key exportable.

64 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

5. 6.

On the Certificate Store page, select Automatically select the certificate store based on the type of certificate, and then click Next. Complete the remaining steps in the wizard.

The certificate is now installed on the new computer.

Step 4: Installing the Outlook Web Access S/MIME Control
Next, to provide signing and encryption functionality, you must install the S/MIME control used by Outlook Web Access. This step must be performed on each computer from which the user uses Outlook Web Access to encrypt or sign e-mail. The Outlook Web Access S/MIME control requires Windows 2000 or later and Internet Explorer 6 or later to be installed.

To install the Outlook Web Access S/MIME control
1. 2. 3. 4. On a computer with Windows 2000 or later and Internet Explorer 6 or later installed, log on to Outlook Web Access. In Outlook Web Access, in the Navigation Pane, click Options. If the Navigation Pane is collapsed, click the Go to options button. On the Options page, under E-Mail Security, click Download. If any security warnings appear, click Yes.

The S/MIME control will be downloaded from the Exchange server to the local computer.

Step 5: Configuring Default E-mail Security Settings
After the S/MIME control is installed, the following two check boxes appear on the Options page under E-Mail Security: • • Encrypt contents and attachments for outgoing messages Add digital signature to outgoing messages

When a message is composed using Outlook Web Access, these options represent the default settings. Even if neither default is selected, users can encrypt or sign individual messages from within the message. Similarly, the default options can be disabled for individual messages.

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To configure the default e-mail security settings
1. 2. 3. Select the Encrypt contents and attachments for outgoing messages check box if you want encryption turned on by default when composing a message. Select the Add digital signature to outgoing messages check box if you want message signatures turned on by default when composing a message. Click Save and Close.

Step 6: Testing Encryption and Signing
At this point, Outlook Web Access users should be able to send signed or encrypted messages. To ensure that both signing and encryption are functioning properly, you should send test messages between two users.

To send a signed message
1. 2. 3. 4. Log on to Outlook Web Access as a user who has a certificate and the S/MIME control installed. Click New to compose a new message. Add a recipient for the test message and fill out the message fields. On the toolbar, there are two new icons: one for encrypting and one for signing. Ensure that the Add digital signature to this message button is selected. Because you just want to test digital signing this time, ensure that that the Encrypt message contents and attachments button is not selected (Figure 2.16).

Figure 2.16 5. Click Send.

The Add digital signature to this message button

66 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

6.

Log on as the recipient of the test message and open the message. The message should contain the digital signature of the sender. Log on to Outlook Web Access as a user who has a certificate and the S/MIME control installed. Click New to compose a new message. Add a recipient for the test message and fill out the message fields. The recipient's public key is required to encrypt the message contents. Therefore the recipient must have already enrolled in a certificate that supports encryption. On the toolbar, ensure that the Encrypt message contents and attachments button is selected. Because you just want to test encryption this time, ensure that that the Add digital signature to this message button is not selected (Figure 2.17).

To send an encrypted message
1. 2. 3.

4.

Figure 2.17 5. 6. Click Send.

The Encrypt message contents and attachments button

Log on as the recipient of the test message. The message should be encrypted and only viewable by the recipient from a computer with the user's encryption certificate installed.

Mobile Services for Exchange
Exchange Server 2003 supports mobile access using the synchronization and browse capabilities of mobile devices. You can deploy mobile services to provide your users with the ability to access their Exchange information from mobile devices such as the Microsoft Pocket PC 2002 Phone Edition device or any mobile device with a mobile browser.

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Exchange ActiveSync
Exchange 2003 now includes the ability to use Pocket PC 2002 devices to synchronize Exchange data with Exchange ActiveSync. By default, when you install Exchange, all of your users are enabled for synchronization. By synchronizing a device to an Exchange server, your users can access their Exchange information without having to be constantly connected to a mobile network. Specifically, users can use their mobile carrier connection to synchronize their Exchange information to their Pocket PC Phone Edition or Smartphone device and then access this information while offline.

Configuring Exchange 2003 for Synchronization Access
By default, when you install Exchange, synchronization access is enabled for all users. You can also use Active Directory Users and Computers to enable individual users for synchronization access. Synchronization access to Exchange also includes the following features: • • Up-to-date notifications Delivery to user-specified SMTP addresses

Up-to-Date Notifications
Future mobile devices will be able to receive notifications that are sent to the device. These notifications will be able to initiate synchronization between a user's device and their Exchange mailbox.

Delivery to User-Specified SMTP Addresses
When the Enable notifications to user specified SMTP addresses feature is enabled in Exchange, users can use any mobile carrier with the synchronization feature of Exchange. With this feature enabled, when a new message arrives in a user's mailbox, up-to-date notifications allow a synchronization to occur on a user's device. Enable this feature if you have users who are using mobile devices to synchronize, and you do not want to specify the carrier. The following procedure describes how to configure synchronization access for your users.

To configure your Exchange 2003 organization for synchronization access
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Global Settings, right-click Mobile Services, and then click Properties (Figure 2.18).

68 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Figure 2.18 3. • •

The Mobile Services Properties dialog box

Under Exchange ActiveSync, select from the following check boxes: Select the Enable user initiated synchronization check box next to allow users to use Pocket PC 2002 devices to synchronize their Exchange data. Select the Enable up-to-date notifications check box to allow users to receive notifications that are sent from the Exchange server to devices that are designed to allow notifications. Select the Enable notifications to user specified SMTP addresses check box to allow users to use their own SMTP carrier for notifications.

• 4.

Click Apply, and then click OK.

Configuring Mobile Devices for Synchronization Access
The following procedure shows you how to configure your mobile device to use Exchange ActiveSync.

To configure your Pocket PC Phone Edition device to use Exchange ActiveSync
1. 2. On your mobile device, from the Today screen, tap Start and then tap ActiveSync. Tap Tools, tap Options, and then tap the Server tab.

Chapter 2: Client Features 69

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Select the check box next to each type of information that you want to synchronize with the server. To configure synchronization options for each type of information, select the type of information, and then tap Settings. In the Server Name field, enter the address or name of the server to connect to when synchronizing Exchange data. Tap Advanced. On the Connection tab, enter your user name, password, and domain name. On the Rules tab, select the rule that best applies to you, for how you want synchronization to work whenever information on your device and your Exchange server have both been changed. Tap OK to accept the changes you made to ActiveSync.

9.

Outlook Mobile Access
Exchange 2003 now includes the Outlook Mobile Access application, which allows users to use mobile devices to access their e-mail, Contacts, Calendar, and Tasks folders. Users can use Outlook Mobile Access with a mobile device that has a mobile browser. The mobile browser needs to support one of the following markup languages: HTML, xHTML or cHTML. To deploy your Exchange server to use Outlook Mobile Access, follow the same steps involved in deploying an Exchange server to use Outlook Web Access. By default, the Outlook Mobile Access application is installed on Exchange servers and all of your users are enabled, however, Outlook Mobile Access as an application is disabled. When you install Exchange, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1, a necessary component for Outlook Mobile Access, is installed automatically for you. Important
Outlook Mobile Access uses Basic Authentication as the authentication method on the Outlook Mobile Access virtual directory in Internet Information Services (IIS). If you change the authentication method for the Outlook Mobile Access virtual directory, Outlook Mobile Access not function properly.

For more information about how to install Exchange, see Chapter 9, "Deployment Features."

Browsing Exchange with a Supported Mobile Device
If your mobile device users want to use Outlook Mobile Access to browse their Exchange data, they must use a device that is supported for Outlook Mobile Access. Table 2.6 lists the supported mobile devices for using Outlook Mobile Access.

70 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Table 2.6 Supported devices for Outlook Mobile Access Device Casio Cassiopeia E-2000 Compaq iPAQ 3630 Rendering Language HTML HTML

Microsoft Pocket PC Phone Edition HTML Microsoft SmartPhone NEC N503is Panasonic P503is Panasonic P504i Fujistu F504i Mitsubishi D503iS Sony SO503iS Mitsubishi D503iS NEC N504i Sony Ericsson T68i Sanyo A3011SA HTML cHTML cHTML cHTML cHTML cHTML cHTML cHTML cHTML xHTML xHTML-mp (WAP2.0) xHTML-mp (WAP2.0) MML (HTML) MML (HTML)

Toshiba C5001T

Sharp J-SH51 MML Toshiba J-T51

Configuring Unsupported Mobile Device Settings
Outlook Mobile Access provides mobile access to Exchange from devices that are not supported. Because these devices are unsupported, they may behave unexpectedly or fail to work properly.

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You should inform your users that such devices are not officially supported and may have unexpected results when using Outlook Mobile Access. To configure your organization's unsupported device settings, use Mobile Services Properties in Exchange System Manager.

To configure unsupported device settings
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Global Settings, right-click Mobile Services, and then click Properties (Figure 2.19).

Figure 2.19 3. 4.

The Mobile Services Properties dialog box

In Mobile Services Properties, under Outlook Mobile Access, select or clear the Enable unsupported devices check box. Click Apply, and then click OK.

72 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Configuring Exchange 2003 to Use Outlook Mobile Access
Perform the following steps to enable your Exchange 2003 users to use Outlook Mobile Access. 1. 2. 3. Configure your Exchange 2003 front-end server for Outlook Mobile Access. Configure user devices to use a mobile connection. Inform your users how to use Outlook Mobile Access.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections.

Step 1: Configuring Exchange 2003 for Outlook Mobile Access
By default, the Outlook Mobile Access virtual directory (which allows your users to access Exchange from a mobile device) is installed with Exchange 2003. This virtual directory has the same capabilities and configuration settings as the Outlook Web Access virtual directory. When you configure a server to use Outlook Mobile Access, you should configure the server in the same way that you configure a server for Outlook Web Access. For complete details about how to configure your Exchange 2000 servers to use Outlook Web Access, see the book Using Microsoft Exchange 2000 Front-End Servers (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=14575&clcid=0x409).

Step 2: Configuring Users' Devices to Use a Mobile Connection
In order for your users to access Exchange 2003 using Outlook Mobile Access, they must have a mobile device from a mobile operator who has an established data network for mobile data. Before your users connect to Exchange 2003 and use Outlook Mobile Access or Exchange ActiveSync over a mobile connection, you should instruct them how to configure their devices to use a mobile network, or at least provide them with resources that explain how to do so.

Step 3: Instructing Your Users How to Use Outlook Mobile Access
Now that you have configured Exchange 2003 for Outlook Mobile Access, and your users have mobile devices that can use a mobile network to access Exchange 2003 servers, your users need to know how to access their Exchange server and use Outlook Mobile Access. The following procedure describes how to use Outlook Mobile Access on a Pocket PC Phone Edition device.

To configure a Pocket PC Phone Edition device to use Outlook Mobile Access
1. 2. On your device, from the Today screen, tap Start, and then tap Internet Explorer. On the Internet Explorer screen, tap View, and then tap Address Bar to open the address bar in your browser window.

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3.

Tap anywhere inside the address bar, enter the following URL, and then tap the Go button: https://ExchangeServerName/oma, where ExchangeServerName is the name of your Exchange server running Outlook Mobile Access. Note
If a connection bubble does not appear, you may have to connect to your network manually.

4.

At the Network Log On screen, enter your user name, password, and domain in the spaces provided, and then tap OK.

The Outlook Mobile Access home page opens, and you can select to read, reply, or forward email, view calendar appointments, and browse or create contacts and tasks. Additionally, from the Outlook Mobile Access home page, you can also select options under preferences, such as default language and time zone.

C H A P T E R

Administration Features

3

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 includes several new features that make Exchange administration easier and more efficient. From new recipient management features to an improved Queue Viewer, Exchange 2003 offers significant improvements over previous versions of Exchange. Table 3.1 lists the Exchange 2003 feature enhancements discussed in this chapter. Table 3.1 Exchange 2003 administration - feature enhancements Feature Recipient management Description • • • • Queue Viewer • • • • • • • Two new mail-enabled objects in recipient management— InetOrgPerson and Query-based Distribution groups. Exchange Features tab of the user Properties includes Wireless Services and Protocols features. You can now run multiple instances of the Exchange Task Wizard simultaneously in a single console. You can use the Exchange Task Wizard in Exchange System Manager to move mailboxes. Improved Queue Viewer functionality provides visibility to more message queues. You can view both SMTP and X.400 queues from Queue Viewer rather than from their separate nodes. You can disable outbound mail from all SMTP queues. You can set the refresh rate for queues. Improved Find Messages option to search for messages within a queue. You can use the Additional queue information pane to view additional information about a particular queue. Hidden queues exposed, such as Failed message retry queue and display in Queue Viewer.

Chapter 3: Administration Features 75

Feature Public Folders

Description • New and improved public folder administration interface such as the Status tab and the Replication tab. Improved search capability to search all public folders. You can create a list of specific servers among which public folder referrals are allowed. Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool (pfMigrate) is a new Microsoft Windows® script file (.wfs) that allows you to create replicas of your system folders and public folders on the new Exchange 2003 server. Using the new Mailbox Recovery Center, you can perform recovery or export operations on multiple disconnected mailboxes at one time. You have greater control in Exchange System Manager over your message tracking log files. You can now track messages after categorization. Exchdump.exe is a command line utility that collects and reports Exchange configuration information from various sources such as Microsoft Active Directory® directory service, the registry, and so on.

• •

Mailbox Recovery Center Message Tracking Center

• • •

Exchdump.exe utility

New Mail-Enabled Objects for Managing Recipients
Recipients are Active Directory objects. Users can either be mailbox-enabled or mail-enabled. Contacts, groups, and public folders can only be mail-enabled. These designations determine what tasks users can perform in Exchange. Exchange 2003 introduces two new recipient objects —InetOrgPerson and Query-based Distribution Group.

InetOrgPerson
The InetOrgPerson object is used in several non-Microsoft LDAP and X.500 directory services to represent people within an organization. Support for InetOrgPerson in Exchange 2003 makes migrations from other LDAP directories to Active Directory more efficient. InetOrgPerson objects in Active Directory can be either mailbox-enabled or mail-enabled. The InetOrgPerson object in Active Directory is derived from the user class; it functions like a user object and conforms to the LDAP standard. Furthermore, InetOrgPerson can be used as a

76 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

security principal, just like the user class. Active Directory now includes InetOrgPerson in queries for users. Active Directory provides support for the InetOrgPerson object class, as well as its associated attributes, which are defined in RFC 2798. For more information about RFC 2798, see http://www.ietf.org/. Note
You can create an InetOrgPerson only if you are running a Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 domain controller. InetOrgPerson can be mail-enabled or mailboxenabled only in a native Exchange 2003 topology.

Creating an InetOrgPerson
The procedures to create a mailbox-enabled or mail-enabled InetOrgPerson are the same as creating a user object. The following procedure describes how to create an InetOrgPerson.

To create an InetOrgPerson
1. 2. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. In the console tree, navigate to the container where you want to create the InetOrgPerson, right-click the container, point to New, and then click InetOrgPerson.

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3.

In New Object – InetOrgPerson, complete the remaining steps. Note
Other than Step 2 above, create an InetOrgPerson the same way you would create a standard user account.

Query-Based Distribution Groups
A query-based distribution group is a new type of distribution group introduced in Exchange 2003. This section explains what a query based distribution group is, how these groups work, and how to create them.

What Is a Query-Based Distribution Group?
A query-based distribution group provides the same functionality as a standard distribution group; however, instead of specifying static user memberships, a query-based distribution group allows you to use an LDAP query to dynamically build membership in the distribution group (for example "All full-time employees in my company"). Using query-based distribution groups allows for a much lower administrative cost, given the dynamic nature of the distribution group. However, query-based distribution groups require higher performance cost for queries that produce a large number of results. This cost is equated with server resources (such as high CPU and increased working set) because every time an e-mail message is sent to a query-based distribution group, an LDAP query is executed against Active Directory to determine its membership. Important
You cannot view the membership of a query-based distribution group in the global address list, because membership is dynamically generated each time mail is sent.

How Does a Query-Based Distribution Group Work?
When a message is submitted to a query-based distribution group, Exchange handles the message in a slightly different manner than messages that are destined for other recipients. A query-based distribution group flows through Exchange to the proper recipients in the following manner: 1. 2. 3. 4. An e-mail message is submitted to the submission queue through the Exchange store driver or through SMTP. The categorizer, a transport component responsible for address resolution, determines that the recipient is a query-based distribution group. The categorizer sends the LDAP query request to the global catalog server. The global catalog server executes the query and returns the set of addresses that match the query.

78 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

5.

After receiving the complete set of addresses matching the query, the categorizer generates a recipient list containing all the users. Note
The categorizer must have the complete set of recipients before it can submit the message to routing; therefore if an error occurs during the expansion of the query-based distribution group to its individual recipients, the categorizer must restart the process.

6.

After the categorizer sends the complete, expanded list of recipients to routing, the standard message delivery process continues, and the e-mail message is delivered to the users' mailboxes.

If a dedicated expansion server (a single server responsible only for expanding distribution groups) is used for query-based distribution groups, the process is slightly different. In this case, rather than sending a query to the global catalog server for expansion (as in Step 4), the message is first routed to the dedicated expansion server. After the message arrives at the expansion server, the expansion takes place, and the delivery follows the same process described above.

Creating Query-Based Distribution Groups
Query-based distribution works reliably in a pure Exchange 2003 deployment or in a native Exchange 2000 and Exchange 2003 deployment in which all Exchange 2000 servers are running Service Pack 3 (SP3) with Windows Server 2003 global catalog servers. If your global catalog servers are running Windows 2000 Server, you can modify a registry key on your Exchange 2000 SP3 servers to achieve greater reliability. You do not need to add this registry key to your Exchange 2003 servers, because, by default, Exchange 2003 expands query-based distribution groups reliably with Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 global catalog servers. If you are running versions of Exchange earlier than Exchange 2000 SP3 in your organization, query-based distribution groups will not work reliably.

Modifying Exchange 2000 SP3 Servers For Use With Windows 2000 Global Catalog Servers
Use the following procedure to configure an Exchange 2000 SP3 server for improved reliability in organizations where query-based distribution groups will be expanded with Windows 2000 global catalogs. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

Chapter 3: Administration Features 79

To modify your Exchange 2000 SP3 server
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\SMTPSVC\Parameters 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. In the details pane, right-click, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. Type DynamicDLPageSize for the name. Right-click DynamicDLPageSize, and then click Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, under Base, click Decimal. Under Value Data, type 31, and then click OK

Creating a Query-Based Distribution Group
To create a query-based distribution group, you must use the Exchange 2003 version of Exchange System Manager and Active Directory Users and Computers. You cannot create querybased distribution groups without upgrading your administration console. Use the following procedure to create a query-based distribution group. Note
It is recommended that you upgrade all your administrative consoles to Exchange 2003 before deploying query-based distribution groups in your environment.

To create a query-based distribution group
1. 2. 3. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. In the console tree, navigate to the container where you want to create the query-based distribution group. Right-click the container, point to New, and then click Query-based Distribution Group.

80 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

4.

In New Object – Query-based Distribution Group, in the Query-based Distribution Group name box, type a name for the query-based distribution group, and then click Next (Figure 3.1).

Figure 3.1

The Query-based Distribution Group name box

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5.

In the Apply filter to recipients in and below box, the parent container that the query-based distribution group will be run against is displayed. If necessary, click Change to select another container (Figure 3.2).

Figure 3.2 Note

The Apply filter to recipients in and below box

The query only returns recipients in the selected container and its child containers. To achieve the desired results, you may need to select a parent container or create multiple queries.

6.

Under Filter, select one of the following options: • To select from pre-defined criteria for membership in the query-based distribution group, click Include in this query-based distribution group, and then click each item you want. The following criteria are pre-defined: - Users with Exchange mailbox - Users with external e-mail addresses - Mail-enabled Groups - Contacts with external e-mail addresses - Mail-enabled Public folders • To create your own criteria for the query, click Customize filter, and then click Customize. Some attributes available for selection in the query are not replicated to the global catalog server. Because the query executes against available attributes on the global catalog server, if you pick attributes that do not exist on the global catalog server, the query returns an empty set of this attribute. The following attributes are not available on the global catalog server:

82 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

- Assistant - Comment - Direct Reports - Division - E-Mail Address (Others) - Employee ID - Generational Suffix - Home Address - Home Drive - Home Folder - ILS Settings - International ISDN Number - International ISDN Number (Others) - Logon Workstations - Member Of - Middle Name - Telex Number - Telex Number (others) - Title 7. 8. 9. Click Next to see a summary of the query-based distribution group you are about to create. Click Finish to create the query-based distribution group. The new query-based distribution group displays under the container you selected in Step 5. Right-click the query-based distribution group you just created, and then click Properties.

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10. To view the query results, click the Preview tab and then verify that the correct recipients are included in the distribution group. Important
Using the Preview tab is strongly recommended. Some attributes available for inclusion in the query are not replicated to the global catalog server. When you click the Preview tab, the query executes against the available attributes on the global catalog server. You can use the tab to ensure that all attributes you select are available on the global catalog server. If the attributes are not available on the global catalog server, the query returns an empty preview pane.

Note
To execute the query, the Preview tab uses the security context of the user that is currently logged on. When the query based distribution group forms its membership, it uses the security context of the Exchange server account. For this reason, the results displayed on the Preview tab may vary from the actual results when the query is run.

Active Directory Users and Computers provides an easy way to format the LDAP query with standard attributes, without requiring specific knowledge of LDAP. For example, you can select all mailboxes under the organizational unit or even customize the query to select all mailboxes under the organizational unit that exist on a particular server. Additionally, after you construct a query, the Preview tab in the query's Properties provides the information necessary to ensure that your query functions properly. As mentioned earlier, you can ensure that all attributes selected for the query are available on the global catalog server. You can also use the Preview tab to learn how long a query takes to execute and, based on this time, you can if you want to break up the query into smaller queries for better performance and faster delivery times.

Guidelines for Creating Query-Based Distribution Groups
Use the following guidelines when creating query-based distribution groups: • You can only use query-based distribution groups in a pure Exchange 2003 environment or in a native mode environment with Exchange 2000 and Exchange 2003, where all Exchange 2000 servers are running Service Pack 3. When creating distribution groups that span domains, use universal groups in multi-domain environments. Although you can add query-based distribution groups to global distribution groups, domain local and global security groups and can contain any of these groups; membership in these types of groups is not replicated to global catalog servers in other domains. Use universal distribution groups in situations where distribution spans a multidomain environment. • When combining query-based distribution groups into an aggregate group, combine them in a universal group. Only universal groups are available on global catalog servers across domains.

84 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

When building query-based distribution groups, you should only include universal groups if you want the membership to be available in all domains in a multi-domain environment.

Index the attributes used in the query. Indexing greatly improves the performance of the query and reduces the time required to expand the distribution group and deliver the e-mail message to the intended recipients. For more information about indexing attributes, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article, 313992, "HOW TO: Add an Attribute to the Global Catalog in Windows 2000" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=313992). If the filter string contains bad formatting or incorrect LDAP syntax, then the global catalog server will not execute the query. Use Active Directory Users and Computers to create your query, which can help prevent you from constructing an incorrect query. You can also use the Preview tab in the query's Properties to view the result of the query; this will confirm the validity and desired results of the query. If you create a query-based distribution group based on an incorrect LDAP query, a user who sends a message to the query-based distribution group will receive a non-delivery report (NDR) with the code 5.2.4; furthermore, if categorizer logging is enabled, one of two events are logged with event identifiers of 6024 or 6025. Always use the Preview tab to ensure that the attributes you include in your query are available on the global catalog server. If the filter string is well formatted but no results are produced, then the sender will not receive an NDR. This is the same behavior that results when a message is sent to an empty distribution group. As mentioned earlier, use the Preview tab in Active Directory Users and Computer to confirm the desired result of your query. Use Exchange System Manager in a security context that has the same permissions for reading objects in Active Directory as the Exchange server. It is important to note that Exchange System Manager runs in the security context of the user who is currently logged in. If an administrator is running Exchange System Manager and has lower security privileges than the Exchange server, it is possible that the query will show a subset of the actual results on the Preview tab. The preview pane only shows the Active Directory objects that the administrator has permission to read. When a message is sent to the query-based distribution group, however, the categorizer runs with the Exchange server permissions. Assuming the Exchange server has permissions for all of the objects in the query, the query returns the correct results. Issues arise when a base distinguished name is deleted. Query-based distribution expansion relies on its base distinguished name referring to a valid container in the directory. If a query-based distribution group's base distinguished name container is deleted, the categorizer cannot execute the query, and the sender receives an NDR with the code 5.2.4. If categorizer logging is enabled, an event ID of 6024 or 6025 is logged. For example, suppose you created a Sales container within the Users container for all Sales employees and then used the Sales container to build a query-based distribution group. If you deleted the Sales container, the query would no longer work.

• •

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Combining Multiple Query-Based Distribution Groups
In Exchange System Manager, you can create query-based distribution groups based on the AND operator. This means you can create a query using two attribute values; the query includes results that meet both of the specified conditions. For example, if you create a query that includes users on mailbox store 1 and users located in Seattle, the results include only users who are on mailbox store 1 and also located in Seattle. To create distribution groups based on the OR operator using query-based distribution groups, create multiple query-based distribution groups and combine them in a single distribution group. For example, if you want to include users who are on mailbox store 1 or located in Seattle, you would need to create on query-based distribution group for users in Seattle and a second query-based distribution group for users residing on mailbox store 1. Then you would create a standard distribution group and include these two query-based distribution groups as members. Note
The distribution group you use to combine the query-based distribution groups cannot itself be a query-based distribution group.

For example, assume you want to create a query-based distribution group that includes all Marketing employees or all employees located in the Paris office. If you create a query-based distribution group with an LDAP query that contains all Marketing employees and all Paris employees, the query only returns users who are in both groups—any user who is not a member of both groups is excluded. To achieve OR functionality (thereby including members of either group), you must create two query-based distribution groups, one for Marketing employees and one for Paris employees; then you must combine the two groups to create a new distribution group (not a query-based distribution group) that contains the two groups as members. To do this, you would perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. Create a query-based distribution group called Marketing for all Marketing employees. Create a query-based distribution group called Paris employees for all employees in the Paris office. Create a distribution group and add the query-based distribution groups—Marketing and Paris employees—as members of this group. Important
You cannot add query-based distribution groups as members of a distribution group the same way you add users to a group. You must right-click the distribution group, and then click Add Exchange Query-based Distribution Groups.

Use the following procedure to add query-based distribution groups as members of a standard distribution group.

86 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To add query-based distribution groups as members of a distribution group
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. In the console tree, navigate to the container where the distribution group resides. In the details pane, right-click the distribution group, and then click Add Exchange Querybased Distribution Groups. In Select Exchange Query-based Distribution Groups, under Enter the object names to select, type the name of the query-based distribution group that you want to add. Click Check Names to verify the entry. Click OK. Repeat Steps 3 through 6 for each query-based distribution group you want to add to this distribution group.

Deployment Recommendations for Query-Based Distribution Groups
The following factors influence the amount of time it takes to expand and execute a query-based distribution group: Hardware The categorizer can require up to 2 KB of memory for each recipient. Use this conservative metric as a baseline. Using this baseline, if you send an e-mail message to a query-based distribution group of 6,000 users (meaning that the query returns 6,000 records), the categorizer requires 12 MB of RAM just to expand the query-based distribution group. Similarly, if you send an e-mail message to a larger query-based distribution group of 100,000 users, the categorizer requires approximately 200 MB of RAM. The processor speed and amount of available physical memory affects the time it takes to deliver the messages after the expansion. Global catalog availability If you send a message to a query-based distribution group and all global catalog servers are unavailable, the message is placed in retry mode in the categorizer. This means that the complete expansion will restart after one hour. The general recommendation is to separate large query-based distribution groups into combinations of standard distribution groups, and then assign different expansion servers for each large distribution group. When expanding distribution groups, consider one of the following three options for designating and configuring expansion servers and global catalog servers: Option 1 Designate an Exchange 2003 server with no mailboxes, such as a public folder replica server or a bridgehead server, as the expansion server for a large query-based distribution group.

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Because this server has more bandwidth and resources to expand the query-based distribution group, expansion and delivery are more efficient. Option 2 Create a query-based distribution group for every Exchange server and limit each querybased distribution group to the mailboxes on that server. Assigning this same server as the expansion server optimizes mail delivery. Then, use aggregate standard distribution groups that contain these query-based distribution groups as members. For example, if you wanted to create a query-based distribution group for all full-time employees, you could create a query-based distribution group on each server for full-time employees, name them Server1 Full Time and Server2 Full Time, and then create a standard distribution group called AllFullTime that is comprised of the two server-based groups. Note
The distribution group you use to combine the query-based distribution groups cannot itself be a query-based distribution group.

Option 3 Instead of using a single large query-based distribution group, create smaller query-based distribution groups and combine them in a standard distribution group. Suppose you want to create a query-based distribution group called All employees with one hundred thousand users. Divide the group into the following smaller query-based distribution groups, and then combine these groups into a single standard distribution group: • • • • • All Temps, 10,000 users All Vendors, 5,000 users All Full-Time, 65,000 users All Interns, 2,000 users All Contractors, 18,000 users

In this scenario All Full-Time is a large distribution group, so you may want to assign a specific expansion server to it. The other query-based distribution groups can be assigned an expansion server, based on how the users are distributed across your Exchange servers. For example, if all the interns reside on one Exchange server, you may want to have the same server as expansion server for All Interns. Overall, this approach performs much better than a single query-based distribution group with 100,000 recipients.

88 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Improved Ability to Restrict Submissions to Users and Distribution Lists (Restricted Distribution Lists)
In Exchange 2003, you can restrict who can send e-mail messages to an individual user or a distribution list. Submissions can be restricted to a limited number of security principles though the standard Windows discretionary access control list (DACL). Restricting submissions on a distribution list prevents non-trusted senders, such as unauthorized Internet users, from sending mail to an internal-only distribution list. For example, an All Employees distribution list should not be available to anyone outside the company (by spoofing or otherwise). Note
Restricted distribution lists and submission restrictions for users only function on the bridgehead servers or SMTP gateway servers running Exchange Server 2003.

Use the following procedures to set submission restrictions on users and distribution lists respectively.

To set restrictions on a user
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. Expand your organizational unit container, and then click Users or the container in which the user resides. In the details pane, right-click user for which you want to restrict submissions, and then click Properties. Click the Exchange General tab, and then click Delivery Restrictions. Under Message Restrictions, under Accept messages, select one of the following options: a. Click From authenticated users only to allow only authenticated users to send mail to this user. When you select From authenticated users, this option affects how the other options are implemented. - Click From everyone to allow anyone that is an authenticated user to send mail to this user. - Click Only from to specify a select set of authenticated users or groups that can send mail to this user. Click Add to specify the users or groups you want. - Click From everyone except to allow everyone but a select set of authenticated users or groups to send to this distribution group. Click Add to specify the list of users or

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groups that you want. Any user or group you select must be authenticated to send to this user. b. Leave From authenticated users only cleared. If you leave this check box cleared, the following options are implemented as such: - Click From everyone to allow anyone to send to this user. This includes anonymous users from the Internet. - Click Only from to specify a select set of users or groups that can send to this user. Click Add to specify the users or groups you want. - Click From everyone except to allow everyone but a select set of users or groups to send to this user. Click Add to specify the list of users or groups you want. These users or groups can be authenticated users or anonymous users.

To set restrictions on a distribution list
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. Expand your organizational unit container, and then click Users or the container in which the distribution list resides. In the details pane, right-click the distribution list for which you want to restrict submissions, and then click Properties. In <Distribution List> Properties, click the Exchange General tab. Under Message Restrictions, under Accept messages, select one of the following options: a. Select the From authenticated users only check box to allow only authenticated users to send mail to this distribution list. If you select this check box, the following options are implemented as such: - Click From everyone to allow authenticated users to send mail to this distribution list. - Click Only from to specify a select set of authenticated users or groups that can send mail to this group. Click Add to specify the users or groups you want. - Click From everyone except to allow everyone but a select set of authenticated users or groups to send mail to this distribution group. Click Add to specify the list of users or groups you want. Any user or group you select must be authenticated to send to this distribution list. b. Leave From authenticated users only cleared. If you leave this check box cleared, the following options are implemented as such: - Click From everyone to allow anyone to send to this distribution list. This includes anonymous users from the Internet. - Click Only from to specify a select set of users or groups that can send to this group. Click Add to specify the users or groups you want.

90 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

- Click From everyone except to allow everyone but a select set of users or groups to send to this distribution group. Click Add to specify the list of users or groups you want. These users or groups can be authenticated users or anonymous users.

Enhanced Exchange Features on User Properties
The Exchange Features tab in the user Properties now includes the Mobile Services and Protocols features. These Exchange features provide added functionality for your mailboxenabled users. You can enable or disable the user's Mobile Services options (such as Outlook Mobile Access), or Protocols (such as Outlook Web Access). For more information about Outlook Mobile Access and Outlook Web Access, see Chapter 2, "Client Features."

To enable or disable Exchange features for a single user
1. 2. 3. 4. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. In the console tree, expand the container where you want to enable or disable Exchange features, and then click Users. In the details pane, right-click the user you want to modify, and then click Properties. In <User Name> Properties, click the Exchange Features tab (Figure 3.3).

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Figure 3.3 5. Note

The Exchange Features tab

Under Features, select a feature, and then click Enable or Disable.
You can also use the Configure Exchange Features page in the Exchange Task Wizard to enable or disable Exchange features for a user. See the following procedure for information about how to do this.

To enable or disable Exchange Features for multiple users
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers. In the console tree, expand the container where you want to enable or disable Exchange features, and then click Users. In the details pane, right-click the users you want to modify, and then click Exchange Tasks. In the Exchange Task Wizard, on the Available Tasks page, click Configure Exchange Features, and then click Next. On the Configure Exchange Features page, under Features, select a feature, click Enable or Disable, and then click Next (Figure 3.4).

92 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Figure 3.4 Note

The Configure Exchange Features page

The default setting for modifying multiple users is Do Not Modify. If you want to enable or disable multiple users, click Enable or Disable for the individual feature you are selecting.

6.

On the Task Summary page, click Finish to complete the wizard.

Moving Mailboxes in Exchange System Manager
Exchange Task Wizard provides an improved method for moving mailboxes. You can now select as many mailboxes as you want and then, using the task scheduler, schedule the move to occur at some point in the future. You can also use the scheduler to cancel any unfinished moves at a selected time. For example, you can schedule a large move to start at midnight on Friday and automatically terminate at 6:00 A.M. on Monday, thereby ensuring that your server's resources are not being tapped during regular business hours. Using the wizard's multithreaded capabilities, you can move up to four mailboxes simultaneously. Note
The following procedure describes how to move mailboxes from Exchange System Manager. You can also move mailboxes from Active Directory Users and Computers.

To move mailboxes
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

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2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server from which you want to move mailboxes, expand First Storage Group, expand Mailbox Store, and then click Mailboxes. In the details pane, right-click the user or users you want, and then click Exchange Tasks. On the Welcome to the Exchange Task Wizard page, click Next. On the Available Tasks page, click Move Mailbox, and then click Next. On the Move Mailbox page, to specify the new destination for the mailbox, in the Server list, select a server, and then, in the Mailbox Store list, select a mailbox store. Then click Next. Under If corrupted messages are found, click the option you want, and then click Next. Note
If you decide to skip corrupted items, these items are lost permanently when the mailbox is moved. To avoid data loss, back up the source database before moving mailboxes.

7.

8.

On the Task Schedule page, in the Begin processing tasks at list, select the date and time for the move. If you want to cancel any unfinished moves at a certain time, in the Cancel tasks that are still running after list, select the date and time. Click Next to start the process. On the Completing the Exchange Task Wizard page, verify that the information is correct, and then click Finish. Note
You can also run multiple instances of the Move Mailbox wizard.

9.

Enhancements to Queue Viewer
In Exchange 2003, Queue Viewer is enhanced to improve the monitoring of message queues. For example, you can now view X.400 and STMP queues in Queue Viewer, rather than from their respective protocol nodes. Other enhancements include: • • • • Disabling outbound mail Queue Viewer includes a new option called Disable Outbound Mail, which allows you to disable outbound mail from all SMTP queues. Setting the refresh rate You can use the Settings option to set the refresh rate of the queues. Finding messages You can search for messages based on the sender, recipient, and message state using Find Messages. Viewing additional information You can click a specific queue to view additional information about that queue.

94 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Viewing previously hidden queues Queue Viewer in Exchange 2003 exposes three queues that were not visible in Exchange 2000: DSN messages pending submission, Failed message retry queue, and Messages queued for deferred delivery

Each of these enhancements is discussed later in this section.

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Figure 3.5 illustrates the new and improved Queue Viewer.

Figure 3.5 Queue Viewer

Disabling Outbound Mail
The Disable Outbound Mail option allows you to disable outbound mail from all SMTP queues. For example, this can be useful if a virus is active in your organization. Note
The Disable Outbound Mail option does not disable the MTA or System queues.

To disable outbound mail for all SMTP queues
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Navigate to Queue Viewer by performing one of the following steps: • • If you do not have routing or administrative groups defined: Expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues. If you have administrative groups defined: Expand Administrative Groups, expand <Administrative Group Name>, expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues.

3.

In the details pane, click Disable Outbound Mail to disable mail from all SMTP queues.

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4. 5.

A warning message appears asking Are you sure you want to disable outbound mail? Click Yes. Outbound mail is now disabled for all queues. To re-enable SMTP queues that have been disabled, click Enable Outbound Mail, and then click Yes. Note
If you want to prevent outbound mail from being sent to a specific remote queue instead of disabling all SMTP queues, you can freeze the messages in that queue. To freeze all the messages in a particular queue, right-click the queue, and then click Freeze To unfreeze the queue, right-click the queue, and then click Unfreeze.

Setting the Queue Viewer Refresh Rate
The Settings option allows to you determine the frequency at which the all the queues are refreshed. The default rate at which the queues are refreshed is every 2 minutes. You can set the refresh rate to 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, or Never refresh.

To modify Queue Viewer refresh rate settings
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Navigate to Queue Viewer by performing one of the following steps: • • If you do not have routing or administrative groups defined: Expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues. If you have administrative groups defined: Expand Administrative Groups, expand <Administrative Group Name>, expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues.

3. 4. 5.

In the details pane, click Settings. In Settings, in the Refresh queue rate list, select the refresh rate you want. Click OK.

Finding Messages
You can use the Find Messages option to search for messages by specifying search criteria such as the sender or recipient, and the message state (such as frozen). You can also specify the number of messages you want your search to return.

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To find messages
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Navigate to Queue Viewer by performing one of the following steps: • • If you do not have routing or administrative groups defined: Expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues. If you have administrative groups defined: Expand Administrative Groups, expand <Administrative Group Name>, expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues.

3.

In the details pane, click the queue in which you want to search for messages, and then click Find Messages (Figure 3.6).

Figure 3.6 4. • • •

The Find Messages dialog box

In Find Messages - <Queue Name>, select from the following search criteria: To search for a particular sender, click Sender, and then, in Select Sender, specify your search criteria. To search for a particular recipient, click Recipient, and then, in Select Recipient, specify your search criteria. To specify the number of messages returned by the search, in the Number of messages to be listed in the search list, select the number of messages (for example, 500) you want listed in the search.

98 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To search for messages in a particular state, in the Show messages whose state is list, select from the following states. - All Messages This option shows all the messages, regardless of their state. - Frozen This option shows messages that are in frozen state. This does not mean that the entire queue is frozen—a single message can also be frozen. - Retry This option shows the messages that are awaiting another delivery attempt. Messages in the retry state have failed one or more delivery attempts.

5. 6.

Click Find Now to begin the search. The results of the search are displayed under Search Results. To stop a search, click Stop. To begin a new search, click New Search (this resets the Find Messages dialog box to its default settings).

Viewing Additional Information About a Queue
The Additional queue information pane (located at the bottom of the Queue Viewer pane) contains information about a particular queue, including: • • • 1. 2. Troubleshooting information Information about errors returned from Exchange specific extensions to the SMTP service, (for example, errors due to remote server connection problems) Information about queue availability (for example, if the SMTP service has not started) Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Navigate to Queue Viewer by performing one of the following steps: • • If you do not have administrative groups defined: Expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues. If you have administrative defined: Expand Administrative Groups, expand <Administrative Group Name>, expand Servers, expand the server you want, and then click Queues.

To view additional information about a queue

3.

In the details pane, click the queue you want. Any additional information for that queue appears under Additional queue information at the bottom of the details pane.

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Viewing Previously Hidden Queues
Several queues that were hidden in Exchange 2000 are now visible in Exchange System Manager. Note
The X.400 queues and the SMTP queues now appear in Queue Viewer rather than under their respective protocol nodes.

Table 3.2 lists the new queues, their descriptions, and possible reasons for message accumulation in each queue. Table 3.2 New queues in Exchange 2003 Queue Name DSN messages pending submission Description Contains delivery status notifications (DSN), also known as non-delivery reports, that are ready to be delivered by Exchange. Note The following operations are unavailable for this queue: • Delete All Messages (no NDR) Delete All Messages (NDR) Causes for Message Accumulation Messages can accumulate in this queue if the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service is unavailable or not running, or if problems exist with IMAIL Exchange store component, which is the component that performs message conversion. Check the event log for possible errors with the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service.

100 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Queue Name Failed message retry queue

Description Contains messages that failed some sort of queue submission, often before any other processing has taken place. By default, messages in this queue are reprocessed in 60 minutes.

Causes for Message Accumulation Possible causes for failed messages are: • • • Corrupted messages. Third-party programs or event sinks may be interfering with message queuing or fidelity. Low system resources causing the system to respond slowly or indicates performances issues. Restarting IIS temporarily may temporarily improve resource issues. but the root cause should be determined.

Messages queued for deferred delivery

Contains messages Possible causes for message accumulation are: that are queued for • If a message is sent to a user's mailbox while the delivery at a later mailbox is being moved, messages can be queued time, including here. messages that were sent by older versions • When the user does not yet have a mailbox and no of Microsoft Office master account Security ID (SID) exists for the user. Outlook®. (You can For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge set this option on Base article 316047, "XADM: Addressing Problems Outlook client That Are Created When You Enable ADC-Generated computers) Accounts" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=3160 Previous versions of 47). Outlook depend on the message transfer • agent (MTA) for message delivery. • Now, SMTP, not the MTA, handles message delivery. Therefore, messages sent by older versions of Outlook treat deferred delivery differently. These messages remain in this queue until their scheduled delivery time. The message may be corrupted or the recipient may not be valid. To determine if a message is corrupted, check its properties. If some messages are not accessible, this can indicate a corrupted message. You can also check that the recipient is valid.

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Improved Public Folder Referral
In Exchange 2000 Server, you could specify whether or not to allow public folder referrals among routing groups. Exchange 2003 provides a richer interface, which you can use to create a list of specific servers among which referrals are allowed. When a user connects to a public folder store that does not contain a copy of the content the user is looking for, the user is redirected to another store that has a copy of the content. You can use public folder referrals to control this redirect traffic (this is similar to public folder affinity in Exchange 5.5). Using the default configuration, Exchange attempts to redirect the user to a server within the local routing group. If none of those servers has the required content, Exchange follows the organization's routing group structure to search for an appropriate server. In Exchange Server 2003, you can create a list of specific servers among which referrals are allowed. For example, you can limit referrals to a single routing group, or only allow referrals between certain servers in each routing group. You can also assign "costs" to prioritize the servers in your referral list.

To specify a list of referral servers
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Servers, right-click the server for which you want to customize referral information, and then click Properties. In <Server Name> Properties, click the Public Folder Referrals tab. In the Public folder referral options list, click Use custom list. To specify a server for the referral list, click Add, and then select a server from the list of available servers. Click OK to return to the Public Folder Referrals tab. Note
To remove a server from the referral list, click the server, and then click Remove.

Use costs to prioritize servers in the referral list. Higher-cost servers are used only if lower-cost servers are not available.

To specify relative costs for servers in the referral list
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

102 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Servers, right-click the server for which you want to customize referral information, and then click Properties. In <Server Name> Properties, click the Public Folder Referrals tab. Click a server in the list, and then click Modify. Specify a cost for the server, and then click OK to return to the Public Folder Referrals tab.

Improved Public Folder Interfaces
To make public folders easier to manage, Exchange 2003 includes several new public folder interfaces. To view these new interfaces, in Exchange System Manager, expand Folders and then select a public folder (or in some cases, a public folder hierarchy). The following new tabs are displayed in the details pane (Figure 3.7).

Figure 3.7 New tabs available for viewing public folder information Content tab Use this tab to view the contents of a public folder in Exchange System Manager. You no longer have to open a separate client application to view public folder content.

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Find tab Use this tab to search for public folders within the selected public folder or public folder hierarchy. You can specify a variety of search criteria, such as the folder name or age. Note The Find tab is available at the top-level hierarchy level as well as the folder
level.

Status tab Use this tab to view the status of a public folder, including information about servers that have a replica of the folder and the number of items in the folder. Replication tab Use this tab to view replication information about the folder.

To view the content of a public folder using Exchange System Manager
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, expand the appropriate top-level hierarchy, and then click the public folder whose content you want to view. In the details pane, click the Content tab. If prompted for a user name and password, type the user name and password of an account that has permission to view the folder contents. The folder contents, displayed in a manner similar to Outlook Web Access, will be listed in the details pane. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, expand the appropriate top-level hierarchy, and then click the public folder that may contain the folder that you want. In the details pane, click the Find tab. To identify the folder you want, fill in the appropriate criteria: • • If you know part of the folder name, you can type that information in the Name contains box. If you know that a particular user or group has certain permissions on the folder, click Permissions, and then fill in the user or group name and specify the permissions. Then click OK to return to the Find tab. If you know that the folder is replicated to certain servers, click Replicated to, and then select the appropriate server. Then click OK to return to the Find tab.

To search for a public folder
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

104 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

If you know that the folder was created or modified within a certain date range, in the Specify folder list, click Modified or Created, and then use the Begin date and End date lists to specify the date range. If you know when the folder was created, in the Folder Age list, click days or older, days or newer, or days, and then, in the Folder age box, type the appropriate number of days.

6.

Click Find Now.

To view the server and public folder store information for a public folder, or the size and number of items the folder contains
1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, expand Public Folders (or the hierarchy you want to work with), and then click the public folder whose status you want to view. In the details pane, click the Status tab to view the information. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, expand Public Folders (or the hierarchy you want to work with), and then click the public folder whose status you want to view. In the details pane, click the Replication tab to view the information.

To view the replication information for a public folder

Manually Starting Replication
If you want to ensure that public folders replicate without waiting for the normal replication interval, you can start replication manually. Using the Send Contents or Send Hierarchy commands on a public folder, you can replicate changes from one specified server to another. The range of changes to replicate starts the specified number of days in the past and ends at the last replication cycle. For example, you can replicate all changes made over the past two days except for any changes made since the last replication cycle.

To manually replicate a public folder hierarchy
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

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2. 3. 4. 5.

If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, and then expand the appropriate top-level hierarchy. Right-click the public folder whose hierarchy you want to replicate (you can select the toplevel hierarchy for this purpose), and then click Send Hierarchy. In Send Hierarchy, under Source Servers, select the check box next to the server or servers that have the appropriate version of the hierarchy. Then, under Destination Servers, select the check box next to the server or servers to which you want to replicate. In the Resend changes made in the last (days) box, type an appropriate number of days. Click OK. When asked to confirm that you want to start replication, click Yes. Replication starts at this time. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. If administrative groups are displayed, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the group you want to work with. Expand Folders, and then expand the appropriate top-level hierarchy. Right-click the public folder whose content you want to replicate, and then click Send Contents. In Send Contents, under Source Servers, select the check box next to the server or servers that have the appropriate version of the content. Then, under Destination Servers, select the check box next to the server or servers to which you want to replicate. In the Resend changes made in the last (days) box, type an appropriate number of days. Click OK. When asked to confirm that you want to start replication, click Yes. Replication starts at this time.

6. 7.

To manually replicate public folder content
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7.

Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool
Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool (pfMigrate) is a new Windows Installation script (.wfs) that allows you to create replicas of your system folders and public folders on new Exchange 2003 servers. After the system folders and public folders have replicated, you can use the pfMigrate tool to remove replicas from the source server. Unlike Microsoft Exchange Server version 5.5, you do not need to set a home server for a public folder in Exchange 2003. Any replica acts as the primary replica of the data it holds, and any public folder server can be removed from the replica list. To determine how many folders must be replicated, you can use

106 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

the pfMigrate tool to generate a report before you replicate folders. To determine whether the folders replicated successfully, you can generate the same report after you replicate folders. To use the pfMigrate tool, the source server and the target server you specify must be in the same routing group. The pfMigrate tool does not allow you to create replicas of your system folders and public folders across routing groups. This is because, in mixed mode, moving folders across routing groups could prevent e-mail delivery to public folders. The pfMigrate tool is located in the ExDeploy folder on the Exchange 2003 compact disc (under Support Tools). You can run the tool at the command prompt, either on a server or from the administrative console.

Mailbox Recovery Center
Using the new Mailbox Recovery Center, you can simultaneously perform recovery or export operations on multiple disconnected mailboxes. This is a significant improvement over Exchange 2000 Server, where such operations had to be performed individually on each disconnected mailbox (a disconnected mailbox is a mailbox that is not associated with a user in Active Directory, usually because the user has been deleted). Use Mailbox Recovery Center to recover one or more mailboxes on one or more mailbox stores. You can export the mailbox properties, and you can associate the mailboxes with users in Active Directory and reconnect the mailboxes. To do this, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager. Specify a mailbox store to work with. If appropriate, export the mailbox properties. If appropriate, do the following to reconnect the mailboxes: a. b. 5. Associate users with the mailboxes. Reconnect the mailboxes.

When finished, remove the mailbox stores from the Mailbox Recovery Center. Note
Some procedures are different for Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following procedures.

To specify a mailbox store to work with if you are running Exchange System Manager on Windows 2000 Server
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Tools, right-click Mailbox Recovery Center (Figure 3.8), and then click Add Mailbox Store.

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3. 4.

In Add mailbox store(s), click the mailbox store you want, and then click Add. You can add multiple mailbox stores in this manner. Click OK to add the store. After the store has been added, the details pane will list any disconnected mailboxes in that store.

Figure 3.8

The Mailbox Recovery Center in Exchange System Manager

To specify a mailbox store to work with if you are running Exchange System Manager on Windows Server 2003
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Tools, right-click Mailbox Recovery Center, and then click Add Mailbox Store.

108 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3.

In Add mailbox store(s), specify the following criteria for identifying the mailbox store and the mailboxes you want to work with: • • In the Enter the object names to select box, type the name of the mailbox store you want to work with. To limit the search to a certain part of Active Directory, click Locations, select a directory container, and then click OK to return to the Add mailbox store(s) dialog box. Note
If you are unsure about which mailbox store you need, click Advanced, specify the criteria, and then click Find now to locate the mailbox store. Select the appropriate mailbox store, and then click OK to return to the Add mailbox store(s) dialog box.

4.

Click OK to add the store. After the store has been added, the details pane lists any disconnected mailboxes in that store. After adding the appropriate mailbox store to the Mailbox Recovery Center, in the details pane, right-click the mailbox you want to export, and then click Export. You can select multiple mailboxes simultaneously. To identify the information you want to export, as well as the destinations to which you want to export it, follow the instructions in the Mailbox Export wizard. After adding the appropriate mailbox store to the Mailbox Recovery Center, in the details pane, right-click the mailbox you want to match to a user (or group), and then click Find Match. You can select multiple mailboxes simultaneously. In the Mailbox Matching wizard, click Next, and then click Finish to identify and accept matches. If a mailbox matches more than one user (or if no match exists), right-click that mailbox, and then click Resolve Conflicts. Follow the instructions in the Mailbox Conflict Resolution wizard to identify a single matching user. Note
When resolving conflicts, you can only select one mailbox at a time.

To export mailbox properties
1.

2.

To associate users with the mailboxes
1.

2. 3.

To reconnect the mailboxes
1. 2. 3. After the mailboxes to be reconnected have been matched to users, select the mailboxes. Right-click the selected mailboxes, and then click Reconnect. Follow the instructions in the Mailbox Reconnect wizard to reconnect the mailboxes.

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To specify a mailbox store to remove if you are running Exchange System Manager on Windows 2000 Server
1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Tools, right-click Mailbox Recovery Center, and then click Remove Mailbox Store. In Remove mailbox store(s), click the mailbox store you want, and then click Remove. You can remove multiple mailbox stores in this manner. Click OK to remove the mailbox store.

To specify a mailbox store to remove if you are running Exchange System Manager on Windows Server 2003
1. 2. 3. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Tools, right-click Mailbox Recovery Center, and then click Remove Mailbox Store. In Remove mailbox store(s), specify the following criteria for identifying the appropriate mailbox store: • • In the Enter the object names to select box, type the name of the mailbox store you want to remove. To limit the search to a certain part of Active Directory, click Locations, select a directory container, and then click OK to return to the Remove mailbox store(s) dialog box. Note
If you are unsure about which mailbox store you need, click Advanced, specify criteria, and then click Find now to locate the mailbox store. Select the appropriate mailbox store, and then click OK to return to the Remove mailbox store(s) dialog box.

4.

Click OK to remove the mailbox store.

110 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Improved Message Tracking
Exchange 2003 enhances message-tracking capabilities in two ways: • When using Exchange System Manager, you have greater control over your message tracking log files. Exchange 2003 automatically creates a shared directory to the message tracking logs and allows you to change the location of the message tracking logs. You can now track messages after categorization (which is the phase where users are located and distribution groups are expanded into individual recipients) and during the routing process.

Enhanced Control of Message Tracking Logs in Exchange System Manager
To provide flexibility when viewing and managing message tracking logs, Exchange 2003 allows you to use Exchange System Manager to change the location of your message tracking logs. Exchange 2003, like Exchange 2000, uses the format \\<server name>\<server name>.log to automatically create a path to a shared folder for message tracking. The individual message log file names are date specific, using the format YYYYMMDD. For example, 20021022.log is the log file for October 22, 2002. Ensure that any users who you want to monitor the log files have remote access to this share. In Exchange 2003, you can use Exchange System Manager to move your message tracking logs. You no longer need to use directory modification tools to change the location of your message tracking logs on a server. Use the following procedure to change the file location of the message tracking logs on an Exchange server.

To move message tracking logs
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, right-click the server from which you want to move message tracking logs, and then click Properties.

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3.

In <Server Name> Properties, on the General tab, select the Enable Message Tracking check box (Figure 3.9).

Figure 3.9 box 4. 5.

The General tab in the <Server Name> Properties dialog

In the Log file directory box, click Change to change the log file directory. In Message Tracking Log File Directory, select the directory where you want to store message tracking logs, and then click OK (Figure 3.10).

Figure 3.10

The Message Tracking Log File Directory dialog box

Enhanced Message Tracking Capabilities
In Exchange 2003, you can now track a message beyond the categorization phase. Categorization is the phase during which the recipient address is verified in Active Directory and its route is determined. You can now track the message through post-categorization and during the routing process.

112 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To track a message
1. 2. 3. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Tools, and then click Message Tracking Center. In the details pane, specify your search criteria, and then click Find Now. The following new categories are available: • • • • • • Messages categorized and queued for routing (enqueue for routing) Messages routed and queued for local delivery (enqueue for local delivery) Messages routed and queued for remote delivery (enqueue for remote delivery) Messages queued for categorization retry Messages queued for local delivery retry Messages queued for routing retry

Including Bcc Recipients in Archived Messages
When you enable archiving on a mailbox store, a copy of all messages sent or received by mailboxes on this store is sent to the mailbox you specify for archiving. In previous versions of Exchange, any recipients on the Bcc line were not archived. In Exchange Server 2003, you can enable a registry key to configure mailbox store archiving to include Bcc recipients. When you enable archiving to include the Bcc recipients, all message recipients are listed on the Bcc list (not just those on the Bcc line). Note
To view the recipients on the Bcc list, you must use the Outlook client to access the archive mailbox. You cannot use Outlook Web Access to view the Bcc recipients.

To include Bcc recipients in archived messages, perform the following steps. 1. 2. Enable archiving on the mailbox store. Set the registry key on each server for which you want archiving to include Bcc recipients.

Chapter 3: Administration Features 113

3.

On each server that you set the registry key, restart the following services: • • • IIS Admin Service (IISADMIN) Microsoft Exchange MTA Stacks service (MSExchangeMTA) Microsoft Exchange Information Store service (MSExchangeIS)

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections.

Step 1: Enabling Archiving on a Mailbox Store
To enable archiving on a mailbox store
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand <Storage Group Name>, right-click the mailbox store mailbox store for which you want to enable archiving, and then click Properties. In <Mailbox Store Name> Properties, on the General tab, select the Archive all messages sent or received by mailboxes on this store check box, and then click Browse to specify the mailbox store you want.

3.

Step 2: Setting the Registry Key
To configure mailbox archiving to include Bcc recipients, you must change the value of the following registry key to 1: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeTransport\Parameters\JournalBCC. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To enable Bcc recipient archiving on a mailbox store
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). Navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeTransport\

114 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

If necessary, create a registry key named Parameters: In the console tree, right-click MSExchangeTransport, point to New, and then click Key. Type Parameters for the key name. Right-click Parameters, point to New, then click DWORD Value. In the details pane, type JournalBCC. Right-click JournalBCC, and then click Modify. In Edit DWORD Value, under Value Data, type 1, and then click OK.

Step 3: Restarting Services
For the registry key settings to take affect, you must restart the following services: IIS Admin Service (IISADMIN), Microsoft Exchange MTA Stacks service (MSExchangeMTA), and Microsoft Exchange Information Store service (MSExchangeIS).

To restart the necessary services
1. 2. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Services. In Services, in the details pane, right-click each of the following services, and then click Restart: • • • IIS Admin Service Microsoft Exchange Information Store Microsoft Exchange MTA Stacks

The archive mailbox now displays the Bcc recipients of any messages sent to or received from this mailbox store. All recipients, including recipients on the To and Cc lines, are displayed in the Bcc line of messages in the archive mailbox. Note
Remember to use an Outlook client to access this mailbox and view the Bcc recipients. You cannot use Outlook Web Access to view the Bcc recipients.

C H A P T E R

Performance and Scalability Features

4

To enhance the performance and scalability of your Exchange organization, Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 provides the following new or improved features: • • • • • • • • • • • Improved distribution list caching Suppression of Out of Office messages to distribution list members Enhanced DNS-based Internet mail delivery Improved Microsoft Office Outlook® synchronization performance Improved Outlook Web Access performance Monitoring Outlook client performance Link state improvements Virtual Address Space improvements Changing the MTA file directory location using Exchange System Manager Changing the SMTP mailroot directory location using Exchange System Manager Tuning Exchange Server 2003

This chapter discusses each of these topics in detail. For information about improvements to reliability, a closely related topic, see Chapter 5, "Reliability and Clustering Features."

Improved Distribution List Membership Caching
Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003 use a rules cache to look up distribution list memberships prior to sending messages. In Exchange 2003, the rules cache has been optimized. As a result, the processing time that is required to look up the membership of a distribution list

116 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

has been reduced. This new functionality improves performance by redesigning the cache so that lookups, insertions, and expirations can be completed more efficiently, thereby resulting in a sixty percent reduction of distribution list-related Microsoft Active Directory® directory service queries. The net benefit of the redesigned cache is a small reduction in Active Directory usage (distribution list lookups are only a small percentage of overall Active Directory lookups).

Suppressing Out of Office Messages to Distribution List Members
In previous versions of Exchange, if you create an Out of Office message, that message is sent to all members of any distribution lists that appear on the To or Cc lines. In Exchange 2003, the Out of Office message is not sent to the entire membership of a distribution list appearing on the To or Cc lines. Instead, Out of Office messages are sent only to individual user names that have been specified on the To or Cc lines of incoming messages. This change was implemented after determining that users who send e-mail messages to distribution lists frequently do not want to receive Out of Office messages from distribution list members. This change provides a minor performance benefit to Exchange servers; specifically, CPU usage is minimally reduced.

Enhanced DNS-Based Internet Mail Delivery
Domain Name System (DNS)-based Internet mail delivery has been enhanced for Exchange 2003. Specifically, load balancing of DNS-based Internet mail is now more efficient. In addition, Exchange 2003 provides improved tolerance to network and host unavailability, as well as to unresponsive external DNS servers. This change provides a performance benefits to Exchange servers; specifically, DNS-based Internet mail is delivered more reliably.

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Improved Outlook Synchronization Performance
Exchange 2003 improves the end-user experience for Outlook 2003 users. For detailed information about how Exchange 2003 improves performance for Outlook 2003, see "Outlook Improvements" in Chapter 2. The following are improvements to Exchange Server 2003 and Outlook 2003 communication: • • • • • • The number of change notifications is reduced. Exchange 2003 detects the native format of messages (for example, HTTP) to be synchronized and only sends messages in that format to the client. Improvements to the conditions in which Outlook clients request synchronizations that include nested folder hierarchies. Users now receive a message indicating the number and size of messages to be downloaded. Exchange 2003 performs data compression to reduce the amount of information sent between the Outlook 2003 client and the Exchange 2003 servers. Exchange 2003 reduces the total number of requests for information sent between the user with Outlook 2003 and the Exchange server.

Exchange 2003 improves the Outlook synchronization performance for users working in Cached Exchange Mode. For more information about using Outlook in Cached Exchange Mode and other Outlook improvements, see "Outlook Improvements" in Chapter 2. The following is a list of enhancements that relate to Outlook clients running in Cached Exchange Mode: • • • • • • The number of change notifications is reduced. Exchange 2003 detects the native format of messages (for example, HTTP) to be synchronized and only sends messages in that format to the client. Improvements to the conditions in which Outlook clients request synchronizations that include nested folder hierarchies. Users now receive a message indicating the number and size of messages to be downloaded. Users can select which messages they want to download. Exchange 2003 performs data compression to reduce the amount of information sent between the Outlook 2003 client and the Exchange 2003 servers. Exchange 2003 reduces the total requests for information between the client and server, whether or not an Outlook 2003 client is working in cached mode, thereby optimizing client and server communication.

118 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

These changes provide a reduction in CPU usage on the Exchange server. Specifically, the server uses less processing power as a result of fewer and less intensive client requests from Outlook clients.

Improved Outlook Web Access Performance
Exchange Server 2003 improves the end user experience for Outlook Web Access users by reducing the total amount of information sent between the computer running Outlook Web Access and the Exchange server. For more information about Outlook Web Access performance improvements, see "Outlook Web Access Compression" in Chapter 2. Outlook Web Access client performance is improved in Exchange 2003 . For example, Outlook Web Access users will notice that their Inboxes load more quickly. They will also notice that tasks will be more responsive, especially over slow connections. A primary reason for this is because Exchange 2003 provides a reduction in the amount of bytes that must travel from the server to the browser. For more information about new Outlook Web Access performance and functionality, see "Outlook Web Access Improvements" in Chapter 2.

Monitoring Outlook Client Performance
Previous versions of Exchange could not monitor the end-user performance experience for Outlook users. However, with Exchange 2003 and Outlook 2003, administrators can analyze performance for their users. Exchange 2003 servers record both RPC latency and errors on client computers running Outlook 2003. An administrator can use this information to determine the overall experience quality for their users, as well as to monitor the Exchange server for errors. Outlook clients send RPC data (for example, latency data or error code) to the Exchange 2003 server on a subsequent successful RPC calls. Note
RPC data sent from the client computers to the Exchange server are not the primary method for detecting individual real time errors.

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Table 4.1 lists the RPC-related operations that you can monitor using Microsoft Operations Manager. For information about using Microsoft Operations Manager, see http://www.microsoft.com/mom and http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/mom. Table 4.1 Client-side performance monitors using Microsoft Operations Manager Counter Client: RPCs attempted Description The total number of RPC requests attempted by the users (since the Exchange store was started). The total number of successful RPC requests sent by the Outlook client (since the Exchange store was started). The total number of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started). The number of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started) due to the "Server Unavailable" RPC error. The number of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started) due to the "Server Too Busy" RPC error. The number of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started) due to all other RPC errors. The rate of RPC requests attempted by the user.

Client: RPCs succeeded

Client: RPCs failed

Client: RPCs failed: Server unavailable Client: RPCs failed: Server too busy Client: RPCs failed: all other errors Client: RPCs attempted / sec Client: RPCs succeeded / sec Client: RPCs failed / sec Client: RPCs failed / sec: Server unavailable Client: RPCs failed / sec: Server too busy

The rate of successful RPC requests.

The rate of failed RPC requests. The rate of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started) due to the "Server Unavailable" RPC error. The rate of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started) due to the "Server Too Busy" RPC error.

Client: RPCs failed / sec: all The rate of failed RPC requests (since the Exchange store was other errors started) due to all other RPC errors.

120 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Counter Client: Total reported latency Client: Latency > 2 sec RPCs / sec Client: Latency > 5 sec RPCs / sec Client: Latency > 10 sec RPCs / sec

Description The total latency (in seconds) for all RPC requests (since the Exchange store was started). The rate of successful RPC requests with latencies > 2 seconds.

The rate of successful RPC requests with latencies > 5 seconds.

The rate of successful RPC requests with latencies > 10 seconds.

Link State Improvements
Exchange 2003 reduces the amount of link state traffic by suppressing link state information when no alternate path exists or a connection is oscillating. (An oscillating connection is a connection that fluctuates between available and unavailable). In both cases, the link state remains available, and therefore reduces the amount of link state traffic that is propagated. For more information about link state improvements, see "Link State Improvements" in Chapter 6.

Virtual Address Space Improvements
With Exchange 2000, administrators may have experienced issues regarding virtual address space management. To address these issues, Exchange 2003 presents the following improvements: • • • Multiple improvements to remove many small memory allocations made by Exchange components. Multiple improvements to ensure that memory allocations are efficient. For example, requesting a 32 KB buffer instead of 17 KB buffer and not wasting the remaining memory. At start-up, Epoxy now allocates a large 190 MB contiguous portion of memory, instead of allocating a smaller portion and then gradually requesting more memory. You can use DSAccess settings to change this Expoxy memory allocation. The Store.exe process thread stack size is reduced from 512 KB to 256 KB.

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Depending on a server's configuration, the Store.exe process now allocates a suitable Extensible Storage Engine (ESE) cache buffer size, instead of using a hard-coded value. For a server that has the /3GB option set, a cache size of 896 MB is set (for example, 28 pieces of 32 MB). If the /3GB option is not set, the cache size is set to 576 MB (for example, 18 pieces of 32 MB). For information about setting the /3GB option, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 266096, "XGEN: Exchange 2000 Requires /3GB Switch With More Than 1 Gigabyte of Physical RAM" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=266096). If available virtual memory reaches 32 MB, Exchange 2003 sends a one-time request to the ESE buffer cache to increase by 64 MB (default). This 64 MB portion becomes available for message processing and provides the administrator with more time before it is necessary to start the Store.exe process. Exchange performs an optimal memory configuration check when the Exchange store process starts. If the memory settings are not optimal, event 9665 will appear in Event Viewer. This message appears in the following instances: • • • The server is running Microsoft Windows® 2000 Server and the SystemPages value in the registry is set outside the range of 24000 to 31000. The server has 1 GB of memory or more and does not have the /3GB switch. The server is running Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003, has 1 GB of memory or more, and the /3GB switch is set, but the /USERVA setting is not present or is outside the range of 3030 to 2970.

If you see this event, check the SystemPages and HeapDeCommitFreeBlockThreshold settings in the registry, as well as the /3GB switch and the USERVA setting in the boot.ini file. Note
If you want to turn off the memory configuration check, you can create the following registry key.

Path

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ CurrentControlSet\Services\ MSExchangeIS\ParametersSystem\ Suppress Memory Configuration Notification REG_DWORD 1

Parameter Type Setting

122 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Changing the MTA File Directory Location Using System Manager
By default, the Exchange MTA database and run directories are located under the folder where Exchange 2003 is installed (<drive>:\Program Files\Exchsrvr\ MTADATA). On some servers, especially where Exchange is functioning as a bridgehead server, you can positively impact performance by relocating the MTA database on a fast disk array, such as a RAID 0+1 partition. Note
When you modify the location of the queue directory, you are modifying only the MTA database path and moving only the database files (.dat files); you are not moving any of the run files or the run directory. Do not attempt to relocate the MTA run directory as this can cause performance problems.

In Exchange 2003, you can now use Exchange System Manager to change the location of the MTA database. To do this, use the General tab in the X.400 Properties dialog box. For more information about how to change the location of the MTA database, see "Moving the X.400 (MTA) and SMTP Queue Directory Locations" in Chapter 6.

Changing the SMTP Mailroot Directory Location Using System Manager
In Exchange 2003, when messages arrive through SMTP, the data is written to a disk in the form of a Microsoft Windows NT® File System (NTFS) file (specifically, an .eml file). By default, these files are written to a directory (<drive>:\Program Files\Exchsrvr\Mailroot) on the same disk partition where the Exchange 2003 binary files are installed. In some scenarios, such as configuring a bridgehead or relay server, relocating the SMTP Mailroot directory to a faster disk partition may positively impact performance. In Exchange 2003, you can now use Exchange System Manager to move the Mailroot directory. To do this, use the Messages tab in the SMTP Virtual Server Properties dialog box. For more information about how to move the Mailroot directory, see "Moving the X.400 (MTA) and SMTP Queue Directory Locations" in Chapter 6.

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Tuning Exchange 2003
Upon installation, Exchange 2003 performs very well and does not require much tuning. However, in situations where you are coexisting with previous versions of Exchange or implementing large scale-up Exchange 2003 servers, some manual tuning may be required. Although this section does not provide a complete list of tuning recommendations, it does recommend tuning changes when upgrading an Exchange 2000 server to Exchange 2003.

Removing Exchange 2000 Tuning Parameters
Many Exchange 2000 tuning parameters [for example, those parameters listed in the technical article Microsoft Exchange 2000 Internals: Quick Tuning Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=1712)], are no longer applicable in Exchange 2003; in fact, some of these parameters cause problems. If you previously tuned your Exchange 2000 servers by adding any of the settings listed in this section, you must manually remove them on your servers running Exchange 2003. The tools you use to remove those settings are Registry Editor, Internet Information Services Manager, and ADSI Edit. For information about how to use Registry Editor, Internet Information Services Manager, and ADSI Edit, see Windows Server Help. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

Initial Memory Percentage
The Initial Memory Percentage registry key no longer works with Exchange 2003. Therefore, use Registry Editor to delete the following registry parameter when Exchange 2003 is installed. Location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeIS\ParametersSystem

Parameter: Initial Memory Percentage (REG_DWORD)

124 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Extensible Storage System Heaps
The optimum number of heaps is now automatically calculated with Exchange 2003. Therefore, use Registry Editor to delete the following registry parameter when Exchange 2003 is installed. Location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ Microsoft\ESE98\Global\OS\Memory

Parameter: MPHeap parallelism (REG_SZ)

DSAccess MaxMemoryConfig Key
If you previously tuned DSAccess performance by adding a MaxMemoryConfig key, that key is no longer recommended. Therefore, you should use Registry Editor to remove the following registry parameter when Exchange 2003 is installed. Location: Parameter: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeDSAccess\Instance0 MaxMemoryConfig (REG_DWORD)

DSAccess Memory Cache Tuning
If you previously tuned the user cache in DSAccess, you can now remove your manual tuning. Exchange 2000 had a default user cache of 25 MB, whereas Exchange 2003 defaults to 140 MB. Therefore, you should use Registry Editor to remove the following registry parameter when Exchange 2003 is installed. Location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\MSExchangeDSAccess\Instance0

Parameter: MaxMemoryUser (REG_DWORD)

Chapter 4: Performance and Scalability Features 125

Cluster Performance Tuning
If you previously added the following registry parameters, use Registry Editor to remove them when Exchange 2003 is installed. Location HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\SMTPSVC\Queuing

Parameter: MaxPercentPoolThreads (REG_DWORD) Location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\SMTPSVC\Queuing

Parameter: AdditionalPoolThreadsPerProc (REG_DWORD)

Outlook Web Access Content Expiration
You should not disable content expiry for the \Exchweb virtual directory. The default expiration setting of 1 day should be used in all scenarios. You can view and modify this setting in Internet Information Services Manager.

Log Buffers
If you previously tuned the msExchESEParamLogBuffers parameter manually [for example, to 9000 (an Exchange 2000 SP2 recommendation), or 500 (an Exchange 2000 SP3 recommendation)], clear the manual tuning. Exchange 2003 uses a default value of 500. Previously, Exchange 2000 used a default value of 84. To return this setting to the default setting of <Not Set>, open the following parameter in ADSI Edit, and then click Clear. Location: CN=Configuration/CN=Services/CN=Microsoft Exchange/CN=<Exchange Organization Name>/CN=Administrative Groups/CN=<Administrative Group Name>/CN=Servers/CN=<Server Name>/CN=Information Store>/CN=<Storage Group Name>

Parameter: msExchESEParamLogBuffers

126 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Max Open Tables
If you tuned the msExchESEParamMaxOpenTables parameter manually, you should clear the manual tuning. When the value of the parameter is cleared, Exchange 2003 automatically calculates the correct value for you; for example, on an eight-processor server, a value of 27600 is used. To return this setting to the default setting of <Not Set>, open the following parameter in ADSI Edit, and then click Clear. Location: CN=Configuration/CN=Services/CN=Microsoft Exchange/CN=<Exchange Organization Name>/CN=Administrative Groups/CN=<Administrative Group Name>/CN=Servers/CN=<Server Name>/CN=Information Store>/CN=<Storage Group Name>

Parameter: msExchESEParamMaxOpenTables

C H A P T E R

Reliability and Clustering Features

5

This chapter provides information about some of the significant updates related to Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 reliability and clustering. For complete information about how to ensure your Exchange 2003 environment is reliable with or without implementing Exchange clustering, see "Planning for Reliability" in the book Planning an Exchange Server 2003 Messaging System (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

Reliability Features
To increase the reliability of your Exchange organization, Exchange 2003 offers the following new or improved features: Virtual memory management The virtual memory improvements to Exchange 2003 reduce memory fragmentation and increase server availability. Mailbox Recovery Center The new Mailbox Recovery Center makes it easy to perform simultaneous recovery or export operations on multiple disconnected mailboxes. Recovery Storage Group The new Recovery Storage Group is a specialized storage group that can exist alongside the regular storage groups in Exchange. Essentially, the Recovery Storage Group provides flexibility in restoring mailboxes and mailbox databases. Error reporting The error-reporting component is improved in Exchange 2003. Exchange error reporting allows you to send information about any failures that may occur to Microsoft. Microsoft then uses that information to determine and prioritize potential updates to future product versions. This section discusses each of these features in detail.

128 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Improved Virtual Memory Management
In Exchange 2003, the virtual memory management process is improved. Specifically, Exchange is much more efficient in the way it reuses blocks of virtual memory. These design improvements reduce fragmentation and increase availability for higher-end servers that have a large number of users. Virtual memory management for clustered Exchange servers is also improved. In previous versions of Exchange, the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service (MSExchangeIS) continues to run on a passive node. As a result, if an Exchange Virtual Server is moved manually or failed back automatically to a node that failed, MSExchangeIS service runs on the server with fragmented virtual memory. In Exchange 2003, when an Exchange Virtual Server is either moved manually or failed over to another node, the MSExchangeIS service on that node is stopped. Then, when an Exchange Virtual Server is moved or failed back to that node, a new MSExchangeIS service is started and, consequently, a fresh block of virtual memory is allocated to the service. Even with these improvements to virtual memory, it is still important that you monitor virtual memory performance. Table 5.1 lists the MSExchangeIS counters used to monitor virtual memory performance. Table 5.1 Performance monitors for virtual memory Counter VM Largest Block Size Description Displays the size (in bytes) of the largest free block of virtual memory. This counter is a line that slopes downward as virtual memory is consumed. When this counter drops below 32 MB, Exchange 2000 logs a warning in the event log (Event ID=9582) and logs an error if it drops below 16 MB. It is important to monitor this counter to ensure that it stays above 32 MB. Displays the total number of free virtual memory blocks that are greater than or equal to 16 MB. This line forms a pyramid as you monitor it. It starts with one block of virtual memory greater than 16 MB and progresses to smaller blocks greater than 16 MB. Monitoring the trend on this counter should allow a system administrator to predict when the number of 16 MB blocks is likely to drop below 3, at which point restarting all the services on the node is recommended. Displays the total number of free virtual memory blocks, regardless of size. This line forms a pyramid as you monitor it. This counter can be used to measure the degree to which available virtual memory is being fragmented. The average block size is the Process\Virtual Bytes\STORE instance divided by MSExchangeIS\VM Total Free Blocks.

VM Total 16MB Free Blocks

VM Total Free Blocks

Chapter 5: Reliability and Clustering Features 129

Counter

Description

VM Total Displays the sum (in bytes) of all the free virtual memory blocks that are greater Large Free than or equal to 16 MB. This line slopes downward as memory is consumed. Block Bytes When you monitor these counters, pay close attention that VM Total Large Free Block Bytes always exceeds 32 MB. For non-clustered servers, if VM Total Large Free Block Bytes drops below 32 MB, restart the services on that server. For clustered servers, if a node in the cluster drops below 32 MB, fail over the Exchange Virtual Servers, restart all of the services on the node, and then fail back the Exchange Virtual Servers. If the virtual memory for your Exchange 2003 server becomes excessively fragmented, the MSExchangeIS service logs the following events (Examples 1 and 2). Example 1 Warning that is logged if the largest free block is smaller than 32 MB.
EventID=9582 Severity=Warning Facility=Perfmon Language=English The virtual memory necessary to run your Exchange server is fragmented in such  a way that performance may be affected. It is highly recommended that you  restart all Exchange services to correct this issue.

Example 2 Error that is logged if the largest free block is smaller than 16 MB.
EventID=9582 Severity=Error Facility=Perfmon Language=English The virtual memory necessary to run your Exchange server is fragmented in such  a way that normal operation may begin to fail. It is highly recommended that  you restart all Exchange services to correct this issue.

For more information about System Monitor and Event Viewer, see the Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 online documentation.

Mailbox Recovery Center
Using the new Mailbox Recovery Center, you can perform simultaneous recovery or export operations on multiple disconnected mailboxes. This is a significant improvement over Exchange 2000, where such operations had to be performed individually on each disconnected mailbox. With this new feature, you can quickly restore Exchange mailboxes, and thereby reduce

130 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

downtime. For more information about how to use Mailbox Recovery Center, see "Mailbox Recovery Center" in Chapter 3.

Recovery Storage Group
With the addition of the Recovery Storage Group, Exchange 2003 provides added flexibility in restoring mailboxes and storage groups. With this new feature, you can quickly restore Exchange data, and thereby reduce downtime. For more information about using the Recovery Storage Group feature, see "Recovery Storage Groups" in Chapter 7.

Improved Error Reporting
Although error reporting was included in Exchange 2000 SP2 and SP3, its implementation is improved in Exchange 2003. Error reporting allows server administrators to easily report errors to Microsoft. Microsoft collects the error reports, and then uses the information to improve product functionality. By default, when fatal application errors occur in Exchange System Manager or an Exchange-related operation of Active Directory Users and Computers, a warning message notifies administrators of the error. Specifically, the message states that the application must close and provides an option to send an error report to Microsoft (Figure 5.1).

Figure 5.1 Warning message that displays after a fatal Exchange System Manager error occurs Similarly, when fatal service-related errors occur that relate to Exchange, a dialog box appears that provides and option to send a report to Microsoft (Figure 5.2).

Chapter 5: Reliability and Clustering Features 131

Figure 5.2 The Microsoft Event Reporting dialog box that displays after service-related errors occur Note
By default, a service-related fatal error does not immediately initiate an error reporting prompt. Instead, the prompt for service-related errors appears the next time you log on to the server.

The error report is sent to Microsoft over a secure HTTPS connection, and usually consists of a 10 to 50 KB compressed file. The error report is known as a minidump file. For detailed technical information about how the information in a minidump file is gathered and sent, see the technical article Using Dr. Watson (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=15183). For general information about error reporting, see the technical article Find Solutions to Office XP Errors with Microsoft Error Reports (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=15186). Exchange 2000 SP2 and SP3 supported the standard error reporting dialog box that provided administrators with the option to send error reports to Microsoft. Exchange 2003 supports the same error reporting functionality included in Exchange 2000 SP3, including the following new features: • Exchange service-related errors (that occur close to each other in time), are queued and then presented to the administrator in a single list. Note
For information about how you can configure Exchange to automatically send service-related errors to Microsoft without requiring the administrator to use the error reporting dialog box, see "Configuring Exchange to Automatically Send Service-Related Error Reports" later in this section.

132 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Corporate Error Reporting (CER) is now supported. CER is a tool designed for administrators to manage error reports created by the Microsoft Windows® Error Reporting client, as well as error-reporting clients shipped with applications. For information about installing and using CER, see the Corporate Error Reporting page of the Windows Online Crash Analysis Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=15195). Additional support for Exchange Setup errors (including queuing the errors so they are all presented to the administrator in a single list after Setup completes). Improved support for errors relating to the Recipient Update Service. In Exchange 2003, critical errors relating to the Recipient Update Service (for example, access violations that occur when Recipient Update Service attempts to update a recipient object) now immediately generate a Microsoft Error Reporting error message that allows you to send information about the error to Microsoft. This is important, because RUS-related errors leave the System Attendant in an unstable state. These Recipient Update Service-related error reports are a significant improvement over Exchange 2000. In Exchange 2000, any Recipient Update Service-related errors resulted in an event being written to the Event Log. As a result, administrators were not immediately notified of the errors.

• •

Configuring Exchange to Automatically Send Service-Related Error Reports
If you do not want to view the standard error reporting dialog box, you can configure Exchange to automatically send service-related error reports to Microsoft. This configuration is useful if you do not want to be interrupted when logging on after an error has occurred (for example, if you already check the Event Log at a specific time each day).

To enable automatic service-related error reporting
1. 2. Start System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then point to System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, right-click the server on which you want to enable automatic error reporting, and then click Properties.

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3.

In <Server Name> Properties>, On the General tab, select the Automatically send fatal service errors information to Microsoft check box (Figure 5.3).

Figure 5.3 The Automatically send fatal service errors information to Microsoft check box 4. In the confirmation dialog box that appears, click Yes (Figure 5.4).

Figure 5.4 Dialog box confirming that you want to automatically send service-related fatal error information to Microsoft.

Clustering Features
This section provides information about some of the significant updates related to Exchange 2003 clustering. For complete information about Exchange 2003 clustering, see the

134 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

following references available in the Exchange Server 2003 Technical Documentation Library (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library): • • • For planning information, read the section "Using Server Clusters" in the book Planning an Exchange Server 2003 Messaging System. For deployment information, see "Deploying Exchange 2003 in a Cluster" in the book Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Guide. For administration information, see "Managing Exchange Server Clusters" in the book Exchange Server 2003 Administration Guide.

Exchange 2003 provides the following new or improved clustering features: Support for up-to eight nodes Exchange has added support for up to 8-node active/passive clusters when using Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition or Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition. Support for volume mount points Exchange has added support for the use of volume mount points when using Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition or Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition. Improved failover performance Exchange has improved clustering performance by reducing the amount of time it takes a server to failover to a new node Improved security Exchange cluster servers are now more secure. For example, the Exchange 2003 permissions model has changed. Improved prerequisite checking Exchange performs more prerequisite checks to help ensure your cluster servers are deployed and configured properly. This section discusses each of these features in detail.

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Support For Up to Eight-Node Clusters
Exchange 2003 enhances clustering capabilities by introducing support for eight-node Exchange clusters. Eight-node clusters are supported only when running Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition or Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition. Another requirement for eight-node clusters is that at least one node must be passive. Note
All Exchange 2003 clustering recommendations are for active/passive cluster configurations. Active/active clustering will continue to be supported on two nodes.

Windows and Exchange Version Requirements
Specific versions of Windows Server and Exchange Server are required to create Exchange clusters. Table 5.2 lists these requirements. Table 5.2 Windows and Exchange version requirements Windows version Exchange version Cluster nodes available

Any server in the Windows 2000 Server or Window Server 2003 families Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition

Exchange Server 2003, Standard Edition None

Exchange Server 2003, Standard Edition None or Exchange Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Exchange Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Exchange Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Exchange Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Exchange Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Up to two

Windows 2000 Advanced Server

Windows 2000 Datacenter Server

Up to four

Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition

Up to eight

Up to eight

136 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Support for Volume Mount Points
Volume mount points are now supported on shared disks when the nodes of your cluster are running Window Server 2003 Enterprise Edition or Datacenter Edition with four or more nodes. Volume mount points are directories that point to specified disk volumes in a persistent manner (for example, you can configure C:\Data to point to a disk volume). Mount points bypass the need to associate each disk volume with a drive letter, thereby surpassing the 26 drive letter limitation. For more information about mounted drives, see the Windows Server 2003 documentation.

Improved Failover time
For clustering in Exchange 2003, the amount of time it takes to failover to another node is reduced, thereby improving overall performance. This section provides information about these improvements to failover times.

Improved Dependency Hierarchy for Exchange Services
To decrease the amount of time it takes to failover a server, Exchange 2003 provides an improved dependency hierarchy for Exchange services. Specifically, the Exchange protocol services, which were previously dependent on the Microsoft Exchange Information Store service, are now dependent on the Microsoft Exchange System Attendant service (Figures 5.5 and 5.6).

Figure 5.5 Hierarchy of Exchange dependencies in Exchange 2000

Chapter 5: Reliability and Clustering Features 137

Figure 5.6 Hierarchy of Exchange dependencies in Exchange 2003 Note
In Exchange 2003, the IMAP4 and POP3 resources are not created automatically when you create a new Exchange Virtual Server.

If a failover occurs, this improved hierarchy allows the Exchange mailbox stores, public folder stores, and Exchange protocol services to start simultaneously. As a result, all Exchange resources (except the System Attendant service) can now start and stop simultaneously, thereby improving failover time. Additionally, if the Exchange store stops, it is no longer dependent on other services to restart. Another benefit is the reduction of downtime resulting from an Exchange Virtual Server failover. This reduction can save several minutes, which is significant when you consider that the average failover time for an Exchange Virtual Server running on Windows 2000 was only three to eight minutes (depending on the number of users hosted by the Exchange Virtual Server).

Improved Detection of Available Nodes
When running Exchange 2003 on Windows Server 2003, the speed at which Exchange detects an available node and then fails over to that node is reduced. Therefore, for both planned and unplanned failovers, downtime is reduced.

Security Improvements
Exchange 2003 clustering includes the following security features: • • Permission improvements Kerberos enabled by default

138 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

• •

IPSec support for front-end and back-end servers IMAP4 and POP3 services no longer included when creating Exchange Virtual Servers

This section discusses each of these features in detail.

Clustering Permission Model Changes
The permissions needed to create, delete, or modify an Exchange Virtual Server are modified in Exchange 2003. The best way to understand these modifications is to compare the Exchange 2000 permissions model with the new Exchange 2003 permissions model.

Exchange 2000 Permissions Model
For an Exchange 2000 cluster administrator to create, delete, or modify an Exchange Virtual Server, the cluster administrator and the Cluster Service account require the following permissions: • If the Exchange Virtual Server is the first Exchange Virtual Server in the Exchange organization, the cluster administrator's account and the Cluster Service account must each be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the organization level. If the Exchange Virtual Server is not the first Exchange Virtual Server in the organization, the cluster administrator's account and the Cluster Service account must each be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the administrative group level.

Exchange 2003 Permissions Model
In Exchange 2003, the permissions model has changed. The Windows Cluster Service account no longer requires that the Exchange Full Administrator role be applied to it, neither at the Exchange organization level nor at the administrative group level. The Windows Cluster Service account requires no Exchange-specific permissions. Its default permissions in the forest are sufficient for it to function in Exchange 2003. Only the logon permissions of the cluster administrator are required to create, modify, and delete Exchange Virtual Servers. As with Exchange 2000, the cluster administrator requires the following permissions: • If the Exchange virtual server is the first Exchange Virtual Server in the organization, the cluster administrator must be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the organization level. If the Exchange virtual server is not the first Exchange Virtual Server in the organization, you must use an account that is a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the administrative group level.

However, depending on the mode in which your Exchange organization is running (native mode or mixed mode), and depending on your topology configuration, your cluster administrators must have the following additional permissions:

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When your Exchange organization is in native mode, if the Exchange virtual server is in a routing group that spans multiple administrative groups, then the cluster administrator must be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at all the administrative group levels that the routing group spans. For example, if the Exchange Virtual Server is in a routing group that spans the First Administrative Group and Second Administrative Group, the cluster administrator must use an account that is a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at First Administrative Group and must also be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at Second Administrative Group. Note
Routing groups in Exchange native-mode organizations can span multiple administrative groups. Routing groups in Exchange mixed-mode organizations cannot span multiple administrative groups.

In topologies such as parent/child domains where the cluster server is the first Exchange server in the child domain, the cluster administrator must be a member of a group that has the Exchange Administrator role or greater applied at the organization level to be able specify the server responsible for Recipient Update Service in the child domain.

Kerberos Enabled By Default on Exchange Virtual Servers
The Kerberos authentication protocol is a security protocol that verifies data to help ensure that both user and network services are safe. In Exchange 2000, the default authentication for Exchange Virtual Servers was the NTLM protocol. This is because the Windows Cluster service did not support Kerberos enablement of a cluster group until Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (SP3). In Exchange 2003, the Kerberos authentication protocol is enabled by default when you create an Exchange Virtual Server on a server running Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 SP3.

IPSec Support for Front-End and Back-End Cluster Configurations
You can use Internet Protocol security (IPSec) if a secure channel is required between front-end and back-end cluster servers. This configuration is fully supported when both the front-end servers and back-end servers are running Exchange 2003 on Windows Server 2003.

IMAP4 and POP3 Resources Not Added By Default
Because IMAP4 and POP3 protocols are not needed on all Exchange servers, the IMAP4 and POP3 protocol resources are no longer created when you create an Exchange Virtual Server.

140 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Checking Clustering Prerequisites
Exchange 2003 performs more prerequisite checks on clusters than previous versions of Exchange. For example, Exchange performs more preinstallation checks on the nodes of your cluster to help ensure that Exchange is installed on your cluster nodes correctly. Similarly, Exchange 2003 performs more checks on your cluster when creating and removing Exchange Virtual Servers to help ensure that your Exchange Virtual Servers are configured correctly.

Exchange 2003 Cluster Requirements
There are important requirements you must consider when planning your upgrade or installing Exchange 2003 on a Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 cluster. These requirements include: • • • System-wide requirements that define how you should configure Domain Name System (DNS). Server-specific requirements that define which Windows operating systems are supported with specific types of cluster deployments. Network configuration requirements that help ensure proper communication between the nodes of your cluster.

For complete information about these requirements, see "Cluster Requirements" in the book Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

Exchange Server 2003 Setup Requirements
There are a number of requirements that must be met before upgrading or installing Exchange 2003 on Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003. Many of these requirements are the same as the ones you must follow to install Exchange 2003 on a stand-alone (nonclustered) server. For example, you must ensure that Internet Information Services and other Windows services are running before you run Exchange Server 2003 Setup on the nodes of your cluster. Similarly, you must ensure that Active Directory® is prepared for Exchange 2003. There are also additional requirements to consider when running Exchange Server 2003 Setup on the nodes of your cluster. For example, you must first install Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC) on the cluster.

Chapter 5: Reliability and Clustering Features 141

For the requirements and procedures for installing Exchange 2003 in a cluster, see "Deploying a New Exchange 2003 Cluster" or "Upgrading an Exchange 2000 Cluster to Exchange 2003" in the book Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

Upgrading an Exchange 2000 Cluster and Exchange Virtual Server to Exchange 2003
To upgrade a cluster from Exchange 2000 to Exchange 2003, you must first run Exchange Server 2003 Setup to upgrade the nodes of your cluster, and then use Cluster Administrator to upgrade the Exchange Virtual Servers. It is recommended that you upgrade one Exchange cluster node at a time. When you upgrade each node, it is recommended that you move the Exchange Virtual Server from the node you are upgrading to another node. This procedure enables users to access their email messages through the relocated Exchange Virtual Server during the Exchange 2003 upgrade process. The Table 5.3 and Table 5.4 explain the requirements for upgrading Exchange 2000 cluster nodes and Exchange Virtual Servers to Exchange 2003. Note
For information about how to upgrade your Exchange 2000 cluster to Exchange 2003, see "Upgrading an Exchange 2000 Cluster to Exchange 2003" in the book Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://ww.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

Table 5.3 Requirements for upgrading a cluster node Area Permissions Cluster resources Requirements • • Account must be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the administrative group level. No cluster resources can be running on the node you are upgrading because Exchange Setup will need to recycle the Cluster service. Onenode clusters are exempt. The MSDTC resource must be running on one of the nodes in the cluster.

142 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Area Other

Requirements • Only servers running Exchange 2000 SP3 or later can be upgraded to Exchange 2003. If your servers are running previous versions of Exchange, you must first upgrade to Exchange 2000 SP3 or later. You must upgrade your cluster nodes one at a time. The Cluster service must be initialized and running. If there are more than two nodes, the cluster must be active/passive. If there are two nodes or fewer, active/active is allowed. Windows 2000 SP4 or Windows 2000 SP3 with hotfix 329938 is required. To obtain Windows 2000 SP4, go to the Windows 2000 Service Packs Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=18353). • To obtain the Windows 2000 SP3 hotfix, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article 329938, "Cannot Use Outlook Web Access to Access an Exchange Server Installed on a Windows 2000 Cluster Node" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=329938).

• • • If running Windows 2000 •

Table 5.4 Requirements for upgrading an Exchange Virtual Server Area Permissions Prerequisites • If the Exchange Virtual Server is the first server to be upgraded in the organization or is the first server to be upgraded in the domain, the account must be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the organization level. If the Exchange Virtual Server is not the first server to be upgraded in the organization or the first Exchange server to be upgraded in the domain, the account only needs to be a member of a group that has the Exchange Full Administrator role applied at the administrative group level. The Network Name resource must be online. The Physical Disk resources must be online. The System Attendant resource must be offline. The version of Exchange on the computer running Cluster Administrator must be the same version as the node that owns the Exchange Virtual Server. You must upgrade your Exchange Virtual Servers one at a time.

Cluster resources

• • • • •

Other

C H A P T E R

Transport and Message Flow Features

6

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 introduces several new features and functionality to improve transport and message flow. This chapter explains the following topics: Link state improvements This section explains how link state improvements reduce the amount of link state information that is replicated throughout the Exchange organization, thereby reducing performance impact. Cross-forest authentication configuration Because Exchange 2003 prevents spoofing or forging e-mail addresses, you must perform specific configuration steps to enable cross-forest authentication. This section shows you how to enable cross-forest authentication. Internet Mail Wizard Exchange 2003 provides a new version of Internet Mail Wizard to guide you through the process of configuring Internet mail delivery in your organization. This section explains how to use the wizard to set up Internet mail delivery. Delivery status notification (DSN) diagnostic logging and codes Exchange 2003 now provides diagnostic logging for delivery status notifications (DSNs) and implements some new DSN codes. This section explains how to configure DSN diagnostic logging and explains the new DSN codes available in Exchange 2003. Support for moving X.400 (MTA) and SMTP queue directories In Exchange 2003, you can use Exchange System Manager to change the location where your SMTP and X.400 queue data is stored. This section explains how to use Exchange System Manager to move your queue directory. Connection filtering Exchange 2003 supports connection filtering based on block lists. This section explains how connection filtering works, and how you can set it up on your Exchange server. Recipient filtering Exchange 2003 also supports recipient filtering so you can filter e-mail messages that are addressed to users who are not in the Microsoft Active Directory® directory service or e-mail messages that are addressed to well-defined recipients indicative of unsolicited commercial mail.

144 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

How enabled filters are applied This section explains how filters and restrictions are applied during an SMTP session. Improved ability to restrict submission to an SMTP virtual server This section explains how you can restrict submissions based on security groups in Exchange 2003. Improved ability to restrict relaying on an SMTP virtual server This section explains how you can restrict relaying based on security groups in Exchange 2003. Exchange 2003 also provides the following other features that enhance transport and mail flow: • A new type of distribution group called query-based distribution groups allow you to use an LDAP query to dynamically build membership in the distribution groups. For more information, see "Query-Based Distribution Groups" and "Improved Message Tracking" in Chapter 3. You can now set restrictions on who can send mail to a distribution list. For more information, see "Improved Ability to Restrict Submissions to Users and Distribution Lists (Restricted Distribution Lists)" in Chapter 3. You can now track messages after categorization (which is the phase where users are located and distribution groups are expanded into individual recipients) and during the routing process. You can also use Exchange System Manager to move message-tracking logs. For more information, see "Improved Message Tracking" in Chapter 3. Improvements to Queue Viewer. More queues are exposed, so you can more easily diagnose problems with mail flow. For more information, see "Enhancements to Queue Viewer" in Chapter 3. With the archiving feature available on a mailbox store, you can archive all recipients, including those on the Bcc line. For more information, see "Including Bcc Recipients in Archived Messages" in Chapter 3.

Link State Improvements
Exchange uses link state routing to determine the best method for sending messages between servers, based on the current status of messaging connectivity and cost.If no alternate path for the message exists, or if there is an oscillating connection (a connection that is intermittently available and unavailable), Exchange 2003 improves how link state information is communicated. Specifically, Exchange 2003 reduces link state traffic by attempting to determine if the connector state is oscillating or if no alternate path exists; if either of these conditions exists, Exchange suppresses the link state information.

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Improved Link State Availability
In Exchange 2003, even if no alternate path exists for a link, the link state is always marked as up (in service). Exchange no longer changes the link state to unavailable if no alternate path exists. Instead, Exchange simply queues mail for delivery and sends it when the route becomes available. This change enhances performance because it reduces the propagation of link state information.

Link State Improvements for Oscillating Connections
Another significant improvement to link state routing is how Exchange 2003 handles oscillating connections. Exchange 2003 reviews the link state queue, and if there are multiple conflicting state changes in a given interval for a connector, the connector is considered an oscillating connection, and its link state remains up (in service). It is better to leave an oscillating connector up than to continually change the link state. This reduces the amount of link state traffic that is replicated between servers.

Configuring Cross-Forest SMTP Mail Collaboration
To prevent spoofing (forging identities) Exchange 2003 requires authentication before a sender's name is resolved to its display name in the global address list (GAL). Therefore, in an organization that spans two forests, a user who sends mail from one forest to another forest is not authenticated; furthermore, the user's name is not resolved to a display name in the GAL, even if the user exists as a contact in the destination forest. To enable cross-forest mail collaboration in Exchange 2003, additional configuration steps are required to resolve contacts outside your organization to their display names in Active Directory. You have two options to enable the resolution of these contacts: • Option 1 (recommended) Use authentication so that users who send mail from one forest to another are authenticated users, and their names are resolved to their display names in the GAL. Option 2 Restrict access to the SMTP virtual server that is used for cross-forest collaboration, and then configure Exchange to resolve anonymous e-mail. This configuration is supported, but not recommended. By default, in this configuration, the Exch50 message properties, which are the extended properties of a message, are not persisted when mail is sent from one forest to another.

146 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To understand the benefits of configuring cross-forest mail collaboration, consider the following scenarios of anonymous mail submission and cross-forest authenticated mail submission. Scenario: Anonymous Mail Submission E-mail addresses are not resolved if the submission is anonymous. Therefore, when an anonymous user who attempts to spoof (forge) an internal user's identity sends mail, the return address does not resolve to its display name in the global address list (GAL). Example: Kim Akers is a legitimate internal user at Northwind Traders. Her display name in the GAL is Kim Akers, and her e-mail address is kim@northwindtraders.com. To send mail, Kim must be authenticated. Because she is authenticated, the intended recipients of Kim's mail see that the sender is Kim Akers. In addition, the properties of Kim Akers are displayed as her GAL entry. However, if Ted Bremer attempts to forge Kim's address by using kim@northwindtraders.com in the From line and then sending the mail to the Exchange 2003 server at Northwind Traders, the e-mail address is not resolved to Kim's display name because Ted did not authenticate. Therefore, when this e-mail message displays in Microsoft Office Outlook®, the sender address appears as kim@northwindtraders.com; it does not resolve to Kim Akers, as authenticated mail from Kim does. Scenario: Cross-Forest Mail Delivery Consider a company that spans two forests: the Adatum forest and the Fabrikam forest. Both these forests are single domains forests with domains of adatum.com and fabrikam.com respectively. To allow cross-forest mail collaboration, all users in the Adatum forest are represented as contacts in the Fabrikam forest's Active Directory. Likewise, all users in the Fabrikam forest are represented as contacts in Adatum forest's Active Directory. If a user in the Adatum forest sends mail to Fabrikam forest, and the mail is submitted over an anonymous connection, the sender's address is not resolved, despite the fact the sender exists as a contact in the Active Directory and in the Outlook GAL. This is because a user in the Adatum forest is not an authenticated user in Fabrikam forest. Example: Kim Akers is a mail user in the Adatum forest—her e-mail address is kim@adatum.com, and her Outlook GAL display name is Kim Akers. Adam Barr is a user in the Fabrikam forest—his email address is abarr@fabrikam. com, and his Outlook GAL display name is Adam Barr. Because Adam is represented as an Active Directory contact in the Adatum forest, Kim can view Adam's e-mail address and resolve it to the display name of Adam Barr in the Outlook GAL. When Adam receives mail from Kim, Kim's address is not resolved; instead of seeing Kim's display name as it appears in the GAL, Adam sees her unresolved e-mail address of kim@adatum.com. Because Kim sent mail as an anonymous user, her e-mail address did not resolve. Although Kim is authenticated when sending mail, the connection between the two forests is not authenticated.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 147

To ensure that senders in one forest can send mail to recipients in another forests, and to ensure that their e-mail addresses resolve to their display names in the GAL, you should enable crossforest mail collaboration. The following sections explain the two options available for configuring mail collaboration between two forests.

Enabling Cross-Forest Authentication
To enable cross-forest SMTP authentication, you must create connectors in each forest that uses an authenticated account from the other forest. By doing this, any mail that is sent between the two forests by an authenticated user resolves to the appropriate display name in the GAL. This section explains how to enable cross-forest authentication. Using the example of the Adatum forest and the Fabrikam forest (see the"Cross-Forest Mail Delivery" scenario in the previous section), perform the following steps to set up cross-forest authentication: 1. Create an account in the Fabrikam forest that has Send As permissions. (For all users in the Adatum forest, a contact exists in the Fabrikam forest as well; therefore this account allows Adatum users to send authenticated mail.) Configure these permissions on all Exchange servers that will accept incoming mail from Adatum. On an Exchange server in the Adatum forest, create a connector that requires authentication using this account to send outbound mail.

2.

Similarly, to set up cross-forest authentication from the Fabrikam forest to Adatum forest, repeat these steps, creating the account in Adatum and the connector in Fabrikam.

Step 1: Creating a User Account in the Destination Forest with Send As Permissions
Before you set up your connector in the connecting forest, you must create an account in the destination forest (the forest to which you are connecting) that has Send As permissions. Configure these permissions on all servers in the destination forest that will accept inbound connections from the connecting forest. The following procedures show you how to set up an account in the Fabrikam forest and a connector in the Adatum forest, thereby allowing users in the Adatum forest to send mail to the Fabrikam forest with resolved e-mail addresses.

To create the account used for cross-forest authentication
1. In the destination forest (in this case, the Fabrikam forest), create a user account in Active Directory Users and Computers. This account must be an active account, but it does not require the following permissions: log on locally, log on through terminal server.

148 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

2.

On each Exchange server that will accept incoming connections from the connecting forest, configure Send As permissions for this account. Note
Be careful when creating the password policy. If you set the password to expire, ensure that you have a policy in place that changes the password before its expiration date. If the password for this account expires, cross-forest authentication will fail.

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, right-click an Exchange server that will accept incoming connections from the connecting forest, and then click Properties. In <Server Name> Properties, on the Security tab, click Add. In Select Users, Computers, or Groups, add the account you just created, and then click OK. On the Security tab, under Group or user names, select the account. Under Permissions, next to Send As, select the Allow check box (Figure 6.1).

Figure 6.1

Allowing the Send As permission

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 149

Step 2: Creating a Connector in the Connecting Forest
After creating the account with the proper permissions in the destination forest, create a connector in the connecting forest and require authentication using the account you just created. In the following procedure, assume that you are creating a connector on an Exchange server in the Adatum forest that connects to the Fabrikam forest.

To configure a connector and require authentication for cross-forest authentication
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, right-click Connectors, point to New, and then click SMTP Connector. On the General tab, in the Name box, type a name for the connector. Click Forward all mail through this connector to the following smart hosts, and then type the fully qualified domain or IP address of the receiving bridgehead server. Click Add to select a local bridgehead server and SMTP virtual server to host the connector (Figure 6.2).

Figure 6.2 6.

The General tab in an SMTP virtual server's Properties

On the Address Space tab, click Add, select SMTP, and then click OK.

150 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

7.

In Internet Address Space Properties, type the domain of the forest to which you want to connect, and then click OK. In this example, because the connector is sending from the Adatum forest to the Fabrikam forest, the address space matches the domain for the forest, fabrikam.com (Figure 6.3).

Figure 6.3

The Internet Address Space Properties dialog box

Exchange will now route all mail destined to fabrikam.com (the Fabrikam forest) through this connector. 8. 9. On the Advanced tab, click Outbound Security. Click Integrated Windows Authentication (Figure 6.4).

Figure 6.4 The Integrated Windows Authentication button in the Outbound Security dialog box 10. Click Modify.

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11. In Outbound Connection Credentials, in the Account, Password, and Confirm password boxes, specify an account and password in the destination forest (in this case, Fabrikam) that has Send As permissions and is an authenticated Fabrikam account (Figure 6.5). Use the following format for the account name: domain\username, where: • • domain is a domain in the destination forest. username represents an account in the destination forest with Send As permissions on all Exchange servers in the destination forest that will accept mail from this connector.

Figure 6.5 12. Click OK.

The Outbound Connection Credentials dialog box

Enabling Cross-Forest Collaboration by Resolving Anonymous Mail
Another way you can configure Exchange to resolve contacts outside your organization to their display names in Active Directory is to configure Exchange to resolve anonymous e-mail. Assume that your company spans two forests, from the Adatum forest to the Fabrikam forest. Important
Configuring Exchange servers to resolve anonymous mail submissions allows unscrupulous users to submit messages with a falsified return address. Recipients are not be able to differentiate between authentic mail and spoofed mail. To minimize this possibility, ensure that you restrict access to the SMTP virtual server to the IP addresses of your Exchange servers.

Perform the following steps to resolve contacts for Adatum users to their display names in the Fabrikam forest: 1. 2. Create a connector in the Adatum forest that connects to the Fabrikam forest. On the receiving bridgehead server in the Fabrikam forest, restrict access to the SMTP virtual server by IP address. By doing this, you can ensure that only servers from the Adatum forest can send mail to this server. On the SMTP virtual server that hosts the connector, enable the Resolve anonymous e-mail setting.

3.

152 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

4.

Change a registry key to ensure that the extended message properties (Exch50 properties) are persisted across the forests. Otherwise, you can lose important message information.

After you complete these steps, all users who send mail from the Adatum forest to the Fabrikam forest will resolve to their display names in the Fabrikam GAL. Next, you need to repeat steps 1 through 3 for the Fabrikam forest. The following procedures show you how to: • • • Set up a connector in the Adatum forest to Fabrikam. Restrict access to the receiving bridgehead server in the Fabrikam forest Enable anonymous e-mail resolution on the SMTP virtual server on the receiving bridgehead server to resolve Adatum contacts in the Fabrikam forest.

In a production environment, you would then repeat this process to configure the resolution of Fabrikam contacts in the Adatum forest.

Step 1: Creating a Connector in the Connecting Forest
1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, right-click Connectors, point to New, and then click SMTP Connector. On the General tab, in the Name box, type a name for the connector. Click Forward all mail through this connector to the following smart hosts, and then type the fully qualified domain or IP address of the receiving bridgehead server.

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5.

Click Add to select a local bridgehead server and SMTP virtual server to host the connector (Figure 6.6).

Figure 6.6 6.

The General tab on an SMTP virtual server Properties

On the Address Space tab, click Add, select SMTP, and then click OK.

154 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

7.

In Internet Address Space Properties, type the domain of the forest to which you want to connect, and then click OK. In this example, because the connector is sending from the Adatum forest to the Fabrikam forest, the address space matches the domain for the forest, fabrikam.com (Figure 6.7).

Figure 6.7

The Internet Address Space Properties dialog box

Exchange will now route all mail destined to fabrikam.com (the Fabrikam forest) through this connector.

Step 2: Restricting IP Addresses on the Receiving Bridgehead Server
After you create the connector in the Adatum forest (the connecting forest) you must restrict access to the receiving bridgehead server. You do this by allowing only the IP address of the connecting servers in the Adatum forest to send mail to the receiving bridgehead server in the Fabrikam forest.

To restrict access by IP address on the receiving bridgehead server
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand < Bridgehead Server Name >, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server you want, and then click Properties On the Access tab, click Connection. In Connection, click All except the list below to restrict access to a specified list of IP addresses.

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6.

Click Add, and then perform one of the following steps: • Click Single Computer, and in the IP address box, type the IP address of the connecting Exchange server in the Adatum forest (the connecting forest). Repeat this step for each computer in the Adatum forest. Click Group of computers, and in the Subnet address and Subnet mask boxes, type the subnet address and subnet masks for the group of computers that host connectors to the Fabrikam forest.

Step 3: Resolving Anonymous Mail on the SMTP Virtual Server
After you have restricted access to the receiving bridgehead server, you must configure the SMTP virtual server on this bridgehead to resolve anonymous e-mail addresses.

To configure an SMTP virtual server to resolve anonymous e-mail addresses
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand < Bridgehead Server Name >, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server you want, and then click Properties. On the Access tab, click Authentication. In Authentication, ensure that the Anonymous access check box is selected, and then select the Resolve anonymous e-mail check box.

Step 4: Enabling Registry Key to Persist Message Properties Across Forests
As explained earlier, when messages are sent anonymously across forests, the extended message properties on a message are not transmitted. For single companies that implement a cross-forest scenario, these message properties must be transmitted because information about the message can be lost. For example, the SCL property, an extended Exchange property contains a spam rating that is generated by third-party solutions. This property is not transmitted when mail is sent anonymously. So if a third-party anti-spam solution is deployed in the Adatum forest, and a message received in this forest is destined to a recipient in the Fabrikam forest, the third party solution stamps the SCL property on the message; however, when the message is delivered to the Fabrikam forest, the extended property containing the spam rating is not persisted. To ensure that the extended message properties are transmitted across forests when you send mail anonymously, you must enable a registry key on the receiving bridgehead server.

156 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

To configure Exchange to accept the extended message properties, you can enable a registry key on the receiving bridgehead server or on the SMTP virtual server that resides on the bridgehead. Enabling the registry key on the Exchange server configures all SMTP virtual servers on the Exchange server to accept extended properties.

Configuring the Exchange Server to Accept Extended Message Properties on Anonymous Connections
Use the following procedure to configure the Exchange server to accept extended properties on anonymous connections. If your Exchange server functions solely as the bridgehead server for cross-forest communication, you may want to configure this setting at the server level. If you have other SMTP virtual servers on this Exchange server, consider setting this registry key on the SMTP virtual server only. Note
If you enable this registry key on an Exchange server, the setting applies to all SMTP virtual servers on the Exchange server. If you want to configure a single SMTP virtual server with this setting, enable the registry key on the SMTP virtual server.

Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To enable an Exchange server to accept message extended properties sent anonymously
1. 2. Start Registry Editor (regedit). In the console tree, navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\SMTPSVC\XEXCH50 3. 4. 5. Right-click XEXCH50, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. In the details pane, type Exch50AuthCheckEnabled for the value name. By default, the value data is 0, which indicates that the XEXCH50 properties are transmitted when mail is sent anonymously.

Configuring an SMTP Virtual Server to Accept Extended Message Properties Sent Anonymously
Use the following procedure to configure the SMTP virtual server on the Exchange server to accept extended properties

To enable an SMTP virtual server to accept message extended properties sent anonymously
1. Start Registry Editor (regedit).

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2.

In the console tree, navigate to the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\ Services\SMTPSVC\XEXCH50

3. 4.

Right-click XEXCH50, point to New, and then click Key. Type the number of the SMTP virtual server instance as the key value. For example, the default SMTP virtual server instance is 1, while the second SMTP virtual server created on a server is 2. Right-click the key you just created, point to New, and click DWORD Value. In the details pane, type Exch50AuthCheckEnabled for the value name. By default, the value data is 0, which indicates that the XEXCH50 properties are transmitted when mail is sent anonymously.

5. 6. 7.

Internet Mail Wizard
In Exchange Server version 5.5, Internet Mail Wizard guided administrators through the process of setting up Internet mail. Exchange 2003 implements a version of Internet Mail Wizard to help you configure Internet mail connectivity with Exchange 2000 Server or Exchange Server 2003. Internet Mail Wizard is intended primarily for small and medium companies with less complex environments than large enterprise companies. The wizard guides you through the process of configuring your Exchange server to send and receive Internet mail. It creates the necessary SMTP connector for outgoing Internet mail and configures your SMTP virtual server to accept incoming mail. If you already set up SMTP connectors or created additional SMTP virtual servers on your Exchange server, you cannot run Internet Mail Wizard unless you revert your server configuration to its default state. Note
Internet Mail Wizard can only configure Internet mail for Exchange 2000 or later. If you are running previous versions of Exchange, these servers can still send mail to or receive mail from the Internet, but you cannot use Internet Mail Wizard to configure them for Internet mail.

When Internet Mail Wizard runs, it creates a log file (Exchange Internet Mail Wizard.log) of all the configuration changes it makes, including whether or not these changes were successful. The wizard saves this log file to the My Documents folder of the user who runs the wizard.

158 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

The following sections explain how to use Internet Mail Wizard to: • • • • Configure an Exchange server to send Internet mail. Configure an Exchange server to receive Internet mail. Configure an Exchange server or servers to send and receive Internet mail. Configure a dual-homed Exchange server for Internet mail.

Configuring an Exchange Server to Send Internet Mail
Use the following procedure to configure Exchange to send Internet mail. When you configure an Exchange server to send Internet mail, Internet Mail Wizard configures the selected server as an outbound bridgehead server. It creates a connector on this server to send mail to the Internet addresses you specify.

To run Internet Mail Wizard and configure your server to send Internet mail
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, right-click your Exchange organization, and then click Internet Mail Wizard. The Welcome page appears (Figure 6.8).

Figure 6.8 3. Click Next.

The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page

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4.

On the Prerequisites for Internet Mail page, read the requirements, ensure that you have completed the tasks listed, and then click Next (Figure 6.9).

Figure 6.9 • • •

The Prerequisites for Internet Mail page

Your server must satisfy the following conditions: You have registered your company's SMTP domain or domains with an Internet registrar. The Exchange server that you want to configure for Internet e-mail has an Internet IP address assigned to it. DNS is correctly configured. Your DNS server must have a mail exchanger (MX) record pointing to the Internet IP address of your Exchange server and your DNS server must be able to resolve external Internet names. Note
For information about how to configure DNS, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 315982, "HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=315982).

160 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

5.

On the Server Selection page, in the Server list, select the Exchange server you want to configure to send Internet e-mail (Figure 6.10).

Figure 6.10 Note

The Server Selection page

Only servers running Exchange 2000 Server and later are available for selection. As stated earlier, you cannot run the wizard on earlier versions of Exchange.

As noted on the Server Selection page, you cannot run Internet Mail Wizard if any of the following conditions exist on your server: • • • 6. Your server is part of a Microsoft Windows® cluster. Your server is part of a Network Load Balancing cluster. Your server has multiple network interface cards configured with separate networks in which IP routing is enabled between the networks.

Click Next.

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7.

On the Wizard in Progress page, Internet Mail Wizard checks your server configuration to ensure that the server meets all necessary prerequisites. After the wizard checks these conditions, the results display under Report (Figure 6.11).

Figure 6.11 • •

The Wizard in Progress page

Select the appropriate option: If your server meets the necessary conditions, click Next. If your server does not meet the necessary conditions, review the report, and then click Back to select another server, or click Cancel to exit the wizard.

162 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

8.

On the Internet E-mail Functions page, you can specify whether you want this server to send Internet e-mail, receive Internet e-mail, or send and receive Internet e-mail. To configure your server to send Internet mail, select the Send Internet e-mail check box (Figure 6.12).

Figure 6.12 Note

The Internet E-mail Functions page

When using Internet Mail Wizard to configure your Exchange server to send outgoing Internet mail, the server cannot already be configured as a bridgehead for any SMTP connectors in the Exchange organization.

9.

Click Next.

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10. On the Outbound Bridgehead Server page, under SMTP virtual server, ensure that the Exchange server and SMTP virtual server designated as the bridgehead are displayed (Figure 6.13). By default, the Internet Mail Wizard creates an SMTP connector on this server with the address space that you specify so that all mail destined to this address space is routed through this connector.

Figure 6.13 11. Click Next.

The Outbound Bridgehead Server page

164 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

12. If the Open Relay Configuration page displays, your server is configured to allow open relay (Figure 6.14). With open relaying, external users can use your server to send unsolicited commercial mail, which may result in other legitimate servers blocking mail from your Exchange server. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is configured to allow open relay. If your SMTP virtual server does not allow open relay, this page does not display.

Figure 6.14

The Open Relay Configuration page

13. Click Disable open relay to secure your server, and then click Next. 14. On the Outbound Mail Configuration page (Figure 6.15), select one of the following options to configure how you want Exchange to send outgoing Internet mail: • • Click Use domain name system (DNS) to send mail if you want Exchange to use DNS to resolve all Internet addresses and then send mail. Click Yes if your DNS server can resolve Internet addresses.

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Click No if your DNS server cannot resolve Internet (external addresses). The wizard then guides you through the process of configuring an external DNS server that your SMTP virtual server will use to resolve external addresses.

Click Route all mail through the following smart host if you want to send mail to a smart host that assumes responsibility for DNS resolution and mail delivery. Then, in the Host name or IP address of the smart host box, type either a fully qualified domain name or an IP address for the smart host.

Figure 6.15 15. Click Next.

The Outbound Mail Configuration page

16. Select one of the following options: • • • If you configured Exchange to use a smart host to send outbound mail, proceed to Step 19. If you configured Exchange to use DNS for outbound mail and your DNS server can resolve Internet address, proceed to Step 19. If you configured Exchange to use DNS and the DNS server Exchange uses cannot resolve Internet addresses, proceed to Step 17.

166 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

17. On the External Domain Name System (DNS) page (Figure 6.16), configure your SMTP virtual server to use an external DNS server: Click Add, and then, in Enter an IP address, type the IP address of the external DNS server you want to use. Important
The external DNS server must have the ability to resolve external or Internet addresses.

Figure 6.16 18. Click Next.

The External Domain System (DNS) page

19. On the Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page (Figure 6.17), select from the following options to specify whether you want to send Internet e-mail to all external addresses or restrict delivery to a specified set of domains: • • Click Allow delivery to all e-mail domains to allow outbound Internet mail for all external domains. Click Restrict delivery to the following e-mail domains(s) to restrict outbound Internet mail to specific domains, and then click Add to enter the domain to which you want to allow mail. If you want to enter a specific domain, type the domain name, for example example.com. If you want to allow e-mail to all domains with a specific extension, for example .edu, type *.edu. Important
Do not proceed the domain name with the at sign (@).

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Figure 6.17 20. Click Next.

The Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page

21. The Configuration Summary page displays the configuration options you selected, as well as the location of the Internet mail log file where the configuration settings will be saved (Figure 6.18). Review these options carefully.

Figure 6.18

The Configuration Summary page

22. Click Next to start the configuration.

168 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

23. When the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page displays, select the View detailed report when this wizard closes check box to view the log file, and then click Finish (Figure 6.19). Note
Internet Mail Wizard writes the log file to the My Documents folder of the user running the wizard. The exact location displays on the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page.

Figure 6.19

The Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page

Configuring an Exchange Server to Receive Internet Mail
Use the following procedure to configure Exchange to receive Internet mail. After you run Internet Mail Wizard, the Exchange server will accept all Internet mail for the SMTP domains that you specify.

To run Internet Mail Wizard and configure your server receive Internet mail
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

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2.

In the console tree, right-click your Exchange organization, and click Internet Mail Wizard. The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page appears (Figure 6.20).

Figure 6.20 3. 4. Click Next.

The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page

On the Prerequisites for Internet Mail page, read the requirements, ensure that you have completed the tasks listed, and then click Next (Figure 6.21).

Figure 6.21

The Prerequisites for Internet Mail page

170 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Your server must satisfy the following conditions: • • • You have registered your company's SMTP domain or domains with an Internet registrar. The Exchange server that you want to configure for Internet e-mail has an Internet IP address assigned to it. DNS is correctly configured. Your DNS server must have a mail exchanger (MX) record pointing to the Internet IP address of your Exchange server and your DNS server must be able to resolve external Internet names. Note
For information about how to configure DNS, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 315982, "HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=315982).

5.

On the Server Selection page, under Server, select the Exchange server you want to configure to receive Internet e-mail (Figure 6.22).

Figure 6.22 Note

The Server Selection page

Only servers running Exchange 2000 Server and later are available for selection. As stated earlier, you cannot run the wizard on earlier versions of Exchange.

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As noted on the Server Selection page, you cannot run Internet Mail Wizard if any of the following conditions exist on your server: • • • 6. 7. Your server is part of a Windows cluster. Your server is part of a Network Load Balancing cluster. Your server has multiple network interface cards configured with separate networks in which IP routing is enabled between the networks.

Click Next. On the Wizard in Progress page, Internet Mail Wizard checks your server configuration to ensure that the server meets all necessary prerequisites. After the wizard checks these conditions, the results display under Report (Figure 6.23).

Figure 6.23 • •

The Wizard in Progress page

Select the appropriate option: If your server meets the necessary conditions, click Next. If your server does not meet the necessary conditions, review the report, and then click Back to select another server, or click Cancel to exit the wizard.

172 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

8.

On the Internet E-mail Functions page, you can specify whether you want this server to send Internet e-mail, receive Internet e-mail, or send and receive Internet e-mail. To configure your server to receive Internet mail, select the Receive Internet e-mail check box (Figure 6.24).

Figure 6.24 Note

The Internet Mail Functions page

To receive incoming Internet e-mail, the server must have only one SMTP virtual server with a default IP address of "All Unassigned" and an assigned TCP port of 25. The default IP address is the address on which the SMTP virtual server listens on port 25 for incoming SMTP connections. A value of "All Unassigned" means that the SMTP virtual server listens on any of the available IP addresses. If more than one SMTP virtual server exists on the Exchange server, or if the IP information or TCP port assignments are different, the wizard will not continue. However, you can restore the Exchange server to its default configuration and rerun the wizard, or you can use Exchange System Manager to configure Exchange manually.

9.

Click Next.

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10. To accept Internet mail, your SMTP virtual server must allow anonymous access. If your server is not configured to allow anonymous access, the Anonymous Access Configuration page displays (Figure 6.25). If this page displays, leave the default option, Enable anonymous access, so your server can accept incoming mail from the Internet. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is not configured to allow anonymous access. If your SMTP virtual server allows anonymous access, this page does not display.

Figure 6.25 11. Click Next.

The Anonymous Access Configuration page

12. On the SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page, under SMTP domains, all the existing domains in your Exchange organization are displayed (Figure 6.26). Ensure that all the SMTP domains for which you want to accept Internet mail are displayed. The address displayed in bold is the primary SMTP address. This address displays as the return address on your users' outgoing mail.

174 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

The SMTP domains for which you want to receive Internet mail are configured in Exchange System Manager in Recipient Policies. You must have a recipient policy configured for every SMTP domain for which you want to accept Internet mail, and Exchange must be authoritative for this domain. If you created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager, you cannot use the wizard to create additional recipient policies. In this case, if you need to add or modify recipient policies, you must use Exchange System Manager.

Figure 6.26 • •

The SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page

13. Select from the following options: If all the SMTP domains for which you want to accept incoming Internet mail are listed, click Next. If you have not modified your recipient policies and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail does not display, click Add, and then add the proper SMTP domain. Click Set as From Address if you want this address to display as your user's return address in their outgoing e-mails. If you created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail does not exist, exit the wizard, and then use Exchange System Manager create or edit a recipient policy for the SMTP domain and make it authoritative. To ensure an SMTP domain is authoritative, on your recipient policy, edit or create the SMTP address, and then click the This Exchange Organization is responsible for all mail delivery to this address check box in SMTP Address Properties.

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14. If the Open Relay Configuration page displays, your server is configured to allow open relay (Figure 6.27). With open relaying, external users can use your server to send unsolicited commercial mail, which may result in other legitimate servers blocking mail from your Exchange server. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is configured to allow open relay. If your SMTP virtual server does not allow open relay, this page does not display.

Figure 6.27

The Open Relay Configuration page

15. Click Disable open relay to secure your server, and then click Next.

176 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

16. The Configuration Summary page displays the configuration options you selected, as well as the location of the Internet mail log file where the configuration settings will be saved (Figure 6.28). Review these options carefully.

Figure 6.28

The Configuration Summary page

17. Click Next to start the configuration.

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18. When the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page displays, select the View detailed report when this wizard closes check box to view the log file, and then click Finish (Figure 6.29). Note
Internet Mail Wizard writes the log file to the My Documents folder of the user running the wizard. The exact location displays on the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page.

Figure 6.29

The Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page

Configuring an Exchange Server to Send and Receive Internet Mail
Use the following procedure to configure an Exchange server to send and receive Internet mail. After you run Internet Mail Wizard, the Exchange server will send and receive all Internet mail according to the configuration you specify.

To run the Internet Mail Wizard and configure your server to send and receive Internet mail
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

178 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

2.

In the console tree, right-click your Exchange organization, and then click Internet Mail Wizard. The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page appears (Figure 6.30).

Figure 6.30 3. 4. Click Next.

The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page

On the Prerequisites for Internet Mail page, read the requirements, ensure that you have completed the tasks listed, and then click Next (Figure 6.31).

Figure 6.31

The Prerequisites for Internet Mail page

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Your server must satisfy the following conditions: • • • You have registered your company's SMTP domain or domains with an Internet registrar. The Exchange server that you want to configure for Internet e-mail has an Internet IP address assigned to it. DNS is correctly configured. Your DNS server must have a mail exchanger (MX) record pointing to the Internet IP address of your Exchange server and your DNS server must be able to resolve external Internet names. Note
For information about how to configure DNS, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 315982 "HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=315982).

5.

On the Server Selection page, under Server, select the Exchange server that you want to configure to send and receive Internet e-mail (Figure 6.32).

Figure 6.32 Note

The Server Selection page

Only servers running Exchange 2000 Server and later are available for selection. As stated earlier, you cannot run the wizard on earlier versions of Exchange.

180 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

As noted on the Server Selection page, you cannot run Internet Mail Wizard if any of the following conditions exist on your server: • • • 6. 7. Your server is part of a Windows cluster. Your server is part of a Network Load Balancing cluster. Your server has multiple network interface cards configured with separate networks in which IP routing is enabled between the networks.

Click Next. On the Wizard in Progress page, Internet Mail Wizard checks your server configuration to ensure that the server meets all necessary prerequisites. After the wizard checks these conditions, the results display under Report (Figure 6.33).

Figure 6.33 • •

The Wizard in Progress page

Select the appropriate option: If your server meets the necessary conditions, click Next. If your server does not meet the necessary requirements, review the report, and then click Back to select another server, or click Cancel to exit the wizard.

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8.

On the Internet E-mail Functions page, you can specify whether you want the server to send Internet e-mail, receive Internet e-mail, or send and receive Internet e-mail (Figure 6.34). To configure your server to send and receive e-mail, select both the Receive Internet e-mail and Send Internet e-mail check boxes. The wizard creates an SMTP connector so you can send mail to all external address or to specified addresses.

Figure 6.34

The Internet E-mail Functions page

Important
To receive incoming Internet e-mail, the server must have only one SMTP virtual server with a default IP address of "All Unassigned" and an assigned TCP port of 25. The default IP address is the address on which the SMTP virtual server listens on port 25 for incoming SMTP connections. A value of "All Unassigned" means that the SMTP virtual server listens on any of the available IP addresses. If more than one SMTP virtual server exists on the Exchange server, or if the IP information or the TCP port assignments are different, the wizard will not continue. However, you can restore the Exchange server to its default configuration and rerun the wizard, or you can use Exchange System Manager to configure Exchange manually. To send outgoing Internet e-mail, the Exchange server cannot already be configured as a bridgehead for any SMTP connectors in the Exchange organization.

9.

Click Next.

182 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

10. To accept Internet mail, your SMTP virtual server must allow anonymous access. If your server is not configured to allow anonymous access, the Anonymous Access Configuration page displays. (Figure 6.35). If this page displays, leave the default option, Enable anonymous access, so your server can accept incoming mail from the Internet. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is not configured to allow anonymous access. If your SMTP virtual server allows anonymous access, this page does not display.

Figure 6.35 11. Click Next.

The Anonymous Access Configuration page

12. On the SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page, under SMTP domains, all the existing domains in your Exchange organization are displayed (Figure 6.36). Ensure that all the SMTP domains for which you want to accept Internet mail are displayed. The address displayed in bold is the primary SMTP address and this address displays as the return address on your users' outgoing mail. The SMTP domains for which you want to receive Internet mail are configured in Exchange System Manager in Recipient Policies. You must have a recipient policy configured for every SMTP domain for which you want to accept Internet mail and Exchange must be authoritative for this domain.

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If you have created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager, you cannot use the wizard to create additional recipient policies. In this case, if you need to add or modify your recipient policies, you must use Exchange System Manager.

Figure 6.36 • •

The SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page

13. Select from the following options: If all the SMTP domains for which you want to accept incoming Internet mail are listed, click Next. If you have not modified your recipient policies and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail is not displayed, click Add, and then add the proper SMTP domain. Click Set as From Address if you want this address to display as your user's return address in their outgoing e-mails. If you created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail does not exist, exit the wizard, and then use Exchange System Manager to create or edit a recipient policy for the SMTP domain and make it authoritative. To ensure an SMTP domain is authoritative, on your recipient policy, edit or create the SMTP address, and then click the This Exchange Organization is responsible for all mail delivery to this address check box in SMTP Address Properties.

184 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

14. On the Outbound Bridgehead Server page, ensure that the Exchange server and SMTP virtual server designated as the bridgehead are displayed (Figure 6.37). Internet Mail Wizard will create an SMTP connector on this server with the address space of *, so that all mail destined to Internet addresses is routed through this connector.

Figure 6.37 15. Click Next.

The Outbound Bridgehead Server page

16. If the Open Relay Configuration page displays, your server is configured to allow open relay (Figure 6.38). With open relaying, external users can use your server to send unsolicited commercial mail, which may result in other legitimate servers blocking mail from your Exchange server. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is configured to allow open relay. If your SMTP virtual server does not allow open relay, this page does not display.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 185

Figure 6.38

The Open Relay Configuration page

17. Click Disable open relay to secure your server, and then click Next 18. On the Outbound Mail Configuration page (Figure 6.39), select one of the following options to configure how you want Exchange to send outgoing Internet mail: • • • Click Use domain name system (DNS) to send mail if you want Exchange to use DNS to resolve all Internet addresses and then send mail. Click Yes if your DNS server can resolve Internet addresses. Click No if your DNS server cannot resolve Internet (external addresses). The wizard then guides you through the process of configuring an external DNS server that your SMTP virtual server will use to resolve external addresses.

186 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Click Route all mail through the following smart host if you want to send mail to a smart host that assumes responsibility for DNS resolution and mail delivery. Then, in the Host name or IP address of the smart host box, type either a fully qualified domain name or an IP address for the smart host.

Figure 6.39 19. Click Next.

The Outbound Mail Configuration page

20. Select one of the following options: • • • If you configured Exchange to use a smart host to send outbound mail proceed to the Step 23. If you configured Exchange to use DNS for outbound mail and your DNS server can resolve Internet address, proceed to Step 23. If you configured Exchange to use DNS, and the DNS server Exchange uses cannot resolve Internet addresses, proceed to Step 21.

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21. On the External Domain Name System (DNS) page (Figure 6.40), configure your SMTP virtual server to use an external DNS server: Click Add, and then, in Enter an IP address, type the IP address of the external DNS server you want to use. Important
The external DNS server must have the ability to resolve external or Internet addresses.

Figure 6.40 22. Click Next.

The External Domain Name System (DNS) page

23. On the Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page (Figure 6.41), select from the following options to specify whether you want to send Internet e-mail to all external addresses or restrict delivery to a specified set of domains: • Click Allow delivery to all e-mail domains to allow outbound Internet mail for all external domains.

188 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Click Restrict delivery to the following e-mail domains(s) to restrict outbound Internet mail to specific domains, and then click Add to enter the domain to which you want to allow mail. If you want to enter a specific domain, type the domain name, for example example.com. If you want to allow e-mail to all domains with a specific extension, for example .edu, type *.edu. Important
Do not proceed the domain name with the at sign (@).

Figure 6.41 24. Click Next.

The Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page

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25. The Configuration Summary page displays the configuration options you selected, as well as the location of the Internet mail log file where the configuration settings will be saved (Figure 6.42). Review these options carefully.

Figure 6.42

The Configuration Summary page

26. Click Next to start the configuration.

190 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

27. When the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page displays, select the View detailed report when this wizard closes check box to view the log file, and then click Finish (Figure 6.43). Note
Internet Mail Wizard writes the log file to the My Documents folder of the user running the wizard. The exact location displays on the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page.

Figure 6.43

The Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page

Configuring a Dual-Homed Exchange Server for Internet Mail
Use the following procedure to configure a dual-homed Exchange server with two SMTP virtual servers to send and receive Internet mail. After you run Internet Mail Wizard, the Exchange server will send and receive all Internet mail according to the configuration you specify.

To run the Internet Mail Wizard on a dual-homed server
1. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 191

2.

In the console tree, right-click your Exchange organization, and then click Internet Mail Wizard. The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page appears (Figure 6.44).

Figure 6.44 3. 4. Click Next.

The Welcome to the Internet Mail Wizard page

On the Prerequisites for Internet Mail page, read the requirements, ensure that you have performed the tasks listed, and then click Next (Figure 6.45).

Figure 6.45

The Prerequisites for Internet Mail page

192 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Your server must satisfy the following conditions: • • • You have registered your company's SMTP domain or domains with an Internet registrar. The Exchange server that you want to configure for Internet e-mail has an Internet IP address assigned to it. DNS is correctly configured. Your DNS server must have a mail exchanger (MX) record pointing to the Internet IP address of your Exchange server and your DNS server must be able to resolve external Internet names. Note
For information about how to configure DNS, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 315982, "HOW TO: Configure DNS Records for Your Web Site in Windows 2000" (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=315982).

5.

On the Server Selection page, under Server, select the Exchange server that you want to configure to send and receive Internet e-mail (Figure 6.46).

Figure 6.46 Note

The Server Selection page

Only servers running Exchange 2000 Server and later are available for selection. As stated earlier, you cannot run the wizard on earlier versions of Exchange.

As noted on the Server Selection page, you cannot run Internet Mail Wizard if any of the following conditions exist on your server: • • • Your server is part of a Windows cluster. Your server is part of a Network Load Balancing cluster. Your server has multiple network interface cards configured with separate networks in which IP routing is enabled between the networks.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 193

6. 7.

Click Next. On the Wizard in Progress page, Internet Mail Wizard checks your server configuration to ensure that the server meets all necessary prerequisites. After the wizard checks these conditions, the results display under Report (Figure 6.47).

Figure 6.47 • •

The Wizard in Progress page

Select the appropriate option: If your server meets the necessary conditions, click Next. If your server does not meet the necessary requirements, review the report, and then click Back to select another server, or click Cancel to exit the wizard.

194 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

8.

On the Internet E-mail Functions page, you can specify whether you want this server to send Internet e-mail, receive Internet e-mail, or send and receive Internet e-mail (Figure 6.48). To configure your server to send and receive e-mail, select both the Receive Internet e-mail and Send Internet e-mail check boxes. The wizard creates an SMTP connector so you can send mail to all external address or to specified addresses.

Figure 6.48

The Internet E-mail Functions page

Important
To receive incoming Internet e-mail, the server must have only one SMTP virtual server with a default IP address of "All Unassigned" and an assigned TCP port of 25. The default IP address is the address on which the SMTP virtual server listens on port 25 for incoming SMTP connections. A value of "All Unassigned" means that the SMTP virtual server listens on any of the available IP addresses. If more than one SMTP virtual server exists on the Exchange server, or if the IP information or the TCP port assignments are different, the wizard will not continue. However, you can restore the Exchange server to its default configuration and rerun the wizard, or you can use Exchange System Manager to configure Exchange manually. To send outgoing Internet e-mail, the Exchange server cannot already be configured as a bridgehead for any SMTP connectors in the Exchange organization.

9.

Click Next.

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10. On the Configure Your Server page, under Configure the dual-homed Internet gateway topology, click Yes to configure a dual-homed gateway server (Figure 6.49). Internet Mail Wizard then configures one SMTP virtual server to accept incoming mail using the Internet IP address and a second SMTP virtual server to send mail using an intranet IP address. Note
To configure a server as a dual-homed gateway, your server must have static IP addresses assigned to each network interface card. Otherwise, the Yes button is unavailable.

Figure 6.49 11. Click Next.

The Configure Your Server page

196 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

12. On the Create two SMTP virtual servers page, create two SMTP virtual servers and assign each one the proper IP address (Figure 6.50).

Figure 6.50 •

The Create Two SMTP virtual servers page

Select the correct IP addresses for each SMTP virtual server: In the Internet SMTP virtual server IP list, assign an Internet IP address to the SMTP virtual server that accepts incoming Internet e-mail. To send mail to your users, external SMTP servers must be able to connect to your SMTP virtual server that accepts incoming Internet mail; therefore you must assign an Internet IP address to your SMTP virtual server. In the Default SMTP virtual server IP (Intranet IP) list, assign an intranet IP to the SMTP virtual server that sends Internet mail. You must assign an intranet IP address to this server to allow only your authenticated internal users to send Internet mail using the SMTP virtual server.

13. Click Next 14. On the SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page, under SMTP domains, all the existing recipient policies for SMTP addresses configured in your Exchange organization are displayed (Figure 6.51). Ensure that all the SMTP domains for which you want to accept Internet mail are displayed. The address displayed in bold is the primary SMTP address, and this address displays as the return address on your users' outgoing mail.

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The SMTP domains for which you want to receive Internet mail are configured in Exchange System Manager in Recipient Policies. You must have a recipient policy configured for every SMTP domain for which you want to accept Internet mail, and Exchange must be authoritative for this domain. If you created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager, you cannot use the wizard to create additional recipient policies. In this case, if you need to add or modify your recipient policies, you must use Exchange System Manager.

Figure 6.51 • •

The SMTP Domains for Inbound Mail page

15. Select from the following options: If all the SMTP domains for which you want to want to accept incoming Internet mail are listed, click Next. If you have not modified your recipient policies and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail is not displayed, click Add, and then add the proper SMTP domain. Click Set as From Address if you want this address to display as your user's return address in their outgoing e-mails. If you created multiple recipient policies in Exchange System Manager and an SMTP domain for which you want to receive Internet mail does not exist, exit the wizard, and then create or edit a recipient policy for the SMTP domain and make it authoritative. To ensure an SMTP domain is authoritative, on your recipient policy, edit or create the SMTP address, and then click the This Exchange Organization is responsible for all mail delivery to this address check box in SMTP Address Properties.

198 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

16. On the Outbound Bridgehead Server page, under SMTP virtual server, ensure that the Exchange server and SMTP virtual server designated as the bridgehead are displayed (Figure 6.52). By default, the Internet Mail Wizard creates an SMTP connector on this server with an address space of *, so that all mail destined to Internet addresses is routed through this connector.

Figure 6.52

The Outbound Bridgehead Server page

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17. If the Open Relay Configuration page displays, your server is configured to allow open relay (Figure 6.53). With open relaying, external users can use your server to send unsolicited commercial mail, which may result in other legitimate servers blocking mail from your Exchange server. Note
This page displays only if your SMTP virtual server is configured to allow open relay. If your SMTP virtual server does not allow open relay, this page does not display.

Figure 6.53

The Open Relay Configuration page

18. Click Disable open relay to secure your server, and then click Next. 19. On the Outbound Mail Configuration page (Figure 6.54), select one of the following options to configure how you want Exchange to send outgoing Internet mail: • • Click Use domain name system (DNS) to send mail if you want Exchange to use DNS to resolve all Internet addresses and then send mail. Click Yes if your DNS server can resolve Internet addresses.

200 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Click No if your DNS server cannot resolve Internet (external addresses). The wizard then guides you through the process of configuring an external DNS server that your SMTP virtual server will use to resolve external addresses. Click Route all mail through the following smart host if you want to send mail to a smart host that assumes responsibility for DNS resolution and mail delivery. Then, in the Host name or IP address of the smart host box, type either a fully qualified domain name or an IP address for the smart host.

Figure 6.54 20. Click Next.

The Outbound Mail Configuration page

21. Select one of the following options: • • • If you configured Exchange to use a smart host to send outbound mail proceed to Step 24. If you configured Exchange to use DNS for outbound mail, and your DNS server can resolve Internet address, proceed to Step 24. If you configured Exchange to use DNS, and the DNS server Exchange uses cannot resolve Internet addresses, proceed to Step 22.

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22. On the External Domain Name System (DNS) page (Figure 6.55), configure your SMTP virtual server to use an external DNS server: Click Add, and then, in Enter an IP address, type the IP address of the external DNS server you want to use. Important
The external DNS server must have the ability to resolve external or Internet addresses.

Figure 6.55 23. Click Next.

The External Domain Name System (DNS) page

24. On the Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page (Figure 6.56), select from the following options to specify whether you want to send Internet e-mail to all external addresses or restrict delivery to a specified set of domains: • Click Allow delivery to all e-mail domains to allow outbound Internet mail for all external domains.

202 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Click Restrict delivery to the following e-mail domains(s) to restrict outbound Internet mail to specific domains, and then click Add to enter the domain to which you want to allow mail. If you want to enter a specific domain, type the domain name, for example example.com. If you want to allow e-mail to all domains with a specific extension, for example .edu, type *.edu. Important
Do not proceed the domain name with the at sign (@).

Figure 6.56 25. Click Next.

The Outbound SMTP Domain Restrictions page

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 203

26. The Configuration Summary page displays the configuration options you selected, as well as the location of the Internet mail log file where the configuration settings will be saved (Figure 6.57). Review these options carefully.

Figure 6.57

The Configuration Summary page

27. Click Next to start the configuration.

204 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

28. When the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page displays, select the View detailed report when this wizard closes check box to view the log file, and then click Finish (Figure 6.58). Note
Internet Mail Wizard writes the log file to the My Documents folder of the user running the wizard. The exact location displays on the Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page.

Figure 6.58

The Completing the Internet Mail Wizard page

DSN Diagnostic Logging and DSN Codes
In Exchange 2003, the following improvements have been made to delivery status notifications (DSNs). • • A new DSN logging category is available. New DSN codes are included to help troubleshoot message flow issues.

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Configuring DSN Diagnostic Logging
You can now configure diagnostic logging for DSNs, also known as non-delivery reports (NDRs).

To configure diagnostic logging for DSN
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers. Right-click the server you want, and then click Properties. In <Server Name> Properties, click the Diagnostics Logging tab. Under Services, click MSExchangeTransport. Under Categories, click NDR. Under Logging level, click None, Minimum, Medium, or Maximum. Click Maximum for troubleshooting purposes.

206 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

DSN Codes Available in Exchange Server 2003
Table 6.1 lists the DSN messages implemented in Exchange 2003 for transport and routing. Table 6.1 New delivery status notifications available in Exchange 2003 DSN Cause Cod e 4.2.2 In Exchange 2000, this delivery status notification is generated when the recipient's mailbox exceeds its storage limit. On Windows 2000 and Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003, this message is generated when the storage size of the drop directory (a directory where messages can be placed for delivery) exceeds the SMTP virtual server disk quota. The disk quota of the SMTP virtual server is 11 times the maximum message size on the virtual server. If no maximum size is specified, the disk quota defaults to 22 MB. If the disk space is within one maximum message size of the quota or if the disk space reaches 2 MB is no maximum message is defined, Exchange assumes that the incoming message will exceed the disk quota, and then issues the DSN. Solution

Check the mailbox storage and the queue storage quota limit.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 207

DSN Cause Cod e 4.4.9 This indicates a temporary routing error or bad routing configuration. Possible causes are: • Someone configured an SMTP connector using DNS (rather than a smarthost) and added a nonSMTP address space, such as an X.400 address, to this connector.

Solution

Routing detects these situations, and Exchange returns DSNs. • To remedy the first scenario, configure the SMTP connector to use a smarthost, instead of DNS, to resolve the non-SMTP address space. To remedy second scenario, ensure that you moved all users in the removed administrative group or routing group to a valid group.

Someone created a routing group, and a recipient in this routing group was supposed to receive mail. A routing group connector using DNS was used to bridge the routing group, and then this • administrative or routing group was removed. Therefore, any mail sent to this routing group was sent in the MSGWIA.X500 format (the address encapsulation used for non-SMTP addresses); DNS does not recognize this format.

5.3.0

Exchange 2003 can operate without the message transfer agent (MTA). If mail was mistakenly sent to the MTA, then Exchange returns this DSN to the sender. This condition is enforced only if you have disabled the MTA service and used specific registry settings to disable the MTA/StoreDriver. A default configuration strands the misrouted mail on the MTA queues.

Check your routing topology. Use the Winroute tool to ensure that the routes are properly replicated between servers and routing groups.

208 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

DSN Cause Cod e 5.7.1 General access denied, sender access denied—The sender of the message does not have the privileges necessary to complete delivery. Possible causes include: • • The sender of the message does not have the privileges necessary to complete delivery. You are trying to relay your mail through another Exchange 2000 server, and the server does not permit you to relay. The remote server returns a 5.7.1 code. The recipient may have mailbox delivery restrictions enabled (for example, if a recipient's mailbox delivery restriction is configured to receive mail from a distribution list only, nonmember's mail is rejected, and this DSN code is returned). New in Exchange 2003: An anonymous user attempted to send mail to recipients or distribution list that accept mail only from an authenticated SMTP session.

Solution

Check system privileges and attributes for the contact and retry the message. Also, for other potential known issues, ensure that you are running Exchange 2000 Service Pack 1 or later. In Exchange 2003, check the permissions on the distribution list to see if it is a restricted distribution list.

Moving the X.400 (MTA) and SMTP Queue Directory Locations
Exchange 2003 allows you to change the queue directory locations for SMTP virtual servers and the X.400 protocol.

To move X.400 (MTA) queue data
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, right-click X.400, and then click Properties.

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3.

In X.400 Properties, under Message Queue Directory, click Modify (Figure 6.59).

Figure 6.59 4.

The X.400 Properties dialog box

In Message Queue Directory, type the path where you want to store X.400 queue data (Figure 6.60).

Figure 6.60 Note

The Message Queue Directory dialog box

When you modify the location of the X.400 queue directory, you are modifying only the MTA database path and moving only the database files (.dat files); you are not moving any of the run files or the run directory. The database files are the core files required for starting the MTA, queue files, and message files.

To move SMTP queue data
1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server whose queue directory you want to move, and then click Properties. In <SMTP Virtual Server> Properties, click the Messages tab (Figure 6.61).

210 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Figure 6.61 5.

The Messages tab

On the Messages tab, under Queue directory, click Browse, and then select a new location for the queue data.

Connection Filtering
Exchange Server 2003 supports connection filtering based on block lists. Connection filtering leverages external-based services that list known sources of unsolicited e-mail sources, dial-up user accounts, and servers open for relay (based on IP addresses). Connection filtering compliments third-party content filter products. This feature allows you to check an incoming IP address against a block list provider's list for the categories you want to filter. If a match is found on the block list provider's list, SMTP issues a "550 5.x.x" error in response to the RCPT TO command, and a customized error response is issued to the sender. (The RCPT TO command is the SMTP command that the connecting server issues to identify the intended message recipient.) Furthermore, you can use several connection filters and prioritize the order in which each filter is applied. With connection filtering, you can do the following: • Set up connection filtering rules that check with a block list service provider for the following: • • • IP addresses of known senders of unsolicited commercial e-mail Servers configured for open relay Dial-up user account lists

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Configure global accept and deny lists. A global accept list is a list of IP addresses from which you will always accept mail. A global deny list is a list of IP addresses from which will always deny mail. You can use global accept and deny lists with or without using a block list service provider. Configure a recipient address as exception to all connection filtering rules. You can configure a recipient address as an exception to all connection-filtering rules. When mail is sent to this address, it is automatically accepted, even if the sender appears on a block list.

How Connection-Filtering Rules Work
When you create a connection-filtering rule, SMTP uses this rule to perform a DNS lookup to a list provided by a third-party block list service. The connection filter matches each incoming IP address against the third-party block list. The block list provider issues one of two responses: • • host not found Indicates that the IP address is not present on its block list 127.0.0.x A response status code indicating that a match for the IP address was found in the list of offenders. The x varies, depending on your block list provider.

If the incoming IP address is found on the block list, SMTP returns a 5.x.x error in response to the RCPT TO command (The RCPT TO command is the SMTP command that the connecting server issues to identify the intended message recipient.) You can customize the response that is returned to the sender. Additionally, because block list providers usually contain different offender categories, you can specify the matches you want to reject. Most block list providers screen for three types of offenders: • • Sources of unsolicited commercial e-mail. These lists are generated from scanning unsolicited commercial e-mails and adding the source address to the list Known open relay servers. These lists are calculated by identifying open relay SMTP servers on the Internet. The most common reason for an open relay server is mis-configuration by the system administrator. Dial-up user lists. These lists are created from either existing Internet service provider (ISP) lists that contain IP addresses with dial-up access, or from inspection of addresses that indicate a probable dial-up connection.

How Block List Providers Match Offending IP Addresses
After you set up your connection filter, when an e-mail message is sent to your organization, Exchange contacts the block list provider. The provider checks for the existence of an A (host) record in its DNS. Exchange queries for this information in a specific format. For example, if the connecting address is 192.168.5.1, and the block list provider's organization is contoso.com, then Exchange queries for the existence of the following record:

212 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 <reverse IP address of the connecting server>.<dns name for the block list   organization> IN A 127. 0.0.x 

which, in this case, is:
1.5.168.192..contoso.com

If this IP address is found on the provider's list, the provider returns a 127.0.0.x status code that indicates an offending IP address and the type of offense. All block list providers return a response code of 127.0.0.x, where x indicates the type of offense. This number varies, depending on the block list provider.

Understanding Block List Provider Response Codes
As mentioned earlier, if a block list provider finds a match, the provider always returns a status code of 127.0.0.x. The status code is either an explicit return code or a bit mask, which is multifunctional return. If your block list provider returns a value, you can specify which values you want to filter against. However, if your block list provider returns a bit mask, you must understand how a bit mask works to specify the matches you want to filter. A bit mask is a method used for verifying that a particular bit is set for an entry. A bit mask differs from a traditional mask in that it checks for a specific bit value, as opposed to a subnet mask, which checks for a range of values. Consider the following example. For each match in its block list, assume a block list provider returns the status codes listed in Table 6.2. Table 6.2 Block list status code examples Category Known source of unsolicited email Dial-up user account Known relay server Returned status code 127.0.0.3

127.0.0.2 127.0.0.4

However, if an IP address is a member of two lists, the block list provider adds the values of the last octet. Therefore, if an IP address is on the list of known relay servers and known sources of unsolicited e-mails, the block list provider returns a status code of 127.0.7, where 7 is the combined values of the last octet returned for known sources of unsolicited commercial e-mail and known relay servers.

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If you want to filter against only known sources of unsolicited commercial e-mail, enter a bit mask value of 0.0.0.3; the block list then filters against any of the possible values, in this case, 127.0.0.3, 127.0.0.5, and 127.0.0.7, and 127.0.0.9. Table 6.3 lists the bit mask values associated with each of the example status codes. Table 6.3 Block list status code and corresponding bit mask examples Category Known source of unsolicited e-mail Dial-up user account Known relay server Known relay server and dial-up user account Returned status code 127.0.0.3 127.0.0.2 127.0.0.4 127.0.0.6 Bit mask 0.0.0.3 0.0.0.2 0.0.0.4 0.0.0.6

In the last example ("Known relay server and dial-up user account"), the bit mask 0.0.0.6 returns a match for an IP address only if it appears on both the known relay server and dial-up user account lists. It does not return a match if the IP address appears on only one of the two lists. You cannot use a bit mask to check for a single match in multiple lists. Note
A bit mask checks only against a single value. If you set a bit mask value that is returned when an IP address appears on two lists, the mask will match only IP addresses that appear on both lists. If you want to check for an IP address on either of two lists, enter the status codes for these settings.

Specifying Exceptions to the Connection Filter Rule
You can allow message delivery to specific recipients, regardless of whether they appear on a block list. This is useful if you want to allow legitimate organizations to communicate with your administrators by contacting the postmaster account. For example, if a legitimate company has a server inadvertently configured to allow open relaying, e-mail messages from this company to your users would be blocked. However, if you configured connection filtering to allow message delivery to the postmaster account in your organization, then the administrator in the blocked company could send mail your postmaster account to communicate their situation or inquire as to why their mail was rejected.

214 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Enabling Connection Filtering
To enable connection filtering, perform the following steps: 1. 2. Create the connection filter using the Connection Filtering tab in the Message Delivery Properties dialog box. Apply the filter at the SMTP virtual server level.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections.

Step 1: Configuring Connection Filtering
To configure connection filtering, perform the following tasks: • • • Create global accept and deny lists. Create connection filtering rules. Create exceptions to the connection filtering rules.

Creating Global Accept and Deny Lists
Connection filtering allows you to create global accept and deny lists. You can use these lists to always accept or always reject mail sent from specific IP addresses, regardless of whether or not you use a block list service provider. Any IP address that appears on the global accept list is automatically accepted, and any connection filtering rules are bypassed. Similarly, any IP address that appears on the global deny list is automatically rejected. Entries in the global accept list take precedence over the entries in the global deny list. Exchange checks the global accept list before the global deny list; so, if you wanted to reject connections from a specific subnet and mask, but accept connections from a single IP address within this range, you would: • • Enter the IP address from which you want to accept connections on the global accept list. Enter the subnet and mask for the range of IP addresses from which you want to reject connections on the global deny list.

When the connecting IP address you added to the global accept list attempts to connect to your Exchange server, Exchange checks the global accept list first. Because Exchange finds a match for this IP address, the connection is accepted, and Exchange performs no additional connection filtering checks.

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To create a global accept list
1. 2. 3. 4. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Global Settings, right-click Message Delivery, and then click Properties. Click the Connection Filtering tab. Click Accept. The Accept List dialog box displays (Figure 6.62).

Figure 6.62 5. 6. Click Add.

The Accept List dialog box

In IP Address (Mask), select one of the following options: • • Click Single IP Address to add a single IP address to the global accept list for this connection filter rule. Click Group of IP Addresses to add a subnet address and mask to the global accept list.

7. 1. 2. 3.

Click OK. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Global Settings, right-click Message Delivery, and then click Properties. Click the Connection Filtering tab.

To create a global deny list

216 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

4.

Click Deny. The Deny List dialog box displays (Figure 6.63).

Figure 6.63 5. 6. Click Add.

The Deny List dialog box

In IP Address (Mask), select one of the following options: • • Click Single IP Address to add a single IP address to the global deny list for this connection filter rule. Click Group of IP Addresses to add a subnet address and mask to the global deny list.

7.

Click OK.

Creating a Connection Filtering Rule
Use the following procedure to create a connection filter.

To create a connection filter
1. 2. 3. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Global Settings, right-click Message Delivery, and then click Properties. Click the Connection Filtering tab (Figure 6.64).

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 217

Figure 6.64

The Connection Filtering tab

218 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

4.

To create a connection filter rule, click Add. The Connection Filtering Rule dialog box displays (Figure 6.65).

Figure 6.65 5. 6. 7.

The Connection Filtering Rule dialog box

In the Display Name box, type a name for the connection filter. In the DNS Suffix of Provider box, type the DNS suffix that the provider appends to the IP address. In the Custom Error Message to Return (default error message will be used if left blank) box, if desired, type the custom error message to return to the sender. Leave this box blank to use the following default error message: <IP address> has been blocked by <Connection Filter Rule Name> You can use the following variables to generate a custom message: • • • %0 – connecting IP address %1 – connection filter rule name %2 – the block list provider

For example, if you wanted your custom message to read: The IP address <IP address> has been blocked by the following block list provider <block list provider name> type the following in the customer error message: The IP address %0 was rejected by block list provider %2.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 219

Exchange replaces %0 with the connecting IP address and %2 with the block list provider. Note
If you want to include a percent sign (%) in your error message, you must enter the percent sign twice (%%).

8.

To configure which return status codes received from the block list provider you want to match in this connection filter, click Return Status Code. The Return Status Code dialog box displays (Figure 6.66).

Figure 6.66 9. •

The Return Status Code dialog box

Select one of the following options. Click Match Filter Rule to Any Return Code (this connection filter rule is matched to any return status code received from the provider service) to set the default value that matches the connection filter to any return status. Click Match Filter Rule to the Following Mask (this connection filter rule is matched to return status codes received from the provider by using a mask to interpret them), and then type the mask you want to filter against the masks used by your providers. Note
A bit mask checks only against a single value. If you set a bit mask value that is returned when an IP address appears on two lists, the mask will match only IP addresses that appear on both lists. If you want to check for an IP address on either of two lists, enter the status codes for these settings.

Click Match Filter Rule to Any of the Following Responses (this connection filter rule is matched to returned status codes received from the provider service by

220 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

using the specific values of the return status codes below). Click Add, and in Return Status Code, type the status code you want to match. For each additional status codes, click Add, type the code, and then click OK. 10. Click OK. You can create exceptions to the connection filter rule. Specifically, you can allow message delivery to specific recipients (for example, to the postmaster), regardless of whether the connecting IP address is on a block list.

To specify an exception to a connection rule
1. In Message Delivery Properties, on the Connection filtering tab, click Exception. The Block List Service Configuration Settings dialog box displays (Figure 6.67)

Figure 6.67 2. 3. 4. Click Add.

The Block List Service Configuration Settings dialog box

In Add Recipient, type the SMTP address of the recipient for whom you want to accept all messages, regardless of whether the connecting IP address appears on a block list. Click OK twice.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 221

Step 2: Applying the Connection Filter to the Appropriate SMTP Virtual Servers
After creating the connection filter, you must apply it to the appropriate SMTP virtual servers. Usually, you apply the connection filter on the SMTP virtual servers that exist on your gateway servers that accept inbound Internet e-mail. Use the following procedure to apply a connection filter to an SMTP virtual server.

To apply a connection filter to an SMTP virtual server
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server on which you want to apply the filter, and then click Properties. In <SMTP Virtual Server> Properties, on the General tab, click Advanced. In Advanced, select the IP address for which you want to apply the filter, and then click Edit. In Identification, select the Apply Connection Filter check box to apply the filter that you previously set (Figure 6.68).

Figure 6.68 7.

The Identification dialog box

If you have multiple virtual servers, repeat Steps 3 through 6 for each virtual server on which you want to apply the filter.

222 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Inbound Recipient Filtering
With recipient filtering, you can block mail that is destined to all invalid recipients. You can also block mail to any recipients who are specified in a recipient filter list, whether they are valid or invalid. The recipient filter blocks mail destined to invalid recipients by filtering inbound mail (based on Active Directory lookups) for each intended recipient. You can filter mail based on the following criteria: • • If the recipient does not exist in Active Directory. If the sender does not have the appropriate permissions.

Any incoming mail matching these criteria is rejected, and the SMTP virtual server returns a 550 5.x.x error during the SMTP session. Note
Exchange only performs Active Directory lookups and blocks invalid recipients for incoming mail destined to a domain for which it is authoritative. This setting is configured in recipient policies.

You can also configure recipient filtering to filter messages sent to specified e-mail address (valid or invalid) within your organization If a message is sent to any of the specified recipients, Exchange returns a 5.x.x level error during the SMTP session. By default, Exchange accepts mail that is destined for any recipient (invalid or valid) and then sends non-delivery reports (NDRs) for all invalid recipients. Additionally, because unsolicited mail is typically sent from invalid addresses, Exchange attempts to re-deliver NDRs to nonexistent senders, thereby expending more resources. If you enable recipient filtering, Exchange no longer expends resources in this manner because invalid recipients are filtered. However, enabling recipient filtering to resolve recipients in Active Directory can potentially allow malicious senders to resolve valid e-mail addresses; this is because SMTP sessions issue different responses for valid and invalid recipients. Note
Recipient filter rules apply only to anonymous connections. Authenticated users and Exchange servers bypass these validations.

Enabling Recipient Filtering
To enable recipient filtering, perform the following steps: 1. 2. Create the recipient filter using the Recipient Filtering tab in the Message Delivery Properties dialog box. Apply the filter at the SMTP virtual server level.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following sections.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 223

Step 1: Creating a recipient filter
Use the following procedure to create a recipient filter.

To create a recipient filter
1. 2. 3. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Global Settings, right-click Message Delivery, and then click Properties. In Message Delivery Properties, click the Recipient Filtering tab (Figure 6.69).

Figure 6.69 4.

The Recipient Filtering tab

To add the address of a specific recipient, click Add, and then, in Add Recipient, type the recipient address, and then click OK. The recipient address must meet the following criteria: • • The recipient address must contain an at sign (@). Display names must be entered in quotes with the @ sign immediately following. Ensure that there are no spaces between the quotes and the @ symbol For example, if you wanted to filter mail for a recipient with the display name of Ted Bremer in the northwindtraders.com domain, you would enter: "Ted Bremer"@northwindtraders.com

224 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Use an asterisk (*) to denote all members of a domain or simply enter @domain. For example, to filter e-mail sent to all users with the domain suffix of northwindtraders.com, enter either: *@northwindtraders.com @northwindtraders.com

5.

To filter mail that is sent to users who do not exist in Active Directory, select the Filter recipients who are not in the Directory check box. Note
Selecting the Filter recipients who are not in the Directory check box can potentially allow malicious senders to discover valid e-mail addresses in your Exchange organization.

Step 2: Applying the Recipient Filter to the Appropriate SMTP Virtual Servers
After creating the recipient filter, you must apply it to the appropriate SMTP virtual servers. Usually, you apply the recipient filter on the SMTP virtual servers that exist on your gateway servers that accept inbound Internet e-mail. Use the following procedure to apply a recipient filter to an SMTP virtual server.

To apply a recipient filter to an SMTP virtual server
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server on which you want to apply the filter, and then click Properties. In <SMTP Virtual Server> Properties, on the General tab, click Advanced. In Advanced, select the IP address for which you want to apply the filter, and then click Edit.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 225

6.

In Identification, select the Apply Recipient Filter check box to apply the filter that you previously set (Figure 6.70).

Figure 6.70 7.

The Identification dialog box

If you have multiple virtual servers, repeat Steps 3 through 6 for each virtual server on which you want to apply the filter.

Understanding How Enabled Filters Are Applied
Exchange Server 2003 supports the following filters: • • • • Connection filtering Recipient filtering Sender filtering IP restrictions on a virtual server basis

Although connection filtering, recipient filtering, and sender filtering are all configured in Message Delivery Properties, they must be enabled on individual SMTP virtual servers. In contrast, IP restrictions are configured directly on each SMTP virtual server. This section shows the order in which these filters, when configured and enabled, are checked during an SMTP session. Filtering and IP restrictions are checked in the following manner. 1. An SMTP client attempts to connect to the SMTP virtual server.

226 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

2.

The IP address of the connecting client is checked against the SMTP virtual server's IP restrictions (configured on the Access tab of the SMTP virtual server Properties): • • If the connecting IP address is on the list of restricted IPs, the connection is immediately dropped. If the connecting IP address is not on the list of restricted IPs, the connection is accepted.

3. 4. 5.

The SMTP client issues an EHLO or HELO command. The SMTP client issues a MAIL FROM: command, similar to the following: MAL FROM: dylanm@contoso.com The IP address of the SMTP client is then checked against the global accept list (configured in Exchange System Manager on the Connection Filtering tab in the Message Delivery Properties dialog box). • • If the connecting IP address is on the global accept list, the global deny list is not checked. Proceed to Step 7. If the connecting IP address is not on the list global accept list, Steps 6 and 7 are performed.

6.

The IP address of the SMTP client is checked against the global deny list (configured in Exchange System Manager on the Connection Filtering tab in the Message Delivery Properties dialog box). • • If the IP address of the SMTP client is on the global deny list, the connection is dropped. If the IP address of the SMTP client is not on the global deny list, the session continues.

7.

Sender filtering checks the sender specified in the MAIL FROM command against its list of blocked senders (configured in Exchange System Manager on the Sender Filtering tab in the Message Delivery Properties dialog box). • If the sender appears on the blocked senders list, one of two things happen, depending on how sender filtering is configured: - If sender filtering is configured to drop the connection, the connection is dropped. - If sending filtering is configured to accept messages without notifying the sender, the session continues; however, mail is sent to the Badmail directory and not delivered to the intended recipient. • If the sender does not appear on the sender-filtering list, the SMTP virtual server issues a response similar to the following. 250 2.1.0 dylanm@contoso.com...Sender OK

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 227

8. 9.

The connecting SMTP server issues a RCPT TO command similar to the following: RCPT TO: kim@example.com The connection filtering rules check the connecting IP address against any block lists provided by their block list service providers. • • If the IP address of the SMTP client is in the accept list, the connection filter rules are bypassed. Proceed to Step 10. If the IP address of the SMTP client is on a block list service provider's block list, the SMTP virtual server returns an error code and then sends the customized error message configured for the connection filtering rule. If the IP address of the SMTP client is not on a block list service provider's block list, the session continues.

10. Connection filtering checks to see if the intended recipient is on the connection filtering exception list. • • If the recipient is on this list, the communication is accepted, and no other checks are applied at the RCPT TO command. Proceed to Step 13. If the recipient does not appear on the exception list, the recipient is checked against other filters.

11. If the recipient does not appear on the exception list configured in connection filtering, the recipient is then checked against any blocked recipients configured in recipient filtering. • • If the recipient is a blocked recipient, the SMTP virtual server returns an invalid recipient error. If the recipient is not a blocked recipient, the session continues.

12. If the recipient is not a blocked recipient, then Active Directory is checked to ensure that the intended recipient exists in Active Directory. • • If the intended recipient is not a valid recipient that exists in Active Directory, the SMTP virtual server returns an invalid recipient error. If the recipient is a valid recipient that exists in Active Directory, the session continues.

13. For each additional recipient specified in a RCPT TO command, Steps 10 through 12 are applied. 14. The connecting server then issues a DATA command similar to the following DATA To: Kim Akers From: dylanm@contoso.com<Dylan Miller> Subject: Mail Message

228 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

15. Sender filtering then checks that the From address does not match a blocked sender. • If the sender specified in the DATA command is a blocked sender, one of two things happen: - If sender filtering is configured to drop the connection, then the SMTP virtual server returns a 5.1.0 "Sender Denied" error and drops the connection. - If sending filtering is configured to accept messages without notifying the sender, the session continues; however, mail is sent to the Badmail directory and not delivered to the intended recipient. • If the sender specified in the DATA command is not a blocked sender, the message is accepted and queued for delivery.

Improved Ability to Restrict Submissions to an SMTP Virtual Server
In Exchange Server 2003, you can restrict submissions to an SMTP virtual server to a limited number of security principles though the standard Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 Discretionary Access Control List (DACL). This allows you to specify groups of users who can submit mail to a virtual server. Note
Do not restrict submissions on SMTP virtual servers that accept Internet mail.

To restrict submissions to an SMTP server based on a security group
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP. Right-click the SMTP virtual server on which you want to restrict submissions, and then click Properties. In <SMTP Virtual Server> Properties, click the Access tab, and then click Authentication. In Authentication, clear the Anonymous Access check box, and then click Users to specify a subset of users for whom you want to grant submit permissions on this SMTP virtual server. In Permissions for Submit and Relay, to remove a group or user, select the group or user, and then click Remove.

6.

Chapter 6: Transport and Message Flow Features 229

7.

To add a group or user, click Add, and then select the group or users for which you want to specify permissions. Select from one of the following options: • On Windows Server 2003, in Select Users, Computers, or Groups, under Enter the object name to select, type the name of the user or the group. If you want to search for the user or group, click Advanced, search for the user or group name, and then click Check Names to validate your entry. Tip
Click the examples link to view the acceptable formats for your entries.

• 8. 9.

On Windows 2000 Server, in Select Users, Computers, or Groups, select the group or user that you want to grant submit permissions, and then click Add.

Click OK to return to the Permissions for Submit and Relay dialog box. Under Group or user names, select the group you just added.

10. Under Permissions for <Selected Group>, next to Submit Permission, if necessary, click Allow to allow the selected user or group to submit mail through this SMTP virtual server. 11. Click OK.

Improved Ability to Restrict Relaying on an SMTP Virtual Server
In Exchange 2003, you can restrict relaying to a limited number of security principles though the standard Windows 2000 Discretionary Access Control List (DACL). This allows you to specify groups of users who can relay through a virtual server. Restricting relaying on virtual servers is useful if you want to allow a group of users to relay mail to the Internet, but deny relay privileges for a different group. Important
To apply relay restrictions, you must disable anonymous access on the SMTP virtual server (on the Access tab, click Authentication).

To restrict relaying based on a security group
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. In the console tree, expand Servers, expand the server you want, expand Protocols, and then expand SMTP.

230 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3. 4. 5.

Right-click the SMTP virtual server on which you want to apply relay restrictions, and then click Properties. In <SMTP Virtual Server> Properties, click the Access tab, and then click Relay. In Relay Restrictions, clear the Allow all computers which successfully authenticate to relay, regardless of the list below check box, and then click Users to specify a subset of users that you want to grant relay permissions on this SMTP virtual server. In Permissions for Submit and Relay, to remove a group or user, select the group or user, and then click Remove. To add a group or user, click Add, and then select the group or users for which you want to specify permissions. Select from one of the following options: • On Windows Server 2003, in Select Users, Computers or Groups, under Enter the object name to select, type the name of the user or the group. If you want to search for the user or group, click Advanced, search for the user or group name, and then click Check Names to validate your entry. Tip
Click the examples link to view the acceptable formats for your entries.

6. 7.

• 8. 9.

On Windows 2000 Server, in Select Users, Computers or Groups, select the group or user that you want to grant submit permissions, and then click Add.

Click OK to return to the Permissions for Submit and Relay dialog box. Under Group or user names list, select the group you just added.

10. Under Permissions for <selected group>, next to Submit Permission, if necessary, select the check box under Allow to allow the selected user or group to submit mail through this SMTP virtual server. 11. Next to Relay Permissions, select the check box under Allow to permit the selected object to relay through this SMTP virtual server, or select the check box under Deny to prevent the selected object from relaying through this connector. Note
You must allow Submit Permissions if you want to allow Relay Permissions.

12. Click OK.

C H A P T E R

Storage Features

7

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 includes many improvements the Exchange store. In general, these improvements focus on making disaster recovery operations easier and faster and on streamlining internal processes such as public folder replication. Specifically, the improvements include the following: • • Support for the new Volume Shadow Copy service, which is available as part of the Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 backup API. A new type of storage group (the Recovery Storage Group) provides a temporary location for restored mailbox data. After restoring the mailbox data to the Recovery Storage Group, you can then merge the data you need with the original mailbox store, whether that means restoring the entire mailbox store or a few individual mailboxes. The Microsoft Mailbox Merge Wizard (Exmerge) is now available for download at the Exchange Downloads Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/2003/updates). Public folder replication processes are overhauled and streamlined for more efficient use of bandwidth. The Exchange Virus Scanning Application Programming Interface (VSAPI) is enhanced and expanded.

• •

Shadow Copy Backup
Exchange Server 2003 supports the new backup infrastructure implemented in Windows Server 2003. Backup programs (including Microsoft Windows® Backup) can use either the existing Microsoft Windows 2000 backup and restore APIs, or the new APIs. The new APIs use the Windows Volume Shadow Copy service to create a shadow copy (also known as a snapshot) of the disk at the beginning of the backup process. Exchange then uses the shadow copy (rather than the working disk) to create the actual backup, therefore normal operation can continue. This method offers the following advantages over previous methods: • A backup of a volume is produced. This backup reflects the state of that volume at the instant the backup started, even if the data changes while the backup is in progress. All the

232 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

backup data is internally consistent and reflects the state of the volume at a single point in time. • Applications and services are notified that a backup is about to occur. The services and applications can then prepare for the backup by cleaning up on-disk structures and by flushing caches and log files. Important
Exchange supports the Volume Shadow Copy service for normal backups and copy backups, but not for incremental or differential backups.

Using Shadow Copy Backup
The Exchange API provides support for shadow copy backups. You can still use the Windows Server 2003 Backup utility to back up Exchange Server 2003 databases (mailbox stores and public folder stores); however, this method uses the existing API's for non-shadow copy backups. Windows Server 2003 Backup supports backing up your Windows file system using the Volume Shadow Copy service, but it does not support the Exchange Volume Shadow Copy service APIs. To use the new shadow copy APIs to back up databases, you must use a third-party solution.

Recovery Storage Group
To provide greater flexibility when restoring mailboxes and mailbox stores, Exchange 2003 provides a Recovery Storage Group feature. The Recovery Storage Group is a specialized storage group that can exist alongside the regular storage groups in Exchange (even if the server already has four regular storage groups). You can restore mailbox stores from any regular storage group that meets the following conditions: • • • The server housing the storage group is running Exchange 2000 SP3 or later. The server housing the storage group is in the same Administrative group as the server housing the Recovery Storage Group. If you are restoring multiple mailbox stores simultaneously, they must all be from a single storage group.

After you restore a mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group, use the Exmerge utility to move the recovered mailbox data from the Recovery Storage Group to the regular storage group. With this method, you can recover an entire mailbox store (all of the database information, including the log data) or just a single mailbox. Mailboxes in the Recovery Storage Group are disconnected and are not accessible to users with mail clients. Note
You can only use the Recovery Storage Group to recover mailbox stores, not public folder stores.

Chapter 7: Storage Features 233

Using a Recovery Storage Group
The following procedures represent a simple restore scenario; these procedures assume that you have already backed up your storage groups. Before you begin these procedures, ensure that you are logged in with an account such as Backup Operators that has Receive As and Send As permissions on all of the Exchange mailboxes. If these permissions are denied, the restore process does not complete. If you restore mailbox stores without creating a Recovery Storage Group, the data is restored directly to the original mailbox stores, as in previous versions of Exchange. The process of using a Recovery Storage Group to restore mailbox data consists of three main steps: 1. 2. 3. Set up the Recovery Storage Group. Restore a mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group. Merge the recovered mailbox data with regular user mailboxes.

Each of these steps is detailed in the following procedures.

To set up the Recovery Storage Group
1. 2. Start Exchange System Manager: Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager. Expand Administrative Groups, expand the appropriate administrative group, expand Servers, right-click the server on which you want to create the Recovery Storage Group, point to New, and then click Recovery Storage Group.

234 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

3.

In Recovery Storage Group Properties, ensure that the file locations specified in the Transaction log location box and the System path location box are appropriate, and then click OK. The new Recovery Storage Group will appear in the server's list of storage groups (Figure 7.1).

Figure 7.1 Exchange System Manager lists the Recovery Storage Group along with the other storage groups on the same server 4. 5. 6. Right-click Recovery Storage Group, and then click Add Database to Recover. In Select database to recover, click a mailbox store, and then click OK. You can select only one mailbox store at a time. In Mailbox Store Properties, review the mailbox store's properties, and then click OK. The default settings are suitable for most cases; however, you can assign the mailbox store a different name. To add more mailbox stores to the Recovery Storage Group, repeat Steps 4-6 (remember, if you are restoring multiple databases simultaneously, they must all be from a single storage group). Note
By default, the mailbox stores in the Recovery Storage Group (also called recovery databases) are not mounted when they are created. You should not mount them until after you have restored the data, as described in the next procedure.

7.

Chapter 7: Storage Features 235

To restore a mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group
1. After configuring the Recovery Storage Group, start your backup and restore application (for the purposes of this procedure, use Windows Backup: click Start, click Run, type ntbackup, and then click OK). If Windows Backup starts in Wizard mode, on the Welcome screen, click Advanced Mode. 2. Click Restore and Manage Media, expand the File list, expand the backup file you want to use, click the appropriate storage group, and then click the database and log files that you want to restore. Important
Make sure that you select only mailbox stores and/or log files. Do not select the entire storage group, especially if the storage group contains public folder stores. The restore operation will not succeed if public folder stores are selected.

Figure 7.2 When selecting items to restore, make sure that only mailbox stores and log files are selected. 3. 4. 5. 6. Click Start Restore. In Restoring Database Store, type the name of a temporary file directory in the Temporary location box and, if this is the last backup to be restored, select Last Restore Set. Click OK. When the restore process is complete, click Close. In Exchange System Manager, right-click the mailbox store in the Recovery Storage Group, and then click Mount Store. In the warning dialog box, click Yes. Note
To complete this procedure, you need the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Merge Wizard

To merge recovered mailbox data with regular user mailboxes

236 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

(Exmerge). You can download Exmerge from the Exchange Downloads Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/2003/updates).

1. 2.

After restoring the appropriate mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group, start Exmerge. You can start Exmerge from a command prompt by typing %path%\exmerge. Follow the instructions in the wizard to specify the export method, the source server, and the destination server (when the Recovery Storage Group is on the same server as the original mailbox store with which you are working, the source server and destination server are the same). On the Database Selection page, select only the mailbox stores that are in the Recovery Storage Group, and then click Next. On the Mailbox Selection page, select the mailboxes to restore. You can select individual mailboxes or multiple mailboxes. When finished, click Next. Specify the appropriate locale (if necessary), and then click Next. On the Target Directory page, click Change Folder. Use the Browse for Folder dialog box to specify a temporary folder, and then click OK. Click Next. Follow the remaining instructions to finish the wizard and move the mailbox data. The wizard will copy data from mailboxes in the restored mailbox store and merge it with data in the corresponding mailboxes in the original mailbox store.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Overriding the Recovery Storage Group
As mentioned in the previous section, if you restore mailbox stores without creating a Recovery Storage Group, the data will be restored directly to the original mailbox stores, as in previous versions of Exchange. If you already created a Recovery Storage Group, you can restore directly to the original mailbox stores if you set the override registry key. Warning
Incorrectly editing the registry can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Problems resulting from editing the registry incorrectly may not be able to be resolved. Before editing the registry, back up any valuable data.

To set the Recovery Storage Group Override registry key
1. 2. 3. Start Registry editor (regedit). In Registry Editor, navigate to the following registry key: HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\MSExchangeIS\ParametersSystem Create a new DWORD value Recovery SG Override = 1. After this key has been set, you can restore mailbox stores to their original locations, even though the Recovery Storage Group exists.

Chapter 7: Storage Features 237

Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Merge Wizard
Previously, the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Merge Wizard (Exmerge) was available as an Exchange Resource Kit tool. Now, the wizard is available for download at the Exchange Downloads Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/2003/updates). With this wizard, you can move data between identical mailboxes that exist in different mailbox stores; for example, to restore a mailbox from a backup, restore the mailbox store to the Recovery Storage Group, and then use the wizard to merge the restored mailbox data with the original mailbox. For detailed information about how to perform this procedure, see "Using a Recovery Storage Group" earlier in this chapter.

Improved Public Folder Store Replication
In Exchange 2003, the public folder replication algorithms have been refined for greater efficiency when backfilling. ("Backfilling" is when a server determines that it has not received all of the updates for a replicated folder and must retrieve the missing updates from another server.) To select a server (or servers) to use as a backfill source, Exchange first creates a list of all of the servers that have some portion of the necessary content, and then sorts the list as follows: 1. 2. Sorts the list according to the lowest transport cost (servers in the same site have priority over servers in remote sites). For servers with the same transport cost, sorts again according to newest Exchange version. In previous versions of Exchange, servers running newer Exchange versions are selected over servers running older versions, regardless of the transport cost. For example, a server in a remote site running Exchange 2000 would be selected over a local server running Microsoft Exchange Server version 5.5. In Exchange 2003, transport cost now has greater importance in the selection criteria. For servers with the same transport cost and Exchange version, sort again according to the largest number of necessary changes available on the server. In previous versions of Exchange, a server holding all of the necessary updates is chosen over a server holding only some of the updates, regardless of transport cost. In Exchange 2003, this preference has been changed so that if some updates are available on a server with a lower transport cost, that server is selected to backfill those updates, even if the rest of the updates must be obtained from other (higher-cost) servers.

3.

As an example of how the new behavior differs from that of all Exchange 2000 Server versions, consider an Exchange 5.5 deployment of several sites (with multiple servers per site, all replicating public folders) that must be upgraded to Exchange 2003. Add one Exchange 2003

238 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

server to each site. In each site, the Exchange 2003 server will backfill its public folders from the local Exchange 5.5 servers, rather than search for a newer server in one of the remote sites.

Improved Virus Scanning API
Exchange 2000 SP1 delivered the Virus Scanning API (VSAPI) version 2.0, which provided improved support for scanning Internet content and reporting on the sender and receiver of the virus. Exchange 2003 improves the VSAPI by allowing antivirus vendor products to run on Exchange servers that do not have resident Exchange mailboxes (for example, gateway servers or bridgehead servers). The Exchange 2003 VSAPI version 2.5 allows antivirus vendor products to delete an infected message and send a notification message to the sender of the infected message. The vendor products can also create additional virus status messages to allow clients to indicate the infection status of a particular message. For more information about antivirus applications that use the new VSAPI features, contact your antivirus manufacturer.

C H A P T E R

Development Features

8

Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 contains important changes and additions for developers. You can find complete information about these changes in the Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Software Development Kit (SDK). In addition, the following sections briefly describe the major changes.

New Development Technologies
The following are new development technologies for Exchange Server 2003. The Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) providers and classes that ship with Exchange 2000 Server provide operational status about Exchange servers, queues, links, and so on, and are intended for use in applications that monitor Exchange. Exchange Server 2003 includes many new and improved WMI classes that are designed for use in Exchange management scripts and operator consoles. The new object classes support managing Exchange stores, public folders, user mailboxes, connectors, queues, links, and so on. Table 8.1 lists the new WMI classes. Table 8.1 New WMI Classes WMI class ExchangeClusterResource Class ExchangeConnectorState Class ExchangeLink Class Changes No change. No change. No change. Additional capabilities are provided in the new Exchange_Link class. No change. Additional capabilities are provided in the new Exchange_Queue class.

ExchangeQueue Class

240 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

WMI class ExchangeServerState Class

Changes No change. Additional capabilities are provided in the new Exchange_Server class. No changes. New class. New class. New class. New class. Additional message tracking entry type values were added to provide more detailed tracking of internal message-transfer events. New class. New class. New class.

Exchange_DSAccessDC Class Exchange_FolderTree Class Exchange_Link Class Exchange_Logon Class Exchange_Mailbox Class Exchange_MessageTrackingEntry Class

Exchange_PublicFolder Class Exchange_Queue Class Exchange_QueueCacheReloadEvent Class Exchange_QueueData Class Exchange_QueuedMessage Class Exchange_QueuedSMTPMessage Class

New class. New class. New class.

Exchange_QueuedX400Message Class New class. Exchange_QueueSMTPVirtualServer Class Exchange_QueueVirtualServer Class Exchange_QueueX400VirtualServer Class Exchange_ScheduleInterval Class New class.

New class. New class.

New class.

Chapter 8: Development Features 241

WMI class Exchange_Server Class Exchange_SMTPLink Class Exchange_SMTPQueue Class Exchange_X400Link Class Exchange_X400Queue Class

Changes New class. New class. New class. New class. New class.

Managed Wrappers for SMTP and Transport Sinks
You can find the code for the managed wrappers, along with the accompanying technical article, Writing Managed Sinks for SMTP and Transport Events, at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16141.

Supported Development Technologies
The following development technologies are supported on Exchange Server 2003.

Data Access Methods
• • • CDO for Exchange 2000 (CDOEX). CDOEX cannot be used remotely. ADO access using the Exchange OLEDB provider (ExOLEDB). ExOLEDB cannot be used remotely. ADO access using Microsoft Data and Internet Publishing Provider (MSDAIPP). MSDAIPP can be used anywhere that it is installed, except for on an Exchange Server 2003 computer. MSDAIPP is not supported for use on the Exchange server itself. CDO for Exchange Management (CDOEXM). CDOEXM can only be used on a computer running the full installation of Exchange Server 2003 or a computer running the Admin-only installation of Exchange Server 2003. CDO 1.2x, both server and client.

242 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

• •

HTTP and WebDAV. MAPI (extended MAPI). For deprecated MAPI technologies, see "Deprecated MAPI Technologies" later in this chapter.

Events and Notifications
• • • • • • Exchange Server version 5.5 event agent service. This service is supported, but disabled by default in Exchange Server 2003. ExOLEDB store events. Transport events. MAPI notifications. WebDAV notifications. Incremental Change Synchronization (ICS).

Application Technologies
• • • Exchange Web Forms. Exchange 2000 Server workflow. Exchange 5.5 routing engine. Samples provided in the Exchange 5.5 Exchange Development Kit (EDK) are not supported.

Monitoring
• Exchange 2000 Server WMI providers.

Specialized Programs
• • Virus Scanning API (VSAPI) version 2.5. Backup and Restore API.

Chapter 8: Development Features 243

Developing .NET Applications for Exchange Server 2003
For information about what is supported and not supported for developing .NET applications for Exchange Server 2003, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 813349, "Support Policy for Microsoft Exchange APIs with .NET Framework Applications" (http://support.microsoft.com?kbid=813349).

Active Directory Classes and Attributes
The installer for Exchange Server 2003 makes numerous changes to the Microsoft Active Directory® directory service classes and attributes to support the new features of Exchange Server 2003. For information about these changes, see the Exchange Server 2003 SDK.

Deprecated Exchange Development Technologies
The following Exchange 2000 Server application development-related technologies and features are removed and are not supported in Exchange Server 2003: • • • • • • Microsoft FrontPage® Extensions for Web Storage System Forms Exchange Instant Messaging. Programmatic access to the Exchange store using the M: drive via custom code. SQL Create Index command. Exchange store schema properties for versioning. MSDAIPP on the computer running Exchange Server 2003. Remote access continues to be supported.

244 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Deprecated MAPI Technologies
The following MAPI technologies, which formerly shipped with Exchange 2000 Server, are not available in Exchange Server 2003: Simple MAPI Simple MAPI is a wrapper around 12 high-level Extended MAPI functions that enable a client application to send, address, receive, and reply to messages. On the client, Simple MAPI is used by Microsoft Office to send mail directly from the application. It is only intended for use in the Microsoft Windows® environment and offers limited functionality. Anything that can be done with Simple MAPI can also be done with Extended MAPI. Common Messaging Calls (CMC) CMC is a wrapper around 10 Extended MAPI functions and was created to abstract the complexities of MAPI and to create an API standard that was supported across platforms. The CMC API was developed in conjunction with the X.400 API Association (XAPIA) standards organization and is only accessible to C/C++ client developers. Anything that can be done with CMC can also be done with Extended MAPI. CDOHTML Also referred to as CDO 1.2.1 Rendering, this API exposes a set of objects that can be used by Internet Information Services (IIS) to render CDO 1.2x objects and properties into HTML output. CDO 1.2.1 Rendering (CDOHTML.DLL) was intended for server-side use only.

C H A P T E R

Deployment Features

9

Whether you are installing a new Exchange organization or upgrading an existing organization, Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 introduces several new features that make deployment easier. Aside from summarizing these new features (including the new deployment tools and setup features), this chapter provides information about required prerequisites for deploying Exchange 2003. Furthermore, you will learn how to perform the basic steps necessary for deploying or upgrading to Exchange Server 2003. For more information about deploying Exchange 2003 in your organization, see the book Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Guide (http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/library).

New Exchange 2003 Deployment Features
To help you successfully deploy Exchange in your organization, Exchange 2003 provides the following new or improved features (each of these features is discussed later in this section): • • • • • Exchange Server 2003 Deployment Tools Active Directory Connector (ADC) Tools Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool Exchange 2003 Setup improvements Running Exchange System Manager from computers running Microsoft Windows®

Along with these new or improved features, Exchange 2003 also takes advantage of Microsoft Windows Server™ 2003 improvements, such as Microsoft Active Directory® directory service and memory allocation enhancements.

246 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Exchange Server Deployment Tools
Exchange Server 2003 is designed to coexist with Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server and Microsoft Exchange Server version 5.5. Establishing coexistence between Exchange 2003 and Exchange 2000 is fairly straightforward, simplified by the fact that both Exchange 2000 and Exchange 2003 rely on the Microsoft Active Directory® directory service for directory services. However, Exchange 5.5 contains its own directory service, which means that you must synchronize the Exchange 5.5 directory with Active Directory, and then ensure that objects continue to properly replicate between the two directories. A new Exchange 2003 feature, the Exchange Server Deployment Tools, significantly eases the process of upgrading from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange Server 2003. The Exchange Server Deployment Tools consist of a series of tools and documentation that lead you through the following process: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Planning your deployment Preparing Active Directory by using ForestPrep and DomainPrep Installing Active Directory Connector (ADC) and running ADC Tools (described in the next section) Installing Exchange Completing deployment and moving mailboxes and public folders

The tools, which you can run directly from the documentation, check such things as naming consistency, permissions conversion, and directory replication. Because some of the Exchange Server Deployment Tools run automatically during Exchange setup, you may not be able to install Exchange unless these tools have been run successfully. By running the tools in advance, you can identify and correct problems before you run Setup.

ADC Tools
The Active Directory Connector (ADC) management console now contains an ADC Tools option. ADC Tools is a collection of wizards and tools that help you set up connection agreements. Specifically, ADC Tools scans your current Active Directory and Exchange 5.5 directory and organization, and then automatically creates the recommended connection agreements. The following wizards are included in ADC Tools. Resource Mailbox Wizard This wizard identifies Active Directory accounts that match more than one Exchange 5.5 mailbox. Using this wizard, you can match the appropriate primary mailbox to the Active Directory account and stamp other mailboxes with the NTDSNoMatch attribute, which designates the mailboxes as resource mailboxes. You can either make these changes online or export a comma-separated value (.csv) file that you can update and import into the Exchange 5.5 directory.

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Connection Agreement Wizard This wizard recommends public folder connection agreements and recipient connection agreements based on your Exchange 5.5 directory and Active Directory configuration. You can review the list of recommended connection agreements and select those you want the wizard to create. The Exchange Server Deployment Tools lead you through the process of installing Active Directory Connector and running ADC Tools.

Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool
The Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool (pfMigrate) is a new tool that allows you to migrate both system folders and public folders to the new server. You can use the tool to create system folder and public folder replicas on the new server and, after the folders have replicated, remove replicas from the source server. Unlike Exchange 5.5, you do not need to set a home server for a public folder in Exchange Server 2003. Any replica acts as the primary replica of the data it contains, and any public folder server can be removed from the replica list. To determine how many system folders or public folders need to be replicated, you can use the Microsoft Exchange Public Folder Migration Tool to generate a report before you run the tool. To determine whether the folders replicated successfully, you can generate the same report after you run the tool.

To run pfMigrate
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. In Exchange Server Deployment Tools, on the Welcome to the Exchange Server Deployment Tools page, click Deploy the first Exchange 2003 server. On the Deploy the First Exchange 2003 Server page, in the Follow this process column, click Coexistence with Exchange 5.5. On the Coexistence with Exchange 5.5 page, click Phase 3. On the Phase 3. Installing Exchange Server 2003 on the Initial Server page, click Next. On the Install Exchange 2003 on Additional Servers page, click Next. On the Post-Installation Steps page, under Moving System Folders and Public Folders, click move system folders and public folders, and then follow the steps listed to complete your public folder migration. Note
After you run pfMigrate, only the hierarchy of the system folders and public folders is migrated immediately. You must wait for replication to occur before the contents of the system folders and public folders are migrated. Depending on the size and number of system and public folders, as well as your network speed, replication could take a considerable amount of time.

248 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Exchange Server 2003 Setup Improvements
The following new Exchange 2003 Setup features make it easier for you to install and upgrade Exchange. Identical schema files in ADC and Exchange In Exchange 2000, ADC schema files were a subset of the Exchange 2000 core schema files. In Exchange 2003, the schema files that are imported during the upgrade of Active Directory Connector are identical to the core Exchange Server 2003 schema; therefore, you only need to update the schema once. Exchange Setup does not require full organization permissions In Exchange 2000, the user account that was used to run Setup was required to have Exchange Full Administrator rights at the organization level. In Exchange 2003, although a user who has Exchange Full administrator rights at the organization level must install the first server in a domain, you can now install additional servers if you have Exchange Full Administrator rights at the administrative group level. Exchange Setup no longer contacts the schema FSMO role In Exchange 2000, the Setup or Update program contacted the schema Flexible Single Master Operations (FSMO) role each time it ran. In Exchange Server 2003, Setup does not attempt to contact the schema FSMO role. ChooseDC Switch in Setup Exchange 2003 Setup includes the new /ChooseDC switch. You can enter the fully qualified domain name of an Active Directory domain controller to force Setup to read and write all data from the specified domain controller. When installing multiple Exchange 2003 servers simultaneously, forcing each server to communicate with the same Active Directory domain controller ensures that replication latencies do not interfere with Setup and cause installation failures. Default permissions at the organization level are only stamped once Exchange 2003 Setup stamps default permissions on the Exchange Organization object once (during the first server installation or upgrade) and does not re-stamp permissions during subsequent installations. Previously, Exchange 2000 Setup re-stamped Exchange Organization permissions during each server installation. This action overwrote any custom changes to the permissions structure; for example, if you allowed all users to create top-level public folders, these permissions were removed. Warning message appears if Exchange Groups are moved, deleted, or renamed Exchange 2003 Setup ensures that the Exchange Domain Servers and Exchange Enterprise Servers groups are intact. If the administrator moves, deletes, or renames these groups, Setup stops, and a warning message appears. Permissions to access mailboxes Exchange 2003 Setup locks down security on the database objects; therefore Exchange administrators cannot open other user's mailboxes.

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Outlook Mobile Access and Microsoft Exchange Server ActiveSync® components installed by Setup By default, Exchange 2003 includes support for mobile devices. The services that enable these devices are called Outlook Mobile Access and Exchange Server ActiveSync. Previously, to use these services, you had to install Microsoft Mobile Information Server. Now, the built-in mobile device support in Exchange 2003 supersedes the Mobile Information Server product. Note
Outlook Mobile Access is part of the typical Setup and is therefore installed on all servers. This component also requires the .NET Framework to be installed.

Automatic installation of required Windows Server 2003 services on Microsoft Windows 2000 If you are installing Exchange 2003 on a server running Windows 2000, Exchange Setup automatically installs and enables .NET Framework and ASP.NET. Automatic configuration of Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 In Windows Server 2003, IIS 6.0 introduces a new "worker process isolation mode," which offers greater reliability and security to Web servers. Worker process isolation mode ensures that all of the authentication, authorization, Web application processes, and ISAPI extensions that are associated with a particular application are isolated from all other applications. To take advantage of these benefits, when you install Exchange Server 2003 on Windows Server 2003, Exchange Setup automatically sets IIS 6.0 to worker process isolation mode. Exchange Setup also enables certain ISAPI extensions. By default, during Windows Server 2003 installation, ISAPI extensions are not allowed to load. However, Exchange 2003 requires certain ISAPI extensions for features such as Microsoft Outlook Web Access, WebDAV, and Exchange Web Forms; therefore, Exchange 2003 enables the required ISAPI extensions during setup. No action is necessary; Exchange Setup automatically configures the ISAPI extensions. The IsapiRestrictionList metabase key controls the ISAPI extension behavior. Exchange Setup sets the metabase key appropriately so that the ISAPI extensions can load; however, if the key is modified after Exchange is installed, certain parts of Exchange may not function correctly. Automatic IIS 6.0 Configuration during Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003 upgrade If you install Exchange 2003 on Windows 2000 and subsequently upgrade to Windows Server 2003, Exchange System Attendant automatically sets the IIS 6.0 mode to worker process isolation mode. Event Viewer will contain an event indicating that this mode change has occurred. After the upgrade, you may find that some of the ISAPI extensions for other applications do not function properly in worker process isolation mode. Although you can set the IIS 6.0 mode to "IIS 5 isolation mode" to ensure compatibility with your ISAPI extensions, it is recommended that you continue to run IIS 6.0 in worker process isolation mode; Exchange 2003 features such as Outlook Web Access, WebDAV, and Web forms, will not work in IIS 5 isolation mode.

250 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Installing Exchange System Management Tools Only
To administer Exchange servers from a computer running Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000 Server SP3, you can use Exchange Setup to install only Microsoft Exchange System Management Tools. Note
If you have not installed an Exchange 2003 server in your organization, you must first run ForestPrep. ForestPrep extends the Active Directory schema to include Exchange-specific classes and attributes and creates the container object for the Exchange organization in Active Directory.

To install Exchange System Management Tools
1. Ensure that the computer meets the following requirements: • • • The computer is running Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000 Professional, or Windows 2000 Server SP3. The computer name does not contain unsupported characters. The language version matches any previous installation of Exchange 2000 System Management Tools (except for upgrades from English to Korean, Traditional Chinese, or Simplified Chinese).

2. 3.

Log onto the domain with an account that has local machine administrator permissions. Depending on the version of Windows that is running on the computer, install the required services (Table 9.1). Table 9.1 Required services for Windows Required services • Internet Information Services Snap-In component (In Control Panel, click Add/Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components) SMTP Service component World Wide Web Service Windows Server 2003 Administration Tools Pack, AdminPak.msi (located on the Windows Server 2003 compact disc in the \i386 folder)

Windows version Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1)

• • •

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Windows version Windows XP SP2

Required services • • Internet Information Services Snap-In component Windows Server 2003 Administration Tools Pack, AdminPak.msi (located on the Windows Server 2003 compact disc in the \i386 folder)

Windows Server 2003 Windows 2000 Professional SP3

Internet Information Services Manager component • • Internet Information Services Snap-In component Windows Server 2003 Administration Tools Pack, AdminPak.msi (located on the Windows Server 2003 compact disc in the \i386 folder) Internet Information Services Snap-In component SMTP Service component NNTP Service component

Windows 2000 Server SP3

• • •

4. 5.

Run Exchange Setup. On the Component Selection page, set the installation action to Custom, and then select Microsoft Exchange System Management Tools. After running Setup, disable SMTP Service, World Wide Web Publishing Service, or NNTP Service if you do not intend to run them on the computer.

Windows Server 2003 Benefits
Exchange Server 2003 takes advantage of the following new Windows Server 2003 features, which greatly improve administration and performance: Active Directory Improvements Exchange Server 2003 benefits from the following improvements to Active Directory in Windows Server 2003: • • • Reduced traffic between replicas Ability to create a branch office replica from CD Ability to roll back Active Directory changes

252 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Memory Allocation Exchange Server 2003 benefits from an improved memory allocator in Windows Server 2003, which decreases the likelihood of running into situations that result in Virtual Machine (VM) fragmentation. In addition, Exchange customers who have more than 1 GB of memory no longer need to purchase the Advanced Server SKU, which previously supported the /3GB switch.

Prerequisites
Before you install or upgrade to Exchange Server 2003, ensure that your network and servers meet the prerequisites described in this section.

Hardware Requirements
The following are the minimum hardware requirements for computers running Exchange Server 2003: • • • • • • Intel Pentium or compatible 133 MHz or faster processor 256 MB of RAM recommended minimum; 128 MB supported minimum 500 MB of available disk space on the drive on which you install Exchange 200 MB of available disk space on the system drive CD-ROM drive VGA or higher-resolution monitor

File Format Requirements
To install Exchange Server 2003, disk partitions must be formatted for NTFS and not FAT. This requirement applies to the following: • • • • • System partition Partition that stores Exchange binaries Partitions containing transaction log files Partitions containing database files Partitions containing other Exchange files

Operating System Requirements
Exchange Server 2003 is supported on the following operating systems:

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• •

Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (SP3) or later Windows Server 2003

Windows 2000 Server
If you intend to install Exchange Server 2003 on a server running Windows 2000, you must download and install Windows 2000 SP3 or later. Otherwise, the Exchange Server 2003 Setup program will stop the installation. Windows 2000 SP3 or later is also a prerequisite for running the Exchange Server 2003 Active Directory Connector. For more information about Windows 2000 service packs, see the Windows 2000 Service Packs Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=18353).

Upgrading the Operating Systems
If you plan to upgrade your Exchange 2000 servers running Windows 2000 SP3 or later to Windows Server 2003, you must first upgrade those servers to Exchange 2003. This upgrade sequence is required because Exchange 2000 is not supported on Windows Server 2003.

Active Directory
Exchange 2003 Setup must be able to contact at least one Active Directory server running Windows 2000 SP3 or later, or Windows Server 2003 within the local Active Directory Site. Domain controllers and global catalog servers must be running Windows 2000 SP3 or later or Windows Server 2003 for Exchange Server 2003 to recognize them.

Permissions
In Exchange 2000, the user account that was used to run Setup was required to have Exchange Full Administrator rights at the organization level. In Exchange Server 2003, although a user with Exchange Full administrator rights at the organization level must install the first server in a domain, you can now install additional servers if you have Exchange Full Administrator rights at the administrative group level. Although this change allows for a more decentralized administrative model, there are still instances where higher-level permissions are required. A domain administrator with the appropriate privileges must manually add the machine account for the server on which you plan to install Exchange Server 2003 to the Exchange Domain Servers group. In addition, an administrator with Exchange Full Administrator rights at the organization level must still perform the following installations and upgrades: • • The first Exchange 2003 server in the organization. The first Exchange 2003 server in an Active Directory domain.

254 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

• • •

Exchange 2000 servers acting as bridgehead servers for Directory Replication Connectors. Exchange 2003 servers with Site Replication Services (both installation and removal). The first instance of a Lotus Notes or Novell GroupWise connector. Note
The Exchange administrator roles in Exchange Server 2003 are equivalent to those in Exchange 2000. For example, anyone to whom you have delegated Exchange Full Administrator permissions in Exchange 2000 can install and fully administer Exchange 2003 servers.

In addition, if you are upgrading an Exchange 5.5 organization to Exchange Server 2003, you are no longer required to be an Exchange 5.5 Administrator; this is because the option to join an existing Exchange 5.5 organization occurs during Setup instead of during ForestPrep. Table 9.2 lists the permissions required to run ForestPrep and DomainPrep and to install Exchange 2003. Table 9.2 Permission requirements for Setup tasks Task Run ForestPrep for the first time in the forest (updates the schema) Required permissions or roles • • • • Run ForestPrep thereafter • • Run DomainPrep • • Install Exchange Server 2003 on the first server in a domain • • Enterprise Administrator Schema Administrator Domain Administrator Local Machine Administrator Exchange Full Administrator at the organization level Local Machine Administrator Domain Administrator Local Machine Administrator Full Exchange Administrator at the organization level Exchange 5.5 Administrator under the organization, site, and configuration nodes (if installing into an Exchange 5.5 site) Local Machine Administrator

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Task Install Exchange Server 2003 on additional servers in the domain

Required permissions or roles • • • Full Exchange Administrator at the administrative group level Exchange 5.5 Site Administrator (if installing into an Exchange 5.5 site) Local Machine Administrator Domain Administrator Enterprise Administrator Local Machine Administrator Exchange Full Administrator at the organization level Local Machine Administrator

Install ADC

• • •

Install Exchange Server 2003 on a server with SRS enabled

• •

Upgrading Front-End Servers
You must upgrade all front-end servers in an Administrative Group before you can upgrade or install Exchange Server 2003 on any other servers in the Administrative Group. Setup ensures that front-end servers are upgraded before back-end servers, such as bridgehead servers, public folder servers, and mailbox servers. Otherwise, Setup stops. Note
Exchange 2003 servers are compatible with Exchange 2000. Therefore, users can access information that is located on Exchange 2000 servers through an Exchange 2003 front-end server.

In addition, ensure that the required services are running before you upgrade. For Exchange 2003 Setup to run, you must install and enable the following services: • • • • Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) service (NntpSvc) Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) service (SMTPSVC) World Wide Web Publishing Service (W3SVC) IIS Admin Service (IISADMIN)

256 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

If the following services are disabled, Setup still runs; however, Setup enables these services automatically: • • • • Microsoft Exchange MTA Stacks service (MSExchangeMTA) Microsoft Exchange IMAP4 service (IMAP4SVC) Microsoft Exchange POP3 service (POP3SVC) Microsoft Exchange Information Store service (MSExchangeIS)

Upgrading Active Directory Connector
You must upgrade all versions of Active Directory Connector (ADC) in the organization to the version provided with Exchange Server 2003. Setup retrieves information about the ADC versions that are running in the organization. If all ADC versions have been upgraded to the Exchange 2003 version, Setup will proceed. However, if older versions of ADC exist, Setup will stop and identify the servers that are running the older ADC versions.

Removing Mobile Information Server Components
If you previously installed the Microsoft Mobile Information Server Exchange Event Sink component on an Exchange 2000 server, you must remove the component before you can install or upgrade to Exchange Server 2003. If you want to retain Mobile Information Server functionality, do not upgrade the Exchange 2000 servers that are running Mobile Information Server. Instead, upgrade to Exchange 2003 on other servers in your organization.

To remove Mobile Information Server components from a server
1. Verify that you have the proper permissions to uninstall Mobile Information Server. To uninstall Mobile Information Server, you must be a member of the Microsoft Mobility Admins group, as well as a member of the local Administrators group on the computer from which you are uninstalling Mobile Information Server. On the server with Mobile Information Server installed, click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. On the Change or Remove Programs screen, select Mobile Information Server. Click Remove. Click Yes to confirm that you want to remove Mobile Information Server. On the warning about wireless enabled users, click Yes.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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Mobile Information Server is now removed from the computer. The Mobile Information Server -specific server instance is removed from Active Directory, and the computer will no longer display as a server running Mobile Information Server in Exchange System Manager.

Required Components for Mobility Support
The Outlook Mobile Access component included with Exchange Server 2003 requires .NET Framework. Because the Outlook Mobile Access component is part of the typical server installation, you must install .NET Framework on the server before running Setup.

Removing Instant Messaging, Chat, ccMail, MSMail, and Key Management Service Components
The Instant Messaging service, Chat service, Key Management Service, MSMail connector, and ccMail connector components are not supplied with Exchange Server 2003. If you want to upgrade an existing Exchange 2000 server to Exchange 2003, and one or more of these components are installed, you must use Exchange 2003 Setup to remove the components before upgrading. Note
If you want to retain these services in your organization, you should not upgrade the Exchange 2000 servers running these components. Instead, you should install Exchange Server 2003 on other servers in your organization.

Third-Party Software
As part of your planning, you should ensure that all third-party software you want to use is compatible with Exchange Server 2003. Specifically, you should determine whether any compatibility issues could result from the following new Exchange 2003 features: • • • Exchange-aware Antivirus Software New features have been added to the Exchange Virus Scanning Application Programming Interface (VSAPI) in Exchange 2003. Exchange-aware Backup and Restore Software New features have been added to Backup (such as Restore Groups and Snapshot) in Exchange 2003. Exchange-aware Enterprise Management New features and WMI providers have been added in Exchange 2003.

258 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

Installing Exchange 2003 or Upgrading from Exchange 2000
After planning your installation or upgrade and ensuring that your environment meets all of the prerequisites listed in this chapter, you can run the Exchange Server Deployment Tools to install Exchange 2003 on a new server or upgrade an Exchange 2000 server. The Exchange Server Deployment Tools consist of tools and documentation that lead you through the entire installation or upgrade process, including running ForestPrep and DomainPrep and ensuring that all of the required tools and services are installed and run properly. Important
For information about upgrading from an Exchange 5.5 organization, see "Upgrading from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2003" later in this chapter.

To start the Exchange Server Deployment Tools
1. 2. 3. 4. Insert the Exchange Server 2003 CD into your CD-ROM drive. On the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003 Setup page, click Exchange Deployment Tools. If the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003 Setup page does not appear after you insert your CD, double-click Setup.exe, and then click Exchange Deployment Tools to begin. Follow the step-by-step instructions in the Exchange Server Deployment Tools documentation.

After you complete the Exchange Server Deployment Tools, Exchange 2003 is installed on the server.

Upgrading from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2003
Unlike Exchange 2000 servers, Exchange 5.5 servers cannot be directly upgraded to Exchange 2003. However, you can join a new Exchange 2003 server to an existing Exchange 5.5 organization. As part of this upgrade process, you must set up Active Directory Connector (ADC) and ensure that objects replicate properly between the Exchange 5.5 directory and Active Directory. To simplify this process, use the Exchange Server Deployment Tools, which consists of tools and documentation that lead you through the entire upgrade process, including running ForestPrep and DomainPrep, installing ADC, creating connection agreements, and installing Exchange 2003.

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The Exchange Server Deployment Tools are a prerequisite for Setup when you are joining a server to an Exchange 5.5 organization. When you choose to join an existing Exchange 5.5 organization, Setup checks Active Directory for markers that indicate that the deployment tools have been run. You can use the Exchange Server Deployment Tools to ensure that all of the required tools have been run. First, install the Exchange 2003 version of ADC. Then start the Exchange Server Deployment Tools.

To start the Exchange Server Deployment Tools
1. 2. 3. Insert the Exchange Server 2003 CD into your CD-ROM drive. On the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003 Setup page, click Exchange Deployment Tools If the Welcome to Exchange Server 2003 Setup page does not appear after you insert your CD, open the Support folder, double-click Setup.exe, and then click Exchange Deployment Tools to begin. Follow the step-by-step instructions in the Exchange Server Deployment Tools documentation.

4.

After you complete the Exchange Server Deployment Tools, Active Directory Connector is set up, and Exchange 2003 is installed on the server.

Appendix

A P P E N D I X

Exchange 2003 Schema Changes

This appendix (specifically, the output from an LDF file) lists the Microsoft® Active Directory® directory service schema changes between Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003.
dn: CN=ms­Exch­AuthMailDisposition,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­AuthMailDisposition adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­AuthMailDisposition attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.5061 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchAuthMailDisposition name: ms­Exch­AuthMailDisposition oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: 97bPVywePk2W30AghiS6/w== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Authorization­Persistence,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Authorization­Persistence adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Authorization­Persistence attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.15011 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchAuthorizationPersistence

262 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 name: ms­Exch­Authorization­Persistence oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: a2Gu1sUWzkSycouSOuvjNQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Bar­Message­Class,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Bar­Message­Class adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Bar­Message­Class attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.1064 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchBarMessageClass name: ms­Exch­Bar­Message­Class oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: SeVDz+EqD0G4lgLkC5NDcw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Connections­Per­IP,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Connections­Per­IP adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Connections­Per­IP attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.8049 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchChatMaxConnectionsPerIP name: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Connections­Per­IP oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: a37FKjf3QU6DhnKV3b4F5g== searchFlags: 0

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 263

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Octets­To­Mask,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Octets­To­Mask adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Octets­To­Mask attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.8050 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchChatMaxOctetsToMask name: ms­Exch­Chat­Max­Octets­To­Mask oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: I3vjPYkn9021H/kgzlREWA== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Default­Load­File,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Default­Load­File adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Default­Load­File attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.15010 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchDefaultLoadFile name: ms­Exch­Default­Load­File oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: fGZnYjTPfUC6EXzIzGjKGw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­BaseDN,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­BaseDN adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­BaseDN

264 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.12543 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.1 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchDynamicDLBaseDN name: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­BaseDN oMSyntax: 127 oMObjectClass:: KwwCh3McAIVK objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: +Q49dpK9+UGrNH4ynbdu4w== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­Filter,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­Filter adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­Filter attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.12544 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchDynamicDLFilter name: ms­Exch­Dynamic­DL­Filter oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: LNO24axr2kijEytYrhxFzg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Encrypted­Anonymous­Password,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Encrypted­Anonymous­Password adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Encrypted­Anonymous­Password attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.15009 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.10 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchEncryptedAnonymousPassword

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 265 name: ms­Exch­Encrypted­Anonymous­Password oMSyntax: 4 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: /FXAXT9cb0qjSk28to4q0A== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­Custom,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­Custom adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­Custom attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11090 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchFolderAffinityCustom name: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­Custom oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: eiVwULeF1E6y4lH3JmhMWA== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­List adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­List attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11089 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchFolderAffinityList name: ms­Exch­Folder­Affinity­List oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: gLySNRcRYkmqUDjG5pu7kQ== searchFlags: 0

266 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Mailbox­Folder­Set,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Mailbox­Folder­Set adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Mailbox­Folder­Set attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11091 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchMailboxFolderSet name: ms­Exch­Mailbox­Folder­Set oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: ukEp19D/jk27hZdxNEDIow== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Max­Restore­Storage­Groups,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Max­Restore­Storage­Groups adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Max­Restore­Storage­Groups attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11095 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchMaxRestoreStorageGroups name: ms­Exch­Max­Restore­Storage­Groups oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: DqjyPoLqG0KKYqElQ8NBQQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Extended­Settings,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Extended­Settings adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Extended­Settings

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 267 attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.126 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaAdminExtendedSettings name: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Extended­Settings oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: DegK5sl6YU6bw5jLwHJqmQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Wireless­Enable,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Wireless­Enable adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Wireless­Enable attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.124 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaAdminWirelessEnable name: ms­Exch­Oma­Admin­Wireless­Enable oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: vr+nwWsRN0eM2dKe9bNpDg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Orig­MDB,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Orig­MDB adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Orig­MDB attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11093 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.1 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOrigMDB name: ms­Exch­Orig­MDB

268 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 oMSyntax: 127 oMObjectClass:: KwwCh3McAIVK objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: J2m29yZ3Zk6eqO/fSNZSAQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Other­Authentication­Flags,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Other­Authentication­Flags adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Other­Authentication­Flags attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.2017 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOtherAuthenticationFlags name: ms­Exch­Other­Authentication­Flags oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: Z/7HtCO1Lk21bqxXtobH4w== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Preferred­Backfill­Source,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Preferred­Backfill­Source adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Preferred­Backfill­Source attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11094 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.1 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchPreferredBackfillSource name: ms­Exch­Preferred­Backfill­Source oMSyntax: 127 oMObjectClass:: KwwCh3McAIVK objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: VOYDXl3YCEmDoWFBBIxcYg==

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 269 searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Names,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Names adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Names attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5070 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchRecipTurfListNames name: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Names oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: 4WgKLte9mUiLstbqAHVYxw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Options,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Options adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Options attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5071 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchRecipTurfListOptions name: ms­Exch­Recip­Turf­List­Options oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: szYLhzXQLUC4c87Qexc3Yw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­RequireAuthToSendTo,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­RequireAuthToSendTo

270 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­RequireAuthToSendTo attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.5062 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.8 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchRequireAuthToSendTo name: ms­Exch­RequireAuthToSendTo oMSyntax: 1 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: O+sz9Vv3s0+y+wjNU3qE0Q== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Restore,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Restore adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Restore attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.11092 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.8 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchRestore name: ms­Exch­Restore oMSyntax: 1 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: TMvtoUVcSk2xKIgDkuncxg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­SASL­Mechanisms,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­SASL­Mechanisms adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­SASL­Mechanisms attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.2018 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSASLMechanisms

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 271 name: ms­Exch­SASL­Mechanisms oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: tHE12ZrJ/Eyqui2An9aOeQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Server­Bindings­Filtering,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Server­Bindings­Filtering adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Server­Bindings­Filtering attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5072 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchServerBindingsFiltering name: ms­Exch­Server­Bindings­Filtering oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: +t+uYbQ0cEGLq7h5Thy09A== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Rules­Priority,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Rules­Priority adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Rules­Priority attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5064 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.10 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionRulesPriority name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Rules­Priority oMSyntax: 4 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: jE/ChpslGU+IuZyURZNhIQ== searchFlags: 0

272 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Display,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Display adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Display attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5065 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListDisplay name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Display oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: rAT7c9SyTUqFIHV908kmGg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­DNS,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­DNS adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­DNS attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5067 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListDNS name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­DNS oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: 5n3uP+XTy0OEWfegcq43iQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Mask,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Mask adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Mask

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 273 attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5069 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListMask name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Mask oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: r0ECvDidQEyELlHYAlBt5Q== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Options,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Options adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Options attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5066 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.9 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListOptions name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Options oMSyntax: 2 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: YCPmWgURi02KHqLHk7TVfQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Response,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Response adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Response attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5068 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListResponse name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Response

274 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: j9nd7gHay06mXl8Bbx2AMg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Whitelist,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Whitelist adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Whitelist attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.5063 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionWhitelist name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Whitelist oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: OkbPhx5WzkWgum1SjxEdIw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­SubmitRelaySD,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­SubmitRelaySD adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­SubmitRelaySD attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.5060 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.15 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchSubmitRelaySD name: ms­Exch­SubmitRelaySD oMSyntax: 66 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: zPvO4sHcpUW6uNX0vXiITQ== searchFlags: 0

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 275

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­User,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­User adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­User defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.31 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaUser name: ms­Exch­Oma­User objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 3 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: dqmgNo3drUqB/aG11AFsqA== subClassOf: top mayContain: msExchOmaAdminExtendedSettings mayContain: msExchOmaAdminWirelessEnable

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.5.7000.62.12010 lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfList name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn

276 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 schemaIdGuid:: 6X3qfp4xikCEYONeLJ2jiQ== subClassOf: top possSuperiors: msExchSMTPTurfList mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionRulesPriority mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionWhitelist

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Rule,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Rule adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Rule defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.5.7000.62.12011 lDAPDisplayName: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListRule name: ms­Exch­Smtp­Connection­Turf­List­Rule objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: rd+6avbi202YIA2pxH2jLA== subClassOf: top possSuperiors: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfList mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListDisplay mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListDNS mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListMask mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListOptions mayContain: msExchSmtpConnectionTurfListResponse

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 277 schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=User,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: auxiliaryClass auxiliaryClass: msExchOmaUser ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify replace: defaultHidingValue defaultHidingValue: FALSE ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify replace: defaultSecurityDescriptor defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;RP;;;AU) ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: possSuperiors possSuperiors: builtinDomain ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: possSuperiors possSuperiors: domainDNS ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN>

278 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 changetype: modify add: possSuperiors possSuperiors: organizationalUnit ­

dn: CN=Text­Country,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify replace: isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Other­Authentication­Flags,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify replace: lDAPDisplayName lDAPDisplayName: msExchOtherAuthenticationFlags ­

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchAssistantName ­

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchAssistantName ­

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchLabeledURI ­

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 279

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchLabeledURI ­

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchMailboxFolderSet ­

dn: CN=Mail­Recipient,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchRequireAuthToSendTo ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Admin­Group,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: domainDefAltRecip ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Calendar­Connector,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchEncryptedPassword ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Calendar­Connector,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchNotesNotesINI

280 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Calendar­Connector,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchNotesNotesServer ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Chat­User­Class,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchChatMaxConnectionsPerIP ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Chat­User­Class,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchChatMaxOctetsToMask ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: managedBy ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchDynamicDLBaseDN ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 281 add: mayContain mayContain: msExchDynamicDLFilter ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Dynamic­Distribution­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchPurportedSearchUI ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Exchange­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchFolderAffinityCustom ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Exchange­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchFolderAffinityList ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Information­Store,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchMaxRestoreStorageGroups ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Mail­Gateway,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchBarMessageClass ­

282 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 dn: CN=ms­Exch­Organization­Container,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: heuristics ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Private­MDB,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchOrigMDB ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Private­MDB,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchRestore ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­HTTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchAuthorizationPersistence ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­HTTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchDefaultLoadFile ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­HTTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchEncryptedAnonymousPassword ­

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 283

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­IMAP­Container,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchSASLMechanisms ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­IMAP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchOtherAuthenticationFlags ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­POP­Container,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchSASLMechanisms ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­POP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchOtherAuthenticationFlags ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­SMTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchAuthMailDisposition ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­SMTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain

284 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 mayContain: msExchServerBindingsFiltering ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­SMTP­Server,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchSubmitRelaySD ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Public­MDB,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchPreferredBackfillSource ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­SMTP­Turf­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchRecipTurfListNames ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­SMTP­Turf­List,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchRecipTurfListOptions ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Storage­Group,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchRestore ­

dn: CN=Organizational­Person,<SchemaContainerDN>

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 285 changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: employeeNumber ­

dn: CN=Organizational­Person,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchHouseIdentifier ­

dn: CN=Organizational­Person,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchHouseIdentifier ­

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­BackEnd­VDir­URL,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­BackEnd­VDir­URL adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­BackEnd­VDir­URL attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.4.7000.102.15012 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchBackEndVDirURL name: ms­Exch­BackEnd­VDir­URL oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema

286 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 schemaIdGuid:: toOytD8MWUqeUL6QJiKCMQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Address,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Address adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Address attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.139 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaCarrierAddress name: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Address oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: uFjoq689fkCxpjoyPtMzSw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Type,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Type adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Type attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.145 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaCarrierType name: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Type oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: rSSzH6MtSEWPWvNEV/ivSg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Url,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 287 adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Url adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Url attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.146 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaCarrierUrl name: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier­Url oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: jYegrPGJ9UWkj2gLflUFcw== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.137 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaConfiguration name: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: xyvh14hCZki8kfDuGJZcFQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Deliverer,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Deliverer adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Deliverer attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.144 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE

288 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeliverer name: ms­Exch­Oma­Deliverer oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: nwAxovKdPUCfvZmAkElyLQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider­DN,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider­DN adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider­DN attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.138 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.1 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: TRUE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeliveryProviderDN name: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider­DN oMSyntax: 127 oMObjectClass:: KwwCh3McAIVK objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: aRoOHyzWBUGZHayv9LB9cQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability­DN,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability­DN adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability­DN attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.133 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.1 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeviceCapabilityDN name: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability­DN oMSyntax: 127 oMObjectClass:: KwwCh3McAIVK objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN>

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 289 objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: xL0QBRmbZ02ToY3aBMFVaA== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Extended­Properties,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Extended­Properties adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Extended­Properties attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.143 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaExtendedProperties name: ms­Exch­Oma­Extended­Properties oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: fFO+noL4PUeYC85SICp12A== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Formatter,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Formatter adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Formatter attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.135 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaFormatter name: ms­Exch­Oma­Formatter oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: as0n6Dy2RE2WGngaZ5SaNg== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Translator,<SchemaContainerDN>

290 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Translator adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Translator attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.136 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaTranslator name: ms­Exch­Oma­Translator oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: iljy0B5wSUaTeQYsYrk+9g== searchFlags: 0

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Validater,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Validater adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Validater attributeID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.1.134 attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.12 isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: FALSE isSingleValued: FALSE lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaValidater name: ms­Exch­Oma­Validater oMSyntax: 64 objectCategory: CN=Attribute­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: attributeSchema schemaIdGuid:: QAx9qL3LoU26LnBIMvylsQ== searchFlags: 0

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 291 dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;LCLORPRC;;;AU) governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.37 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaCarrier name: ms­Exch­Oma­Carrier objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: TNMSh+UnskGXbkgq2MlU5w== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaCarrierAddress mayContain: msExchOmaCarrierType mayContain: msExchOmaCarrierUrl mayContain: msExchOmaConfiguration mayContain: msExchOmaDeliveryProviderDN mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties mayContain: msExchOmaTranslator

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration­Container,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration­Container adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration­Container defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;LCLORPRC;;;AU) governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.32 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaConfigurationContainer name: ms­Exch­Oma­Configuration­Container objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: u5oP23AHCU+6ZHmT2RUXtw== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaAdminWirelessEnable

292 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Container,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Container adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Container defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.38 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaContainer name: ms­Exch­Oma­Container objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: IKs9hkD7pEOl4YJbIHEFDw== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Data­Source,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Data­Source adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Data­Source defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;LCLORPRC;;;AU) governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.35 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDataSource name: ms­Exch­Oma­Data­Source objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: TYqj3SqXokSSRArLSx000Q== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaConfiguration mayContain: msExchOmaDeliveryProviderDN mayContain: msExchOmaDeviceCapabilityDN mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 293 mayContain: msExchOmaValidater

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.36 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeliveryProvider name: ms­Exch­Oma­Delivery­Provider objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: DRO/zeLHckWUsPyb5+75Uw== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaConfiguration mayContain: msExchOmaDeliverer mayContain: msExchOmaDeviceCapabilityDN mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;LCLORPRC;;;AU) governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.34 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeviceCapability name: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Capability objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: 3/R63xjzLE6sQ75bSJRxHA== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

294 What's New in Exchange Server 2003 mayContain: msExchOmaFormatter

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Type,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Type adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Type defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:(A;;LCLORPRC;;;AU) governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.33 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaDeviceType name: ms­Exch­Oma­Device­Type objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: s496ytAhp06vP9FcbffAlA== subClassOf: container mayContain: msExchOmaDeviceCapabilityDN mayContain: msExchOmaExtendedProperties

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Oma­Connector,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: add adminDescription: ms­Exch­Oma­Connector adminDisplayName: ms­Exch­Oma­Connector defaultHidingValue: TRUE defaultSecurityDescriptor: D:S: governsID: 1.2.840.113556.1.6.20.2.39 lDAPDisplayName: msExchOmaConnector name: ms­Exch­Oma­Connector objectCategory: CN=Class­Schema,<SchemaContainerDN> objectClass: classSchema

Appendix: Exchange 2003 Schema Changes 295 objectClassCategory: 1 rDNAttID: cn schemaIdGuid:: sdDJTUxZfkCn0kJubCDauw== subClassOf: msExchConnector mayContain: legacyExchangeDN mayContain: deliveryMechanism mayContain: msExchOmaCarrierUrl mayContain: msExchSourceBridgeheadServersDN

dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

dn: CN=ms­Exch­Restore,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify replace: isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet isMemberOfPartialAttributeSet: TRUE ­ dn: CN=ms­Exch­Protocol­Cfg­HTTP­Virtual­Directory,<SchemaContainerDN> changetype: modify add: mayContain mayContain: msExchBackEndVDirURL ­ dn: changetype: modify replace: schemaUpdateNow schemaUpdateNow: 1 ­

For more information about Exchange, see http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/.

296 What's New in Exchange Server 2003

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