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Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 Siler, Tara. "Millions In Student Aid Going Unused.

" NPR. NPR, 31 Mar. 2010. Web. 27 Mar. 2013. In this article, Siler explains how many students are not taking full advantage of the help that is available right now. The Pell Grant program provides grants to lowincome students if only more would apply. Mark Kantrowitz (publisher of FinAid) estimates that about two million eligible students nationwide are foregoing this federal assistance. In California, those students leave about a half a billion dollars in federal Pell Grants untapped. Pell Grants are available to students who make less than $50,000 a year and can pay for anything a student needs books, transportation, housing or tuition.

The article stresses the importance of free financial aid for students. Kantrowitz says that about a half billion dollars go unused each year and its because students dont know it is available to them or they dont take the time to fill out the forms. S iler talks about the benefits of Pell Grants for students who need financial aid to afford college. The author proves his point well because she gives statistics of student aid that is left unclaimed. She expresses her knowledge of pell grants and the type of students who qualify for them. This article leaves wondering what happens to the money that is never used for aid; is the money put towards education or is it rolled over for the next year?

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 Annotated Bibliography I chose this article because it exemplifies a type of aid available for students and does not have to be paid back. The last topic in my inquiry will be about the different resources available to students for financial aid and the amount of money/aid that remain unused each year. For the students that were unable to attend college due to financial issues, I want to list some resources that could have helped them out if they werent aware of them.

those students leave about a half billion dollars in federal Pell Grants untapped. Many students are not taking advantage of the help thats available right now. He estimates that about two million eligible students nationwide are foregoing this federal assistance.

Congressionally Mandated Studies of College Costs and Prices. Washington, D.C.: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2003. Internet resource. In this article, the National Commission on the Costs of Higher Education conducted a study that distinguishes between prices and costs of a college education. Although the Commission was unable to determine the cause or causes for price increases, it found that over the past two decades, college tuition has increased at a faster rate than both the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and median household income.

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 The highest increase in price of attendance was for the 25% of students who had the highest income, and the lowest increase in the price of attendance was for the 25% of students who had the lowest income (grants and loans offset increase in price of attendance for low-income undergraduates). Although low-income students paid less out-of-pocket, increased borrowing also increased their long-term loan indebtedness. The Commission concluded that sticker prices increased higher than inflation and the costs (expenses to provide the education) of universities. The Commission illustrates that a college is like a commercial firm and a charity. College is becoming less and less affordable for students, which causes students to result to financial aid (grants, loans, and scholarships). The authors main point in the article was to highlight annual increases in tuition for universities and the percentage of students who pay the most out-of-pocket.

The article leaves me with a few questions why are low-income students noticeably using more aid than middle or higher-income families? Is it because middle and higher-income families dont qualify for such aid, or because they feel no need to seek for help if they already have the money?

This article helps me get an idea of the affordability of college for most students in any economic status. I want to start my inquiry by introducing college prices and costs and how much tuition increases per year and the social class that is affected most by

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 those increases. This study helps me realize the fact that tuition is increasing more than the CPI and annual household income, and that higher-income students are paying the most out-of-pocket while lower income students result more towards aid (therefore, increasing their debt).

In sharp contrast to business firms, colleges operate both as commercial firms, selling their product for a price, and as charities, giving it away for social purposes. (5). Over the last two decades, college tuition has increased at a faster rate than both the CPI and the median household income. (6). Combined grant aid was sufficient to offset increases in price of attendance for low-income undergraduates, those who had the highest need and were least able to afford to pay for an increase in total price.

Rennekamp, Rose M. "I Cant Afford College and Other Financial Aid & Grant Myths." Articles Advice. N.p., 7 Sept. 2011. Web. 26 Mar. 2013. In this article, Rose highlights and explains the myths about paying for college. Rose states that college is an important and expensive process for parents and students. She gives alternative options to help make college affordable. Students can receive a combination of grants, loans, scholarships, or work-study jobs to help reduce the cost of college. Grants and scholarships are forms of aid that one doesnt have to repay, and loans are a type of aid that one does have to repay. There are need-based aid for lowerincome families and merit-based aid for students who excel in athletics or academics.

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 Financial aid can be found from the federal government, state government, colleges, employers, and many organizations.

The author is arguing that college affordability is not an excuse for stressing about college planning or an excuse for not attending a college. She exemplifies options for paying for college, and provides information about each option. The author stresses the importance of applying for financial aid quick, not waiting until the last minute, and gives resources to find more information. The author proves her point well because although college is expensive for families, she provides ways to help make college affordable. Questions that this article leaves for me to find more information about are how many students do not continue education after high school because they didnt seek other forms of aid? How much money is offered by the state for financial aid? What are the qualifications for need-based aid?

I chose this article because it shows other options for paying for college. The second point in my paper is to talk about the aid (loans, grants, and scholarships) available for students. For my inquiry, I want to talk in depth about each alternative method for paying for college.

However, two out of three students get at least some financial aid to help make college more affordable, according to Sallie Mae, the largest education lender.

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 You will find financial aid from a number of sources: the federal government, state government, the college or university itself, a parents employer, and many other organizations. For example, parents with incomes less than $60,000 arent expected to contribute to the cost of their childs education at Harvard.

Lindauer, Carly. "New College Board Trends Reports: Public College Tuition Increases Slow; Rapid Growth in Federal Grant Aid Ends." New College Board Trends Reports: Public College Tuition Increases Slow; Rapid Growth in Federal Grant Aid Ends. The College Board, 24 Oct. 2012. Web. 01 Apr. 2013 This article explains the trends in college in-state tuition and federal aid granted to college students. In 2012-13, in-state tuition increased 4.8% from the previous year, while total student aid decreased from $52 billion to $49 billion. In 2012-13, undergraduates at public four-year colleges received an average of $5,750, while in 2011-12 undergraduates received an average of $13,218 for the year.

The author, Carly Lindauer, is the director of advocacy communications for The College Board. She reinforces her statements about rising college tuition prices with factual information pertaining to tuition prices from 2011 to 2013. Since The College Board is closely related to college admissions and a source for grant aid for students, they can accurately compare college tuition prices with student aid. College Board is reliable because it works closely with the admissions office of most colleges.

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013

For my inquiry topic, I want to describe college tuition costs for students and how much tuition prices increase annually. This article provides me with information on how much tuition has increased. Average published tuition and fees for in-state students at public four-year colleges and universities increased from $8,256 in 2011-12 to $8,655 in 2012-13. Also in my inquiry topic, I want to include the trends of student aid (loans and grants) available for students. This article illustrates the decline in federal funds for student aid over the span of 2011 to 2013. I want to describe tuition prices and the amount of aid available for students to allow the reader to form an opinion if college is affordable to everyone, considering tuition prices and aid.

Lipka, Sara. The Chronicle of Higher Education. [Washington, D.C.]: Chronicle of Higher Education, 2011. Print. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 66 percent of undergraduate students received some form of financial aid, up from the previous 63 percent of students who received financial aid. The study that was conducted showed that the percentage of students who receive financial aid did not experience a sharp increase as from the 1999-2000 school years. The total average amount for students

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 receiving financial aid was $9100, including grants, student loans, and federal aid. The article also breaks down the types of student aid by income level.

Sara Lipka is explaining the main points of a study that was conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics. The informational article gives statistics of the amount of students on financial aid and the different types of financial aid that are available to students. The National Center for Education Statistics is the research branch of the Department of Education, so they can provide factual information related to financial aid. The study seemed fair because they used several colleges for the study, including students with and without student aid.

This article is related to my inquiry topic because it gives an idea of how many students resort to financial aid to afford college. Because college tuition increases each year, the most students use financial aid to help pay for college. For my inquiry, I also wanted to note alternative ways to make college affordable by naming different types of financial aid available for students. Sixty-six percent of undergraduates received some type of student aid during the 2007-8 academic year, up from 63 percent in 2003-4, says a report released today by the Education Departments National Center for Education Statistics

Brandon Jackson Megan Keaton English 1102 27 March 2013 The latest rise in the percentage of students receiving aid is not as sharp as the previous jump, from 55 percent in 1999-2000. Fifty-two percent of students received grants, at an average of $4,900, and 38 percent obtained student loans, taking out, on average, $7,100. Over all, 47 percent of students received federal aid, 34 percent took out Stafford Loans, and 27 percent got Pell Grants.