M aY 2013

Pet Project
Douglas Feed & Pet Supply thrives in down economy Hydroplanes return to Folsom Lake Fallen Marine remembered
ECRWSS Postal Customer Granite Bay, CA 95746

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Kiersten Schmidt bonds with her service dog, Rover.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

04 08 11

Tell it to the Birds

On the Water

Douglas Feed and Pet Supply continues to thrive in face of chain store competition

Hydroplanes, Folsom Lake, three days of fun: Oh my!

Her Loyal Companion

Fallen Marine Remembered
Victor Dew honored with U.S. Post Office in his name

A young woman with autism finds a true friend in a service dog

14 20

’m pretty sure there aren’t enough positive adjectives in all the world’s languages to adequately describe how much I love my dog, Buster. Or, as I refer to him: “The World’s Cutest Living Creature.” I know I am not alone in this First World problem. Everyone with a furry friend probably feels the same way. You may also think you have the world’s cutest dog, and I’m sorry to inform you that you’re wrong. But, I’m pleased to tell you, your dog is a close second. Cole and I became Buster’s human companions eight months ago. He’s now about 2 years old, and likely a Shih Tzu/terrier mix. We don’t really know, because he’s a rescue dog with a sketchy

True Love
Sena Christian Managing Editor

history. Apparently, he was found abandoned at a gas station and passed around among three families before finding his forever home with us. All we know for sure is every time Buster looks up at us with those soulful brown eyes and his sparkly white under bite, our hearts melt. We’d do anything for that little guy, which usually means three walks a day and way too many yummy treats. Oops. I’m convinced Buster has taught me the meaning of life. I only wish I could be as carefree as him, and not

worry what society thinks when I have a milk mustache or mud caked on my belly. Buster gives us so much more than we give him — not in the least of which is pure joy. We tell Buster all the time that he better live forever and ever. Is that too much to ask?
Sena Christian is the managing editor of the View. Contact her at senac@gold countrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @GraniteBayView.

A Year of TRICKS

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Dining View Hot Property Fitness View Things to Do Daytripper Back and Forth 16 26 56 59 60 62

TRICKS dancers land Sacramento Kings gig

ON THE COVER:
DeeDee and Craig Lyman own Douglas Feed and Pet Supply in Granite Bay.
COVER PHOTO • ANNE STOKES

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MAY 2013 Volume 23 • Number 5
188 Cirby Way, Roseville, California 95678 www.granitebayview.com, 916-774-7928
Publisher: Kelly R. Leibold, 916-774-7910, kellyl@goldcountrymedia.com Editor: Krissi Khokhobashvili, 916-774-7955, krissik@goldcountrymedia.com Managing Editor: Sena Christian, 916-774-7947, senac@goldcountrymedia.com Advertising director: Suzanne Stevenson, 916-774-7921, suzannes@goldcountrymedia.com Advertising information: Rebecca Regrut, 916-774-7928, rebeccar@goldcountrymedia.com Production supervisor: Sue Morin Circulation: 1-800-927-7355 or 916-774-7900

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

3

Mom and Pop Shop Thrives

Victoria Lyman, 8, gets acquainted with the chicks for sale at Douglas Feed and Pet Supply in Granite Bay. The Lyman family raises some 30 chickens at their Lincoln home.
PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Feed store a success thanks to business smarts, good service

DOUGLAS FEED AND PET SUPPLY
Where: 5460 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Info: (916) 791-3202, www.douglasranchsupply.com

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BY TINKA DAVI

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

raig Lyman was an executive with a major lending agency and his wife, DeeDee, was employed at a financial institution when the real estate market went downhill. The couple could see the dire economic forecast ahead, and feared losing their jobs. “We said, ‘We’re done. We’re not going to get laid off,’” Craig Lyman said, reflecting on that decision six years ago. The Lymans were living in Hillsboro, Ore., at the

time. They put their house up for sale and it sold in six days for the full asking price. Then, they returned to Placer County — where they’d previously lived — and purchased the former Douglas Ranch Supply, which had opened in 1980, and where DeeDee Lyman had shopped for her horses 25 years ago. Taking on a business in late 2007 was risky, but Craig Lyman was confident he’d make it work. “If I could manage 150

people (for the lending agency), I could manage 15,” he said. The Lymans renamed the store Douglas Feed and Pet Supply and have transformed it into a multi-million dollar business, all while facing an onslaught of chain pet store competition nearby and a weakened national economy. “It was the only business in the entire Sacramento area that we could
• DOUGLAS FEED PAGE 6

Douglas Feed and Pet Supply employee Trevor Grabenauer bucks hay bales at the Granite Bay store. Co-owner DeeDee Lyman says female customers are often smitten with Grabenauer: “He can pick up anything.”

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DOUGLAS FEED: Pet store has building for cat and dog needs, building for equine goods
continued from 4 afford,” Craig Lyman said. “We had animals — horses, dogs and cats — and it seemed like a good family business. It also was one mile down the street from my old office.” The day escrow closed on the pet supply business, he received notice that his office in Oregon closed. He would have been laid off.

‘We’re Very Blessed’
Around 10 a.m. most mornings, the Douglas Feed and Pet Supply parking lot on Douglas Boulevard is full and the aisles inside are bustling with customers. Shoppers know it’s the go-to place for all things for animals, of all sizes. Douglas Feed has two buildings — one for dog and cat food and supplies, another for equine necessities. A barn and bales of hay are out back. Dog training classes are available through Paws in Progress training, offered in-home or at the store. Professional trainers cover basic manners and obedience, and there is pet therapy and socialization playgroups for dogs that

The Lyman family, from left: Craig, Victoria, Trenton, Alexis and DeeDee.
get over 300 dogs a month.” Another popular part of their business: employee Trevor Grabenauer, who can often be found bucking hay bales. DeeDee Lyman said Grabenauer has his fans among female customers because of his long Fabio locks and muscles. “He can pick up anything,” she said. Around 15,000 people shop there monthly, Craig Lyman said, and he considers Douglas Feed the largest independent pet supply retailer in Placer County.

From left, Victoria, 8, and Alexis Lyman, 7, make sure the mechanical horse at Douglas Feed and Pet Supply is in good working order.
have completed some training. It’s a safe, supervised alternative to dog parks. Pet owners can wash their dogs in large tubs in the canine/feline store. “It’s very popular,” Craig Lyman said. “We

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Alexis Lyman, 7, inspects the different types of feeders available in the new bird room at Douglas Feed and Pet Supply.

“It was the only business in the entire Sacramento area that we could afford. We had animals — horses, dogs and cats — and it seemed like a good family business.”
Craig Lyman, owner, Douglas Feed and Pet Supply

The customer base includes Placer, El Dorado and Sacramento counties. “We’re very blessed; we’re very fortunate,” he said. The Lymans have expanded the site to five acres and the buildings from a total of 1,800 square feet to 5,200 and added the equine shop, which offers tack and food for horses, as well as riding

apparel for owners. People can also buy live chicks, gifts and propane. A recent addition to the store is a bird room with seed, cages and other items for wild and pet birds. Douglas Feed and Pet Supply has more than half a million dollars in inventory and sells 3,000 bags of dog food a month. Lyman said the business has doubled its sales in five years.

Committed to their Community
While the Lymans don’t have a background in pet supply sales, they have dogs, cats, chickens, geese, one duck and a horse at their house in Lincoln. They also have three children: Trenton, 12, who works at Douglas Feed and Pet Supply during the summer, and Victoria, 8, and Alexis, 7, who are especially fond of the chicks available for sale at their parents’ store. Craig Lyman describes his family business’s success as an act of God. “It wasn’t me,” he said. The couple, who attend Gracepoint Adventist Church in Rocklin, are committed to sharing their good fortune with the community and often support Bayside Church outreach efforts, Eureka Schools Foundation fundraisers and Granite Bay youth soccer and baseball. Manager Kristen Jackson has worked at Douglas Feed and Pet Supply for 10 years, starting when the store was still Douglas Ranch Supply. She likes the store’s sense of community, familial

Most of Douglas Feed and Pet Supply’s sales nowadays involve pet food, says Craig Lyman, who bought the store in 2007.
feel and the relationship employees develop with customers. “The biggest compliment we get is when people come in year after year,” she said. “We have customers who have been shopping with us for 15 to 20 years. It really is a destination store and we’re on a first-name basis with many people.”

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

7

Rover and Me

Kiersten Schmidt throws out two tennis balls for her service dog, Rover, who she describes as a “fetch fanatic.”
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Service dog helps young woman overcome hurdles of autism
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

“I’ve struggled with social skills due to my autism situation, and (Rover) lets me know, you don’t need to be afraid to talk to someone. I’m right here.”
Kiersten Schmidt

ent person,” her mom said.

Living With Autism
Schmidt got Rover nearly two months ago. He is her third service dog. She got her first one, Horace, in 2004, but he passed away at age 3. She then got Wella, her companion for the next eight years. Schmidt took Wella with her to Granite Bay High School and fellow students began approaching the pair to pet the dog and strike up a conversation. That continues to happen with

K

GRANITE BAY VIEW

iersten Schmidt was a painfully shy child and often felt alone, unlike her younger sisters. “Having two siblings that were always going to sleepovers and being invited to birthday parties, that really wasn’t what her childhood was like,” said her mom, Charity Schmidt.

You wouldn’t guess that Schmidt, who has autism, used to be shy upon meeting the 22-year-old today. Perhaps you’ve seen her with a big smile on her face, engaging with customers at Little Bliss Cakery in Granite Bay. At times, Schmidt still

feels different from her sisters. It’s hard being the only person in her family with a disability, she said. But she credits one loving companion with helping her flip feelings of negativity into positivity: Her service dog, Rover. “When she has a dog, she’s just a totally differ-

Rover, when the pair are out together in public. “For me, in my life, I’ve struggled with social skills due to my autism situation, and he lets me know, you don’t need to be afraid to talk to someone. I’m right here,” Schmidt said. Children as young as 5 years old are eligible to get a service dog through Santa Rosa-based Canine Companions for Independence, founded in 1975 to provide trained assistance dogs to enhance the lives of people with disabilities.

8

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Volunteers provide homes for the breeder dogs and, when puppies are 8 weeks old, send them to the organization’s headquarters. The puppies then go to other volunteers who train them on socialization and obedience. Once the puppies are 15-18 months old, they go to regional centers across the United States for six months of training. The dogs are then paired with a graduate for a twoweek training period. In 2012, the northwest region of Canine Companions, which serves northern California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and northern Nevada, placed 79 dogs with people with disabilities. Through donations and private funding, the organization is able to provide dogs at no charge to the graduate, according to Angie Schacht, develop-

Kiersten Schmidt’s service dog, Rover, shows how he can close kitchen drawers. Schmidt, 22, has autism, and Rover knows 40 commands.
ment associate and instructor for the northwest region. “People with disabilities often feel isolated and worry about their safety,” Schacht said. “Our dogs can give greater independence through physical tasks like picking up dropped items, tugging open doors, turning light switches on and off and alerting people who are deaf or hard of hearing to sounds. They also provide unconditional love and incredible joy.”

Life of a Service Dog
Rover came to Kiersten at age 2. Service dogs are typically half Labrador and half golden retriever. Labradors are intelligent

breeds, while golden retrievers offer the personal side. Rover may be a full Labrador, but he’s also a love bug. He’s a “fetch fanatic,” as his mother describes him. He loves when Schmidt tosses two tennis balls, at the same time, across the backyard and he chases them down at top speed. But that’s during playtime — when his vest goes on, his demeanor changes. “When they don’t have their vest on they’re just a regular dog,” Charity Schmidt said. “Once the vest is on, they know they’re working.” Rover knows 40 commands, including how to push in drawers, open a sliding glass door with a string, alert Schmidt when someone is at the front door and carry a package. In the past, Schmidt’s service dogs have trav• SEE ROVER PAGE 10

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ROVER: Service dog gives Schmidt the comfort she needs to help spread autism awareness
continued from 9 eled with her — lying at her feet — on flights to visit family in Michigan. Rover may be able to do a lot of fancy things, but most importantly, he provides comfort. Especially when Schmidt tosses and turns at night, which is common for people with autism. Schmidt says Rover “just knows” when she’s having a hard time and will jump on the bed and snuggle until she falls asleep. Typically, a service dog will be retired at around 10 years old to enjoy the rest of his life in peace and relaxation.

“When they don’t have their vest on, they’re just a regular dog. Once the vest is on, they know they’re working.”
Charity Schmidt

Spreading Awareness
Many people with autism struggle with noise and touch sensitivities. Hearing a fire truck’s alarm or a balloon pop used to scare Schmidt, but not so much anymore. But this sort of predicament isn’t easily understood by people without the disability, she said. The Granite Bay-based A Touch

of Understanding has found a way to demonstrate these sensitivities in its efforts to spread disability awareness. The nonprofit organization has relied on the help of Schmidt, who is highfunctioning enough to explain how her brain works. She often does speaking engagements to talk about the subject matter, and there beside her is Rover. “Dogs give me that encouragement to not be afraid,” Schmidt said. “I’m not just the girl with a disability. I’m someone special.”
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

Kiersten Schmidt pets her service dog, Rover, who helps 22year-old Schmidt get through the struggles of life with autism.

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MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

TRICKS dancers put on show at Kings game
BY LAURA O’BRIEN

Dancers Catch Performance Bug

RICKS dance companies recently got a taste of bigtime entertaining. The group of 6- to 14-yearolds rocked Sleep Train Arena for a jazz and hip-hop infused Sacramento Kings pre-game show in March. “Some of the players were actually practicing on the court, so (the dancers) were starryeyed,” said company Director Kiersten Meyer. TRICKS Dance Company in Granite Bay, Folsom and Sacramento re-formed in 2012 under Meyer’s direction, after a hiatus of several years. The company recently performed at the Folsom Family Expo and Wellness Festival and several retirement homes. Upcoming performances include Celebrate

T

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Danielle Schloss dances at TRICKS Gym in Granite Bay.
PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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• MAY

11

TRICKS DANCE COMPANY
What: Bunny Ballet classes for ages 3-5, School Age Dancer classes for ages 6 and up, Production classes for ages 6 and up. Every class includes dance technique, expressive movement, musical and rhythmic awareness and life skills. Where: 4070 Cavitt Stallman Road, Granite Bay Info: (916) 791-4496 or www.tricksgym. com/dance

Sacramento on May 11 and fairs in Placer and El Dorado counties. Meyer has her sights set on Disneyland next year. “You have to be able to perform anywhere, anytime,” Meyer said. “Even if the audience is close, you still have to keep your stage smile and keep your presence and still dance full out.” When preparing for a big performance such as the Kings pre-game show, dancers from three TRICKS studios practice together on Saturdays at the Granite Bay studio off Cavitt Stallman Road. Sarah Kenney, 14, of Granite Bay, is a member of the company and has taken TRICKS classes since age 3.

Emily Arellano, front, practices dance routines at TRICKS Gym in Granite Bay.

“I like learning all the new routines and I like feeling so accomplished once I get something done correctly,” Kenney said. The company focuses

on lyrical, contemporary and jazz styles, with some hip-hop. “We do really try to give the girls a variety of styles because we don’t want them to be all ballet or all

jazz,” Meyer said. “We want a well-rounded education.” Meyer began teaching dance 13 years ago at age 15, when an instructor told her she should give it

a try. She now holds a bachelor’s degree in dance. As a student, performing kindled her love of dance. “I thought it was really fun to be out in the com-

munity and get the community excited about dance,” Meyer said. “And I think that’s what I want (company dancers) to gain from it, is sharing
• SEE DANCERS PAGE 13

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DANCERS: Share passion
continued from page 13 your passion with the rest of the world and shedding some light on the dance world. Maybe there’s somebody there who’s never seen dance but falls in love with it, and then wants to come take a class and then they’re sharing in the passion with you.” Kenney has caught the bug. She hopes to earn a spot on a high school dance team next year, but wants to continue taking classes with Meyer. “I really like her,” Kenney said. “She’s funny, and she helps us do everything correctly, and she does the best that she can for us.” Company auditions are held every year in August. Dancers take a technique and company class each week, in addition to weekend practices and performances.
A big sister/little sister program fosters camaraderie among the 39member group during Saturday practices in Granite Bay, said Kurt Albaugh, of Elk Grove. His daughter Kaitlyn, 6, joined the company this season, and has taken classes since age 3. “She’s a star,” Albaugh said. “It’s just getting brighter and brighter as she gets older.” The dancers learn life lessons working as a group, said Heather Zang, a dance company mom from Folsom. “It’s team building for them and pushes them to learn new stuff,” Zang said. Arielle Castro, 8, of Folsom, gained enough confidence through dance that she entered a talent show at her school. “I like doing the splits,” Castro said, flashing a big

PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Top: Director Kiersten Meyer re-formed the dance company in 2012. Right: Shelby Hagge, 8, warms up before dance practice.
grin. “I like leaping.” Meyer enjoys seeing her young dancers grow in the art form: “That’s the best gift ever is to see them continue dancing and to pursue it for their life.”

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

13

Can’t Wait for Big Wake
Three-day boat races to be held in Granite Bay
BY STEPHANIE GARCIA
GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

When: Friday, May 31, to Sunday, June 2 Where: Folsom Lake, Granite Bay entrance (end of Douglas
Boulevard) Parking: Free parking and shuttle services at Sierra College Cost: General admission is $39 per day. Must be purchased in advance, tickets not available at event. Purchase at 7165 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay. Info: (916) 9906620, info@big wakeweekend.com or www.bigwake weekend.com

BIG WAKE WEEKEND

The countdown has begun. On the website promoting Big Wake Weekend at Folsom Lake in Granite Bay, a ticker marks the time left — up to the second — until the three-day event starts. But the excitement has already begun. Much of the anticipation is centered on the return of 200-mph HI Unlimited Hydroplanes to the greater Sacramento area for the first time in 46 years, according to promoter Bob Richards. The festival will also feature Air National Guard H1 Hydroplane and Ameri-

COURTESY

can Power Board Association racing. Aside from the boat racing, fans will be able to watch the Hyperlite Experience, which is a wakeboarding show,featuring

wakeboarders Shaun Murray, Jimmy LaRiche, Jacob Valdez and other athletes entertaining the crowd by performing huge aerial maneuvers, according to Richards.

Don’t like water sports? Check out the vendors, fiberglass jet boat exhibit, themed beer and wine gardens and food concessions. Although Big Wake Weekend is billed as “California’s premier beach picnic and party, combining culture, sport and entertainment,” Richards insists the event will cater to families, as well. “This event is for all ages,” he said. “There are activities for kids, food and entertainment.” For the three-day event, organizers have obtained a special permit to sell beer and wine in certain areas, lifting the no-alcohol restriction typically on the lake. But patrons aren’t allowed to bring in their own alcohol.

“Each beer and wine garden is set up to feel like a restaurant, so parents can enjoy a cold beer and eat a meal with the kids,” Richards said. To prepare the park for the major event, Richards said he paid nearly $500,000 to the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area in fees, which go toward the area’s operations and maintenance. He will also donate the time of more than 40 volunteers who will clean the half-mile stretch of beach and shorelines. They will also repair bathrooms, paint, landscape and conduct general safety repairs. Party patrons wanting to make this a weekend to remember will need to plan ahead.

There will be strictly enforced rules during the three-day affair, including no general parking, no admittance to the park without a pre-purchased wristband (tickets cannot be purchased at the event) and the entrance to the lake at the end of Douglas Boulevard will be open to ticketholders only. Richards says the event will be a professional extravaganza and set up in a way that will appeal to the patrons, vendors and city officials who have supported the venture. “(The) state park has been incredible,” Richards said. “From the sanction officials to the sponsors, everyone has really been great.”

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• MAY

15

dining view

Chef Joe O’Connor joined the Flower Farm Café in Loomis in January.
PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES •

Lunch at the Flower Farm Café
Loomis eatery boasts new chef, menu
BY TOBY LEWIS

GRANITE BAY VIEW

Cream of mushroom soup and a caprese sandwich.

t’s not often the words “dining” and “lunch” are used in the same sentence, especially in this column. But just off Auburn Folsom Road, on the outskirts of Granite Bay, sits a little place worthy of mention, in my opinion. Although it is only open for

I

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

breakfast and lunch, the Flower Farm Café is a hidden gem of which I have only recently learned. And so on a recent sunny (and breezy) spring afternoon, I thought I’d pop in for some lunch. The Flower Farm is situated on 10 acres of fruitful Loomis farmland, which owner Annie Bowler says has been continuously farmed since the late 19th century. “It’s very fertile,” Bowler said. “This whole area was fenced in for cows and sheep when we bought it. We plant stuff and everything just kind of grows.” There is a bed and breakfast, a

café, event center, orchard and a nursery. Casque Wines, featuring Rhone and Bordeaux-style wines, also holds its tasting room on the property. The Flower Farm Café is pretty much everything you would expect from a small countryside café — grab a menu, check out the specials board, place your order at the counter, grab a number and find a table either indoors or out on the covered patio. The outdoor patio area holds several tables covered by a wooden pergola surrounded by citrus orchards and nursery plants. It is quite tranquil. On my recent visit to the

16

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Grads and Dads
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NEW:
café, I was immediately greeted by Rebecca, the friendly hostess/cashier who was happy to answer any questions I had about the menu. I glanced at the menu and noticed several paninis listed, each one at $6.95. Rebecca explained the Italiana (basil pesto, grilled chicken and provolone cheese), the American (tri-tip, mozzarella cheese and white garlic sauce) and the Orchard (apples, brie cheese, fig jam and chicken) were the most popular. But, I decided I could not pass on Sheri’s Curried Chicken Sandwich ($6.95) — a tempting combination of cubed white chicken meat tossed in a yellow curry sauce with dried cranberries served with a mixture of spring lettuces on a sourdough walnut wheat bread. The sandwich was as fresh and tasty as I would have expected from this somewhat-off-the-beaten-path country café. That is to say, it was delicious. All sandwiches are served with a choice of

FLOWER FARM CAFE
What: Café and coffee shop; sandwiches, soups, daily specials Where: 9280 Horseshoe Bar Road, Loomis When: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Saturday; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays Info: www.flowerfarminn.com

Birthday Party Room Cake Decorating Classes 8789-D Auburn Folsom Road • Granite Bay 916.791.CAKE • www.LittleBlissCakery.com

YOU ’ RE INVITED
What excites me the most about the Flower Farm Café is perhaps not quite where it is just yet, but where it is headed.
bread from the Sacramento Baking Company, including wheat, wheat walnut, sourdough and focaccia. There is also a selection of gluten-free bread from Whole Foods Market. I decided on a cup of soup with my sandwich ($1 extra) and I had two choices that day — cream of mushroom and sweet potato. I chose the sweet potato, at which time another employee asked if I wanted to taste it first since other guests had been complaining it was a bit too salty. A nice touch. While the taste of soup was quite hot, as it hadn’t had time to cool down yet, I did not find it too salty and was happy to stick with my choice. It was served with two toasted crostini and two slices of apple, which I imagined were freshly picked from a nearby orchard. The apple was a confusing element to the soup, however, and added a sweetness that was not needed with the sweet potato. My complaints stop there, however. What excites me the most about the Flower Farm Café is perhaps not quite where it is just yet, but where it is headed. Since the café is surrounded by such pristine
• SEE CAFE PAGE 18

Granite Bay View Mixer
Wednesday, May 15 • 5pm – 7pm
Hosted by Local Granite Bay Businesses and The Granite Bay View Open to the Public

8789-D Auburn Folsom Road, Granite Bay
GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 17

Flower Farm Café regular Brian Sharp enjoys a Mediterranean chicken wrap for lunch.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

CAFE: New menus coming
continued from page 17 and fertile farmland, it begs the question: Is the Flower Farm looking to epitomize the “farm-totable” concept? “We’re really trying to move it in that direction, but it’s a little more complicated to get it started,” Bowler said. “We already have a small kitchen garden by the inn, which we’ve used for a number of years, but we want to expand it and have a lot of food come straight from here.” Plans are already in motion to plant a small plot of land situated directly off Auburn Folsom Road and within short eyeshot of the café with a variety of vegetable specifically requested by chef Joe O’Connor. O’Connor recently joined the Flower Farm after serving as executive chef at Sunset Whitney
Country Club in Rocklin. “We have new menus coming out where we are going to be adding both more breakfast items and lunch items,” Bowler said. “We’re trying to add really healthy options that taste good, but are also good for you.” For me, the bottom line is I had a two-course lunch in a nice, quiet country setting for less than $10. Next time I am cycling along Auburn Folsom Road or simply enjoying the trails out near Granite Beach, I will certainly remember the Flower Farm. Bon appetit!
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer with 30 years experience in the restaurant industry. Look to each month’s Dining View for his thoughts, insights and opinions about dining in and around Granite Bay. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

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18 MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

LARGE QUANTITY DISCOUNTS FOR BUSINESS!

(Close to Ace Hardware. Corner of Douglas Blvd.)

Bayside Church youth assist families in need
BY LAURA O’BRIEN

A Different Type of Spring Breaker
assigned project sites. “You just see the transformation where they become these amazing young adults,” said Teresa Wilcox, whose husband and two sons, one in high school and one in college, also attended the trip. “It gives you faith in this next generation.” The program serves a twofold purpose: It provides basic and spiritual needs for families in Mexicali, and gives service experience for Bayside teenagers, said Teaching Pastor Curt Harlow. “It’s a better hearttransformation experience than any one that I’ve been involved with in 30 years of working in youth ministry,” Harlow said. “It’s really about helping our kids get a bigger picture.”

exico Outreach, Bayside Church’s spring break mission in Mexicali, has assisted needy families for the past 17 years. For one week during spring break in March, high school and college students provided children’s programs and fellowship at 25 churches in Mexicali. Teams also built homes for the neediest families living in those communities. Joey Petrali served at one of the church sites. “I bonded with this little niño, Jesus Eduardo. It was really hard to say goodbye to him,” said Petrali, who interns in the

M

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

COURTESY • DARREN TAKEGAMI

Teenagers with Bayside Church build houses in Mexicali during spring break.
Thrive Leadership School at Bayside Church in Granite Bay. “I had to leave him there, but I knew that he was part of the family of God now, and so I wasn’t going to have to leave him forever.” Bayside transported 1,000 volunteers to and from Mexico. Base of operations was a 63-tent camp on an alfalfa field. Experienced staff and adult volunteers from Bayside campuses in Granite Bay, Folsom, Lincoln and Midtown Sacramento provided security, food preparation, first aid and logistical support. Spring breakers were allowed one shower during the week, at a designated time, and had no access to electricity for recharging their cellphones. Students awoke at 6:30 a.m. for chapel service and spent the rest of the day working at their

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 19

Patty Schumacher, center, hugs one of the Marines her son, Lance Cpl. Victor Dew, served with in Afghanistan. Dew was killed in combat in Afghanistan in 2010, and the Granite Bay Post Office was renamed in his honor.
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Granite Bay Post Office Renamed for Victor Dew
Marine died in combat in 2010 at 20 years old
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

ne day, when Marine Victor Dew and his good friend Marvin Arnold were sitting around outside, while serving a tour in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan, a very large spider approached them. “We alerted everyone to the presence of this spider,” Cpl. Arnold recalled. “Then we did what any respectable Marine would do and we caught it.” They kept the spider in a jar until one time it leapt out onto

O

GRANITE BAY VIEW

20

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Dew and disappeared. “And (Dew) thinks it’s funny to grab a piece of grass and, as I’m bent over looking for it, he tickles the back of my neck,” Arnold said. “These experiences will last with me forever. They may not seem like much, but they mean the world to me.” Dew died in combat on Oct. 13, 2010. He was 20 years old. Two and a half years after his death, Dew’s family, friends and dozens of members of the community gathered for a ceremony April 4 to rename the Granite Bay Post Office in his honor. A dedication plaque is now mounted at the entrance of the post office on Auburn Folsom Boulevard. “It’s an honor for us as a family, and at the same time, it lets us know the community stands behind our military,” said Dew’s mother, Patty Schumacher. During the ceremony, Arnold recounted how he and Dew spent countless hours together in the barracks watching funny videos on YouTube and zombie movies. Arnold used to try and con-

vince Dew to go out on the town with their buddies, but he was often reluctant. He was saving money for his wedVictor Dew ding and honeymoon with fiancée, Courtney Gold, who he had proposed to at Disneyland only a few months before leaving for Afghanistan. Gold attended the dedication ceremony, along with Dew’s mother, father, Tom Schumacher, younger brother, Kyle, and younger sister, Katie. Dew graduated from Granite Bay High School in 2008. He was a second-degree black belt in Zen Budokai Jujitsu, a martial art he began practicing at age 6. During high school, he played football for two seasons. He dreamed of becoming a Marine by the time he was 12 years old, and enlisted in 2009. Instead of serving in the presidential color guard, Dew turned down the post and chose combat, said Rep. Tom McClintock,

who introduced the bill to rename the post office in the fallen Marine’s honor. The legislation unanimously passed the House of Representatives in February 2012. Lance Cpl. Dew was killed when a roadside bomb exploded near his military vehicle during a mission. All four Marines in the vehicle lost their lives that day, and parents of two of the other Marines were in the audience at the dedication ceremony. The plaque should be seen “as a token that we, too, will never forget,” McClintock said. He said families who lose their loved ones who serve in the military grieve as much today as when the casualty officer knocked on their front door.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

U.S. Post Office Sacramento District Manager Al Santos mounts a plaque on the wall during the dedication and renaming April 4 of the Granite Bay Post Office in honor of Lance Cpl. Victor Dew.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 21

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22 MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

O ly mpi c L e g a c y Not Forgotten

Stan and Maryann Batiste show off a few items in their collection of Olympics memorabilia from the 1960 winter games in Squaw Valley.
PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Exhibit ensures 1960 Winter Olympics heritage doesn’t fade
BY EILEEN WILSON

ki season has ended, but at the new Tahoe Museum, featuring 1960 Squaw Valley Winter Olympics memorabilia in Tahoe City, ski history has never been cooler. Granite Bay resident Stan Batiste had a dream

S

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

— not to win Olympic gold, but to gather Olympic artifacts that he would someday place on display in a Tahoe home he had built. Fast forward a decade and he realized he had gathered some special items. Fast forward two decades and he realized he had a comprehensive, museum-worthy collection that he wanted to share. Though there is a lot of

“This was such an important event that happened in the area. It’s important that this heritage isn’t lost.”
Maryann Batiste

community support, for now, a permanent museum remains just a dream. But a temporary one is opening in May, thanks to Stan Batiste. The exhibit inhabits the former bookstore in Tahoe City’s Boatworks Mall

through 2018. “This was such an important event that happened in the area. It’s important that this heritage isn’t lost,” said Batiste’s wife, Maryann. Some may find it hard
• SEE OLYMPICS PAGE 24

Stan and Maryann Batiste still have, at home, a few items from their collection of 1960 Winter Olympics memorabilia from Squaw Valley: an American participation medal, left, an unopened bottle of drinking water and a Polish participation medal.

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OLYMPICS: Batiste’s collection will be ‘a journey’ aimed to educate on the history of skiing
continued from 23 to believe there isn’t already a permanent Olympics museum in the area. “The Squaw Valley Ski Museum Foundation has been trying for years to build a world-class museum at the entrance to Squaw Valley,” Stan Batiste said. “Hopefully, our combined efforts with the museum foundation and others will help to move the project forward.” Batiste wanted to shed light on the 1960 Winter Olympics, an important event in skiing history and California history, alike. “Our Olympics museum in Tahoe City will be a journey from the beginning of skiing through the Olympics, and will include contemporary skiing overall,” he said. Batiste has a special

TAHOE MUSEUM
What: Exhibit features Squaw Valley 1960 Winter Olympics memorabilia When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, May through 2018 Where: Boatworks Mall, 760 N. Lake Blvd., Tahoe City Cost: Free

“It really impressed me how much the locals appreciated having these artifacts displayed. The people who were in the area at the time — the display just meant so much to them. They were so happy to see the artifacts come back to Tahoe City.”
Maryann Batiste

connection to the mountainous area. His dad built a cabin in Tahoe in 1957 and his family spent their summers near Tahoe City.

The late 1950s in Squaw Valley was nothing like it is today. It took two families — one that owned the valley floor

and one that owned the mountain — to come together to create the massive ski area. According to Batiste,

through the genius of one man, the Olympics were awarded to Squaw Valley when the ski area included only one chair lift and a dirt road. With the state of California stepping in with funding and Walt Disney offering his genius to design the project, the Squaw Valley Olympics was a resounding success. The Batistes’ museum recently hosted a soft opening, which was a special day for Maryann. “It really impressed me how much the locals appreciated having these artifacts displayed,” she said. “The people who were in the area at the time — the display just meant so much to them. They were so happy to see the artifacts come back to Tahoe City.” The exhibit includes

rarely seen concept drawings by Disney, photographs by renowned photographer Bill Briner and hundreds of Olympic items, as well as historic ski memorabilia from the Auburn Ski Club, Squaw Valley Olympic Museum Foundation, the foundation’s board President Bill Clark and the Squaw Valley Ski Corporation. Stan Batiste said the exhibit wouldn’t have come together without the help of author and friend David C. Antonucci, a Lake Tahoe historian who located the original Olympic cross-country ski trails and wrote what’s considered the foremost book on the 1960 Winter Olympics, “Snowball’s Chance: The Story of the 1960 Olympic Winter Games, Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe.”

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I can make my ad current within a day and with real estate that is critical because it moves fast!!!. The brand management aspect is incredible! I meet people all the time who say I have seen you in the paper and it gives me a credibility of being consistent and stable in a world where so many things are fly by night. In real estate we have to be consistent and dependable and when I advertise with Gold Country I am with the readers and their Saturday morning coffee saying “Good Morning, it’s Kate, call me if you would like me to help you today! How’s that coffee?” ~ Kate Tustin, Broker Capitol Crown Real Estate

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 25

hot property

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f you’re looking for a family-friendly home in the best school district around, you’re in luck. And if you’re looking for a pristine home with modern sensibility, all at an excellent value, then this is the perfect property for you. “The home is a tremendous value in a wonderful neighborhood,” said Valisa Schmidley, of Keller Williams. Located just yards from a nature trail filled with common egrets and redwinged blackbirds, the home has every amenity your family will love. Start with the resort-like backyard. A natural pool with a cascading waterfall is the place to be as the busyness of spring gives way to summer pool parties and family get-togethers. “This is a low-maintenance yard,” Schmidley said. “It’s perfect.” The yard includes a raised stone pad that overlooks the pool — a great location for a gazebo or sunbathing area. The 1990s home has definitely kept pace with the times. “The family has really kept the home current,” Schmidley said. A modern black-andwhite kitchen includes a large granite-topped, furniture-style center island. Polished nickel hardware adds an upscale touch to white cabinets. The kitchen includes stainless appliances — a

I

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

COURTESY PHOTOS

The natural pool features a cascading waterfall, perfect for summertime pool parties.

Where: 220 Broughton Court, Granite Bay Size: Six bedroom, three bath, 3,957 square feet Price: $650,000 Contact: Valisa Schmidley, Keller Williams Luxury Properties, (916) 412-4924

HOT PROPERTY

five-burner cook top, dual ovens, built-in microwave, dishwasher, dual stainless sinks and pantry.
• SEE PROPERTY PAGE 29

The spacious family room includes a mosaic stone hearth design.

26

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

VALISA SCHMIDLEY

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220 BROUGHTON COURT

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Granite Bay
GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 27

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

29

All in the Family
Hygienist joins dad’s dentistry practice in Granite Bay
BY TOBY LEWIS

F
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Dr. James Jack, left, works with his daughter, Kimberly Jack, who recently joined her father’s Granite Bay practice as a hygienist.

amily practice is taking on multiple meanings for one Granite Bay dentist office. Dr. James Jack, who has owned Granite Bay Family Dentistry on Auburn Folsom Road for almost 30 years, recently hired his daughter, Kimberly, to join the staff of hygienists at the office. “All his hygienists and

employees have been here practically since I was born,” Kimberly Jack said. “So, it’s really nice to be around everyone that I’ve known for so long.” In addition to working with staff at the family practice she has known for so long, she is now working on patients who have watched her grow up into a young lady. “I love all of my dad’s patients that remember

Congratulations to all the Masters Club Achievers!
from Debbrah Campbell, Suzie Moore & Gayle Scott

Joe Siau
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30

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

“I’d say there’s a lot of experience in this office. We have hygienists here five days a week (who’ve) been here for over 25 years.”
Dr. Linda Crow, Granite Bay Family Dentistry

Congratulations to the 2012 Masters Club Members!

when I was born and just being around this atmosphere,” she said. “Many of his patients have been seeing him for years and years, so it’s just very personable.” Kimberly Jack, who recently graduated from West Coast University for dental hygiene, said she didn’t always know she was going to grow up to become part of the family business. “I made the decision when I graduated (from Granite Bay High School) that I wanted to go into dentistry,” she said — a decision supported by her father. Kimberly Jack is the newest addition to a short list of hygienists who have a proven longevity at the practice. “I’d say there’s a lot of experience in this office,” said Dr. Linda Crow, who recently joined the practice as an associate dentist. “We have hygienists here five days a week (who’ve) been here for over 25 years.” Crow joined the practice in March and brings with her an advanced education in general dentistry degree from the University of San Francisco. While she is of no relation to the Jack family, she says the dentist office has a familial atmosphere. “I think it’s great because a lot of people that come through here are families that we know through sports here in Granite Bay,” Crow said. “We get to treat them, and that’s nice to be able to do that.” Granite Bay Family

Dentistry specializes in high-quality dental care, including fillings, bridges and crowns, whitening, veneers, extractions, root canals and implants. Crow said she especially enjoys working with senior citizens. “I have a degree in gerontology from the University of Southern California,” Crow said. “I like working with (seniors) because they have such great stories to tell. And a lot of people are keeping their teeth more now, so the cases are more interesting.” Kimberly Jack’s father, Dr. Jack, also grew up in Granite Bay and is a graduate of Del Oro High School. He is a University of California at Berkeley graduate and earned his dental degree from Emory University. “It’s neat,” Dr. Jack said, of working with Kimberly. “It’s something she’s been raised around, and it’s nice to have her back home. She went to school in the L.A. area and it’s nice to have someone to talk dentistry to at home.” Kimberly Jack said she enjoys following the career path of her father and, even though she and her dad are the only blood relatives at the practice, the business still feels like home. “I would say that it is so tight-knit and family-run, there’s not much turnover in our employees,” she said. “We’re all very sociable with our patients.”
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer living in Sacramento. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

31

C a l i f o r n i a c h i e f j u st i c e sp e a k s t o l o c a l t e e n s
Fields questions from panel of Granite Bay High School students
BY SENA CHRISTIAN

A

GRANITE BAY VIEW

s a student at McClatchy High School in Sacramento in the late 1970s, Tani CantilSakauye never imagined she’d become the chief justice of the California Supreme Court, let alone the first Filipina-American in the court’s history and only its second female chief justice. During high school, she was in student government and on the cheerleading team, where she developed the ability to speak loudly without a microphone, a skill that would come in handy

PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

California Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye speaks before Granite Bay High School students on April 8.
years later in the courtroom. But CantilSakauye, whose family members were mainly farmworkers, didn’t know any lawyers or judges. “You can never dream big enough about what

can happen to you,” she told a group of 300 students at Granite Bay High School on April 8. The presentation, in which she fielded questions from a panel of four students, was part of her ongoing outreach and civic learning initiative, “Your Constitution: The Power of Democracy.” She encouraged the students to get involved with political campaigns, and to read a lot and learn to write well, because people are judged by these traits in the professional world. She urged the teens to keep informed of the news. After high school, Cantil-Sakauye attended Sacramento City College and joined the speech and debate team. As a wait-

ress, she picked up on the body language and signs of disgruntled customers, which turned out to be useful for choosing a jury. She attended the University of California at Davis for undergrad and law school, from which she graduated in 1984. “You can imagine back in the ’80s there weren’t a lot of lawyers that looked like me,” she said. Women had to fight harder, she said, and learn to speaker louder. She found support in other women and in “forward-thinking, visionary men.” In 1988, she joined Gov. George Deukmejian’s senior staff and did constitutional analysis. In 1990, she was appointed as a judge to the Sacramento

Municipal Court. She served seven years as a trial judge and six years as an appellate judge. Student panelist Devon Patel asked: “How has your cultural heritage and being a woman influenced your career?” Cantil-Sakauye said coming from a large, Filipino family, she learned how to work with others and organize social events, and took cues from her mother, who was very tough, although she appeared small and docile. When asked about the most interesting case she’s heard on the Supreme Court, Cantil-Sakauye said all the cases they hear are interesting. No one has a right for their case to be heard

before the Supreme Court, except death penalty defendants. Otherwise, the case must be novel, unique, important, conflicting and with no clear answer, to reach the state’s highest court. While there are about 10,000 filings a year in this court, the justices write only about 100 opinions annually and each one involves a painstaking process to consider the case in multiple ways, Cantil-Sakauye said. “To work to make justice accessible to all … that is the greatest part of this job,” she said.
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountry media.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

Grateful to all my clients who have contributed to my success, Thank You!
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32 MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

T h e G a z e t t e Wi n s B i g
Granite Bay High School student newspaper honored at national level
BY SENA CHRISTIAN
GRANITE BAY VIEW

H

aley “Graph” Massara appreciates that for at least one period every day, she will go into class and know exactly what she’s doing, and she’ll share her knowledge with others. She’ll write articles, edit the work of her peers, design pages and brainstorm investigative story ideas all in a day’s work as co-editor-in-chief of Gra-

nite Bay High School’s student newspaper, the Gazette. “It changed high school for me,” Massara said. “I can honestly say I don’t know who I would be without (journalism).” Massara recently finished third in the Journalism Education Association Northern California High School Journalist of the Year competition, earning a $300 scholarship. This marks one

more award in a long line of honors for Gazette staff through the years. On March 22, in New York City, the Gazette won a Gold Crown Award given by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association to recognize scholastic journalism excellence. The Gazette was one of 13 high school newspapers nationally to win a Gold Crown for issues published last year.
• SEE GAZETTE PAGE 34

Voices editor Kiana Okhovat peruses past issues of the Granite Bay Gazette during her journalism class.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

33

GAZETTE: Headlines and deadlines all in a day’s work for dedicated student staff
continued from Page 33 This is the Gazette’s sixth Gold Crown since the paper was established in 1998, according to Principal Mike McGuire. The Gold Crown is considered one of the most prestigious general awards in American scholastic journalism. “Graph,” as Massara’s staff calls her, joined the journalism class freshman year and is now a senior and ready to head to the University of California at Berkeley, where she plans to major in Japanese and one day work in Japan as a foreign correspondent for a major news organization. “My favorite thing about it is, ironically, the deadline,” Massara said,of working for the Gazette. “I’ve always been a writer, but I need that discipline.” Sure, she may spend
tured freedom.” Grubaugh has been with Granite Bay High School since 1998, besides a two-year gap. He worked for many years as a sports stringer for the Santa Cruz Sentinel and has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri. Eyen, a senior, said being on the newspaper staff has given her the opportunity to express herself through the written word and exercise her First Amendment rights. The article she is most proud of is one she wrote about how religion affects people’s politics during last year’s presidential election. “It’s such a rewarding experience,” she said. “I’ve had to learn so much on how to work with people and learn to be a leader.” Co-editor Chris Pei is serving his second year on the newspaper staff. He’s now a senior. “It’s nice to have a foil to academics, and something you can work on and have in your hands at the end of the day that’s tangible,” Pei said. Co-editor Nicole Bales has also been with the Gazette since her junior year, and said the editing experience has taught her how to work to develop other people’s strengths. “Besides growing as a writer and editor, I definitely learned how to work with people and developed a lot of great relationships,” she said. Bales plans to major in journalism at the University of Oregon, and one day become an investigative reporter.

ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Granite Bay Gazette features and photo editor Kristin Taylor, left, works with photographer Cleora Reber on their student newspaper.
Friday evenings in frustration as the staff tries to put the paper to bed, but in the end, they produce something of value, she said. Massara attributes her newspaper’s honors to the fact that students raise funds themselves — each of the 42 teens in the class has an advertising revenue requirement, as well — and to their teacher, Karl Grubaugh, who gives them the guidance to write about what interests them. Fellow co-editor Lena Eyen also praises Grubaugh as a great coach. “So much credit goes to Mr. Grubaugh,” Eyen said. “He does a great job of demonstrating how to do things, but letting us figure it out … It’s struc-

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34

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Cake, Pirates in Three Stages spotlight
Band returns to Sacramento area for three shows
BY LAURA NEWELL

he band Cake returns to the Sacramento region for three nights of performances at Three Stages in Folsom. “We haven’t performed in Sacramento in a while,” said Cake founding member and singer John McCrea. “We haven’t been able to find a good location with good acoustics in the region, so we are happy to be able to play at Three Stages.” McCrea said it’s hard to pinpoint a favorite memory during his twodecade-long history with

T

SPECIAL TO THE GRANITE BAY VIEW

the band, but he does remember all the interesting and odd moments that could only happen while performing and touring. “I just like the weirdness of the band and all the fun that we have,” he said. “It’s all surreal.” He said like any touring act, the job has its ups and downs. “It’s great to play music, but it gets hard to perform regularly on tour. I’ve been doing it for more than 20 years,” McCrea said. “It’s a good argument for appreciating what you have. You may think one thing is so great and I have this dream job, but there is always a flip side. So, I like to tell people to be in the here and now and live

KNOW AND GO
“THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE” When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9; 3 p.m. and 8
p.m. Friday, May 10 Where: Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom Cost: $29-$49, premium $59 Info: www.threestages.net

CAKE When: 8 p.m. Friday, May 31, and
Saturday, June 1; 7 p.m. Sunday, June 2 Where: Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom Cost: $29-$39, premium $49 Info: www.threestages.net

your life to the fullest.” Cake started out as a local band in the early 1990s with their first radio hit, “Rock ‘N’ Roll Lifestyle,” followed by classics such as “The Dis• SEE THREE STAGES PAGE 36

“The Pirates of Penzance” will be performed on Thursday, May 9, and Friday, May 10, at Three Stages at Folsom Lake College.
COURTESY

Patricia Seide
9811 Wexford-Granite Bay
Presenting a beautiful lake front home located in the exclusive gated community of Wexford in Granite Bay. On an approximate acre lot with a large rear lawn area that stretches down to your own shoreline on the private lake. This home has been recently updated with new flooring, paint, lighting and remodeled baths. It features four bedrooms, each with their own full bath, a study/office with fireplace and a luxurious master suite. The newly remodeled kitchen opens to a family room with French doors leading out to the patio. This area of Granite Bay has access to the best local public schools, at all grade levels. This is a truly warm and striking traditional property.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

35

THREE STAGES: The classic tale ‘Pirates of Penzance’ will take over three stages in May
continued from 35 tance,” “Never There” and “Short Skirt/Long Jacket.” The band has seven albums, including “Showroom of Compassion,” which was recorded in their solar-powered studio in Sacramento. The month of May also brings “The Pirates of Penzance” to Three Stages for three performances. The Gilbert and Sullivan repertory ensemble performs “The Pirates of Penzance” to a full orchestra and chorus. This exuberant piece of musical theater, directed and conducted by Albert Bergeret with choreography by Bill Fabris, is performed in its original format. The plot centers on the dilemma of young Frederic who, as a child, was mistakenly apprenticed to pirates until his 21st birthday. Since he was born during a leap year, on Feb. 29, he is honor-bound to remain a pirate until the distant date of 1940, despite his moral objection to piracy. “‘The Pirates of Penzance’

“We haven’t performed in Sacramento in a while. We haven’t been able to find a good location with good acoustics in the region, so we are happy to be able to play at Three Stages.”
John McCrea, founding member and singer of Cake

hardly needs an introduction,” Bergeret said. “Long before Joe Papp’s Broadway production and major motion picture added renewed popularity, this engaging operetta had established itself as one of the best-loved pieces of musical theater in the English-speaking world. I’m sure that will remain a staple of the Gilbert and Sullivan canon for as long as these classic operettas continue to enthrall the child in all of us.”

Cake will perform Friday, May 31, Saturday, June 1, and Sunday, June 2, at Three Stages at Folsom Lake College.
COURTESY • ROBERT MCKNIGHT

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MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

GB Destination Imagination Team Wins State

G

Students need help raising funds for global finals

ranite Bay High School’s Destination Imagination team recently won the state competition and is eligible to compete in the global finals May 22-26 in Knoxville, Tenn. Team members include Abe Denton, Arianna Jones, Grant Kanada, Erica Lucia and Amber Miller. They will compete with other teams in the Wind Visible Challenge, one of seven open-ended challenges that require

young people to apply science, technology, engineering and math, in addition to improvisation, theater arts, writing, project management, communication, innovation, teamwork and community service. The team’s next challenge is to raise more than $9,000 to cover expenses to attend the finals. To make a taxdeductible donation, contact team manager Michelle Kanada at (916) 240-2337 or mkanada@eurekausd.org.

Granite Bay High School’s Destination Imagination team won the state competition and is heading to the global finals May 22-26 in Knoxville, Tenn.
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• MAY

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38

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

It’s Never Too Late
Seniors practice martial arts
BY MARGARET SNIDER
GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

Mari Nathanson warms up for The Studio’s Wise Warriors Taekwondo class.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

lder adults who wish they would have practiced martial arts in their youth don’t have to feel regret anymore. Instead, they can take up a martial art in their elder years, as evidenced by those who participate in the Wise Warriors program now offered at The Studio Martial Arts & Fitness in Granite Bay. “We wanted to make sure that even those with physical limitations are still active and healthy and those that are in their 50s and 60s and 70s, even folks that are in retirement, can have something that they work hard for and attain,” said Amitis Pourarian, 35, owner of The Studio in Granite Bay and San Diego. “It’s never too late to do martial arts.”
• SEE WARRIORS PAGE 40

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

39

WARRIORS: Owner ‘saw the need’ for non-contact martial arts program in the community
continued from 39 The Studio conceived of Wise Warriors because of the number of people Pourarian encountered who said they would love to learn martial arts, but thought they were too old or too limited, or were leery of injuries from the contact part of the sport. “The criteria are modified slightly based on physical limitations and age group,” Pourarian said. “But they’ll still earn every belt, they’ll still work hard for every belt. They just won’t have that physical contact part of it, unless they choose to engage in some of it, then we can incorporate it.” Practicing martial arts will keep them fresh mentally as well as physically, Pourarian said, as they continuously learn new material. “We still do all the traditional forms,” she said. “We’ve added in a little bit of Qigong in there, too, a little bit of Tai Chi, a little bit of yoga, a little bit of medita-

THE STUDIO MARTIAL ARTS & FITNESS
What: Wise Warriors non-contact martial arts program When: 10-11:30 a.m. or 7-8:30 p.m. Fridays Where: 4130 Douglas Blvd., Suite 405, Granite Bay Info: (916) 258-5425, www.trainatthestudio.com

ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Wise Warrior Taekwondo student Mike Matson works on kicks at The Studio in Granite Bay.
tion, plus all the martial arts aspects. ... They will do weapons. They’ll do all the kicks, all the basic self-defense, so all the components minus the injury. We just saw the need in our community.” Pourarian began learning Taekwondo as a teen when she tried a class with a family friend and fell in love. She graduated high school a year early and

earned a bachelor’s degree in business and a master’s degree in construction engineering, but as far as Taekwondo goes, she said, it has never been for business. “This has always been my passion, my way to give to my community, to better it in so many different ways,” she said. “I just come to teach.” Pourarian, who is a sixthdegree black belt, has won four national championships and made the United States sparring team, competing in the World Cup in 2001.

Laurie Rich, 51, one of her students, is now also program director for Wise Warriors. “Seriously, if someone had told me 19 months ago, before I walked into The Studio, that in 2013 I could be earning my black belt, I would have laughed so hard and told them that they were insane,” Rich said. “For me, some of the specific benefits have been believing in myself, believing that I could do something that I thought was completely impossible, because of some of the physical disabilities that I deal with.”

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40

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Dancing for a Cause

Windermere Granite Bay Realtors
Congratulates our
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COURTESY • SCOTT BELDING

Members of the Northern California Dance Conservatory will perform during a charitable gala May 17 and May 18.

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he Northern California Dance Conservatory in Roseville will host a charitable gala, “Synthesis,” to benefit its new Access Dance Program, which offers nocost therapeutic dance and creative movement classes for children with special needs and developmental disabilities. The celebration of visual and performing arts will include a pre-performance reception sponsored by Robert Mondavi Winery and Hawks Restaurant of Granite Bay, live improvisational painting, art gallery, documentary film, dance performances and a post-performance dessert reception opening night.

T

“The vision behind Synthesis is one of community collaboration and giving back, people helping people in our own community while celebrating and enjoying all that our local artists have created together,” said conservatory spokeswoman Monique Coleman. The gala costs $30 and takes place at 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 17, at the Black Box Theater, 920 Reserve Drive, Suite 110, in Roseville. Additional performances cost $18 and will be held at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 18, at the theater. To purchase tickets, visit www.ncdc.com.
~ Sena Christian

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Broker ID 01841288 • windermeregranitebayrealtors.com
GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 41

Granite Bay adviser has some answers
BY TINKA DAVI

Confused About Dementia Care?
Kristina Blocker leads a bimonthly support group for caregivers with loved ones struggling with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.
ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

KRISTINA BLOCKER

W

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

hen Laurie Erskine-Farley began noticing changes in her mom’s behavior, she wasn’t sure what to do. The changes began after her mom underwent radiation therapy for lung cancer and seemed to lack energy. Several months later, her mom was diagnosed with leukemia. “My mother had a drop-off in memory and was doing some things that concerned me,” Erskine-Farley said. Married for 65 years, her mom, 86, and dad, 87, lived in their own home with assistance from a caregiver. This wasn’t an ideal situation, but their children didn’t agree on what should be done. “I was trying to grapple with what my mom needed,” said Erskine-Farley, who called her

(866) 689-5413 www.dementiacare advisor.com kristina@dementiacare advisor.com

parents often and traveled frequently from her home in Redding to care for them. Then she met Kristina Blocker, of Granite Bay, a dementia care adviser. “Kristina was wonderful,” Erskine-Farley said. “She helped us change to a neurosurgeon who diagnosed my mother as having early onset Alzheimer’s. She explained things to me and to my father and met with my sisters. She was also instrumental

in convincing my father that he and my mother couldn’t live in their home. … She helped me deal with medical, psychological and family issues.” Blocker, who has specialized in memory care for 14 years, starts with a consultation, then does personal assessments by meeting with the loved one for a casual conversation. Next, she offers the family advice on lifestyle options. “It’s really important to find

the right community for their loved one,” Blocker said. “Some may like a large place with lots of activities. Others may want a quieter atmosphere.” Blocker charges for consultations and assessments, but not for looking for communities or talking to facility directors. She encourages family members to attend support groups where she talks about communication and stages of dementia. Caregivers are at risk of developing a detrimental health issue due to stress. They get angry, don’t socialize or burn out. Other issues can develop, such as depression, weight gain, high blood pressure and divorce. “Families want to hang on,”

she said. “A lot of families go through the stages of grief. That’s very common in dealing with people with dementia. They’re angry, say that they can’t look at their mom or they feel guilty. It’s my job to say, ‘That’s normal.’” When Blocker meets with families, she discusses her major concerns about people with dementia who continue to drive or start to wander. If the person is still driving, family members can call the DMV anonymously and say they’re concerned. Blocker doesn’t recommend that people with dementia live alone, but, if they do, she suggests home safety inspections or in-home help. Many family members have their heels in the sand and don’t know what to do — that’s why it’s important to have a care plan, Blocker said. “When you’re trying to deal with emotions over a loved one, she is a great help,” Erskine-Farley said. “She created a map of how to go through this situation.”

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Nurse fulfills dream with air rescue service
BY MARGARET SNIDER

few years ago, Gennifer De Paoli had the opportunity to do a fly-along with an air rescue service. It was exciting not only because of being in the helicopter, but also because of the autonomy and increased scope of practice the nurses had. “I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it ever since,” she said. De Paoli was already a registered nurse working in intensive care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Stockton while studying for her bachelor’s degree in nursing. She needed three years of critical care experience to qualify for air rescue work, so she kept on going, reinforced by a flight nurse she had met from California Shock Trauma Air Rescue (CALSTAR), who told her she was doing all the

A

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

P u s hin g i t t o t h e Li m i t
The plane used by CALSTAR air rescue services is a Beechcraft King Air.
MARGARET SNIDER • GRANITE BAY VIEW

right things to achieve her goal. De Paoli, 29, began working for CALSTAR in January and is based at McClellan Park. She lives in Granite Bay with her husband, Dustin, a firefighter for the city of Roseville. To become a flight nurse, she underwent an arduous process that included a seven-person panel interview, three-part written test, scenarios, a ridealong and a phone interview with Chief Flight Nurse Dan

Miller. Now part of the team, De Paoli works two 24-hour shifts a week, while also covering two days a month in the surgical intensive care unit at St. Joseph’s. Unlike most air rescue companies, there are two registered nurses on each flight. That is one of the things that makes CALSTAR unique, Miller said, since most air rescue companies staff their flights with a registered nurse and a para-

medic. With the same scope of practice, the two nurses are best able to help each other. Patients may be in a life-ordeath situation, lines and tubes everywhere, all kinds of medications stacked up with invasive monitoring. “If you’re a nurse and you like to take care of sick people and you also like to fly and you don’t like to be confined to a hospital . . . this is the best of both worlds,” Miller said.

The flight nurses’ work is more advanced than what they generally do in a hospital setting, De Paoli said: “I always wanted to be the kind of nurse that could push my license to the limit.” Pilots work for 12 hours and nurses for 24 hours, and they must be ready to fly at any time. They also must continually study for certifications and continuing education. Though
• SEE CALSTAR PAGE 46

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

Silent Auction & Wine Tasting Saturday, May 18, 2013
GRANITE BAY. STOP HUNGER NOW!
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CALSTAR: Flight nurse enjoys the excitement
continued from 45 the journey is long, grueling and never-ending, De Paoli is satisfied with the results. So, evidently, is CALSTAR. “I think it’s fair to say that we only pick the best and the brightest,” Miller said. “She’s one of those.” CALSTAR is the largest nonprofit air ambulance on the West Coast, with nine bases, according to CALSTAR pilot Isaac Sumner. In its 29 years of service and more than 50,000 flights, the company has not had a single injury to a patient or crew member. They were also pioneers in getting night-vision goggles for helicopter emergency medical services. Although they never know when a call will come, De Paoli said she has had only two shifts when she didn’t fly. The

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MARGARET SNIDER • GRANITE BAY VIEW

CALSTAR flight nurses Gennifer De Paoli (left) and Joni Alameda with pilot Isaac Sumner.
work from McClellan is primarily air ambulance transfers — taking critically ill patients to another hospital, or bringing a stabilized patient to a facility closer to home. They do a lot of work involving infants and children. “Most hospitals don’t have pediatric ICUs,” De Paoli said. “So when you have a sick kid, you have to get them out of those little facilities and bring them to, usually, a teaching hospital or somewhere that has a pediatric (intensive care unit).” Sumner said there are other rewards besides the satisfaction of saving lives. “I really do enjoy the fact that until the phone rings, I don’t know where I’m going,” he said. “Many times, it’s somewhere I’ve never been before, so that’s always an exciting thing.”

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MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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COURTESY

L

ila Mettler remembers when sheep roamed around a ranch on Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay. Through the years, shopping centers and houses sprung up, and the sheep were displaced. But through all the changes, Mettler’s house of worship, Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, has remained. Mettler, an original congregation member, joined other parishioners to celebrate the church’s 50th anniversary on April 7. In 1963, the church built one room, now its Fellowship Hall, on a patch of barren land. “They actually had a plowbreaking ceremony at the

Lutheran Church of the Resurrection Turns 50
time,” said congregation member John Firth. “They had an old horse-drawn plow and I think the congregation members pulled it to do the ground breaking. And we’ve had our ups and downs over the years, but it’s a vibrant church, a warm and welcoming place.” The church’s first pastor from 1963-1968, John Moren, said at first the congregation was so poor, they used Styrofoam cups for coffee, which they washed. They’d quit using them when they had teeth marks or lipstick. “The greatest celebration we ever had was when we decided we could throw all those cups away and use regular ones,” he said.

Parishioners gather for a ground-breaking ceremony of Lutheran Church of the Resurrection in Granite Bay in 1963. The church celebrated its 50th anniversary April 7.

Lutheran Church of the Resurrection Senior Pastor Don Haven conducts a service during the Granite Bay church’s 50th anniversary celebration April 7.

Lutheran Church of the Resurrection in Granite Bay celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY ANNE STOKES • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Docent Ron Becker educates guests about the Lutheran Church of the Resurrection’s 50-year history during the Granite Bay church’s anniversary celebration April 7.

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

47

How to stay safe and have fun with your dog all summer long
BY EILEEN WILSON

Summer Fun with Fido
Doggie Bag owner Sherrie Ammirato offers several types of food for dogs to keep them healthy.
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

f you see a stylish pooch at Folsom Lake this summer sporting a colorful life vest and protective goggles, you’ll know that Fido’s mom or dad has paid a visit to the Doggie Bag on Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay. Owners Sherrie and George Ammirato are self-professed dog lovers who traded in their corporate expense accounts to run a small business

I

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

that reflects their values of taking care of customers and being part of

their community. The couple makes it their job to educate pet owners on

all things dog-related and to dispel pet myths. Myth No.1: All dogs are

good swimmers. “People assume that all dogs are good swimmers

— but bull dogs, pit bulls and other breeds actually aren’t good swimmers because of their chest size and their general build,” Sherrie Ammirato explained. Life vests are important when boating, but the equipment also comes in handy for the pool. “All our vests have handles,” Ammirato said. “It’s very hard to pick a wet dog up out of the water. You can’t pick the dog up by the collar.”

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MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

The vest handle is also a convenient way to “grab and dunk” your dog to keep him from overheating. The Doggie Bag also carries waterproof collars and quick-dry collars. “Staying in a wet collar can be an issue for your dog’s skin,” Ammirato said. Myth No. 2: A dog’s paws can handle heat. While your pet’s paws may be more durable than your own tender tootsies, dogs can burn their paws if their owners aren’t careful. Hot weather is when Pawz booties come in handy. They are available in all sizes and a variety of colors and patterns. Myth No. 3: Sticking his head out of the car window is a good thing. Whether it’s riding with the convertible top down or speeding along the lake in a motorboat, most dogs love the feel of fresh

air on their snouts. Unfortunately, too much wind can irritate your pet’s sensitive eyes, and the risk of getting insects or particulates in the dog’s eyes can mean a visit to the vet. Thankfully, the Doggie Bag carries Doggles. You guessed it: goggles for your dog that include ultraviolet protection. “These aren’t just toys,” Ammirato said. “They’re

made for real protection,” Myth No. 4: Big box pet stores offer the best prices. The Doggie Bag’s prices are competitive with big box stores, and in some cases, their dog foods are dollars cheaper than the store’s large competitors. Ammirato also offers a frequent buyer program for pet food. The demand for special

Doggie Bag owner Sherrie Ammirato spruces up the dog leash selection at her Granite Bay shop, the Doggie Bag.
pet items is high. So high, in fact, that the couple was able to open a second store in Roseville two years ago. It’s not hard to understand why. “You’re going to get a lot better customer service here,” said Nick Bisagno, a regular customer of the Doggie Bag who brings in his mixed-breed rescue dog. “The staff knows so much about the variety of dog foods, and you’re always going to get a big smile when you shop here.”

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Dog Lucy gives Victoria Wells some love and kisses during the Paws to Read program at the Granite Bay Library.

Learn to Read with Help from a Furry Friend
As part of the Granite Bay Library’s monthly program, children ages 5 and up read for 10 minutes each to a furry friend for an opportunity to polish their reading skills. The dogs are provided by Lend A Heart Lend A Hand animal-assisted therapy. Paws to Read takes place from 3:30-4:30 PHOTOS BY KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW p.m. the third Thursday of each month. The library is at 6475 Douglas Smokey looks at the illustrations in the book 7-year-old Logan Brown reads Blvd. in Granite Bay. For more information, call (916) 791-5590 or visit to him, “Happy Birthday, Bad Kitty,” during the Paws to Read program at the Granite Bay Library on April 18. www.placer.ca.gov/departments/library.

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History Comes Alive
Reenactment camp in Colfax focuses on Gold Rush era
traveling minstrel in a fictional 1850s Gold Rush camp. This is her sixth season and the first as the full owner of Wagons West Camp, which opened in April in Colfax and closes for the season in October. “For 20 years, it was the Old Sierra Historical Ranch based on the great-grandmother of Rosemary Hawthorn, the camp’s (previous) owner. Her great grandmother came over on the Pioneer Trail,” O’Ryan said. “The living history we act out is based on her story.” The previous location, at Camp Far West, wasn’t secure and the buildings suffered damage at the hands of vandals, she said. The new location at Rollins Lake is secure
BY DON CHADDOCK

IN THE KNOW
What: Wagons West Camp Who: The camp accepts groups
and schools with parties up to 110. The curriculum is designed to fulfill third- through fifthgrade California Gold Rush educational field trip requirements. When: April through October Where: Rollins Lake, Colfax Reservations: Halie O’Ryan at (530) 613-0809; www.wagonswestcamp.com Halie O’Ryan, of Auburn, rolls a wagon wheel across her newly relocated historical reenactment camp at Rollins Lake in Colfax.
COURTESY• HALIE O’RYAN

S

SPECIAL TO THE GRANITE BAY VIEW

he’s toured the globe entertaining troops, hit the stage at casinos such as Red Hawk in Placerville and Thunder Valley in Lincoln, but now she’s trading in her microphone for petticoats. Halie O’Ryan, of Auburn, is known for fronting her music group, the Halie O’Ryan Band, and for years, she toured with United Service Organizations, commonly known as the USO. But many don’t know about her other life, the one firmly planted in the 1850s during the California Gold Rush. For five seasons, O’Ryan has taken on the role of “Miss Halie,” a

and flat, surrounded by tall pine trees. O’Ryan is thrilled. “Moving the camp is creating an environment that is safer, and it’s just incredible,” she said. “This is a groomed, open, flat area that is child-safe and ready for people to arrive.” O’Ryan went from the spotlight to the candlelight after touring with the USO for 13 years, and she wanted to make a positive footprint locally. She said the camp teaches kids about hard work and life on the trail. “What I found was kids just didn’t know respect and the beauty of electronic-free living,” she said. “Rosemary (the previous owner) said she didn’t know anybody else

who could take this on, so she taught me. … The first season, there were 3,500 kids all in about two and a half months. It made me cry when two little kids came up to me and said ‘thank you’ in sign language. I know this school needs to stay open.” For six weeks, O’Ryan has been dismantling,

hauling and reassembling the eight buildings and tents, as well as the large stage. While the camp is geared for schools ranging from charter to public to religious, it is also open to gatherings and clubs. Kids learn how to cook using organic foods. They go fishing and there’s a stream for gold

panning. Instructors also teach about American Indian dance and sign language. For some of the kids who travel from larger cities, such as San Francisco, this is their first time in nature. “I had one kid who just touched the tree bark,” O’Ryan said. “It was unfamiliar to him.”

52

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

family in view

n the relationship with your child, honesty develops trust and ensures healthy communication and responsibility. Honesty is the basis of good character. We help our child be healthy mentally and physically when we handle dishonesty as soon as we become aware of it. Most important, be a positive role model who does not lie. Here is insight into what else a parent can do to help a child who lies.

I

How to Deal with a Lying Child
Sheri Hitchings

determining solutions that will be most effective in eliminating problems.

Why Does a Child Lie?
Lies are based on needs. Know what your child’s needs are. Is lying becoming a habitual response? Ask him, and when you find him telling the truth, praise the truth. If the truth is not forthcoming, you have some work to do. A child often tries to divert blame. A younger child may blame it on an imaginary bad child or a younger child. You can play along with the child, but in the end, he needs to know that it is pretend. A young child doesn’t have the memory capacity of older children; he simply may not remember all the details, so he leaves out or adds details that don’t make sense. Teach the difference between pretending

reassured that you value the truth much more than the misbehavior. Keep in contact with school personnel. Is there a problem with lying at school, as well? Work with the teacher to monitor your child’s homework, test scores and participation.

and lying. The child needs to know why honesty is important. Read books together and have the child identify lying. An older child may lie to cover up guilt and avoid punishment. Guilt, anxiety and fear are typical emotions.

his best option.

What Else Can Parents Do?
Show you care and then let the child know how he positively contributes to the family. Discuss how you feel about what he is doing to himself when he lies. Tell him you are disappointed in what he said or did. As a parent, remember lecturing and angry irrational decisions are not helpful in having your child make positive progress. When your child lies, he needs to know your disappointment, and he needs to be part of the solution and or consequences, including apologizing.
Sheri Hitchings, married for 47 years, has two children and four grandchildren. As an elementary teacher, learning coordinator, principal, GATE director and student teacher supervisor, she has written articles for more than 25 years.

Compulsive Lying
Habitual lying is compulsive and is more serious and needs consistent confrontation. Look for nonverbal signals that show a child is lying. A younger child may have a look of quiet on his face or he may not look you in the eye. He often looks guilty, displaying no eye contact, appears anxious, unhappy, scared, unsettled, distressed, embarrassed, rejected, worried or trapped. An older child needs consequences for both the misbehavior and the lying. The child needs to learn that lying is never

Caring Parents are Key
A child needs to know his parents care about his welfare and appreciate his contributions, however small and infrequent they may be. Show you value truth and praise your child’s truth. Communication is also vital. Does your child lie to keep you happy or to keep the teacher happy? The child needs to be

Determine Lying Patterns
Keep an ongoing dialogue with your spouse regarding your child and do research on lying to determine what you can do to help your child. Analyze each situation by keeping a diary of your child’s lying patterns, including specific times and situations that trigger lying. This record-keeping is essential in

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53

• MAY

professional view

e’ve all experienced, in one-way or another, what the economic downturn has inflicted on our businesses. The unexpected collapse of the financial health of our country just about wiped away many dreams and plans for our future, both in business and personal lives. Companies that stayed open dealt with a changing workforce that took on a very different shape. Employees were laid off;

W

How healthy is your workforce?
Amelya Stevenson

positions were modified and changed. Employees who kept their jobs had to wear many hats to get the job done. Today, hope for our business future is beginning to take shape again, which means it is important to facilitate a strong foundation in

our businesses now. This period of growth is vital to the survival of our businesses, and a sturdy foundation is based in its most important assets: its employees. I like to call this time a “period of re-engineering.” Organizations are beginning to rebuild their workforce infrastructure. Now is the time to ensure that our society rebuilds into a stronger workforce with longterm sustainability. The first attempt in under-

standing your workforce health and attitude is easily uncovered in what’s called an employee engagement survey. Crafting specific questions to uncover how your employees feel about their positions, culture and company will provide you with a landscape for improvement. If you communicate to your employees the need for workplace improvement without retaliation, you are far more likely to receive true and honest feed-

back. If you don’t have a trusting culture, or you receive honest feedback and do nothing with the information, you will have a much smaller chance for future survey successes. Your employees will just not trust your intentions. It’s all up to you.
Amelya Stevenson is the co-founder of e-VentExe in Granite Bay, which provides businesses with human resources tips and techniques.

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54 MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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financial view

t’s springtime, and “spring cleaning” is on the mind. Whether it’s getting that yard back in shape or cleaning the garage so you can fit in a car or two, there are always a few projects to do around this time of year. De-cluttering your financial records should be on your to-do list. I often get asked by clients how long they should keep tax returns, investment statements and other financial records. Here is a general guideline on retaining financial documents, based on recommendations by the IRS and several professionals in the industry. For tax-related paperwork, the IRS says to retain tax returns and supporting documents for three years from the tax-filing deadline for that return. Three years is the period of limitations during which you can amend your tax return to claim a credit or re-

I

Spring Clean Your Financial Records
fund, or the time during which the IRS can assess additional tax. Most accountants, Rashida however, Lilani advise that you retain tax returns for seven years. That includes keeping supporting documents for income and deductions, such as W-2s, 1099s, 1098s and charitable donation receipts. There is no period of limitations if the IRS suspects fraud or if no return was filed. As for bank and credit card statements, keep a year’s worth in a current file, unless they may be needed to support tax filings. Credit card statements may be needed to dispute charges or provide proof of purchase. And then there are all those investment documents. I recommend keeping the applications and other pertinent paperwork used for establishing the accounts, as those usually include contractual agreements. Monthly statements should be retained until you get a year-end statement and then off to the shredding basket they go. Keep at least three years’ worth of statements. If the investment is not a tax-deferred qualified plan and you’re incurring taxes as you go, keep records for at least as long as you own the investments, longer if needed to support a tax return. The burden of proof to provide the true cost (cost-basis) is on you. When you sell the investments, you generally pay taxes on just the gains/appreciation, not on the full account value, so make sure you keep all records that would help calculate the exact cost of your investments. Custodians will usually keep all records. But if there has been a change of custodian, or if you’ve changed brokers, the information may not get transferred over. Besides, with so many banks having gone under in the last few years, it’s best to have your own filing system and not depend on an entity that may not always be around. In the case of qualified or retirement accounts, contributions are generally made pre-tax, hence there is no need to establish basis. Keep records of all contributions made into the retirement plans. Saving statements digitally is a newer, but far more convenient and efficient way, of storing documents. Use an external hard drive or USB flash drive and store in a safe place. Make sure to periodically check your digital storage system. With changing technology, your filing system may become obsolete. Remember those floppy discs? I do! Preparing an emergency graband-go file is also a good idea. Gather birth certificates, Social Security cards, passports, lists of bank accounts and investments into one file called “Vital Records.” I provide my clients with a “Life Planning Checklist,” which provides a quick reference guide to the location of important documents, including wills and trusts, and your safe deposit key. Give a copy of such a list to your loved ones. Once organized and caught up, make sure you stay organized and de-cluttered, and follow the system that works best for you.
Rashida Lilani is the owner and principal of Lilani Wealth Management in Roseville. She can be reached at info@lilaniweathmanagement.com or (916) 782-7752.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

55

fitness view

ou’re going to love this tip because it’s so simple and yet it makes all of the difference when it comes to your fitness results. The sad truth is that more than 90 percent of gym-goers fail to achieve the level of results they want — even after a full year of faithfully going through their routine. Maybe you can relate. It doesn’t have to be this way. I believe you deserve to get the highest level of results possible from the valuable time you invest in exercise. This simple concept has the power to dramatically accelerate your fitness results. Without further adieu,

Y

Here’s Your No. 1 Fitness Tip
Deb Skelton

in brief Hit The Track: Fund Run raises money for Eureka schools
Lace up your tennis shoes and hit the track for the fifth annual Fund Run, benefitting the nonprofit Eureka Schools Foundation. The event includes a 5K and 10K run/walk and begins with a $5 pancake breakfast at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, May 19, at Granite Bay High School, 1 Grizzly Way. Last year’s Fund Run raised nearly $40,000 for the foundation, which provides funding to the Eureka Union School District. The standard registration for the adult 5K is $30, and day-of is $35. The standard registration for the youth 5K is $25, and day-of is $30. Standard registration for the adult 10K is $40, and day-of is $45. For the youth 10K, standard registration is $35 and day-of is $40. The kids mile, for ages 11 and under, is $15; the kids 100-yard dash, for ages 9 and under, is $10. To register, visit www.eurekaschoolsfoun dation.org.

You get what you give when it comes to exercise and results. If you simply go through the motions, while staying in your comfort zone, then results will always be a hope for tomorrow and not today’s reality.
So, what exactly do I mean when I say “intensity?” Intensity is a measure of how much energy you’re expending while exercising. The harder you push yourself, the higher your intensity. When you’re simply going through the motions of a routine, without digging down and giving it your all, the workout lacks intensity and your results will dis-

the tip: The results you achieve are equal to the intensity of your workout. In other words, you get what you give when it comes to exercise and results. If you simply go through the motions, while staying in your comfort zone, then results will always be a hope for tomorrow and not today’s reality.

appoint. During your workout, pay attention to how you feel. Could you be working harder? If the honest answer is yes, then step it up a notch. It’s worth it. In addition to seeing awesome results quickly, there are two more benefits to bringing up your exercise intensity. The first benefit is that when you bring the intensity, you’re able to shorten exercise time. This means

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less time spent sweating away in the gym and more time doing the things you really love. All while getting even better results than with longer, low-intensity workouts. The second benefit is the after-burn you’ll experience following an intense workout. Simply put, this means your body will continue to burn extra calories long after you have finished exercising. Talk about supercharging your results. Just imagine how quickly your body could transform when you begin to harness the power of exercise intensity. One thing to remember: It’s important that you never sacrifice proper form in favor of intensity. As soon as your form starts to be compromised, reduce your intensity to where proper form is achieved.
Debra Skelton is a certified fitness consultant, a licensed nurse and owner of Motivative Health and Fitness. She can be reached at deb@gotatrainer.com.

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56

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Within these pages, you’ll see that the Granite Bay View has introduced a new element, and redesigned some sections. We launched “Back and Forth,” which will appear monthly and consist of a Q&A with a local person. Have ideas for someone to feature? Email Managing Editor Sena Christian at senac@goldcountry media.com. The View redesigned its table of contents page with the help of intern Calvin Car-

in brief Time for a Facelift

tano, a 2012 graduate of Granite Bay High School who now attends Sierra College. Our calendar page was redesigned by Gold Country Media paginator Jamie Hazelton. Paginator Megan Houchin has added some fun designs throughout the magazine, as well. We hope you like the changes.

Won’t You Join Us?
The View would like you to join us at a mixer from 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, May 15. These mixers are a chance for us to

get to know the people in our community, and for readers to find out more about the people behind the magazine. Feel free to stop by to give us your feedback, pitch story ideas or find out about purchasing an advertisement. The mixer is free and open to the public, with catering by La Petite Gourmet, Pullman Kitchen, Dominick’s Italian Market & Delis and Artisan Meat and Fish. The event will be held at Little Bliss Cakery, 8789 Auburn Folsom Road in Granite Bay.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • MAY 57

916-791-1901

Cutest Critter

Pet Photo Contest
Hosted by The Granite Bay View Douglas Feed and Pet Supply The Doggie Bag
PRIZE: $100 (store credit) Eligible: dog, cat, bird, small animals Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply PRIZE: $75 Gift Card Eligible: dog, cat Provided by: The Doggie Bag PRIZE: $50 Gift Card Eligible: dog, cat, bird, small animals Provided by: Douglas Feed & Pet Supply PRIZE: Years Supply of Dog Washes Eligible: dog Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply
Mail or drop off entries: Granite Bay View 188 Cirby Way Roseville, CA95678 or email a photo to: GBView@goldcountrymedia.com For further information or questions call 916-786-8746

Entries must be emailed, mailed or dropped off at the Granite Bay View office by 5pm on May 15th. No late entries will be accepted. Employees of Gold Country Media are welcome to submit photos but are not eligible for any prizes.

PET ENTRY FORM: Pet’s Name:_____________________________________ Owner’s Name(s)________________________________ Submitted by____________________________________ Address________________________________________ City_______________________________Zip_________ Phone__________________________________________
58 MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

And the Winner is...The winning pets will be featured in the June issue of the Granite Bay View.

things to do
WHAT’S HAPPENING BY SENA CHRISTIAN
Big Wake Weekend marks the return of 200mph hydroplanes to Folsom Lake.
COURTESY • BIG WAKE WEEKEND

DO YOU LOVE WATER SPORTS?
How does a day full day of water-related festivities sound? Not enough? Well, how about celebrating water sports with the three-day Big Wake Weekend event at Folsom Lake State Recreation Area at Granite Bay? This event marks the return of 200 mph H1 Unlimited Hydroplanes to the area for the first time in 46 years, according to event organizers. Attendees can also enjoy the Hyperlite Experience, a wakeboarding presentation, and American Power Boat Association-sanctioned race series, exhibits, themed beer gardens, food concessions and midway entertainment.

“Soon the Rains Will Come”
Presented by Roseville may may Theatre Arts Academy opens May 9 at Roseville Theater, 241 Vernon St. in Roseville. Showtimes at 7 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays through May 17. $9. (916) 772-2777.
to

9 17

What: Big Wake Weekend When: Friday, May 31, to Sunday, June 2 Where: Folsom Lake State Recreation Area at Granite Bay, 500 Park Road Cost: $79 three-day admission, $14 Friday general admission, $39 Saturday general admission, $39 Sunday general admission Info: www.bigwakeweekend.com

31 2
to

may june

BerryFest
From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. may may May 11 and 12 at Placer County Fairgrounds, 800 All America City Blvd. in Roseville. Boy Scouts pancake breakfast at 8 a.m., carnival, pony rides, petting zoo, arts and crafts, Little Miss Strawberry pageant, strawberry shortcake eating contest. $5 parking, $8 general, $5 kids/seniors. (916) 786-2023 or www.feedmeberries.com.
to

11 18

from 6-9 p.m. at Quarry Ponds Shopping Center, 5550 Douglas Blvd. in Granite Bay. Hosted by Fellowship Church may to raise money for packaging food event to feed 80,000 people through Stop Hunger Now Hunger Relief organization and Placer Food Bank. $40 in advance, $50 at the door. Must be 21 or older. www.gbstophungernow.org.
FILE PHOTO • GRANITE BAY VIEW

18

Stop Hunger Now Wine 3rd Saturday Art Walk Tasting and Silent Auction 18
From 7-10 p.m. in downtown and Old may Town Roseville. Visit local galleries and businesses including Shady Coffee & Tea, Blue Line Gallery, Beatnik Books and Downtown Library. Free. www.3rdsatartwalk.com.

From 7-10 p.m. at Skatetown Ice Arena, may 1009 Orlando Ave. in Roseville. Live DJ, laser light show, free beginner skating lessons. $11 for ages 13 and older, $10.50 for ages 12 and younger, $7 kids ages 5 and under. (916) 783-8550 ext. 115 or www.skatetown.biz.

17

’70s Music Skate Party

Meuy Saevang of Saevang Strawberry Farms sells fresh strawberries during last year’s BerryFest.

Music by CAKE
8 p.m. May to 31 and may june June 1 at Three Stages, Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway in Folsom. Alternative rock band. $29-$49. (916) 608-6888 or www.threestages.net.

“Thunder in The Valley Show & Shine” 31 1
Hosted by Rods & Relics of Lincoln Hills with registration from 3-6 p.m., show 4-10 p.m., Thunder Valley Casino, 1200 may Athens Ave. in Lincoln. Awards, raffle, music, food, beverages. Free. (916) 749-7468 or www.rodsnrelics.net.

31

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Historic Downtown Lincoln. Raffle prizes, music, food, vendors. Registration $20 before May 15, or $25 after. Free admittance. Proceeds benefit the Alpha june Henson Women’s Center, Placer County Food Bank and The Lighthouse Family Resource Center. (916) 749-7468 or www.rodsnrelics.net.

Downtown Lincoln Classic Car Show
1

The Placer Theatre Ballet brings the story of a may may mistreated step-daughter, her Fairy Godmother and the search for Prince Charming to life through the art of ballet in the company’s production of “Cinderella.” Experience the joy of dance while revisiting this classic love story. Shows are at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. May 4, and noon and 4 p.m. May 5 at Placer High School Theater, 275 Orange St. in Auburn. $13-$20. (916) 630-7820 or www.placertheatreballet.org.
to

4 5

“Cinderella”

The Placer Ballet Theatre brings the story of Cinderella to life.
COURTESY • PLACER THEATRE BALLET

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• MAY

59

daytripper

Take a Trip to Petaluma
KNOW AND GO
PETALUMA’S SALUTE TO “AMERICAN GRAFFITI” What: Classic car show
and cruise to celebrate film When: Thursday, May 16, to Saturday, May 18 Where: Historic downtown, Petaluma Boulevard Cost: Free Info: www.american graffiti.net

Make a weekend getaway out of visiting the scenic town

I

BY SENA CHRISTIAN
GRANITE BAY VIEW

remember one summer day as a child, back when VHS tapes were still on entertainment stands, my dad spent several hours editing and recording scenes from the classic 1973 George Lucas movie, “American Graffiti.” My dad, a U.S. history teacher, was compiling scenes from various movies for a film on youth culture to show his students. Watching only those few minutes of “American Graffiti” — over and over again — has stuck with me through the years. Imagine my delight when I learned that several memorable scenes from the movie were filmed in the city of Petaluma, which I visited for a weekend getaway earlier this year. It was an exciting revelation, although one I had following my trip, as I researched this article. In fact, I didn’t do a single piece of research before my fiancé and I left for our adventure. Thankfully, Petaluma isn’t a destination you need to research before a visit. That’s because the city of 58,000 residents in Sonoma County has so much to do and see in its historic downtown alone, all you need to know is how to get there. Shoot, you don’t even have to leave Petaluma Boulevard, if you really want to be lazy. After checking in at the Metro Hotel & Café, a quaint, remodeled Victorian house within walking distance of downtown, we headed to the historic district for several hours of browsing through antique shops. Our most fascinating find

SONOMA-MARIN FAIR What: Carnival rides,
exhibits, livestock show, concerts, “World’s Ugliest Dog” contest When: Wednesday, June 19, through Sunday, June 23 Where: Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma Cost: $15 adult, $10 child/senior Info: www.sonoma-marin fair.org

COURTESY • COLE ALLEN

The Metro Hotel & Café in Petaluma offers a quaint, charming atmosphere for a weekend getaway.
was Military Antiques and Museum on Petaluma Boulevard. This place is easy to miss, but an absolute must-see, as it has mounds and mounds of old military paraphernalia. We walked back in the direction of the Metro Hotel for dinner next door at SEA Thai Bistro, which serves a delicious vegetarian yellow curry with tofu. So, that was my trip. Then, I bought an overnight stay at the Metro Hotel & Café for my parents and told my mom to help me finish up this review. “We started out wellequipped with my latest high-

Catch a matinee at Boulevard 14 Cinemas, conveniently located in the downtown Theatre District.
COURTESY • CARLA CHRISTIAN

60

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

tech navigation tools, got lost anyway and your dad had to resort to the old-fashioned way — stop and ask for directions,” my mom said. My mom, herself a seller of antiques, and my dad, her “silent partner,” immediately hit up the downtown antique shops, searching for treasures to resell. The shops were too upscale, but they enjoyed coveting a selection of Tiffany lamps, priced $9,000 to $17,000. They next spotted an old U.S. Post Office building now being used as a fitness center. “Wait, what, I didn’t notice that,” I said, as my mom relayed her trip. “Oh, come on, girl!” my mom admonished. “You’ve got to open your eyes when you go to these places!” Then my parents — musicians and hippies — happened upon Tall Toad Music Store, a shop with scores of guitars and ukuleles hanging from the rafters. The business also has a large collection of music books. “In fact, we were thrilled when we found an Eric Clapton songbook with music we had been searching for,” my mom said. Famished, they headed over to the Theatre District for lunch at Tres Hombres, each selecting the half turkey sandwich with fries, sprinkled with feta cheese and parsley, which my dad — who likes food as plain as possible — promptly scraped off. Afterward, they came across Thrifty Hippy on Petaluma Boulevard. “This shop was more our style with knickknacks, racks of vintage clothing, jewelry and a fair collection of vinyl records,” my mom said. They appreciated the shop’s relaxed vibe and the room where parents can pick out a few children’s items for free. Then it was back to the Metro Hotel for a relaxing evening. “The Metro Hotel can be described as a cross between shabby chic and just plain old shabby. However, we had a charming room with a private patio,” my mom said. “The café is not really a working one, more of a do-it-yourself type. But they do provide a list of restaurants.”
Sena Christian can be reached at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaC_RsvPT.

COURTESY PHOTOS • CARLA CHRISTIAN

This former bank on Petaluma Boulevard now boasts (pricey) old treasures as Vintage Bank Antiques.

Thankfully, Petaluma isn’t a destination you need to research before a visit. That’s because the city of 58,000 residents in Sonoma County has so much to do and see in its historic downtown alone, all you need to know is how to get there.
GRANITE BAY VIEW

Music lovers can peruse the guitars at Tall Toad Music on Petaluma Boulevard.

• MAY

61

back and forth

BY TOBY LEWIS

Get to Know Your source Server
With the change in the economy, several of our guests (at Source) are new to Granite Bay. And they said they moved here because of the schools, so their children could have the quality of education that is here. I really like that it is a community supporting itself.
What attracted you to the restaurant business?

D

GRANITE BAY VIEW CORRESPONDENT

iana Todd is a manager and server at Source Global Tapas, in the Quarry Ponds Town Center in Granite Bay. The California native recently relocated from Truckee to Folsom and has been working at Source for almost a year. I sat down for a candid conversation with Todd to talk about what it’s like working at a local restaurant.

grown. It doesn’t go to a cooling unit, it doesn’t go to a warehouse — it literally comes from the farm. In the winter, we serve a lot of stuff from Otow Orchards, and you could walk to Otow Orchards from here, if you really wanted to. They pick it, we slice it and put it on our menu.
It seems like a lot of restaurants are doing that nowadays.

Greece, that come from around the world, because he tasted a domestic product and it wasn’t the same.

What do you do when you are not working?

How do you feel about the Granite Bay restaurant community?

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Santa Ynez, and then for high school I moved to the Central Valley. It was a little bit of a shock there, but definitely misery is impetus for change, so…
What do you like about working in Granite Bay?

Probably the overwhelming sense of community. Everyone really supports everyone else and even in the shopping center — Hawks, Pete’s, all of them, are really great neighbors. If you need something, they are all really there for you. I would say Roseville is huge and the Sacramento metro area is huge, and this place still maintains a sense of community. It is not at all what I thought it would be.
What did you think it would be like out here?

Well, for my first restaurant job, I was 15 and a half and I got a work permit. My friends were working at a local restaurant and so I started working there. It worked out well for me. I definitely have to stay moving and I really, really like people. For a long time there was growth and change with food and cocktails, and (a movement toward) farm-to-table. But my first job was just a total accident. You know, you’re 15 and either you get a job at the mall or you get a job in a restaurant.
What do you mean by farm-to-table?

It’s very, very popular. I would wholeheartedly agree. And we’re a little bit of a mix here. With everything that we can, we do local, but then my boss is all about quality, and so if something isn’t the best here, he’ll get it from someplace else. We have quite a few things that come from Spain or

I feel great about the people involved in it. I feel a little sad that it is not larger. The more going on in this shopping center and the more going on in Granite Bay, then the better it is, the more we have a possibility to get people from outside to come here. I want the Granite Bay restaurant scene to grow.

I like to be outside. Living in Truckee it was skiing 100 days a year and hiking in the summer. I’m a raft guide, I whitewater kayak, I just learned to surf because I got to move down here and the coast is so close.
Where do you like to go backpacking?

And then, luckily around here, we’re really close to the north fork of the American River. The canyon of the north fork is some of the most amazing wilderness I’ve ever seen. The water is crystal-clear and you can see the bottom.
Do you think the Giants have it in them to win back-to-back World Series titles?

In Tahoe, probably Desolation Wilderness, which is really easy for a lot of people. And it is huge. There is a hike called Ellis Peak. You go along this ridge and look out over Desolation and it really sums up exactly why they call it that and just how massive it is. You start out at the lake and then the big trees and you end up in these huge slabs of granite. It feels like the world is new, like some dinosaur might peek out from somewhere. It’s such an interesting landscape.

Without a doubt. Can you say three-peat? For sure. You know, the Giants are a team and not just a couple million-dollar players. I don’t think that changes one year from the next, because we didn’t buy someone new to change who we were.
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer living in Sacramento. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

LET US KNOW
KNOW OF AN INTERESTING LOCAL PERSON TO FEATURE IN BACK AND FORTH? Email senac@gold country media.com

I lived in Palo Alto for a little while and I thought it would be similar to that. I thought it would be a lot of new money and a lot of people driving fancy cars and trying to prove something to someone else. And it is absolutely not.

We serve, here in the summer, Heidi Watanabe’s tomatoes, and I’ve been out to the (West Sacramento) farm and we’ve picked those tomatoes. And then the next morning, we load them into boxes and drive them out here, and we slice them and put them on a plate. So farm-to-table is knowing where your food is

KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Diana Todd is a manager and server at Source Global Tapas, in the Quarry Ponds Town Center in Granite Bay.

62

MAY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

quarryponds.net

Granite Bay! Stop Hunger Now!
Silent Auction & Wine Tasting

Saturday, May 18
at Quarry Ponds
Sponsored by Fellowship Church at Granite Bay. More details at www.gbstophungernow.org

Dine, Shop & Enjoy!
(916) 783-3113 peets.com (916) 772-3900 sourcetapas.com (916) 213-1716 terifode.com (916) 370-3223 pullmankitchen.com (916) 899-6121 (916) 780-9030 capitolcellars.com (916) 774-0440 crushedvlvt.com (916) 788-2828 theartisanmeats.com 916-791-3543 • www.barreflies.com (916) 751-7922 Rima Boutique 916-797-7462 www.rimaboutique.com

MEETING ROOM
Eve Fenstermaker 916-791-6761 granitebayprop.com Our new Meeting Room is now located in the Market Hallway and available to local business groups and private parties. Have your next event at Quarry Ponds and have it catared by one of our center’s restaurants! Visit quarryponds.net for more details.

FARMER’S MARKET
(916) 791-2529 theclaycorner.com The Farmer’s Market is back each Sunday morning starting June 2nd. Stop by for some fresh vegetables and support your local farmers!

916.791.6200 hawksrestaurant.com

Quarry Ponds Partnering with Placer SPCA Quarry Ponds will host the Pet Mobile on Saturday, May 11 from 10am to 1pm in the parking area. Stop by to adopt a pet or to just see the adorable animals and learn more about supporting your local SPCA.
Visit the Quarry Ponds mobile site by scanning our QR code with your smart phone app.

(916) 797-4992 petesrandb.com

916-791-4111 mythaitable.com

QUARRY PONDS
5520~5550 DOUGLAS NOW LEASING B LV D . , GRANITE B AY
Spaces are available for lease from 1125 sf and up. If you are interested in becoming a part of Quarry Ponds, contact us today!

CA

Capital Pacific Company, 7110 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay CA 916-782-8777 email: info@quarryponds.net

Introducing Kraft Real Estate Property Management.
“The time and attention your investments deserve while you live the life you deserve”

CALL 916.723.0888
Call for a free over-the-phone home evaluation today!
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

Dan & Lisa Kraft

Winner of Sacramento Magazine’s Five Star Agent Award 2012 and 2013
The strength of teamwork... The reputation for results! Call today for a FREE market analysis of your home!

MOVE IN READY HOME!
• 4 Beds 2 Baths 2288sqft • Open bright floor plan • Inviting built-in pool on park like lot • Located on Cul-de-Sac next to park

GORGEOUS HOME IN ROCKLIN!
• 5 Beds 5 Baths 3700sqft • Located in desirable Whitney Ranch • Chef’s dream kitchen with granite counters • Double convection ovens for great parties • Large master suite double sinks 910 Farm House Court Rocklin
LIC#01747355

Short Sale & Foreclosure Specialists

8959 Quail Glen Court Fair Oaks

$374,900

$460,000

LIC#00895098

Call Bryarsat at303.6056 723.0888 CallCindy Mina Rowe
Address 4580 Northglen St 8265 Hillgrove St 8043 Joe Rodgers Ct 8715 Spooner Ct 5431 Erickson Dr 8275 Royall Oaks Dr 7500 Barton Rd 8295 Macargo Ct 7517 Mia Linda Ct 4768 Copperfield Cir 8355 Coventry Ct 4850 Bentwood Way 5105 Parkford Cir 9385 Oak Leaf Way 6004 Princeton Reach Way 4434 Polo Ranch Pl

CallBeverly Della & Ramm Reuben at 337.5233 Call at 870.8575
Bd 3 3 3 3 4 3-4 3 4 4 4 5 4 5 5 6-7 5 Bth 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 3 (2 1) 3 (2 1) 3 (2 1) 3 (3 0) 3 (2 1) 3 (3 0) 3 (3 0) 3 (3 0) 4 (3 1) 4 (3 1) 6 (5 1) 8 (5 3) SqFt 1,075 1,315 1,796 2,187 2,664 2,150 2,279 2,798 2,727 2,802 2,987 3,196 3,557 3,155 6,525 7,628

Call Cindy Bryars at 723.0888
Year 1974 1975 1978 1974 1996 1971 2007 1986 1979 1990 1988 1994 1996 1978 1995 2009 Date 3/21/13 3/11/13 3/22/13 3/29/13 3/15/13 3/12/13 3/28/13 3/15/13 3/22/13 3/26/13 4/2/13 3/11/13 3/18/13 4/4/13 3/22/13 4/3/13 DOM 13 48 11 36 17 22 37 14 50 8 6 10 9 6 21 471

Debbie Cancilla 916-251-6314 pdcRealEstate@gmail.ocm www.debbiec.kraftrealestate.com License #01858325

Mina Rowe 916-303-6056 mina@kraftrealestateocm www.mina.kraftrealestate.com License #01747355

Buying? Selling? Give us a call!

RECENT GRANITE BAY HOME SALES
LotSz 0.1650ac 0.092ac 0.6540ac 0.4280ac 0.2080ac 46174sf 2.6000ac 1.000ac 1.0700ac 0.1900ac 0.4760ac 0.251ac 0.350ac 1.2000ac 1.2620ac 6.00000ac List Price 215,000 231,000 315,000 377,000 420,000 375,000 469,900 449,900 524,900 599,950 679,000 699,500 774,900 800,000 1,499,000 2,799,999 Sale Price 220,000 231,000 286,000 377,000 385,000 385,000 475,000 500,000 510,000 622,000 694,000 715,000 750,000 861,000 1,499,000 2,450,000

Information deemed to be reliable but not verified. Home sales are based in information from MetroList Services, Inc.

NEW LISTING

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

GREAT HOME IN ROCKLIN!
• 4 Beds 3 Baths • 3 car garage • Full bedroom & bath downstairs • Whole house fan for efficient cooling • Low maintenance yard & newer roof • No Mello Roo or HOA dues

GREAT RENTAL IN ANATOLIA!
• 4 Beds 2 Baths • Large kitchen with granite • Stainless steel appliances • Family room w/fireplace • Formal living and dining room • Laundry upstairs w/4 bedrooms • Call Cindy for appt. to view

GREAT NEW RENTAL BY KRAFT RENTALS
• 3 Beds 2 Bath 1367 sqft • Newer carpet and paint • Nice private backyard • Ready for move-in • At the end of a cul-de-sac 6311 Appian Way Carmichael

NEW RENTAL IN ORANGEVALE
• 2 Beds 1 Bath Approx. 900 sqft • Remodeled with paint and flooring • Available April 1 • Call Cindy to inquire 5825 Hazel Ave. Orangevale

3400 Cobblestone Dr. Rocklin

4012 Kalamata Way Rancho Cordova
LIC#01702972

$299,000

$1700 per mo.

$1400 per mo.

$950 per mo.

CallDella Sharon Whiting at 296.9417 Call & Reuben 337.5233

Call Cindy Bryars at 723.0888

Call Bryars CallCindy Thomas Reillyat at723.0888 215.6535

Call Cindy Bryars at 723.0888

With Kraft Real Estate Agents, finding an experienced & knowledgeable Realtor® is just a phone call away. Check Out Property Management on Our website at www.kraftrentals.com

916.723.0880 • www.KraftRealEstate.com

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