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THE STUDY ON STRESS MANAGEMENT IN BISLERI INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Project report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement of South Asia University for the award of the degree of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 2012


Submitted By

NAME ENROLLMENT NO

: :

TAMILARASAN.A SAA04F147ELB1HA3

SOUTH ASIA UNIVERSITY LONDON

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that project entitled THE STUDY ON STRESS MANAGEMENT IN BISLERI INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is submitted by TAMILARASAN. A (ENROLMENT NUMBER -

SAA04M147ELB1HA3), GEMS B SCHOOL, Bangalore. in partial fulfillment of the Eighth trimester requirement in HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT for the award of the degree master of business administration and is certified to be an original and bonafide work.

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that this project entitled THE STUDY ON STRESS MANAGEMENT IN BISLERI INTERNATIONAL LIMITED was sincerely done The study has been undertaken in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Master of Business Administration at GEMS B School, Chennai affiliated to South Asia University.

I also declare that this project has not been submitted to any other institutions or university, for the award of any Degree or Diploma.

Place: Bangalore

A.TAMILARASAN

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that this project entitled THE STUDY ON STRESS MANAGEMENT IN BISLERI INTERNATIONAL PRIVATE LIMITED, CHENNAI was sincerely done, during the period from Aug 2012. The study has been undertaken in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Master of Business Administration at Easwari Engineering College, Chennai affiliated to Anna University.

I also declare that this project has not been submitted to any other institutions or university, for the award of any Degree or Diploma.

Place: Chennai

TAMILARASAN. A

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER NO 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2 2.1 2.2 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

TITLE

PAGE NO

CHAPTER -1 INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION INDUSTRY PROFILE PROFILE OF THE COMPANY PRODUCT PROFILE CHAPTER -2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE REVIEW OF LITERATURE RESEARCH REVIEW CHAPTER -3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY RESEARCH METHODOLOGY NEED OF THE STUDY SCOPE OF THE STUDY OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

3.5 3.6 3.6.1 3.6.2 3.6.3 3.6.4 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 4

RESEARCH DESIGN SAMPLING DESIGN SAMPLE AREA SAMPLE SIZE SAMPLE UNIT SAMPLE TECHNIQUE FRAMEWORK OF QUESTIONNAIRE METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION TOOLS USED FOR DATA ANALYSIS LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY CHAPTER SCHEME CHAPTER -4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5

ANALTICAL APPROACH PROBLEM SOLVING PROBLEM INDENTIFICATION OBSERVATION ANALYSIS ACTION

4.6 5

CHECK CHAPTER-5 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS,SUGGESTIONS & CONCLUSION

5.1 5.2 5.3

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS SUGGESTIONS CONCLUSION BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDIX

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE NO

TITLE

PAGE NO

1.1

VARIOUS PACKAGING OPTIONS PROVIDED BY BISLERI ALONG WITH THE TARGET CONSUMERS

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8

AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES CLASSIFICATION ON EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION WORK EXPERIENCE STRESS AT WORK ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH COWORKERS OR BOSS

4.9

SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS

4.10 4.11 4.12

RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB

4.13 4.14 4.15

EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY

4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 4.21

GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

4.22 4.23

MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FRIENDS FAMILY MEMBERS AND

4.24 4.25

OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT T & D PROGRAMS TO REDUCE THE STRESS

4.26 4.27 4.28 4.29

FOR INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP FACTORS FOR WORKLOAD FACTORS FOR PHYSICAL FACTORS FOR EMOTIONAL FACTORS

4.30

FOR COPING STRATEGIES

LIST OF CHARTS

CHART NO

TITLE

PAGE NO

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8

AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES CLASSIFICATION ON EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION WORK EXPERIENCE STRESS AT WORK ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH CO-WORKERS OR BOSS

4.9

SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS

4.10 4.11 4.12

RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB

4.13 4.14

EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB

4.15

ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY

4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 4.21

GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

4.22 4.23

MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FRIENDS FAMILY MEMBERS AND

4.24 4.25

OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT T & D PROGRAMS TO REDUCE THE STRESS

LIST OF FIGURES

FIGURE NO

TITLE

PAGE NO

1.1 1.2

INDIVIDUAL COPING STRATEGIES

ORGANIZATIONAL COPING STRATEGIES

ABSTRACT

Stress is a phenomenon that we are all familiar with. Reports, articles and new stories bombard us with news about the increased stress in our daily life and warn us of the dangers of longterm stress. Work related stress in the life of organized workers, consequently, affects the health of organization. Stress management is a collection of skills, tools, and techniques that help us reduce, manage, and even counteract the negative side-effects of stress. Nowadays the corporate sector is booming in a high speed that the people have to work for prolonged hours to maintain the standard of living and achieve their basic needs. So is the condition in the hospitals, colleges, BPOs and lots of other places. In spite of having the modern technologies and facilities, people are feeling themselves to be work loaded and stressed. Stress arises because of many reasons which are discussed in the following project. The project report also contains the techniques to reduce the stress and methods to overcome such problems. A survey has been conducted to access the extent of stress the following group undergoes:- working class in hospitals, BPOs, other industries and as well as institutes. Stress arises because of unfulfilled wants, lack of job satisfaction etc. This project discusses how stress is one of the most influential factors that affect a worker's behavior and the way they deal with others. The importance in understanding stress is vital as it not only can negatively affect our interpersonal relationships, but our health as well. Thus the relationship between from what and from where this stress arises is identified. The remedy or solution to reduce the so called stress can also be analyzed.

CHAPTER -1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION People experience stress in private life and at work place. People have to work effectively against time and within the parameter of various rules and regulations. It is not always possible to create an organizational climate conducive to work. Various departments, groups and external environment factors affect individual behavior. Minimal level of stress is required for organizations to operate effectively. People suffer from high blood pressure, heart attack when stress is beyond control of the human beings. It is therefore necessary to identify causes of stress and modify behavior so that the individual energy is directed towards organizational productivity and healthy organization climate is created. WHAT IS STRESS? Stress is a persons reaction to change. It is a physical and mental response to feelings, situations, other people, or places. The things that cause stress are stressors. A stressor can be internal or external. An internal stressor is a feeling or emotion that cause stress. An external stressor is something outside a person that cause stress. Stressors can be minor, like misplacing our keys. Stressor also can be major. PHYSICAL REACTIONS TO STRESS When a person experiences stress, the brain releases chemicals called epinephrine and cortisol. Epinephrine is sometimes called adrenaline. A stressor sends these chemicals, or stress hormones, racing through the body. Stress hormones prepare the body to protect itself from danger. The hormones signal blood to move to the heart and other organs. People experiencing stress might suddenly feel hot. Their heart may beat faster and their muscles may tense. Their hands and feet might feel cold or clammy. Their senses may become sharper. People might feel like they can smell, see, and taste things more clearly. Once the stressor disappears, the stress hormones quiet down. The body gradually goes back to normal. DEFINITION OF STRESS

Hans Selye was one of the founding fathers of stress research. His view in 1956 was that stress is not necessarily something bad it all depends on how we take it. The stress of exhilarating, creative successful work is beneficial, while that of failure, humiliation or infection is detrimental. Selye believed that the biochemical effects of stress would be experienced irrespective of whether the situation was positive or negative. POTENTIAL SOURCES OF STRESS (a)Environmental Factors: Just as environmental uncertainty influences the design of an organization. Changes in business cycle create economic uncertainties. Political Uncertainties: If the political system in a country is implemented in an orderly manner, there would not be any type of stress. Technological Uncertainties: New innovations can make an employees skills and experiences obsolete in a very short period of time. Technological uncertainty therefore is a another type of environmental factor that can cause stress. Computers, robotics, automation and other forms of technological innovations are threat to many people and cause them stress. (b)Organizational Factors: There are no storages of factors within the organization that can cause stress; pressures to avoid error or complete tasks in a limited time period, work overload are few examples. Task demands are factors related to a persons job. They include the design of the individuals job working conditions, and the physical work layout. Role demands relate to pressures placed on a person as a function of the particular role he or she plays in the organization. Role overhead is experienced when the employees is expected to do more than time permits. Role ambiguity is created when role expectations are not clearly understood and employee is not sure what he / she is to do. Interpersonal demands are pressures created by other employees. Lack of social support from colleagues and peers. Interpersonal relationships can cause considerable stress, especially among employed with a high social need. Organizational structure defines the level of differentiation in the organization, the degree of rules and regulations, and where decisions are made. Excessive rules and lack of

participation in decision that affect an employee are examples of structural variables that might be potential sources of stress. Organizational leadership represents the managerial style of the organizations senior executive. Some executive officers create a culture characterized by tension, fear, and anxiety. They establish unrealistic pressures to perform in the short-run impose excessively tight controls and routinely fire employees who dont measure up. This creates a fear in their hearts, which lead to stress. Organizations go through a cycle. They are established; they grow, become mature, and eventually decline. An organizations life stage - i.e. where it is in four stage cycle creates different problems and pressures for employees. The establishment and decline stage are particularly stressful. (c)Individual Factors: The typical individual only works about 40 hrs a week. The experience and problems that people encounter in those other 128 non-working hrs each week can spell over to the job. Family Problems: National surveys consistently show that people hold family and discipline, troubles with children are examples of relationship problems that create stress for employee and that arent at the front door when they arrive at work. Economic Problems: Economic problems created by individuals overextending their financial resources are another set of personal troubles that can create stress for employees and distract their attention from their work. EFFECTS OR CONSEQUENCES OF JOB STRESS Effects on the Individual The impacts of distress on individuals are of following types: The subjective or intrapersonal effects of stress are feelings of anxiety, boredom, apathy, nervousness, depression, fatigue, and anger. Sometimes experiencing the stress may cause aggressive behaviors on the part of the individual. The cognitive effects include poor concentration, short attention span, mental blocks and inability to make decisions.

The physiological effects can be seen in increased heart and pulse rate, high blood pressure, dryness of throat, and excessive sweating. The behavioral effects arc manifest in such things as accident proneness, drinking, excessive eating, smoking, impulsive behaviors, depression, and withdrawal behaviors. The manifest health effects could be stomach disorders, asthma, eczema, and other psychosomatic disorders. In addition, the mental health, i.e. the ability to function effectively in one's daily life, will also decline as excessive stress is experienced.

Consequences for the Family Negative stress, which is handled by individuals in dysfunctional ways, such as drinking or withdrawal behaviors, will have an adverse effect on their home life. Spouse abuse, child abuse, alienation from family members, and even divorce could result from dysfunctional coping mechanisms. Consequences to Organizations The adverse consequences on an organization include low performance and productivity, high rates of absenteeism and poor decision-making. It also leads to loss of customers because of poor worker attitudes, increased alienation of the worker from the job, and even destructive and aggressive behaviors resulting in strikes and sabotage. The stresses experienced by employees who take on critical roles and are responsible for safety can sometimes be detrimental to the public. STRESSORS: A stressor is a chemical or biological agent, environmental condition, external

stimulus or an event that causes stress to an organism. An event that triggers the stress response may include: environmental stressors, daily stress events, life changes, workplace stressors, physical stressors. According to Syele a stressors is Whatever produces stress with or without functioning hormonal or nervous systems. TYPES OF STRESSORS: a. Extra Organizational Stressors: Extra organizational stressors have a tremendous impact on job stress. Taking an open system perspective of an organization, it is clear that job stress is not just limited to things that

happen inside the organization, during working hours. Extra organizational stressors include things such as social / technological change, the family, relocation, economic & financial conditions, race & class, residential or community conditions. b. Organizational Stressors: Besides the potential stressors that occur outside the organization, there are also those associated with the organization itself. Although the organization is made up of groups & individuals, there are also more macro-level dimensions unique to the organization that contains potential stressors. c. Group Stressors: The group can also be a potential source of stress. Group stressors can be categorized into three areas. Lack of groups cohesiveness Lack of social support Intra-Individual, interpersonal & inter-group conflict

d. Individual Stressors: In a sense, the other stressors (Extra organizational, organizational, & Group stressors) all eventually get down to the individual level. For example, role conflict, ambiguity, selfefficacy & psychological hardiness may all affect the level of stress someone experiences. TYPES OF STRESS: Good Stress V/S Bad Stress: Stress has often been misunderstood to be negative, with few people acknowledging the importance and usefulness of positive stress. In our everyday lives, stress is everywhere and definitely unavoidable. Hence our emphasis should be on differentiating between what is good stress, and what is bad. This will help us to learn to cope with negative stress, and harness the power of positive stress to help us achieve more. There are 4 main categories of stress, namely o Eustress o Distress o Hyper stress o Hypo stress.

Negative stress can cause many physical and psychological problems, whilst positive stress can be very helpful for us. Heres how we differentiate between them. STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress management is the need of the hour. However hard we try to go beyond a stress situation, life seems to find new ways of stressing us out and plaguing us with anxiety attacks. Moreover, be it our anxiety, mind-body exhaustion or our erring attitudes, we tend to overlook causes of stress and the conditions triggered by those. In such unsettling moments we often forget that stressors, if not escapable, are fairly manageable and treatable. DEFINITION: Stress management encompasses a range of modalities designed to treat the physical and emotional toll of stress. The approaches used can include bodywork, meditation, counseling, energy work, and education. Stress management is the amelioration of stress and especially chronic stress often for the purpose of improving everyday functioning. A set of techniques used to help an individual cope more effectively with difficult situations in order to feel better emotionally, improve behavioural skills, and often to enhance feelings of control. WORKPLACE STRESS Workplace stress is the harmful physical and emotional response that occurs when there is a poor match between job demands and the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Stress-related disorders encompass a broad array of conditions, including psychological disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder) and other types of emotional strain(e.g., dissatisfaction, fatigue, tension, etc.), maladaptive behaviours (e.g., aggression, substance abuse), and cognitive impairment (e.g., concentration and memory problems). In turn, these conditions may lead to poor work performance or even injury. Job stress is also associated with various biological reactions that may lead ultimately to compromised health, such as cardiovascular disease. CAUSES OF WORKPLACE STRESS: Job stress results from the interaction of the worker and the conditions of work. Views differ on the importance of worker characteristics versus working conditions as the primary cause of job stress. The differing viewpoints suggest different ways to prevent stress at work. According to one school of thought, differences in individual characteristics such as

personality and coping skills are most important in predicting whether certain job conditions will result in stress. In other words, what is stressful for one person may not be a problem for someone else. This viewpoint leads to prevention strategies that focus on workers and ways to help them cope with demanding job conditions. SIGNS OF WORKPLACE STRESS: Mood and sleep disturbances, upset stomach and headache, and disturbed relationships with family; friends are examples of stress-related problems. The effects of job stress on chronic diseases are more difficult to see because chronic diseases take a long time to develop and can be influenced by many factors other than stress. Nonetheless, evidence is rapidly accumulating to suggest that stress plays an important role in several types of chronic health problems-especially cardiovascular disease, musculo skeletal disorders, and psychological disorders. COPING WITH STRESS AT WORK PLACE: Some stress is good for motivation and increasing efficiency, too much stress can result in negative impacts such as reduced effectiveness and efficiency. More and more people are feeling isolated and disrespected at work, and this has led to greater occupational stress. Many companies have taken to consulting experts and professionals on ways to increase connectedness and motivation of their employees. Some companies organize parties and make their employees feel valued at work. INDIVIDUAL COPING STRATEGIES: Many strategies for helping individuals manage stress have been proposed.

Fig. 1.1 INDIVIDUAL COPING STRATEGIES

ORGANIZATIONAL COPING STRATEGIES: The most effective way of managing stress calls for adopting stressors and prevent occurrence of potential stressors. Two basic organizational strategies for helping employees manage stress are institutional programs and collateral programs.

Fig. 1.2 ORGANISATIONAL COPING STRATEGIES REMEDIES TO REDUCE STRESS There are two major approaches to reduce stress. They are, Individual approaches Organizational approaches INDIVIDUAL APPROACHES An employee can take individual responsibility to reduce his/her stress level. Individual strategies that have proven effective include, implementing time management techniques, increasing physical exercise, relaxation training, and expanding the social support network. Time management Physical exercise Relaxation training Social support Yoga & Meditation

ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACHES Several of the factors that cause stress particularly task and role demands and organizations structure are controlled by management. As such they can be modified or

changed. Some of the strategies that management want to consider include improved personal self section and job placement, use of realistic goal setting, redesigning of jobs, improved organizational communication and establishment of corporate wellness programmes. Certain jobs are more stressful than others. Individual with little experience or an external lower of control tend to be more proven to stress. Selection and placement decisions should take these facts into consideration. Goal setting helps to reduce stress. It also provides motivation. Designing jobs to give employees more responsibility, more meaningful work, more autonomy, and increased feedback can reduce stress, because these factors give the employee greater control over work activities and lessen dependence on others. Another remedy for reducing stress is cognitive restructuring. It involves two step procedures. First irrational or maladaptive thought processes that create stress are identified. The second step consists of replacing these irrational thoughts with more rational or reasonable ones. 1.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE In the present scenario many consumers living in urban areas are increasingly looking towards bottled water as a means of meeting some or all of their daily requirements. There is a growing concern for the safety and quality of drinking-water. Consumers may have various reasons for purchasing bottled drinking-water, such as taste, convenience or fashion, but for many consumers, safety and potential health benefits are important considerations. The packaged water business is worth Rs. 1,000 crore, and it is growing at a huge 40%-50% annually. According to the Bureau of Indian Standards there are 1,200 bottled water factories all over India (of which 600 are in one state -- Tamil Nadu). Over 100 brands are vying for the Rs 1,000-crore (Rs 10 billion) bottled water market. OVERVIEW: The modern water industry operates sophisticated equipment which produces the purest of water is generally looked upon by the public for its utility as a natural monopoly. In most of the cases, such industries are owned by the state or the centre. The normal GDP ranges between 1-2%.

In some countries, notably France, the UK and the Czech Republic, the water industry is regulated but services are largely operated by private companies with exclusive rights for a limited period and a well-defined geographical space. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS FOR BOTTLED DRINKING WATER: The intergovernmental body for the development of internationally recognized standards for food is the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC). WHO, one of the cosponsors of the CAC, has advocated the use of the Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality as the basis for derivation of standards for all bottled water. The CAC has developed a Codex Standard for Natural Mineral Waters and an associated code of practice. The Codex Standard describes the product and its labeling, compositional and quality factors, including limits for certain chemicals, hygiene, packaging and labeling. The Codex Code of Practice for Collecting, Processing and Marketing of Natural Mineral Waters provides guidance to the industry on a range of good manufacturing practices matters. While CAC standards and recommendations are not strictly mandatory, Codex health and safety requirements are recognized by the World Trade Organization as representing the international consensus for consumer protection and any deviation from Codex recommendations may require a scientifically-based justification. This Commission is currently developing a draft of a Codex Standard for Bottled/ Packaged Waters to cover drinking-water other than natural mineral waters. Under the existing Codex Standard and Code of Practice, natural mineral waters must conform to strict requirements concerning, for example, their direct collection and bottling without further treatment from a natural source, such as a spring or well. In comparison, the draft Codex Standard for Bottled/Packaged Waters has been proposed to include waters from other sources, in addition to springs and wells, and treatment to improve their safety and quality. Neither the CAC nor WHO offer certification of any bottled or mineral water products. In this regard, WHO does not permit its name or emblem to be used in connection with any commercial purposes? While many countries have national standards for bottled waters and some have national certification schemes, no universally accepted international

certification scheme now exists. Persons seeking information on bottled water certification should approach the national authorities in the country concerned. THE POTENTIAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF BOTTLED DRINKING WATER: In European and certain other countries, many consumers believe that natural mineral waters have medicinal properties or offer other health benefits. Such waters are typically of high mineral content and, in some cases, significantly above the concentrations normally accepted in drinking-water. Such waters have a long tradition of use and are often accepted on the basis that they are considered foods rather than drinking-water peers. Although certain mineral waters may be useful in providing essential micro-nutrients, such as calcium, WHO is unaware of any convincing evidence to support the beneficial effects of consuming such mineral waters. As a consequence, WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality do not make recommendations regarding minimum concentrations of essential compounds. HASSLES CAUSED BY BOTTLING INDUSTRY: The water industry, which depends on groundwater, is a lucrative business for several players including private suppliers who sell water to water tankers and big bottled water companies. Over-extraction has led to the rapid depletion of water tables as well as deterioration of water quality in most cities. Higher rates of groundwater extraction in coastal areas have also led to salinity intrusion into coastal aquifers, especially in Tamil Nadu and Gujarat. Unplanned and uncontrolled groundwater extraction has disturbed the countrys hydrological balance. MINERAL WATER INDUSTRY CURRENT MARKET SCENARIO A decade ago, the mineral water market had been crawling at the rate of 3-4%, or even a lower figure. Indians carried drinking water in earthen pitchers, plastic or PUF bottles. But increasing cases of typhoid and other waterborne diseases began to be reported. In addition to this, liberalization happened and the mineral water industry began to be stirred and shaken. The market started growing an astounding rate of over 100% per annum. The fact that there were very few players in the market meant that their business grew by leaps and bounds. The market today has grown to Rs11bn. The organized sector - branded mineral water has only Rs5bn of market share. The rest is accounted for by the unorganized sector, which

is dominated by small regional players. The market is still growing- at a rate greater than 80% per annum. In the branded segment, Parles Bisleri is the market leader with a share of more than 45%. Parle Agros Bailley comes a close second with market share of 15%. Other major players in the market are Yes of Kotharis, Ganga of T-Series, Himalayan, Hello, Nestls Pure Life, Pepsis Aquafina, Coca-Colas Kinley Prime, and Florida etc. Sensing the opportunity that this segment holds, MNCs began to draw up plans to enter the market. Today the market is proving to be yet another battlefield for an ongoing battle between the Desis and MNCs. In the last few years the industry had around 170 brands. This figure is over 300 presently. The major foreign players are Coca-Cola promoted Kinley, Pepsis Aquafina, Britannias Evian, Nestls Perrier, Herbert sons and Danone International. Indias largest packaged water company Bisleri International Pvt. Ltd is to enter valueadded water business. The company will launch flavored packaged drinking water in the country by next coming years. They are conducting research and development with at least 12 fruit flavors, such as nimbu paani, strawberry and orange, for flavored water. With the move, Bisleri aims to strengthen its position in a space in which other leading beverage companies have also evinced interest. Companies such as Coca-Cola India Inc., PepsiCo India Holdings Pvt. Ltd and Tata Tea Ltd, also plan to enter the flavored water business. So far, there is only one prominent player, DS Foods, in the segment. Its brand, Catch, is priced at Rs30. The flavored water market is still at a nascent stage in India. Higher price, limited products and alternative home-made products are some of the barriers for the growth of this segment, said Puneet Bansal, senior analyst with Datamonitor. Bisleris focus on premium segment, however, is part of its strategy to tap higher-margin opportunities in the packaged water business. Of last few years, it had launched a premium water brand Mountain Water, which currently contributes 25-30% to its total sales. The company plans to launch this brand in Europe soon. 1.3 PROFILE OF THE COMPANY In 1967, Bisleri an Italian company, was started by Signor Felice Bisleri, who first brought the idea of selling bottled water in India. He started a company called Bisleri India. In 1969, Ramesh Chauhan, the Chairman of Parle Exports, bought over the brand. In those days, Bisleri packaged drinking water was available in glass bottles.

Being a returnable package and owing to various other problems such as breakage and weight, in 1972-73, Bisleri was made available in PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride) bottles. After this plastic packaging was introduced, things started to change, and sales increased rapidly. The upsurge in the sales of Bisleri started in 1993 as Ramesh Chauhan sold off the Parle stable of brands, including Thums up, Limca and Gold Spot. Recognizing the potential of the drinking water market, he then went on to concern trade on marketing Bisleri a top selling brand in India. THE PRESENT It was around the year 1995, when Parle Export took charge of the brand operations and the business took off in the market. With factories across India and a strong distribution network, Bisleri established itself a force a reckon with in the domestic packaged drinking water. Earlier the packaged drinking water market consisted of five star hotels, tourists and foreigners. As a marketing strategy, a conscious decision was taken by the company that only 40% of the sales should come from these outlets and 60% from general market, i.e. pannwalla, street shop, general stores and even non-tourists. This brought about a sea change in the perception of the customers mind about consumption of Bisleri. Earlier, drinking bottled water was considered to be of a status symbol. That thinking has slowly changed to the point where today, not drinking Bisleri is considered as being behind. The bottled water proved very economical for the customer. FUTURE PLANS Bisleri was the first to market bottled water in a totally virgin market and naturally people associate the brand with bottled water. Now Bisleri is perhaps already ten steps ahead of its competitors and will endeavor to widen its gap in the times to come. Bisleris brand positioning stresses on pure, clean and safe drinking water. Some of the future plans to maintain the top spot that Bisleri commands in the Indian market are: New pack sizes in bottles and jars. Increase the distribution network with an investment of over 200 cr.

Strengthen presence in traditionally weak areas by setting up 12 new bottling facilities at a cost of rs.150 cr.

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS To make sure that the product that reaches the customers is always of highest standard and also meets international standards, Bisleri has always been involved in improving its product packaging. One such recent development is the tamper proof break away seal. Bisleri also recognizes the need to produce environment friendly products and is working on the PET project. The breakaway seal Keeping in mind customers need to recognize a genuine product that cannot be tampered with, Bisleri developed the breakaway seal. The unique cap has been patented and cannot be duplicated or tampered with. This technology development in the product ensures that the customer will only get a highly safe product when they consume Bisleri packaged drinking water. Product packaging To ensure purity of the bottle water, the bottles that are used are blown and filled at the factory itself, to avoid contamination. Purification process At BISLERI plants, water undergoes multi-stage purification process to ensure proper blend of minerals and complete filtration of microorganisms and toxic substance. What advantage has Bisleri purification process got over purification done by other methods? Traditional process of boiling water for purification has its limitations. Boiling may kill the microbes but cannot remove other physical impurities and toxic substances. Home appliances available in market for water purification use either filtration technique or Ultra Violet rays or a combination of both the techniques. These techniques do not guarantee 100% purity of water. BISLERI, multi-stage purification process ensures removal of toxic substances as well as physical and microbiological impurities. PROTECT YOUR HEALTH WITH BISLERI WHICH USES 6 STAGES OF PURIFICATION

CHLORINATION: Kills micro organisms. Remove organic matter. ARKAL FILTER: Removes suspended matter and turbidity. CARBON FILTER: Remove residual chlorine & odors. REVERSE OSMOSIS: Remove organic material. Control total dissolved solids in the water. MICRON FILTRATION: Additional safety measures of filtration. OZONATION: Ensure water remains bacteria free for longer shelf life.

Product & Packaging Bisleri is available in a range of sizes. The Bisleri bottled water range comprises of the conventional 250ml, 500ml, 1 litre and 2 litre bottles are meant to be disposed. But water in larger quantities(5 litre, 15 litre, 20 litre jars), packed in jars are made in such a way that they are reusable after consumption of its contents. VISION: A major, diversified, transitional, integrated consumer product manufacturing company, with National Leadership and a strong environment conscience, playing a national role in safe water and Agro based drinks. MISSION: To provide the highest quality product, keeping in mind all aspects including freshness, purity and safety, and making it easily available to the consumer at a very affordable price. To achieve international standard of excellence in all aspects of energy and diversified business with focus on consumer delight through value and service of product and cost reduction. To enhance capital and fixed assets of the group to withstand challenges and tough market trends. To attain leadership in developing, adopting and assimilating state or art technology for competitive advantage. To provide better quality of product and services through sustained market research and product and development.

To foster a culture of participation and innovation for employee growth and contribution. To cultivate high standard of business ethics, and total quality management for a strong corporate identity and brand equity with continuous and positive growth. To help enrich the quality of life of all the communities specially the neglected ones and preserve ecological balance and heritage through a strong environment conscience.

WHY BISLERI? Bisleri is totally safe and protects you from all water borne disease. Bisleri is trusted by 50Lac household across the country. Bisleri is the brand leader in bottled water category. The water is purified through six stages of purification process that includes reverse osmosis and Ozonation. 1.4 PRODUCT PROFILE The Bisleri product range includes Bisleri mineral water, Bisleri soda and Vedica natural spring water. Every drop that goes into Bisleri bottle is scientifically purified, as per international standards, and fortified with minerals, to give The Sweet Taste of Purity. Vedica Natural Mountain Water: Vedica Natural Mountain Water comes to us in all its untouched purity, right from its source. Gushing from an aquifer with intense pressure, the natural mountain water is pushed above the ground surface to a height of 5 meters above ground level, powerfully and consistently. The underground geological origin guarantees that there is no external Contamination, since the mouth of the water source is covered from rocks on all sides. Besides, being naturally fortified with silica, the spring is naturally free form any Microbial infection or pollution. Vedica Natural Mountain Water is also low on sodium, making it the perfect choice for the health conscious. It has a high proportion of sulphates, which work as natural detoxifying agents. And its clear, sweet taste proves that it is free of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate salts, which give some mineral waters a chalky taste. Scientifically put, the Total Dissolved Solids in Vedica Natural Mountain Water is225mg/ltr. It is also high in sulphates, the natural detoxifying agents. Ensuring that all you get with

Vedica Natural Mountain Water is the sweet taste of purity. Vedica Natural Mountain Water is available in 500 ml and 1 litre bottles. Bisleri with added minerals: This product is bottled drinking water at its best. Bisleri with added minerals has a TDS count (total dissolved solids count) of approximately 100. It contains minerals such as magnesium sulphate and potassium bicarbonate which are essential minerals for healthy living. They not only maintain the pH balance of the body but also help in keeping you fit and energetic at all times. Bisleri with added minerals is also put through multiple stages of purification to ensure the elimination of all forms of bacteria. This makes the water you drink completely safe to consume. Bisleri with added minerals is available in 250ml bottles, 500ml bottles, 1 litre bottles, 2 litre bottles and 5, 15 and 20 litre jars. Bisleri Fizzy Soda: Fizzy soda is cabonated water, and comes under soft drinks segment. It is the most recent product from Bisleri. The new Bisleri Fizzy Soda in an astonishing bottle. Hold it close!!! It has the right mix of minerals and uses the Bisleri pinpoint combination, to get the great fizz and yet not change the taste of the whisky. Get fizzy!!! With Bisleri fizzy soda. Table 1.1 VARIOUS PACKAGING OPTIONS PROVIDED BY BISLERI ALONG WITH THE TARGET CONSUMERS Size of the bottle 250 ml 500 ml Price per bottle Rs. 6 Rs. 8 Target consumer Conferences, parties and for travel Teenagers, college students and roadside consumers. Also aimed to supply to the Indian Railways. 1 litre 2 litres 5 litres Rs. 12 Rs. 25 Rs. 35(empty jar deposit Rs. 20/-) 15 litres Rs. 40(plus jar deposit Rs.50) General consumers and travelers. Small offices, shopkeepers, households Households, institutes, offices, retail shops, showrooms Households, institutes, offices, retail shops, showrooms, schools and colleges

20 litres

Rs. 60(empty jar deposit Rs. 150/-)

Households, institutes, offices, schools and colleges Selected malls and high-end hotels Selected malls and high-end hotels Affluent, urban and health conscious

500 ml Vedica 1 litre Vedica 600 ml Soda

Rs. 25 Rs. 40 Rs. 15

CHAPTER -2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE


2.1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE The term `stress' is derived from the Latin word `Stringere', which means `to be drawn tight'. The concept of stress was first introduced by Hans Selye first in life sciences in 1936. Selye defined stress as, "an adaptive response to the external situation that results in physical, psychological, and/or behavioral deviation for organizational participants." Stress is an adaptive response of an individual to an external situation as a result of his/her interaction with the environment. Confronting an opportunity, constraint or demand causes stress, when the expected outcome is important and uncertain. Stress arises when there is a mismatch between an individual and his/her environment or an inability to cope with the constraints or demands encountered. Stress is inevitable in our lives. Stress is an important and increasing problem in organizations. It is a subject of interest to researchers across fields. Occupational stress is becoming increasingly globalized and affects all countries, all professions and all categories of workers, as well as families and society in general (Ahmad & Ahmad, 1992). But stress is not always negative. It also has constructive contribution, which is advantageous for organizational growth and productivity. Hans Selye has very correctly said, "To be totally without stress is to be dead." He adds, "Complete freedom from stress is death" (Selye, 1974). In general, stress is conceived of as anxiety and dissatisfaction (Perrewe & Ganster, 1989). Research into stress within the sphere of social and organizational psychology in general dichotomizes the explanations as far as its origins are concerned, acknowledging that contingent elements, or individual psychocognitive elements, are sufficient explanation for its appearance among workers. The dispute therefore comes down to the definition of stress as an individual response, or as an environmental factor that causes certain psychological reactions (Caplan & Jones, 1975; Matteson & Ivancevich, 1987; Perrewe & Ganster, 1989). Cropanzano, Howes, Grandey and Toth (1997, pp. 164-165) also defined stress as the subjective feeling that work demands exceed the individuals belief in his or her capacity to cope, which creates the sensation of anxiety and tension that in turn are th e evidence of stress. These authors believe that these circumstances can be costly for organizations and

individuals to the extent that they generally result in an enormous loss of time, a reduction in production and the occurrence of accidents. For Fontana (1994) stress is the natural result of the current living conditions in modern society; it is desirable if managed at minimum levels. Marshall & Cooper (1981) argue that stress is a different phenomenon form pressure. Stress is something more than mere pressure. It carries strong overtones of the breakdown of normal human performance. In an earlier work, Cooper & Marshall, (1978), the same two authors concluded that stress is essentially individually defined and must be understood with reference to characteristics of both the individual and his environment, as it is the outcome of the two. Fienmann views stress as a psychological response state of negative effect characterized by a persistent and a high level of experienced anxiety or tension. Stress is the excitement, feeling of anxiety, and/or physical tension that occurs when the demands placed on an individual are thought to exceed his ability to cope. This most common view of stress is often called distress or negative stress. The physical or psychological demands from the environment that cause this condition are called stressors (Hellriegel & Slocum, 2004). Holmes & Rahe,(1967) defined stress as a stimulus event that presents unusual demands. By Ganster and Murphy (2000) Stress is defined as a form of strain provoked in response to situational demands labeled stressors which occur when jobs are simultaneously high in demands and low in control. Stress (psychology), an unpleasant state of emotional and physiological arousal that people experience in situations that they perceive as dangerous or threatening to their wellbeing (Auerbach et al, 2007 / Encarta 2008). An adaptive response, moderated by individual differences, that is a consequence of any action, situation, or event and that places special demands on a person (Ivancevich, Konopaske and Matteson, 1987). A stimulus definition treats stress as some characteristic or event that may result in a disruptive consequence. In a response definition, stress is seen partially to some stimulus, called a stressor. A stressor is a potentially harmful or threatening external event or situation. In a response definition, stress is the consequence of the interaction between an environmental stimulus (a stressor) and the individuals response. That is, stress is the result of a unique interaction between stimulus conditions in the environment and the individuals predisposition to respond in a particular way.

2.2 RESEARCH REVIEW Journal Articles And Speeches/Meeting Papers: 1.Differential Effectiveness of Coping in Managing Stress and Burnout in Oncology Nurses. Authors: Rounds, James B., Jr.; Zevon, Michael A. High levels of stress experienced by primary care oncology nursing staff, and the competency impairment which results from such stress, has become a matter of much concern in health care settings. This study was conducted to identify the coping strategies employed by oncology nurses, and to relate these strategies to differential indices of stress and burnout. Oncology nurses (N=133) at a comprehensive cancer center completed the Ways of Coping (WC) Checklist, the Job-Related Tension Index, the Emotional Exhaustion Scale, the Role Conflict scale, the Job Involvement scale, and the Home-Work Conflict scale. The Job Involvement scale showed a clear and positive relationship to five of the eight WC scales (Self-Controlling, Seeking Social Support, Accepting Responsibility, Planful ProblemSolving, and Positive Reappraisal), all of which contained coping responses characterized by constructive engagement. Role conflict, stress, and burnout indices were most strongly and positively associated with the WC scales of Confrontive Coping, Distancing, Accepting Responsibility, and Escape-Avoidance scales, and negatively associated with the Planful Problem-Solving scale. Type of coping response was differentially related to the level of reported stress and burnout. Increased use of emotional-focused coping responses was related to increased reports of stress and burnout. 2.Impact of Stress on the Performance of Construction Project Managers. Authors: Leung, M., Chan, Y., and Olomolaiye, P. The work of construction project managers (CPMs) is often highly stressful, due to time pressures, and due to the uncertainties and the dynamic social structure involved in construction projects. This study aims to investigate the impact of stress on the performance of CPMs. Correlation analysis and structural equation modeling are employed to uncover the relationships between different types of stress (i.e., objective stress, burnout, and physiological stress) and the work performances (i.e., task performance, interpersonal performance, and organizational performance) of CPMs. Data were collected from 108 CPMs

who work in a variety of construction sectors, including prime contractors, subcontractors, developers, consultant firms, and the public sector. Results showed that (1) objective stress reduces the task performance of CPMs while burnout can have a positive effect on it; (2) interpersonal performance is maximized with a moderate level of objective stress (i.e., an inverted-U-shaped relationship between these two variables) and increases in line with the improvement of the task performance of individuals; and (3) organizational performance has U-shaped relationships with both burnout and physiological stresses and is worsened by objective stress. Last, it is suggested to stakeholders that regular reviews of job allocation, stress appraisals, stress management workshops, group or individual counseling, and psychological treatment or physiotherapy be carried out to optimize the stress and the performance of CPMs. 3.Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety Authors: Kimberly Renk, Tara Smith University of Central Florida This study examined potential predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. In particular, the relationships among the coping strategies used by college students, social support, the parenting style used by college students mothers and fathers, college students experience of anxiety, and academic-related stress were examined. Ninety-three undergraduate students enrolled in a psychology course at a large southeastern university completed a series of self-report questionnaires that measured the variables under study. Results suggested that anxiety, problem-focused coping, and support from significant others may serve as potentially important predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. Thus, identifying college students experience with these variables and addressing these variables in practical settings may help college students alleviate their experience of academic-related stress and have a less stressful, and possibly more fulfilling, college career. 4.Sources and effects of Work-related stress in nursing Authors: leni Moustaka , Theodoros C Constantinidis Introduction: The working environment is one of the most important recourses of occupational stress. The importance of management of occupational stress is recognized,

besides all by Occupational health and safety since it has been found to be related not only with loss of productivity and loss of working hours but with the arousal of diseases and occupational accidents. Purpose: The aim of this systematic review was the examination of the sources and consequences of occupational stress on nurses adequacy, productivity, efficiency. Material method: A systematic review was made in European Agency for Safety and Health at Work, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Job Stress Network web sites for various publications and abstracts around the exact them e and the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Journal using as key words stress, occupational stress, and Nursing. Results: A number of aspects of working life have been linked to stress. Aspects of the work itself can be stressful, namely work overload and role-based factors such as lack of power, role ambiguity, and role conict. Threats to career development and achievement, including threat of redundancy, being undervalued and unclear promotion prospects are stressful. Stress is associated with reduced efficiency, decreased capacity to perform, a lack of concern for the organisation and colleagues. Conclusions: During last decade there has been increasing recognition of the stress experienced by hospital nursing staff . Although some stressful situations are specific to a particular type of hospital unit, nurses are subject to more general stress which arises from the physical, psychological, and social aspects of the work environment. High levels of stress result in staff burnout and turnover and adversely affect patient care. Interventions that are targeted at sources of occupational stress seem to be required in order to support nurses. 5.Job Stress-Prone Type A behavior and personal and organizational consequences Authors: Muhammad Jamal., Syed Waseeq Ahmed The research study of Jamal. M* finds that job stressors were significantly related to employees psychosomatic problems, job satisfaction, unproductive time at the job, and absenteeism. Type A behavior was found to be an important moderator of the stress outcome relationship. This study examines the relationship among job stressors (role ambiguity, role overload, role conflict, resource inadequacy, skill underutilization), Type A behaviour pattern

and employees' psychosomatic complaints, life and job satisfaction, unproductive time at the job, and absenteeism among middle managers (N = 227) and among blue-collar workers (N = 285). Job stressors were found to be significantly related to all outcome variables, except life satisfaction. Type A behaviour was associated with a number of job stressors and outcome variables. In addition, Type A behaviour was found to be an important moderator of the stressoutcome relationships. Implications of the findings for management and for future research are highlighted.

CHAPTER -3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY


3.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research methodology is the specification of methods and procedures for acquiring the information needed to structure or solve problems. It is the overall operational pattern or framework of the project that stipulates what information is to be collected, from which sources and with what procedures. A research methodology is a plan of the proposed research work. In other words research methodology s the arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine the relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure. 3.2 NEED OF THE STUDY The present world is fast changing and there are lots of pressures and demands at work. These pressures at work lead to physical disorders. Stress refers to individuals reaction to a disturbing factor in the environment. Hence this study would help the organization to know the factors of stress and to reduce the stress in employees. Since it is a well known fact that healthy employee is a productive employee. 3.3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY The scope of the study covers Bisleri International Private Limited, Chennai. The study covered employees from the middle management of the organization during the time period July12-Aug12. 3.4 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY Primary objective: To undergo an study about the stress among the employees of BISLERI INTERNATIONAL PRIVATE LIMITED. Secondary objective: To study about the effects of stress on employees in BISLERI INTERNATIONAL PRIVATE LIMITED. To identify the factors causing stress among the employees of the organization. To identify the coping strategies to manage stress.

To analyze the association between the demographic factors of the respondents and their stress at work.

3.5 RESEARCH DESIGN Research design is needed because it facilitates the smooth sailing of the various research operations thereby research as effective as possible yielding maximal information with minimal expenditure of effort, time and money.There are many kinds of research design namely exploratory, diagnostic research, descriptive research, hypothesis testing, etc. This research deals with descriptive research. The research study undertaken by the researcher in this project is the Descriptive Study. It includes surveys and fact finding enquiries of different kinds. The major purpose of descriptive research is description of the state of affairs, as it exists at present. The main characteristics of this method are that the researcher has no control over the variables; it can only report which has happened or what is happening. 3.6 SAMPLING DESIGN: 3.6.1 Sample Area The sample area of the study is Bisleri International Private Limited, Chennai. 3.6.2 Sample size The sample size for the study is 40. 3.6.3 Sample Unit The employees of Bisleri International Private Limited are the sample unit in the survey. 3.6.4 Sample Technique Simple random sampling is the simplest form of random sampling. It is the basic sampling technique where we select a group of subjects, a sample, for study from a larger group, a population. 3.7 FRAMEWORK OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE: The tool used for data collecting was questionnaire method. The questionnaire was a highly structured one with multiple choices. The reliability of the data collected and the response rate to be achieved depend, to a large extent, on the design of the questionnaire. This means that each part of the structuring stage will involve substantial rewriting in order to get the questionnaire right. For the purpose of this study, closed-ended questions were used. Closed ended questions provide a number of

alternative answers from which the respondent is instructed to choose. They are usually quicker and easier to answer. Responses are also easier to compare as they have been predetermined. A Likert-style Rating Scale, where the respondents were asked how strongly they agree or disagree with the statement on a five point scale, was used to measure responses. 3.8 METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION Primary Data Primary data are those that are gathered for a specific purpose or for a specific research project. The information was collected through a structured questionnaire. Secondary Data Secondary data means data that have already been collected and analyzed. The sources used to collect these types of data are: Books, Journals and Websites. 3.9 TOOLS USED FOR DATA ANALYSIS Percentage Analysis Method: It refers to a special kind of ratio. It is used in making comparison between two or more series of data. Percentage analysis is used to determine relationships between the series of data. Finding relative difference becomes easier through percentage analysis.

Percentage = (No. of respondents 100) / (Total No. of respondents)


Weighted Average Method: There are cases where the relative importance of the different item is not the same. When it so, the researcher can use the weighted arithmetic mean. The weight stands for the relative importance of the different items. The formula for computing weighted arithmetic mean is, (N1+2N2+3N3+4N4+5N5) WA=---------------------------------(N1+N2+N3+N4+N5) CHI- SQUARE TEST: It is a non-parametric test and distribution free tests, which are designed to conduct statistical tests on the samples. They are very easy to compute and understand. They can be used with where, N1, N2, N3, N4, N5 are the respondents.

types of measurements that prohibit the use of parametric test. Chi-Square describes the magnitude of discrepancy between theoretical and observed values. 2 = (Oi Ei) / Ei Where, Oi - Observed Frequency Ei - Expected Frequency 2 It should be positive and should range from 0 to Expected value Ei = (Row Total Column Total) / Grand Total 3.10 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY Time and cost factors were the problems faced by the researcher. The research has been done only in the Chennai branch. The findings of the study are solely based on the information provided by the respondents. The result holds good only for a short period. 3.11 CHAPTER SCHEME The first chapter deals with the introduction, profile of the industry and the company. The second chapter covers the review of literature. The third chapter focuses on the research methodology scope of the study, objective of the study, research design, sampling design, framework of the questionnaire, method of data collection and the limitations of the study. The fourth chapter deals with the analysis and interpretation of data. The fifth chapter recapitulates the summary of main findings, suggestions and conclusion of the study.

CHAPTER-4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


4.1 AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES Table 4.1 AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES AGE GROUP 21-30yrs 31-40yrs 41-50yrs Total FREQUENCY 17 15 8 40 PERCENTAGE 42.5 37.5 20.0 100.0

Chart 4.1 AGE WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES

INFERENCE It is observed from the survey that 42.5% of the respondents are between (21-30) yrs, 37.5% of the respondents are between (31-40) yrs, and 20% of the respondents are between (41-50) yrs.

4.2 GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES Table 4.2 GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES GENDER Male Female Total FREQUENCY 30 10 40 PERCENTAGE 75.0 25.0 100.0

Chart 4.2 GENDER WISE CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES

INFERENCE It is found from the survey that 75% of the respondents are male and 25% of the respondents are female.

4.3 CLASSIFICATION ON EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION Table 4.3 CLASSIFICATION ON EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION SSLC UG PG TECHNICAL PROFESSIONAL Total FREQUENCY 1 25 11 1 2 40 PERCENTAGE 2.5 62.5 27.5 2.5 5.0 100.0

Chart 4.3 CLASSIFICATION ON EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

INFERENCE It is evident from the survey that 5% of the respondents are professionally qualified, 62.5% of the respondents have graduation, 27.5% of the respondents have post graduation, 2.5% of the respondents have only finished SSLC.

4.4 WORK EXPERIENCE WITH BISLERI INTERNATIONAL PRIVATE LIMITED Table 4.4 WORK EXPERIENCE WORK EXPERIENCE 5yrs & below 5-15yrs >15yrs Total FREQUENCY 23 13 4 40 PERCENTAGE 57.5 32.5 10.0 100.0

Chart 4.4 WORK EXPERIENCE

INFERENCE It is found from the survey that 10% of the respondents have more than 15 years of experience, 32.5% of the respondents have (5-15) yrs of experience and 57.5% of the respondents have 5 years or less than 5 years of experience.

4.5 STRESS AT WORK Table 4.5 STRESS AT WORK FREQUENCY Yes No Total 16 24 40 PERCENTAGE 40.0 60.0 100.0

Chart 4.5 STRESS AT WORK

INFERENCE Of the data collected, it is observed that 60% of the respondents claimed to have no stress at their level of work, whereas 40% of the respondents showed that they were stressed with their work.

4.6 ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK Table 4.6 ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 2 10 19 9 40 PERCENTAGE 5.0 25.0 47.5 22.5 100.0

Chart 4.6 ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK

INFERENCE It is observed that 47.5% of the respondents agree and 22.5% of the respondents strongly agree to the above statement, whereas 25% of the respondents are neutral i.e., they neither agree nor disagree and 5% disagree to the same.

4.7 SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT Table 4.7 SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 2 12 12 14 40 PERCENTAGE 5.0 30.0 30.0 35.0 100.0

Chart 4.7 SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT INFERENCE It is evident from the chart that 35% of the respondents strongly agree and 30% of the respondents agree to the above statement, while the same percentage of the respondents are neutral and 5% of them disagree to the same.

4.8 EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH COWORKERS OR BOSS Table 4.8 EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH CO-WORKERS OR BOSS FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 4 12 15 7 2 40 PERCENTAGE 10.0 30.0 37.5 17.5 5.0 100.0

Chart 4.8 EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH CO-WORKERS OR BOSS INFERENCE From the graph it is clear that 17.5% of the respondents agree that they experience argument or heated conversations with co-workers or boss and 30% of the respondents disagree with the above statement. While 37.5% of the respondents remained neutral and the rest strongly agreed and strongly disagreed to the same.

4.9 SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS Table 4.9 SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 1 15 10 14 40 PERCENTAGE 2.5 37.5 25.0 35.0 100.0

Chart 4.9 SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS INFERENCE It is evident from the chart that 35% of the respondents strongly agree and 25% of the respondents agree to the above statement, while 37.5% of the respondents are neutral and only 2.5% of the respondents disagree to the same.

4.10 RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS Table 4.10 RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 2 5 22 11 40 PERCENTAGE 5.0 12.5 55.0 27.5 100.0

Chart 4.10 RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS

INFERENCE It is observed that 27.5% of the respondents strongly agree and 55% of them agree to the above statement, whereas 12.5% of the respondents are neutral and only 5% of the respondents disagree to the same.

4.11 ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK Table 4.11 ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 7 22 6 4 1 40 PERCENTAGE 17.5 55.0 15.0 10.0 2.5 100.0

Chart 4.11 ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK

INFERENCE From the graph it is clear that 55% of the respondents disagree and 17.5% strongly disagree to the above statement. Whereas 15% of the respondents remained neutral and only 10% of them agreed to the statement.

4.12 GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB Table 4.12 GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Total 3 17 8 12 40 PERCENTAGE 7.5 42.5 20.0 30.0 100.0

Chart 4.12 GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB INFERENCE It is observed that maximum percentage of the respondents disagree and 30% of the respondents agree that they get upset thinking that they are not able to progress in their job, while 7.5% of the respondents strongly disagree and 20% of them remained neutral to the same.

4.13 EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE Table 4.13 EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Total 3 12 12 13 40 PERCENTAGE 7.5 30.0 30.0 32.5 100.0

Chart 4.13 EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE

INFERENCE It is clear from the chart that 32.5% of the respondents agree that they experience work pressure, while 30% of the respondents remained neutral and the same percentage is applied to the respondents who disagreed for the same. And only a very few respondents strongly disagreed to the statement.

4.14 DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB Table 4.14 DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 4 21 8 6 1 40 10.0 52.5 20.0 15.0 2.5 100.0

Chart 4.14 DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB INFERENCE It is evident that 15% of the respondents agree that they are not given enough time to do what is expected of them on their job, while 20% of the respondents remained neutral and the remaining disagree for the same.

4.15 ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY Table 4.15 ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY FREQUENCY Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 14 20 6 40 PERCENTAGE 35.0 50.0 15.0 100.0

Chart 4.15 ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY INFERENCE It is observed that almost all the respondents agree that they are able to get the necessary information to perform their job effectively, while 35% of the respondents remained neutral.

4.16 GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK Table 4.16 GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 4 8 25 3 40 10.0 20.0 62.5 7.5 100.0

Chart 4.16 GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK INFERENCE It is evident that 62.5% of the respondents agree that they always get a good night's sleep without worrying about work, while the 20% of the respondents remained neutral and very few disagree to the same.

4.17 COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION Table 4.17 COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 1 2 5 25 7 40 PERCENTAGE 2.5 5.0 12.5 62.5 17.5 100.0

Chart 4.17 COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION INFERENCE From the graph it is clear that almost all the respondents agree that they are comfortable with the dress code in the organization, whereas only a very few respondents remained neutral.

4.18 RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING Table 4.18 RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Total 3 24 6 7 40 PERCENTAGE 7.5 60.0 15.0 17.5 100.0

Chart 4.18 RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING INFERENCE It is clear that 60% of the respondents disagree and 17.5% of the respondents agree to the above statement, while the remaining respondents are neutral to the same.

4.19 FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB Table 4.19 FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 8 20 5 6 1 40 20.0 50.0 12.5 15.0 2.5 100.0

Chart 4.19 FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB INFERENCE It is clear that 15% of the respondents say that they suffer from headache while doing the job, while 50% the respondents disagree and a few strongly disagree to the above respondents and 12.5% remained neutral.

4.20 FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY Table 4.20 FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disgree Neutral Agree Total 2 22 11 5 40 PERCENTAGE 5.0 55.0 27.5 12.5 100.0

Chart 4.20 FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY INFERENCE It is shown that 12.5% of the respondents agree and 55% of the respondents disagree that they are unable to think clearly and 27.5% of them remained neutral to the same.

4.21 GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL REQUIREMENTS Table 4.21 GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FREQUENCY Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 5 15 16 3 1 40 PERCENTAGE 12.5 37.5 40.0 7.5 2.5 100.0

Chart 4.21 GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL REQUIREMENTS INFERENCE It is evident that 37.5% of the respondents disagree to the statement that they get nervous when they didnt meet the organizational requirements, while 7.5% of the respondents agree and 40% of the respondents remained neutral.

4.22 MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION Table 4.22 MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 5 24 6 5 40 PERCENTAGE 12.5 60.0 15.0 12.5 100.0

Chart 4.22 MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION INFERENCE It is shown that 60% of the respondents remained neutral and 15% of them agreed to the above statement.12.5% of the respondents strongly agreed and the same percentage of the respondents disagree to the same.

4.23 DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS Table 4.23 DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 2 4 19 15 40 PERCENTAGE 5.0 10.0 47.5 37.5 100.0

Chart 4.23 DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS INFERENCE It is clear that 47.5% of the respondents agree and 37.5% of them strongly agree that spending time with their family members and friends destress them and 10% of the respondents remained neutral to the same.

4.24 OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS Table 4.24 OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS FREQUENCY Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 7 18 15 40 PERCENTAGE 17.5 45.0 37.5 100.0

Chart 4.24 OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS INFERENCE It is clear that 45% of the respondents agree and 37.5% of the respondents strongly agree that outings during the weekends ease their work stress and 17.5% of the respondents remained neutral to the same.

4.25 COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS TO REDUCE STRESS Table 4.25 COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT T & D PROGRAMS TO REDUCE THE STRESS FREQUENCY Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Total 3 25 11 1 40 PERCENTAGE 7.5 62.5 27.5 2.5 100.0

Chart 4.25 COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT T & D PROGRAMS TO REDUCE THE STRESS INFERENCE It is evident that only 27.5% of the respondents agree that training and development programs helps them to cope-up with new technology and reduces the stress and 62.5% of the respondents remained neutral to the same.

WEIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD SCALE REPRESENTATION Strongly Agree - 5 Agree - 4 Neutral - 3 Disagree - 2 Strongly Disagree - 1

Table 4.26 FOR INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP FACTORS: STATEMENTS I am able to compete with my colleagues at work. I am able to receive support from my boss, colleagues and juniors. I experience argument or heated conversations with co-workers or boss. My relationship with colleagues and peers is smooth and co-ordial. I am able to receive good support from my family members. INFERENCE Among all the interpersonal relationship factors, all the data tabled showed positive response from the respondents. The maximum positive response was proved to be from the family support. Table 4.27 FOR WORKLOAD FACTORS: STATEMENTS I find it difficult to concentrate on my work. I get upset thinking that I am not able to make progress in my job. I experience excessive work pressure. I am not given enough time to do what is expected of me on my job. I am able to get the necessary information to perform my job effectively. INFERENCE With respect to the factor of workload most of the respondents gave out positive reactions to the various variables that were questioned. The maximum positive response was that they were able to get the required information to perform the job assigned them effectively. WEIGHTED AVERAGE 2.25 2.72 2.87 2.47 3.8 WEIGHTED AVERAGE 3.87 3.95 2.77 3.92 4.05

Table 4.28 FOR PHYSICAL FACTORS: STATEMENTS I always get a good night's sleep without worrying about work. I am comfortable with the dress code in the organization. I become restless and cant keep stiff while working. I frequently suffer from headache while doing the job. INFERENCE The physical factors expressed by the respondents showed a positive trend with the maximum representing comfort in the dress code in the organization. Table 4.29 FOR EMOTIONAL FACTORS: STATEMENTS I often feel that I am unable to think clearly. I get nervous when I didnt meet the Organizational requirements. INFERENCE From the analysis, it is found that the emotional factors are equally rated on a positive aspect by the respondents. Table 4.30 FOR COPING STRATEGIES: STATEMENTS Yoga and Meditation helps me to manage stress. Spending time with my family members and friends destress me. Outings during the weekends ease my work stress. Training and development programs helps me to cope-up with new technology and reduces the stress. INFERENCE Among the coping strategies of stress, the respondents have rated outings during the weekends the highest. WEIGHTED AVERAGE 3.27 4.17 4.2 3.25 WEIGHTED AVERAGE 2.47 2.5 WEIGHTED AVERAGE 3.67 3.87 2.42 2.3

CHI-SQUARE TEST ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THE GENDER AND STRESS AT WORK NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no association between the gender and the stress at work among the respondents. ALTERNATIVE HYOPTHESIS: There is association between the gender and the stress at work among the respondents.

GENDER STRESS AT WORK YES NO TOTAL MALE FEMALE TOTAL

11 19 30

5 5 10

24 16 40

CALCULATION: OBSERVED EXPECTED (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei)/Ei

FREQUENCY(Oi) FREQUENCY(Ei) 11 19 5 5 12 18 4 6 -1 1 1 -1 1 1 1 1 0.083 0.056 0.25 0.167 =0.556 From the above table, calculated value for chi-square test is 0.556. Degrees of freedom=(no of rows-1)*(no of columns-1) = (2-1)*(2-1) =1 The table value of 2 for 1 degrees of freedom at 0.05 level of significance is 3.841 Therefore calculated value is lesser than table value, so H is accepted.

INFERENCE From the statistical analysis, it is proved that there is no association between the gender and the stress at work among the respondents. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THE AGE GROUP AND STRESS AT WORK NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no association between the age group and the stress at work among the respondents. ALTERNATIVE HYOPTHESIS: There is association between the age group and the stress at work among the respondents.

STRESS AT WORK AGE GROUP (21-30yrs) (31-40yrs) (41-50yrs) TOTAL YES NO TOTAL

7 7 2 16

10 8 6 24

17 15 8 40

CALCULATION: OBSERVED EXPECTED (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei)/Ei

FREQUENCY(Oi) FREQUENCY(Ei) 7 7 2 10 8 6 6.8 6 3.2 10.2 9 4.8 0.2 1 -1.2 -0.2 -1 1.2 0.04 1 1.44 0.04 1 1.44 0.00588 0.167 0.45 0.00392 0.11 0.3 =1.0375 From the above table, calculated value for chi-square test is 1.0375.

Degrees of freedom=(no of rows-1)*(no of columns-1) = (2-1)*(3-1) =2 The table value of 2 for 2 degrees of freedom at 0.05 level of significance is 5.991 Therefore calculated value is lesser than table value, so H is accepted. INFERENCE From the statistical analysis, it is proved that there is no association between the age group and the stress at work among the respondents. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THE EXPERIENCE AND STRESS AT WORK NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no association between the experience and the stress at work among the respondents. ALTERNATIVE HYOPTHESIS: There is association between the experience and the stress at work among the respondents.

STRESS AT WORK YES EXPERIENCE 5yrs & BELOW (5-15yrs) >15yrs TOTAL 6 7 3 16 17 6 1 24 23 13 4 40 NO TOTAL

CALCULATION: OBSERVED EXPECTED (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei)/Ei

FREQUENCY(Oi) FREQUENCY(Ei) 6 7 9.2 5.2 -3.2 1.8 10.24 3.24 1.1130 0.6231

3 17 6 1

1.6 13.8 7.8 2.4

1.4 3.2 -1.8 -1.4

1.96 10.24 3.24 1.96

1.225 0.7420 0.4154 0.8167 =4.9352

From the above table, calculated value for chi-square test is 4.9352. Degrees of freedom=(no of rows-1)*(no of columns-1) = (2-1)*(3-1) =2 The table value of 2 for 2 degrees of freedom at 0.05 level of significance is 5.991 Therefore calculated value is lesser than table value, so H is accepted. INFERENCE From the statistical analysis, it is proved that there is no association between the experience and the stress at work among the respondents.

CHAPTER-5 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS & CONCLUSION


5.1 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Out of the total sample majority of the respondents are male and many are between 21 and 50 years. Most of the respondents are under graduates and post graduates. Maximum number of respondents have an experience of 5 years and below, whereas 32.5% of the respondents have about 5-15 years of experience and very few have a long association with the organization. Of the data collected from the respondents the majority claimed to have no stress at their level of work, whereas minority showed that they were stressed with their work. Majority of the respondents were able to compete with their colleagues, whereas few strongly agreed to the point and some remain neutral. The report strongly felt that 35% of the respondents were able to receive support from their boss, colleagues and juniors, while 30% of the respondents agreed and the other 30% remain neutral. 37.5% of the respondents remain neutral on experiencing argument or heated conversations with their co-workers or boss while 30% percentage showed their idea of disagreeing and17.5% of agreeing on the statement said above. The data also reflects the maximum response which shows that the relationship of the respondents with their colleagues and peers is very strong, while some percentage of the respondents though remained neutral, the others did agree with the point. As far as the support from the family members are concerned the graph showed elevational response agreeing to the topic. Further down it was noted that the maximum percentage of the respondents found it unsuitable to be labeled that they were finding it difficult to concentrate on their work. The same trend showed disagreeing once again to the fact that they get upset thinking that they are not able to make progress in their job. A few though agreed to the statement.

32.5% of the respondents agreed on experiencing excessive work pressure while the 30% of the respondents who remained neutral and who disagree remained with equal weightage.

The trend collected from the data once again shot up in favour of disagreeing with the idea of not being given enough time in doing their job. But few respondents remained neutral and some agreed to the same.

The needle pointed to the maximum score agreeing that the employees were able to get the necessary information to perform their job effectively. While 35% of the respondents remained neutral and 15% of the respondents strongly agreed with the point.

The physical factor of all the other factors showed a remarkable percentage of the respondents agreeing to the fact that they always get a good nights sleep without worrying about their work.

The respondents to the maximum percentage agreed that they were very comfortable with their dress code in the organization. And a few did very strongly feel positive about it.

Most of the respondents disagreed with the fact that they become restless and cant keep stiff while working, whereas a few percentage of the respondents did feel that they agreed to have become restless.

As said in the previous point, the percentage of the respondents who frequently suffer from headache while doing the job, shot up disagreed to the maximum. Maximum percentage of the respondents never felt uncomfortable, unclear, nervous when they were suppose to complete their assignments. Whereas, many tried to remain neutral on the issue.

Most of the employees remained neutral on the fact that yoga and meditation helps them to manage stress, very few percentage of the respondents agreed or disagreed on the issue.

Many of the employees did agree that keeping close to their family and outings during the weekends eases them of their official stress and 37.5% of the respondents very strongly agreed to the comment.

Most of the employees remained neutral on the point that training and development programs helps them to cope-up with new technology and reduce stress, while a few did agree on the same issue.

By weighted average method, among all the interpersonal relationship factors, all the data tabled showed positive response from the respondents. The maximum positive response was proved to be from the family support.

With respect to the factor of workload most of the respondents gave out positive reactions to the various variables that were questioned. The maximum positive response was that they were able to get the required information to perform the job assigned them effectively.

The physical factors expressed by the respondents showed a positive trend with the maximum representing comfort in the dress code in the organization. From the weighted average analysis, it is found that the emotional factors are equally rated on a positive aspect by the respondents. The coping strategies tabled in the weighted average method showed that apart from spending time with family, friends, yoga & meditation, use of new technology; outings during the weekends eased the work stress.

5.2 SUGGESTIONS A small percentage of the employees did have some kind of stress. The employees must give importance to time management techniques thereby they can complete their work within the specified time. Many tasks can be delegated to subordinates without losing effectiveness so that we can reduce the overload of work. The employees facing stress from workload factors, emotional factors and any other individual and organizational factors are advised to attend stress management courses which will help them to build coping strategies and reduce their stress. Some of the suggestions to reduce stress are Set daily goals. Positive outlook towards works / responsibilities Reward yourself for accomplishing things. Get enough sleep.

Manage your time better. Be willing to compromise. Learn to forgive. Take small breaks during work. Go for vacation with your family/friends. Realize excessive use of tea / coffee cigarette is not answer to stress. Listen to good music

5.3CONCLUSION The present study was conducted at Bisleri International private limited in chennai. The aim was to find the amount of stress, personality type of the employees. This was done using a detailed questionnaire. The study revealed that only a small percentage of the employees are highly stressed & needed prevailing in the organization to some extent. At the end of the study, it was found that though there are signs of stress among the employees & such stress is affecting their behaviors, it can be controlled & reduced effectively. This can be done by adopting coping strategies to reduce stress & incorporating the suggestions given here at both individual & organization level.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Stress management- A comprehensive handbook of techniques and strategies Jonathan c. smith Susan.R.Gregson-Stress Management Fred Luthans -Organization Behavior, Mc Graw Hill International Edition. Organization Behaviour Concept Controversies & Applications - Stephen P.Robbin S.S. Khanka, First Edition (2000), reprint (2006). Organizational Behaviour.

Journals Leung, M., Chan, Y., and Olomolaiye, P., Impact of Stress on the Performance of Construction Project Managers Journal of Construction Engineering and Management leni Moustaka ., Theodoros C Constantinidis., Sources and effects of Workrelated stress in nursing Health Science Journal Volume 4, Issue 4 (2010) Kimberly Renk., Tara Smith., Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice Volume 44, Issue 3 (2007) Jamal M., Syed Waseeq Ahmed., Job Stress-Prone Type A behavior and personal and organizational consequences, Canadian Journal of Administrative

APPENDIX
QUESTIONNAIRE PERSONAL PROFILE Kindly provide your valuable personal information. 1.NAME : -50yrs) Dept:

2.AGE GROUP : 3.GENDER

: MALE/FEMALE

4.EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION: SSLC/UG/PG/TECHNICAL/PROFESSIONAL 5.EXPERIENCE: & below -

6. Do you feel stressed at work? Yes No

Please read the following questions and tick the relevant column:

S.No Questions INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP FACTORS: 7 I am able to compete with my colleagues at work. I am able to receive support from my boss, colleagues and juniors. I experience argument or heated 9 conversations with co-workers or boss. 10 My relationship with colleagues and peers is smooth and co-ordial. I am able to receive good support from my family members.

Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Strongly Agree

11

WORKLOAD FACTORS: 12 I find it difficult to concentrate on my work. I get upset thinking that I am not able to make progress in my job. I experience excessive work

13

14

pressure. I am not given enough time to do what is expected of me on my job. I am able to get the necessary

15

16

information to perform my job effectively.

PHYSICAL FACTORS: 17 I always get a good night's sleep without worrying about work. I am comfortable with the dress code in the organization. I become restless and cant keep stiff while working. I frequently suffer from headache while doing the job.

18

19

20

EMOTIONAL FACTORS: 21 I often feel that I am unable to think clearly. I get nervous when I didnt meet the Organizational requirements.

22

COPING STRATEGIES: 23 24 Yoga and Meditation helps me to manage stress. Spending time with my family

members and friends destress me. 25 Outings during the weekends ease my work stress. Training and development programs 26 helps me to cope-up with new technology and reduces the stress. Please offer suggestions if any for better management of work stress in the Organization:

WEIGHTED AVERAGE CALCULATIONS ABILITY TO COMPETE WITH COLLEAGUES AT WORK WA= [ 0*(1) + 2*(2) + 10*(3) + 19*(4) + 9*(5) ] / ( 0 + 2 + 10 + 19 + 9 ) =155 / 40 = 3.87 SUPPORT FROM THE WORK SPOT WA= [ 0*(1) + 2*(2) + 12*(3) + 12*(4) + 14*(5) ] / ( 0 + 2 + 12 + 12 + 14 ) = 158 / 40 = 3.95 EXPERIENCE ON ARGUMENT OR HEATED CONVERSATIONS WITH COWORKERS OR BOSS WA= [ 4*(1) + 12*(2) + 15*(3) + 7*(4) + 2*(5) ] / ( 4 + 12 + 15 + 7 + 2 ) = 111 / 40 = 2.77 SMOOTH AND CO-ORDIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH COLLEAGUES AND PEERS WA= [ 0*(1) + 1*(2) + 15*(3) + 10*(4) + 14*(5) ] / ( 0 + 1 + 15 + 10 + 14 ) = 157 / 40 = 3.92 RESPONSE AND SUPPORT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS WA= [ 0*(1) + 2*(2) + 5*(3) + 22*(4) + 11*(5) ] / ( 0 + 2 + 5 + 22 + 11 ) = 162 / 40 = 4.05 ABILITY TO CONCENTRATE ON WORK WA= [ 7*(1) + 22*(2) + 6*(3) + 4*(4) + 1*(5) ] / ( 7 + 22 + 6 + 4 + 1 ) = 90 / 40 = 2.25 GETTING UPSET ABOUT NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PROGRESS IN THE JOB WA= [ 3*(1) + 17*(2) + 8*(3) + 12*(4) + 0*(5) ] / ( 3 + 17 + 8 + 12 + 0 ) = 109 / 40 = 2.72

EXPERIENCE ON EXCESSIVE WORK PRESSURE WA= [ 3*(1) + 12*(2) + 12*(3) + 13*(4) + 0*(5) ] / ( 3 + 12 + 12 + 13 + 0 ) = 115 / 40 = 2.87 DURATION GIVEN TO DO WHAT IS EXPECTED ON THE JOB WA= [ 4*(1) + 21*(2) + 8*(3) + 6*(4) + 1*(5) ] / ( 4 + 21 + 8 + 6 + 1 ) = 99 / 40 = 2.47 ABILITY TO GET THE NECESSARY INFORMATION TO PERFORM THE JOB EFFECTIVELY WA= [ 0*(1) + 0*(2) + 14*(3) + 20*(4) + 6*(5) ] / ( 0 + 0 + 14 + 20 + 6 ) = 152 / 40 = 3.8 GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT THE WORK WA= [ 0*(1) + 4*(2) + 8*(3) + 25*(4) + 3*(5) ] / ( 0 + 4 + 8 + 25 + 3 ) = 147 / 40 = 3.67 COMFORT WITH THE DRESS CODE IN THE ORGANIZATION WA= [ 1*(1) + 2*(2) + 5*(3) + 25*(4) + 7*(5) ] / ( 1 + 2 + 5 + 25 + 7 ) = 155 / 40 = 3.87 RESTLESSNESS AND UNABLE TO KEEP STIFF WHILE WORKING WA= [ 3*(1) + 24*(2) + 6*(3) + 7*(4) + 0*(5) ] / ( 3 + 24 + 6 + 7 + 0 ) = 97 / 40 = 2.42 FREQUENTLY SUFFERING FROM HEADACHE WHILE ON JOB WA= [ 8*(1) + 20*(2) + 5*(3) + 6*(4) + 1*(5) ] / ( 8 + 20 + 5 + 6 + 1 ) = 92 / 40 = 2.3

FEELING OF NOT BEING ABLE TO THINK CLEARLY [ 2*(1) + 22*(2) + 11*(3) + 5*(4) + 0*(5) ] / ( 2 + 22 + 11 + 5 + 0 ) = 99 / 40 = 2.47 GETTING NERVOUS WHEN NOT MEETING THE ORGANIZATIONAL

REQUIREMENTS WA= [ 5*(1) + 15*(2) + 16*(3) + 3*(4) + 1*(5) ] / ( 5 + 15 + 16 + 3 + 1 ) = 100 / 40 = 2.5 MANAGING STRESS WITH YOGA AND MEDITATION WA= [ 0*(1) + 5*(2) + 24*(3) + 6*(4) + 5*(5) ] / ( 0 + 5 + 24 + 6 + 5 ) = 131 / 40 = 3.27 DESTRESS BY SPENDING TIME WITH FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS WA= [ 0*(1) + 2*(2) + 4*(3) + 19*(4) + 15*(5) ] / ( 0 + 2 + 4 + 19 + 15 ) = 167 / 40 = 4.17 OUTINGS DURING THE WEEKENDS EASE WORK STRESS WA= [ 0*(1) + 0*(2) + 7*(3) + 18*(4) + 15*(5) ] / ( 0 + 0 + 7 + 18 + 15 ) = 168 / 40 = 4.2 COPE-UP WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY BY CONSTANT TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS TO REDUCE STRESS WA= [ 0*(1) + 3*(2) + 25*(3) + 11*(4) + 1*(5) ] / ( 0 + 3 + 25 + 11 + 1 ) = 130 / 40 = 3.25