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WILKES-BARRE, PA TuESdAy, APRIL 30, 2013 50¢
THE TIMES LEADER
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INSIDE
A NEWS: Local: 3A
Nation & World: 5A
Obituaries: 8A, 9A
Editorials: 11A
Weather: 12A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS: 8B
Stocks: 8B
C HEALTH: 1C
Birthdays: 5C
Television: 6C
Crossword/Horoscope: 7C
Comics: 8C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
Fatal hit-run charge moves forward
WILKES-BARRE —Investigators
believe Thomas Letteer Jr. was driv-
ing the vehicle that struck and killed
5-year-old Kevin Miller on North Street
on Dec. 21, and with FBI assistance,
they said they have mapped Letteer’s
movements before and after.
Letteer, 23, of Mack Street, Plains
Township, was placed at specific loca-
tions by use of his cellphone. Letteer
allegedly made three phone calls that
were processed through two cell tow-
ers in downtown Wilkes-Barre minutes
after the boy was struck.
The mapping of Letteer’s cell use
was critical for Luzerne County pros-
ecutors Alexis Falvello and Mamie
Phillips during an emotional prelimi-
nary hearing on Monday. Falvello and
Phillips convinced District Judge Mar-
tin Kane to forward a felony charge of
accidents involving death to Luzerne
County Court.
City police and county detectives al-
lege Letteer was behind the wheel of a
red 1999 Pontiac Grand Am that struck
the boy as he held the hand of his fa-
ther, Stephen Miller, of Dallas, as they
left a holiday party on North Street.
“I was holding Kevin’s hand with my
left hand and we were all crossing the
street together,” Stephen Miller testi-
fied, noting he did not see any vehicles
when he crossed. “As I was stepping
onto the curb, I felt Kevin leaving my
Thomas Letteer Jr. arrives for his
preliminary hearing Monday.
CLArk VAN OrDEN/THE TimES LEADEr
FBI’s mapping of cellphone use
builds case against Plains Township
suspect in Kevin Miller’s death.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
There’s an election coming up
next month in Pennsylvania, but
luckily for Gov. Tom Corbett,
the governorship is not on the
ballot.
According to a Quinnipiac
University poll released Mon-
day, three
of the seven
D e m o c r a t s
mentioned as
possible guber-
natorial candi-
dates for the
2014 election
would beat
Corbett if the
election were held now.
And the three —a former con-
gressman, a current congress-
woman and the state’s treasurer
— would all defeat the Repub-
lican governor by margins of 9
points or more, according to a
Quinnipiac University poll.
Each of three leading Demo-
crats who might challenge Cor-
bett for re-election in 2014 lead
the Republican incumbent by
margins of 9 percentage points
or higher, according to a Quin-
nipiac University poll released
today.
“Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Cor-
bett gets a triple dose of bad
news. Three Democratic chal-
lengers would beat him handily
if the election for governor were
held today,” said Tim Malloy, as-
Anyone
except
Corbett,
poll says
If gubernatorial election were
held now, three possible dem
nominees would beat governor.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Corbett
La Tolteca fire ruled accidental
CLArk VAN OrDEN/THE TimES LEADEr
Carlos DeLeon, owner of La Tolteca in Wilkes-Barre Township, looks over the fire and water damage at his restaurant Monday.
Owner hopes to reopen eatery in a month
WILKES-BARRE TWP. —
Plates of food remained on the
tables below fallen ceiling tiles
at LaTolteca Mexican Restau-
rant Monday — evidence of
how quickly customers fled
when a devastating fire broke
out Sunday evening.
Thirty-three year-old owner
Carlos DeLeon walked around
the building trying to make
sense of it all as he waited for
insurance inspectors to arrive
to assess the damages so he
can begin to rebuild the popu-
lar eatery off Mundy Street he
opened nearly nine years ago.
Wilkes-Barre Township Fire
Chief John Yuknavich said
Monday the fire was deter-
mined to be accidental, prob-
ably started by a still-lit ciga-
rette tossed near cardboard
boxes at the rear of the build-
ing.
Yuknavich said the ruling
was made by him, Assistant
Fire Chief Danny Harken-
reader and Ashley Borough
Fire Chief Joe McGlynn after
employees and the restaurant’s
owner were interviewed.
“The employees take their
break in the back in an en-
closed area where boxes are
thrown before being taken to
a Dumpster at the end of the
night,” Yuknavich said. “The
fire started there and ran up
the outside wall to the roof.”
Yuknavich said employees
tried to douse the fire with a
garden hose, but couldn’t con-
tain it.
As he walked through res-
taurant in the heart of the
township’s commercial dis-
trict, DeLeon shook his head.
“It’s a lot of damage,” he
said. “And this happens right
before my busiest week.”
Cinco de Mayo — May 5
— a celebration of Mexican
heritage and pride, will come
and go without festivities at
LaTolteca.
DeLeon said he hopes to get
the place reopened within a
month.
“The main thing is every-
body got out and nobody was
hurt,” DeLeon said. “That’s
the main concern. We can put
everything else back together.”
Five fire companies respond-
ed to the fire call — Wilkes-
Barre Township, Plains Town-
ship, Ashley Borough, Hanover
KINGSTON —Thanks to a $6
million renovation, many fewer
psychiatric patients and their
families will have to travel hours
away to receive treatment and
offer support.
Commonwealth Health is
expanding behavioral health re-
sources in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania with the addition of
20 inpatient
adult psychi-
atric beds at
First Hospital.
The new beds
are dedicated
to care for the
most complex
acute behav-
ioral health
cases, increasing the hospital’s
capacity to 127 beds, a growth
of nearly 20 percent.
“The biggest issue is that a lot
of residents of this community
have to go down to the Philadel-
phia area when there is a lack of
psych beds,” First Hospital CEO
Mark Schor said before a ribbon-
cutting ceremony at the hospital
on Monday.
With the closure of the ap-
proximately 20-bed psych unit
at Marian Community Hospital
in Carbondale last year, First
Hospital has been seeing more
and more residents leaving the
area for behavioral health treat-
ment — anywhere between 50
and 100 each month, Schor said.
“This expansion and hope-
fully others down the road will
Hospital
expands
psych unit
services
Extra beds at First Hospital
mean better, faster care for
area patients, officials say.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. —
Sgt. 1st Class Greg Robinson
has become the first amputee
to complete Army air assault
school, a course so grueling
his prosthetic leg broke twice
over the 10 days spent rappel-
ling down ropes, navigating ob-
stacle courses and completing
long road marches.
Each year thousands of sol-
diers are physically and men-
tally tested to their limits at
the Fort Campbell school. In-
structors said Robinson accom-
plished everything other partic-
ipants did and trainers cut him
no slack even though he lost
part of his right leg in a 2006
deployment to Afghanistan.
When he joined his team-
mates at a brief graduation
ceremony Monday at the Sa-
balauski Air Assault School, it
was a testament to what can
be achieved by amputees. War
wounds from Iraq and Afghani-
stan and the recent bombing
at the Boston Marathon have
highlighted the challenges that
amputee patients face to re-
cover.
An inspiration to the bomb-
ing victims? Robinson, a
34-year-old noncommissioned
officer from Elizabethtown, Ill.,
said his attitude was one of just
wanting to complete the same
program he sends soldiers to
who are under his command.
“Right now, I am a platoon
sergeant,” Robinson told re-
porters after graduating. “I have
roughly 30 men in my platoon.
As a leader, I didn’t want to tell
my soldiers that they needed to
go to air assault school, if I am
Man who lost leg is 1st amputee to complete Army’s air assault school
AP PHOTO
Sgt. First Class Greg Robinson, 34, of 101st Airborne Division,
greets fellow soldiers on Monday at Fort Campbell, Ky.
No slack cut for Sgt. Greg
Robinson, who attacked a
strenuous 10-day program.
By KRISTIN M. HALL
Associated Press
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See AMPUTEE, Page 12A
See FIRST, Page 12A
See LETTEER, Page 12A
See POLL, Page 12A
See LA TOLTECA, Page 12A
Schor
“The employees take their break in the back in an
enclosed area where boxes are thrown before be-
ing taken to a dumpster at the end of the night.
The fire started there and ran up the outside wall
to the roof.”
Wilkes-Barre Township Fire Chief John Yuknavich
HARVEYS LAKE - The bor-
ough planning commission
Monday night tabled a compa-
ny’s request to build a 195-foot
cellphone tower.
That decision came after at-
torney Eric Goldman, who rep-
resents X Cell, the tower com-
pany, and Mario Calabretta, X
Cell’s engineer, disagreed with
commission member Michael
Dziak about the status of the
area where the tower is to be
built. Dziak and Penn East-
ern engineer Daryl Pawlush
challenged X Cell’s represen-
tatives, who said the area is
not required to be labeled as
a subdivision. Dziak was also
concerned about the property
owner’s Clean and Green sta-
tus if the tower is placed on the
property. Dziak said the county
will not issue a separate num-
ber for tax purposes if the area
is not a subdivision, leaving the
property owner responsible for
the taxes.
X Cell wants to lease a
100-foot-by-100-foot area of
property off Cliff Street. The
actual area to be used for the
tower is 50 feet by 50 feet,
with room to expand if other
providers decide to join in with
the anchor provider, AT&T.
Attorney Mark McNealis has
said he will research whether
the area is legally considered
a subdivision. After McNealis
determines the land’s status,
the commission will meet with
Goldman and Calabretta in or-
der to grant the application to
work on the property.
Lakeside Drive resident
Mary Ann Tarantini is not
pleased with the potential
plans.
“This is a beautiful area and
we don’t want to see these
things around” Tarantini said.
“The neighbors want to keep
the beauty.”
The planning commission’s
next meeting is May 15.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013
timesleader.com
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 8-0-0
BIG 4 - 0-8-0-9
QUINTO - 8-3-2-4-4
TREASURE HUNT
07-15-17-23-28
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 4-6-7
BIG 4 - 9-4-8-9
QUINTO - 2-9-3-0-8
Cash 5
05-11-16-31-38
MATCH 6
14-25-33-45-46-47
Three players matched all five num-
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ing, each receiving $440,677. Today’s
jackpot will be worth $125,000.
Lottery officials said 255 players
matched four numbers, each receiv-
ing $247.50; 9,543 players matched
three numbers, each receiving $11
and 114,939 players matched two
numbers, each receiving $1.
No player matched all six numbers
drawn in Monday’s Match 6 drawing.
Thursday’s jackpot will be worth
$750,000.
OBITUARIES
Bartnikowski, Anna
Dellarte, Samuel
Dembowski, Lorraine
Evans, George Sr.
Fielding, Edward
Fox, Ann
Gesecki, Dorothy
Ginyard, Caleb
Kennedy, Catherine
Kunda, Helen
Malecki, Doris
Maulbeck, Rosemarie
Minkiewicz, John
Newhart, Joseph
Plevel, Anna
Summers, Joseph Jr.
Pages 8A, 9A
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BUILDING
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and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in
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PAGE 2A
POLICE BLOTTER
HANOVER TWP. — Township
police are investigating the rob-
bery of a Posten Taxi car driver
along South Main Street in the
Preston section of the township
Monday morning.
Posten driver Christopher Weiss
reported that he was transporting
a fare along South Main Street at
about 10 a.m. when a male passen-
ger stuck a knife to his waist and
demanded him to pull over.
After he pulled the cab to the
side of the road, the two men and
the woman he was transporting to
Wilkes-Barre robbed him of about
$80 and fled to the Park & Ride
along South Main Street, where
they got into and drove away in a
blue or black four-door vehicle.
Two of the suspects are de-
scribed as white men in their 30s,
about 6 feet tall. One had a thin
build, short, brown hair and a thin
mustache and was wearing blue
jeans and a gray Ohio Buckeyes
sweatshirt. The other had blonde
hair in a ponytail and was wearing
tan cargo pants, a dark shirt and a
Penn State baseball cap.
The third suspect was a white
or Hispanic woman in her mid 20s,
about 5 feet, 6 inches tall, with
blonde hair and wearing a red Old
Navy zipped hoodie.
Anyone with information should
call police at 570-825-1254.
WEST PITTSTON — An allega-
tion of shoplifting led to the filing
of a slew of additional charges of a
Kingston man accused of possess-
ing key ingredients to manufacture
methamphetamine.
West Pittston Police Sgt. Mi-
chael Turner responded to a re-
port of retail theft at the Gerrity’s
Supermarket, 801 Wyoming Ave.,
on Oct. 26, where loss prevention
officer Mary Turek had detained
John Stribaugh, 41, of rear South
Wyoming Avenue, for allegedly
concealing two, 1-ounce containers
of iodine valued at $2.78.
The state police Troop P Vice/
Narcotics Unit confirmed for
Turner that iodine is an ingredient
used to manufacture methamphet-
amine.
Turner reviewed surveillance
video and determined which
vehicle Stribaugh drove to the
store. He observed a plastic bag
on the floor containing boxes of
matches, more iodine and a spray
can of what appeared to be ether.
State police confirmed they were
also meth ingredients and Turner
obtained a search warrant for the
vehicle.
The items seized from the ve-
hicle were sent to the state police
crime lab for analysis. A report
came back on March 12 identify-
ing the items as key ingredients
and equipment necessary for the
clandestine manufacture of meth-
amphetamine, according to court
records.
Stribaugh was charged with two
counts of the manufacture, deliv-
ery or possession with intent to
manufacture or deliver a controlled
substance; three counts of posses-
sion of liquified ammonia with the
intent to manufacture a controlled
substance; one count of risking
catastrophe; two counts of posses-
sion of a controlled substance; and
one count of retail theft.
He was arraigned before Dis-
trict Judge Joseph Carmody and
released on $7,500 unsecured bail.
His preliminary hearing is sched-
uled for 9 a.m. May 8 before Car-
mody.
HANOVER TWP. — Police are
trying to locate a late 1990s or
early 2000s green extended cab
Dodge truck with Eagles decals on
the rear tailgate.
The truck was involved in an
assault on Oxford Street Sunday
evening in which a male from the
Mountain Top area suffered minor
injuries. The truck was said to be
occupied by three white males
and one white or Hispanic male. A
white male wearing glasses and a
sweatshirt is the suspected assail-
ant, police said.
The truck was last seen traveling
west on West Division Street. Any-
one with information should call
police at 570-825-1254 or dial 911.
WILKES-BARRE —City police
reported the following:
• Police are searching for a sil-
ver Volkswagen Jetta they say fled
the scene of a crash in front of 18 E.
Main St. late Saturday night.
The Jetta, which was occupied
by two women and headed toward
Plains Township, likely has exten-
sive damage to the right front, in-
cluding a smashed headlight.
Anyone with information should
call police at 826-8106 and leave a
message for Officer J. Touey.
• After responding on Sunday
to Kirby Park for a report of a man
selling marijuana, police arrested
a 15-year-old boy who admitted to
having marijuana but denied sell-
ing it and said it was for his own
personal use.
The boy was taken to police
headquarters and released to his
mother. Charges will be filed, po-
lice said, adding that two pill bot-
tles with suspected marijuana were
confiscated.
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Issue No. 2013-120
Shavertown bridge reopens after lengthy project
SHAVERTOWN — After
more than a year and more
than a million dollars, the East
Center Street Bridge Project in
Shavertown is complete.
The bridge, closed on April
16, 2012, reopened to traffic
earlier this month, and a ribbon-
cutting ceremony was held last
week.
“We’re relieved,” Kingston
Township Manager Kathleen
Sebastian said of the bridge’s
opening. “It’s beautiful. They
did a fantastic job and every-
body is thrilled.”
Sebastian explained plans to
renovate the bridge started in
2000 and included removing the
old bridge, widening the area,
building a new bridge and new
roads.
Kingston Township budgeted
$220,000, or 20 percent of the
overall cost, while the remain-
ing 80 percent of the project was
paid for by the Pennsylvania De-
partment of Transportation.
“Everything went smoothly,”
Sebastian said, although crews
did run into soil erosion prob-
lems when digging into the
creek bed, making redesigns
necessary. “Everybody coop-
erated. Once it started, it was
smooth sailing.”
Bob Nause, proprietor of Top
Value Kitchens near the bridge,
is “happy that it’s open,” al-
though he admitted the closed
bridge had little effect on his
business.
“Ours is a destination busi-
ness, not a spur of the moment
sale,” he said. “A kitchen is a
well-planned decision because
of the cost involved.”
Nause said customers made
every effort to get around the
detour to get to his business
which does not depend on retail
flow.
“It was, however, a huge nui-
sance for tractor trailers deliv-
ering product,” he admitted,
explaining how trucks needed
to be re-routed to Main Street
around Offset Paperback to
reach his business.
The story is different for Greg
Williams, owner of Studio 309
Music Antiques and Collect-
ibles, who said his business suf-
fered tremendously during the
bridge reconstruction.
Williams rented a building
on the corner of Main and Cen-
ter streets that he lived in as
an 18-year-old just two weeks
before the bridge closed, not
knowing about the construction
project.
“We suffered dearly and pa-
tiently,” he said. “We depend
entirely on retail traffic and the
only accessibility to our build-
ing was through the back door.”
Williams added that he was
forced to sell a lot of his mer-
chandise at area flea markets
and on Ebay during the bridge
project.
Of the bridge itself, however,
he said, “The bridge is gorgeous.
It looks fantastic and has done a
lot to improve the infrastructure
of Shavertown.”
Susan Collini, of Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgeons Ltd. at
the intersection of Center Street
and Route 309, mirrors Nause’s
comments.
“Although it was difficult for
people to get into the center,
they did figure out a way to get
here,” she said. “We didn’t face
the same challenges the retail
folks did.”
Collini does, however, feel
the Main Street/Center Street
intersection was safer than ever
during the bridge reconstruc-
tion.
A 3-way stop sign had been
installed at the intersection dur-
ing the project, slowing traffic
in all directions. Now that the
bridge has re-opened, the third
stop sign has been removed.
“I’ve seen so many near ac-
cidents at that intersection
before the 3-way stop sign was
installed,” Collini said. “It’s a
dangerous intersection. We
have actually petitioned the
township to put in a 4-way stop
sign.”
As for the completed bridge
project, Collini said, “It’s won-
derful. It’s been a long time
coming.”
She commended the workers
and their attention to detail.
“I know it was a lot of money
for the township but it was well
worth it.”
By DOTTY MARTIN
For The Times Leader
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
The East Center Street Bridge reopened to traffic earlier this month, and a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held last week.
East Center Street span, road
work project, went smoothly,
Kingston Twp. officials say.
PLAINS TWP. - Wilkes-Barre
Area Career & Technical Cen-
ter Joint Operating Committee
forwarded a proposed 2013-
2014 budget of $8.8 million to
participating school districts
for approval on Monday night.
Crestwood, Greater Nan-
ticoke Area, Hanover Area,
Pittston Area, and Wilkes-Barre
Area school districts will have
until June 30 to weigh in on the
budget, which is $74,465 lower
than the current year’s spend-
ing plan.
“All member school districts
are expected to approve the
budget,” said Business Man-
ager Tom Melone. “There has
been no increase in payments
required from those districts.”
Melone lauded the work
of the committee and staff in
minimizing costs throughout
the year.
“Although we have been able
to contain costs, we have ab-
solutely been able to maintain
quality education, ” said com-
mittee member John Quinn,
of Wilkes-Barre Area, citing
special recognition received
from the state Department of
Education for assessment test-
ing scores.”
Principal Frank Majikes
said he was especially proud
the center had matriculation
agreements with several col-
leges that made it possible for
students to continue their edu-
cation after graduation.
“Our cooperative programs
also make it possible for stu-
dents to get hands-on experi-
ence, which is invaluable,” said
Majikes.
Each member district will
vote on the budget, which
must be adopted by June 30.
WBCTC budget set
for district approval
Subdivision status disputed
for proposed cell tower
construction site.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
Cellphone tower plans put on hold
By SUSAN BETTINGER
Times Leader Correspondent
WILKES-BARRE — He may have
graduated as a Meyers Mohawk and
spent his professional career working
at Wilkes-Barre Area School District,
but beginning July 1, Andrew Kuhl is
not only a Hanover Area Hawkeye,
he’s the top Hawk.
“I graduated from Meyers,” Kuhl
said Monday as he begins the transi-
tion fromhis job as Wilkes-Barre Area
director of secondary curriculum
to Hanover Area superintendent. “I
worked in every secondary school in
Wilkes-Barre through the years. It’s
tough to leave when you have such
deep roots.”
The Hanover Area School Board
voted to hire Kuhl during a special
meeting last week. He will replace re-
tiring Superintendent Anthony Pod-
cazy at a time of dramatic changes.
Kuhl will assume the post just as
the teacher and support staff con-
tracts expire. The two sides began
negotiations earlier this year, as re-
quired by state law.
Kuhl also will become superinten-
dent as school districts shift from
current state education standards to
the new “Common Core” standards
adopted by Pennsylvania and 45
other states. The new standards also
come with new tests, as the state has
rolled out the high school Keystone
Exams given in various subjects at
the end of a course, and is revamping
the Pennsylvania System of School
Assessment tests in grades three
through eight to align with Common
Core.
Administrative challenges
Throw in a new, more time-con-
suming teacher and principal evalu-
ation system implemented by the
state, as well as a looming change
in how the state measures each
school’s success (moving away from
“proficiency” in standardized tests
to “student academic growth”), and
it looks like Kuhl is taking the reins
of Hanover Area as the educational
SCRANTON — Things continue
to look up for the financially strug-
gling Diocese of Scranton, with the
Diocesan Annual Appeal — a key
money-raising effort each year — ex-
ceeding goals and netting the second
highest amount in the history of the
fund drive.
The appeal was launched this year
with a goal of $5.55 million, and the
diocese issued a press release Mon-
day noting more than $5.58 million
has been pledged so far, with two
months left for donors to step for-
ward.
Diocese Spokesman Bill Genello
said the record for donations was
set during the 2006-07 appeal, which
raised $6.09 million when the goal
was $5.25 million. That total was
bolstered substantially by several
large corporate and individual con-
tributions that totaled $1.1 million,
according to Times
Leader archives.
This year’s to-
tal so far has been
pledged by 33,198
donors, according
to the diocese, mak-
ing an average gift
of $168.14. The dio-
cese sets goals for each parish as well
as an overall goal, and so far 36 par-
ishes in the 11-county diocese have
met their individual goals. With 121
parishes, that’s slightly less than 30
percent hitting their goals so far, but
Genello noted another 15 parishes
topped 90 percent of their goals.
Exceeding the goal in the appeal
may be further evidence the diocese
is turning a financial corner. The
diocese had a history of exceeding
steadily increasing goals until that
2006-07 peak. Total donations de-
clined in following years and then-
Bishop Joseph Martino released
financial statements that painted
gloomy pictures of a diocese battling
growing debt.
Martino oversaw extensive school
and church closings before retiring
unexpectedly in 2009, but the steps
he took seem to have worked, with
his successor, Bishop Joseph Bam-
bera, overseeing a return to increases
in Appeal totals and a reduction of
debt.
Among other things, money from
the appeal goes toward care for re-
tired priests, programs for formation
of priests and deacons, social service
programs for the poor and diocesan
media outlets such as the Catholic
Light newspaper and Catholic Televi-
sion station.
This year, the diocese increased al-
location from appeal funds to Catho-
lic Social Services. The diocese also
appointed clergy and laypersons as
regional chairs for this campaign.
WILKES-BARRE — Defenses by
Luzerne County Public Defender’s Of-
fice of three men separately charged
with firearm offenses, burglary and
sexually assaulting a child will be in-
adequate due to excessive caseloads,
understaffing and lack of resources,
according to an amended class action
lawsuit filed in county court Friday.
The amended suit,
filed on behalf of
former Chief Public
Defender Al Flora Jr.,
and three men fac-
ing felony charges,
claims the public
defender’s office and
public defenders can-
not lawfully represent their clients due
to limited resources and space and a
declining budget from county council.
Flora filed a separate lawsuit in fed-
eral court last week over his dismissal
as chief public defender by county
Manager Robert Lawton on April 17.
The amended suit replaces another
lawsuit that Flora, when he was chief
public defender, filed against the coun-
ty in April 2012. Trial is scheduled in
June.
According to the latest suit:
In December 2011, Flora stopped as-
signing public defenders to represent
clients who were charged with lesser
crimes due to excessive caseloads,
limited staffing and a state Supreme
Court order to expunge the records of
nearly 3,000 juvenile cases that were
presided over by former county judge
Mark Ciavarella.
In June, Senior Judge Joseph Augel-
lo ordered Flora to resume represent-
ing all defendants who qualified for
representation and told the county to
allowFlora to fill vacant positions. Flo-
ra reassigned a public defender from
adult cases to juvenile cases, but was
not permitted by the county to hire an
attorney despite money in the budget
to pay the salary.
Flora claimed county council allo-
cated $2.5 million, a nearly 7 percent
decrease from 2011, for the public
defender’s office in 2012. Flora rear-
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013
timesleader.com
PAGE 3A
LOCAL
WILKES-BARRE
Bus company is sued
A Plains Township couple filed
a lawsuit in Luzerne County Court
Monday against a local bus company
after a November 2011 accident that
left a man injured.
Namik and Nancy Tedik filed the
suit through their attorney, David
Selingo, against the Yatesville Bus
Company and Allstate Insurance
Company requesting monetary dam-
ages.
According to court papers, on Nov.
8, 2011, a vehicle driven by Namik
Tedik was struck on Route 315 in
Jenkins Township by a Yatesville Bus
Company bus. The suit alleges the
bus company acted negligently and
careless in causing injuries to Namik
Tedik, including a herniated disc and
other pain. The accident has caused
Namik Tedik to incur “large sums of
money” for medication and treatment,
court papers say.
HARVEYS LAKE
JCC dance event planned
The Jewish Community Center
will host a dance-a-thon fundraiser to
benefit the JCC Day Camp Scholar-
ship Program.
The fundraiser will
be held from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Sunday,
rain or shine, at the
center’s campsite
near Harveys Lake.
The event is open
to the public and will include Zumba
and dance instructors from several
local organizations.
A $15 donation is requested and
advance registration can be made by
calling the JCC at 824-4646. Tours of
the camp and an overnight camping
site will be available throughout the
event.
WILKES-BARRE
WBA budget input sought
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
residents get their third chance to sit
in on — and offer suggestions at — a
meeting of the school board’s budget
and finance committee today. The
committee will hold a third public
meeting at 5:30 p.m.
The board is trying to close a short-
fall that began at about $2.7 million
between what it expects to take in and
would likely spend just to maintain
the status quo next school year. Board
members have already agreed to ask
principals and athletic directors to cut
supply costs by 10 percent, and re-
jected a three-year, $270,000 contract
with Hawkeye Security Solutions for
monitoring of security camera video
outside schools.
The district is trying to draw up a
budget with significant unknowns:
Contracts for teachers, administra-
tors, support staff and custodians are
all under negotiations. By state law, a
preliminary budget must be approved
by the end of May so it can be avail-
able to the public before final approval
by June 30.
The meeting is in the first floor
boardroom of the administration
building, 730 S.Main St.
DUNMORE
PennDOT seeks volunteers
PennDOT officials are recruiting
volunteers for this year’s Great Ameri-
can Cleanup of Pennsylvania effort
that runs through May 31. Those who
would like to get involved may call
570-963-4044.
WILKES-BARRE
Public invited to openings
The Downtown Wilkes-Barre Busi-
ness Association invites the commu-
nity to ribbon-cutting ceremonies at
Prana Yoga and Shambala on Wednes-
day at noon. It will be a dual cer-
emony to celebrate the association’s
newest members. Light refreshments
will be provided.
“We think that this initiative is a
fantastic way to introduce the newest
members of the downtown business
community to the public. Prana Yoga
and Shambala are both businesses
with roots in Scranton, so we are
eager to welcome them to downtown
Wilkes-Barre. We look forward to
hosting many more ribbon-cutting
ceremonies as the downtown con-
tinues to grow,” said John Maday,
chairman of the DWBBA’s promotions
committee, which is spearheading
this effort.
Shambala is offers an assortment of
’60s-themed and New Age merchan-
dise. Prana Yoga is a donation studio.
The suggested donation for classes is
$10.
I N B R I E F
Flora
Andy Kuhl, secondary curriculum director of Wilkes-Barre Area School District, will become Hanover Area
Superintendent on July 1.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
D O N AT E
Donations can be made until the end
of the fiscal year on June 30. For
information, call the appeal office at
570-207-2250, go online at www.an-
nualappeal.org, or send donations to
Diocesan Annual Appeal, 300 Wyo-
ming Ave., Scranton, PA., 18503-1279
Flora amends suit for more PD funds
Investment officer’s lawyer claims
gambling and alcohol addiction led
his client to steal from investors.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE — A former in-
vestment broker with PNC Bank was
sentenced Monday to 42 months in
federal prison on charges he swindled
more than $700,000 from the bank
and eight customers.
Nicholas Polito Jr., of Scranton, was
sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge
A. Richard Caputo on a charge of bank
fraud.
Pol i t o’s
attorneys,
P a t r i c k
Casey and
Lawrence
M o r a n ,
blamed ad-
dictions to
alcohol and
gambl i ng
for why
their client
stole in-
vestments
from eight el-
derly customers of PNC Bank.
Federal authorities said Polito was
working as an investment broker with
PNC Bank in Scranton when he stole
money from 2005 to November 2011.
U.S. Assistant Attorney John Gur-
ganus said PNC Bank repaid custom-
ers — including interests for their
stolen investments. Polito repaid one
customer $42,070 prior to being sen-
tenced Monday and was ordered by
Caputo to pay PNC Bank restitution
of $673,349.
“The nature and circumstances of
the offense is extremely serious,” Ca-
puto told Polito, noting Polito violated
the “trust” he earned from his employ-
er and customers.
“Everything we do every day is
trust,” Caputo said. “When you inject
money into the situation, it is magni-
fied. Seven or eight people would have
been wiped out if PNC Bank did not
compensate them.”
“I stole their money,” Polito said be-
fore being sentenced. “I lost their trust
in me. I want to personally apologize.
The guilt that I have will be with me
for the rest of my life.”
Polito’s son, Nicholas III, said his
father sought help for alcohol and
gambling addictions prior to being
charged by the U.S. Attorney’s Office
in October 2012.
Nicholas III, of Connecticut, said his
father had driven to his home in No-
vember 2011 to inform him about the
thefts, an act that Caputo appreciated.
“That is the greatest lesson you’ll
ever give him by driving to Connecti-
cut and telling your son,” Caputo told
Polito.
Caputo ordered Polito to begin serv-
ing his sentence on June 3.
Filingclaimsthreemencannot be
representedproperlybecausePublic
Defender’sOfficelacksfunding.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
He’s headed for Hawkeye country
Donors push annual appeal beyond goal
Veteran W-B Area administra-
tor Andy Kuhl will take over as
superintendent at Hanover Area.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Diocese of Scranton money-
raising campaign nets its second
highest total.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See KUHL, Page 4A
‘I stole their mon-
ey. I lost their trust
in me. I want to
personally apolo-
gize. The guilt that
I have will be with
me for the rest of
my life.’
Nicholas Polito Jr.
Sentenced for bank fraud
See FLORA, Page 4A
Bambera
Ex-bank
executive
sentenced
for fraud
WEST PITTSTON — A
man serving a probation sen-
tence for texting an illicit pic-
ture to a 15-year-old girl was
arrested Monday on charges
he attempted to coerce two
girls to send him nude pic-
tures of themselves..
John David Saul, 19, last
known address as Luzerne
Street, was arraigned by Dis-
trict Judge Joseph Carmody
on three counts of criminal
use of communication facility,
two counts each of unlawful
contact with minors and cor-
ruption of minors, and one
count of dissemination of
sexual material. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County Cor-
rectional Facility for lack of
$20,000 bail.
Court records say Saul was
sentenced to two years pro-
bation in July on a charge of
dissemination of sexual ma-
terial when he texted a nude
picture of himself to a 15-year-
old girl. The girl’s father inter-
cepted the picture on her cell-
phone in October 2011, court
records say.
According to the latest
criminal complaint filed by
Hanover Township police and
Luzerne County detectives:
A 13-year-old girl in Ha-
nover Township was using a
computer on April 1 to mes-
sage friends when Saul alleg-
edly joined the conversation,
telling the girl to send him
nude pictures of herself.
The girl kept telling Saul
“No,” at which time Saul told
the girl he was going to “cave
in the head” of her 16-year-
old male friend from Ashley,
whom they both know, if she
did not send him the pictures
he wanted.
The girl’s older sister told
Saul during the conversation
to leave them alone, calling
him a “pervert” and a “creep,”
the complaint says.
Investigators allege in the
complaint that a 14-year-old
girl reported Saul contacted
her on a messaging service,
asking her if she had a boy-
friend and to send three pic-
tures of herself to him.
The 16-year-old boy from
Ashley told investigators that
Saul may have retrieved the
girls’ contact information
from his cellphone.
Saul’s girlfriend told in-
vestigators he is attracted to
young girls and it has caused
problems in their relation-
ship.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 N E W S PAGE 4A
landscape shifts beneath him.
“We’re at a time when there
are changes across the board
in education,” Kuhl said, “It’s a
welcome change in the era of ac-
countability. Unfortunately, one
of the byproducts is that there
are a lot of unknowns.”
But Kuhl, 52, is hardly inex-
perienced, having weathered
plenty of changes in 27 years
working his way up from a so-
cial studies teacher. “I think I’m
ready for it,” he said of the chal-
lenge.
Kuhl’s contract at Hanover
Area breaks new ground as well.
He agreed to pay part of his in-
surance premium, a first in the
district, according to Business
Manager Tom Cipriano.
The contract runs for three
years with annual raises and a
starting salary of $115,000, Kuhl
said, adding that he is taking a
hit in one other area changed
by state law: Accumulated sick
days. Until recently, his roughly
250 sick days accumulated at
Wilkes-Barre Area could have
been carried over to Hanover
Area, but a new law limits him
to 30.
“I’m giving up about 220 un-
used sick days to take this job,”
he said.
Kuhl said he had started con-
sidering the teaching profession
in high school, but didn’t make
up his mind until he had nearly
completed his bachelor’s degree
in political science at Dickinson
College. His original plan was
to stay in the classrooms, or at
least near the students as a prin-
cipal, but five years ago he was
given the opportunity to work
in Wilkes-Barre’s Central Office
and decided it was time for a
new challenge.
And while he received state
eligibility to work as an assis-
tant superintendent in 2000,
he didn’t get the required pa-
perwork for the top job until
this year, bypassing the chance
to apply at Wilkes-Barre Area
when long-time Superintendent
Jeff Namey retired last year.
Hanover Twp. resident
Why skip a chance to head
the district of his alma mater yet
opt for a neighboring district?
For starters, his daughter gradu-
ated from Hanover Area, and he
lives in Hanover Township now.
Is the daughter going into
education?
“She’s an on-air broadcaster
for a radio station covering the
Pittsburgh Pirates,” Kuhl said.
Which could be a good thing for
him.
“I’ve been a Pirates fan all my
life,” he laughed. “That shows
good parenting, nudging her to
my favorite team.”
So, special access to the press
box seats?
“No,” he laughed again. “I
have to sit in the regular seats
with everybody else.”
Continued from Page 3A
KUHL
ranged the spending plan to
prevent staff layoffs but reduced
his expert witness budget from
$100,000 to $72,000.
“This budget reduction sub-
stantially impacted the ability to
retain experts in capital and juve-
nile cases, both of which frequent-
ly require expert testimony,” the
lawsuit says.
Named as defendants in the lat-
est lawsuit are Luzerne County
andLawton.
Continued from Page 3A
FLORA
Man charged with soliciting nude pictures from 2 girls
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
STEVE MOCARSKY/THE TIMES LEADER
A
Pennsylvania American Water Co. employee moves a safety
cone outside 19 W. Butler St., Shickshinny, Monday afternoon
after fire devastated the home that morning. Joe and Randi Reno
and their two sons, Pete and Joey, made it out safely along with
their two dogs, according to neighbor, Joan Malischak. Malischak
said something woke her up just before 3 a.m. Monday and she
saw an orange glow outside her bedroom window. While she
called 911, her husband, Rich, and their daughter Amy ran outside
and found that the Renos had already evacuated, but salvaged
nothing but the clothes on their backs. A Luzerne County 911
supervisor said it was a two-alarm fire and a state police deputy
fire marshal is investigating the cause.
EARLY MORNING FIRE DISPLACES
FAMILY OF FOUR
WASHINGTON — With the
simplest of sentences, NBA
veteran Jason Collins set aside
years of worry and silence to
become the first active player
in one of four major U.S. profes-
sional sports leagues to come
out as gay.
In a first-person article posted
Monday on Sports Illustrated’s
website, Collins begins: “I’m
a 34-year-old NBA center. I’m
black. And I’m gay.”
Collins has played for six
teams in 12 seasons, most re-
cently as a reserve with the
Washington Wizards after a mid-
season trade from the Boston
Celtics. He is now a free agent
and wants to keep playing in the
NBA.
“I didn’t set out to be the first
openly gay athlete playing in a
major American team sport. But
since I am, I’mhappy to start the
conversation. I wish I wasn’t the
kid in the classroom raising his
hand and saying, ‘I’m different,’”
Collins writes.
“If I had my way, someone
else would have already done
this. Nobody has, which is why
I’m raising my hand.”
Saying he had “endured years
of misery and gone to enormous
lengths to live a lie,” Collins im-
mediately drew support for his
announcement from the White
House, former President Bill
Clinton, the NBA, current and
former teammates, and athletes
in other sports.
Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe
Bryant tweeted that he was
proud of Collins, writing: “Don’t
suffocate who u r because of the
ignorance of others,” followed
by the words “courage” and
“support.”
“We’ve got to get rid of the
shame. That’s the main thing.
And Jason’s going to help that.
He’s going to help give people
courage to come out,” said Billie
Jean King, a member of the In-
ternational Tennis Hall of Fame
who confirmed she was gay after
being outed in the early 1980s.
“I guarantee you he’s going to
feel much lighter, much freer.
The truth does set you free,
there’s no question. It doesn’t
mean it’s easy. But it sets you
free,” King said in a telephone
interview with The Associated
Press.
The Wizards, whose season
ended April 17, issued a state-
ment from President Ernie
Grunfeld: “We are extremely
proud of Jason and support his
decision to live his life proudly
and openly.
DAMASCUS, Syria — Syr-
ia’s prime minister narrowly
escaped an assassination at-
tempt in the heart of the heav-
ily defended capital Monday,
state media said, laying bare
the vulnerability of President
Bashar Assad’s regime.
The bombing, which killed
several other people, high-
lights an accelerating cam-
paign targeting government
officials, from mid-level civil
servants to
the highest
echelons of
the Syrian
regime.
S t a t e
t e l e v i -
sion said
Prime Min-
ister Wael
al-Halqi was not hurt in the
bombing, which struck his
convoy as it drove through the
posh Mazzeh neighborhood
— home to embassies, gov-
ernment officials and business
elites with close ties to the
regime. Footage of the scene
broadcast on state TV showed
the charred hulks of cars and
the burnt-out shell of a bus in
a street littered with rubble.
The attack on al-Halqi punc-
tuated a series of attacks on
government officials in recent
weeks. On April 18, gunmen
shot dead the head of public
relations at the Ministry of So-
cial Affairs while he dined at a
Mazzeh restaurant. A day lat-
er, a Syrian army colonel was
killed in Damascus, and five
days after that a bomb killed
an official from the Electricity
Ministry.
Then there are the larger
attacks that have shaken the
regime to its core.
Last month, a suicide bomb-
ing at a Damascus mosque
killed Sheik Mohammad
Said Ramadan al-Buti, a lead-
ing Sunni Muslim preacher
and outspoken supporter of
Assad. That followed a blast
last July that killed four top
regime officials, including
Assad’s brother-in-law and the
defense minister, at the Syrian
national security building in
the capital.
Eager to assure the public
that al-Halqi survived Mon-
day’s attack, the state-run
Al-Ikhbariya station said the
prime minister attended a
regular weekly meeting with
an economic committee im-
mediately after the bombing.
The station broadcast video of
al-Halqi sitting at a table with
several other officials.
Later, in its evening news
program, state TV showed
video of al-Halqi denouncing
the attack, calling it a “terror-
ist and criminal act” and wish-
ing the wounded a speedy
recovery.
A government official said
two people were killed and 11
wounded in the blast, while
the Britain-based Syrian Ob-
servatory for Human Rights
activist group put the death
toll at five, including two of al-
Halqi’s bodyguards and one of
the drivers in his convoy.
The government official
spoke to The Associated Press
on condition of anonymity be-
cause he was not authorized
to give official statements to
reporters.
SAVAR, Bangladesh — A
Bangladesh court on Monday
gave police 15 days to inter-
rogate the owner of a build-
ing that collapsed last week,
killing at least 382 people, as
rescuers used heavy machin-
ery to cut through the de-
stroyed structure after giving
up hopes of finding any more
survivors.
Mohammed Sohel Rana,
who was arrested Sunday as
he tried to flee to India, will
be held for questioning on
charges of negligence, ille-
gal construction and forcing
workers to join work. His
father, Abdul Khaleque, was
also arrested on suspicion of
aiding Rana to force people to
work in a dangerous building.
The illegally constructed,
8-story Rana Plaza collapsed
in a heap Wednesday morn-
ing as thousands of people
worked inside in five garment
factories. About 2,500 survi-
vors have been accounted for.
Rana was brought to the
Dhaka Metropolitan Mag-
istrate’s Court in a bullet-
proof vest, and led away to
an unknown detention place
after the magistrate granted
a police request to hold him
longer before filing formal
charges. The crimes he is ac-
cused of carry a maximum
punishment of seven years.
More charges could be added
later.
The collapse was the
deadliest disaster to hit Ban-
gladesh’s garment industry,
which is worth $20 billion
annually and supplies global
retailers.
In renewed anger against
conditions in garment facto-
ries — a mainstay of Bangla-
desh’s economy — hundreds
of workers poured into the
streets in the Dhaka suburb
of Ashulia and set fire to
an ambulance Monday, the
Independent TV network
reported. They also tried to
set fire to a factory, it said.
Authorities shut down all gar-
ment factories in the Ashulia
and Gazipur industrial sub-
urbs, including one that had
reportedly developed cracks
and was evacuated earlier.
Volunteers, army person-
nel and firefighters have
worked around the clock
since Wednesday, mostly
using their hands and light
equipment to pull out sur-
vivors. Around midnight
Sunday, authorities deployed
hydraulic cranes and heavy
cutting machines to break up
the massive slabs of concrete
into manageable pieces that
could be lifted away.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 N A T I O N & W O R L D PAGE 5A
LOS ANGELES
Jackson suit trial begins
Michael Jackson’s family and friends
knew he was addicted to prescription
medications, but the only ones who
refused to acknowledge it were the
promoters of his ill-fated final series
of comeback concerts, an attorney
for the singer’s mother told a jury on
Monday.
Lawyer Brian Panish traced Jack-
son’s addiction in opening statements
during the trial of a wrongful death
lawsuit against concert giant AEG
Live, telling jurors the company ig-
nored numerous warning signs about
the singer’s health in his final months.
Panish told the jury of six men and
six women that it would ultimately
have to decide whether Jackson’s
mother and his three children deserve
compensation for AEG’s conduct.
Millions, possibly billions, of dollars
are at stake, but Panish did not give a
suggested damage figure in his open-
ing remarks.
Katherine Jackson sued the com-
pany in September 2010.
WASHINGTON
Transportation head tapped
President Barack Obama renewed
his pitch for investment in American
infrastructure on Monday as he named
Anthony Foxx, mayor of Charlotte,
N.C., to serve as his next transporta-
tion secretary.
Obama called Foxx “one of the
most effective mayors” in the country
because of the city’s investments in
transportation and other projects that
have boosted the local economy.
While Foxx has been in office, the
city has broken ground on a new
streetcar project for the downtown
area, extended its light rail system and
expanded the Charlotte airport.
“All of that has not only helped to
create new jobs, it has helped Char-
lotte become more attractive to busi-
ness,” Obama said, introducing Foxx
as his nominee during a ceremony in
the East Room on Monday afternoon.
His nomination is subject to Senate
confirmation.
BAGHDAD
Baghdad bombings escalate
A wave of car bomb blasts tore
through Shiite areas south of Baghdad
on Monday, killing at least 36 and
deepening fears that Iraq is rapidly
spiraling back out of control.
The attacks capped a week of
turmoil that is posing the greatest test
of Iraq’s stability since U.S. troops left
the country in late 2011. At least 218
people have been killed in attacks and
battles between gunmen and security
forces that began with clashes at a
Sunni protest camp in northern Iraq
last Tuesday.
The unrest follows four months
of widespread protests among Iraq’s
Sunni minority.
DUBLIN
Court makes suicide ruling
A paralyzed Irish woman who wants
to die cannot legally commit suicide
with her partner’s help, Ireland’s Su-
preme Court ruled Monday.
The seven-judge court said nothing
in the country’s Catholic-influenced
1937 constitution could authorize the
deliberate taking of a life on humanitar-
ian grounds. It said lawmakers could
pass such a law to permit 59-year-old
Marie Fleming to die at a time of her
choosing, but no such statute existed
yet.
Fleming, a former University College
Dublin lecturer who is unable to move
from the neck down because of ad-
vanced multiple sclerosis, testified that
her life had been reduced to irrevers-
ible agony and that she feared choking
to death because she couldn’t swallow.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
A Bangladesh court on Monday gave police 15 days to
interrogate Mohammed Sohel Rana, center, owner of a
building that collapsed, killing at least 382 people.
AP PHOTO
9/11 memorial, city’s tallest building
One World Trade Center rises behind
the Statue of Liberty in New York.
According to the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey, the final
pieces of spire will soon be lifted by
crane and placed on top of the sky-
scraper, making it the second tallest
building in the Western Hemisphere,
second only to Chicago’s Willis Tower.
AP PHOTO
Somali men finish the grave of 12-month-old Liin Muhumed Surow, who died of malnutrition 25 days after reaching the
camp, according to her father, Mumumed. East African officials say a U.S. funded agency’s report, to be released this
week, gives the highest death toll yet from Somalia’s 2011 famine, estimating that 260,000 people died - more than
double earlier estimates.
Syrian leader escapes bombing
Blast targeting convoy
spares prime minister, but
kills several others.
By ALBERT AJI and
RYAN LUCAS
Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya — The
2011 Somali famine killed
an estimated 260,000 people,
half of them age 5 and under,
according to a new report to
be published this week that
more than doubles previous
death toll estimates, officials
told The Associated Press.
The aid community be-
lieves that tens of thousands
of people died needlessly be-
cause the international com-
munity was slow to respond
to early signs of approaching
hunger in East Africa in late
2010 and early 2011.
The toll was also exacer-
bated by extremist militants
from al-Shabab who banned
food aid deliveries to the areas
of south-central Somalia that
they controlled. Those same
militants have also made the
task of figuring out an accu-
rate death toll extremely dif-
ficult.
A Western official briefed
on the newreport —the most
authoritative to date — told
AP that it says 260,000 people
died, and that half the victims
were 5 and under. Two other
international officials briefed
on the report confirmed that
the toll was in the quarter-mil-
lion range. All three insisted
they not be identified because
they were not authorized to
share the report’s contents
before it is officially released.
The report is being made
public Thursday by FEWS-
NET, a famine early warning
system funded by the U.S.
government’s aid arm USAID,
and by the Food Security and
Nutrition Analysis Unit - So-
malia, which is funded by the
U.S. and Britain.
A previous estimate by
the U.K. government said
between 50,000 and 100,000
people died in the famine.
The new report used research
conducted by specialists ex-
perienced in estimating death
tolls in emergencies and di-
sasters. Those researchers
relied on food and mortality
data compiled by the Food Se-
curity and Nutrition Analysis
Unit.
Because of the imprecise
nature of the data available,
the toll remains only an esti-
mate.
When asked about the re-
port, Somalia Health Minister
Maryan Qasim Ahmed said
she didn’t want to comment
until she read it because of
questions she had about the
accuracy of the figures.
Man arrested after eight-
story plaza collapse kills at
least 382 people.
By JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
By CHRIS BLAKE and
FARID HOSSAIN
Associated Press
260,000 died in Somali famine
Bangladeshpolicequestionbuilding’sowner
Player
Collins
reveals
he’s gay
NBA center, now a free agent,
makes announcement on
Sports Illustrated website.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Sports Writer
Slow response from international community blamed for severity
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 N E W S PAGE 6A
WILKES-BARRE — A
Hughestown borough coun-
cilwoman has filed a request
in Luzerne County Court
to reduce the number of
Hughestown Borough Coun-
cil members from seven to
five.
Marie Griglock, Rock Street,
filed the petition Monday, ask-
ing a county judge to approve
the reduction.
Griglock secured 83 signa-
tures from registered voters
in support of the move. Her
petition says the downsizing
“would provide cost savings
and ensure a “more efficient
government without affecting
the quality of representation of
the community.”
Griglock’s petition cites the
population of Hughestown as
1,600, according to the last U.S.
Census.
The councilwoman, elected
in 2009, could not be reached
for comment Monday.
She had previously worked as
the borough secretary for seven
years.
Hughestown council mem-
bers now include: Griglock,
Wayne Quick, Phil Falvo, Ed-
ward Strubeck, Paul Murphy,
Barbara Gatto and Bob Gable.
Paul Hindmarsh in the bor-
ough’s mayor.
A county judge has not yet
scheduled a hearing date for
the petition.
Once a hearing is sched-
uled, interested parties will
present their sides.
A judge would then make a
ruling.
Typically, members who
are serving on council would
be permitted to finish their
terms. Any seats expiring by
the next election date would
not be refilled or put on the
ballot.
Last year, West Wyoming
and Laurel Run boroughs re-
duced the number of their
council seats, as did Dallas
and Luzerne boroughs in
2011.
Reducing Hughestown council eyed
Marie Griglock files petition
in county court to cut council
from seven to five members.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Pa. Senateleader urges openrecords rework
HARRISBURG — A new
proposal to make changes to
Pennsylvania’s Right-to-Know
Lawwould include limits on ac-
cess by inmates and authorize
the Office of Open Records to
review documents in private to
see if they should be released.
The 22-page bill introduced
Friday by Sen. Dominic Pi-
leggi of Delaware County, the
Republican floor leader, would
permit agencies to impose fees
for commercial use of records,
allow government to block “un-
duly burdensome” requests and
exempt volunteer fire and res-
cue companies.
The proposal represents a
first step as lawmakers con-
sider revisions to the 2008 law
that controls the public’s ability
to get government information
and records.
The Pennsylvania NewsMe-
dia Association supports some
elements but has concerns
about others, said Deb Mussel-
man, a lobbyist with the orga-
nization.
“There are some portions
of the bill that, if they are not
changed, would cause us to re-
ally have to sit down and think
seriously about our position,”
Musselman said. “But we are
hopeful we can make our case
about the things we want to
change.”
Pileggi’s bill would not apply
the law fully to Pennsylvania’s
four “state-related” universities
— Penn State, the University of
Pittsburgh, Lincoln and Temple
— but that provision, which
has some support in the Leg-
islature, could be added as an
amendment. The campus po-
lice of the state-related schools,
however, are added to the agen-
cies that must comply with the
law under the current draft.
The Pennsylvania Interscho-
lastic Athletic Association was
already covered under the law,
but it would be moved to anoth-
er section for technical reasons.
Inmates would be limited to
a list of records, most of which
pertain to the inmate directly,
including his or her criminal
records, work records and dis-
ciplinary records.
Pileggi said inmates account
for a significant portion of
requests under the Right-to-
Know Law, requests that he
said have questionable public
benefit.
Lawmakers mull revisions to
law that controls public’s
ability to get government info.
The Associated Press
WILKES-BARRE — A New
Jersey man was sentenced
Monday to three years, seven
months to seven and a half
years in state prison for robbin
a local convenient store at
gunpoint.
Anthony Tims, 25, of New-
ark, N.J., was sentenced on a
charge of robbery by county
Judge David Lupas. Tims
pleaded guilty in March. He re-
ceived 556 days credit for time
already served in prison and
must pay $300 in restitution to
the Uni-Mart in Wyoming.
According to court pa-
pers, on Oct. 20, 2011, Tims
entered the Uni-Mart store on
Wyoming Avenue in Wyoming,
pointed a gun at the clerk and
demanded money.
WILKES-BARRE — A
Dunmore man pleaded guilty
Monday to a drug-related
charge stemming from a May
2011 incident.
Sir Anthony Johnson, 31,
of 3rd Street, entered the plea
to a charge of delivery of a
controlled substance. County
Judge Michael Vough said
Johnson, who was scheduled
to stand trial in the case this
week, will be sentenced on
July 1.
According to court papers,
on May 23, 2011, Johnson,
also known as “Miami,” alleg-
edly sold suspected heroin to a
police informant in Exeter.
Johnson is also awaiting
trial in another case stemming
from May 19, 2011, where po-
lice say he again sold suspect-
ed heroin to a police informant
in Avoca. Vough said that case
will be addressed at the July
sentencing hearing.
Assistant District Attorney
Tom Hogans prosecuted the
case. Johnson was represented
by attorney Allyson Kacmar-
ski.
WILKES-BARRE — A
Berwick man charged with his
role in making drugs along the
Susquehanna River pleaded
guilty Monday to related
charges.
David Fausnaught, 52,
entered the plea to charges
of possession an ingredient
of methamphetamine and
criminal conspiracy. County
Judge Fred Pierantoni said
Fausnaught will be sentenced
on June 27.
Fausnaught had previously
pleaded guilty to a related
charge, but withdrew that
guilty plea in September and
requested a jury trial. Faus-
naught was scheduled to stand
trial this week on nine related
charges.
According to court papers,
Fausnaught was one of three
men observed by a Fish and
Boat Commission officer pass-
ing a plastic bottle back and
forth among them on July 23,
2011.
A bag and empty pseudo-
ephedrine packages were also
found near the group. Police
said that in the bag they found
batteries, pseudoephedrine,
camping fuel, coffee filters,
drain cleaner, funnels, tubing,
gloves and a number of other
items police say are commonly
used in manufacturing meth-
amphetamine.
Police later located a receipt
that indicated Fausnaught pur-
chased medications from the
Walmart store in Bloomsburg.
The medications are com-
monly used to manufacture
methamphetamine.
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COURT BRIEFS
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In Memoriums
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Mon. deadline is Thurs. at 11am
Tues. deadline is Thurs. at 5pm
Wed. deadline is Fri. at 4pm
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live anywhere in the State of
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burial space at no cost in the veteran’s
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1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001
Susan L. (Motyka) Haddick
9-23-64 ~ 4-30-11
You were taken from us suddenly -
no warning, no advance notice, and
no time to prepare for what was
to come. Although it has been two
years, sweet memories of you are as
fresh as yesterday. The imprint you
left on our hearts and on the lives of
all you touched, especially your family,
your friends, and your students, will
remain forever. Your beautiful smile
and kind heart will always be with us.
Sadly missed by Mom, Dad,
Stan and family,Tracy and family,
C.J., Brynn and Charlie.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 O B I T U A R I E S PAGE 8A
DORIS E. MALECKI, 68,
of Waller Street, Wilkes-Barre,
passed away on Sunday at her
home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105
N. Main St., Ashley.
DOROTHY E. GESECKI, 88,
of West Grand Street, Nanti-
coke, passed away on Wednes-
day, April 24, 2013 at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Kielty-Moran
Funeral Home, Inc., 87 Washing-
ton Ave., Plymouth.
GEORGE G. EVANS SR., 78,
of Mockingbird Drive, Larks-
ville, passed away on Monday at
his home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Andrew Strish
Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St.,
Larksville.
Mr. JOHN (JACK) A.
MINKIEWICZ, 84, of Hanover
Township, passed away peace-
fully Sunday at Hospice Com-
munity Care, Wilkes-Barre.
A full obituary will be pub-
lished in Wednesday’s newspa-
pers.
The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituar-
ies, which can run with a photo-
graph. A funeral home repre-
sentative can call the obituary
desk at (570) 829-7224, send a
fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail
to tlobits@timesleader.com. If
you fax or e-mail, please call
to confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral home
or crematory, or must name
who is handling arrangements,
with address and phone num-
ber. We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15 typing
fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
Edward Fielding
April 27, 2013
E
dward Fielding, “Uncle Ed”
to all, youngest son of the
late John Henry and Eliza Ash-
man Fielding, left this earth on
Saturday, April 27. He had been
a patient at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Hollybush, South
Wales, Ed had immigrated to the
United States with his mother
and family in 1930.
He served in the U. S. Army
during World War II and later
became a hairdresser, operating
his own salon in Trucksville and
then in Shavertown until his re-
tirement.
Ed was always ready to visit
the sick, taking along meals he
had prepared for them. He loved
to cook and entertain, preparing
many banquets for church mem-
bers and entertaining family and
friends at his home. Ed enjoyed
gardening and flower arrange-
ment and at age 87 he began to
paint. He enjoyed wintering in
Leesburg, Florida. He was a mem-
ber of the Green Street Baptist
Chapel, Edwardsville, where he
had served many positions, main-
ly as a deacon, but also as Sunday
school teacher, youth director,
choir member and organist.
Ed was the last of his genera-
tion, being preceded in death by
his brothers, William Fielding,
Fred Fielding, John Fielding, Sid-
ney Fielding, Ronald Fielding and
George Fielding and sisters, Janet
F. Hogg, Myrtle F. Rogers, Bron-
wen F. Lawson and Betty F. Jones.
He was “Uncle Ed” to numer-
ous nephews and nieces who will
miss him greatly.
Funeral services will
be held Friday, May 3,
at 10 a.m. in the Green
Street Baptist Chapel, 25 Green
St., Edwardsville. Pastor David
Miklas and Pastor Christopher
Hall, Ed’s nephew, will officiate.
Interment will be made in Hunts-
ville Cemetery, Jackson Town-
ship. Friends may call Thursday,
May 2, from5 to 8 p.m. at the Har-
old C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown.
In lieu of flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to the Green
Street Baptist Church, 25 Green
St., Edwardsville, PA 18704.
Joseph C. Newhart
April 29, 2013
J
oseph C. Newhart, 67, of Ed-
wardsville, fell asleep in the
Arms of the Lord on Monday,
April 29, 2013 at the ManorCare
Health Services, Kingston.
He was born in Kingston on
Feb. 19, 1946. He was the son of
the late John Newhart and Irene
Riscavage Newhart. Joseph was
a graduate of Edwardsville High
School, Class of 1964. He was
a veteran of the Vietnam War,
serving in the U.S. Army. He
was decorated with the National
Defense Service Medal, the Viet-
nam Service Medal, the Vietnam
Campaign Medal and the Good
Conduct Medal. He was an expert
marksman M/16. He retired from
Tobyhanna Army Depot. Joseph
also loved fishing, hunting, gar-
dening and, most of all, his kids
and grandkids.
Surviving are his wife of 46
years, Judy Ostroski Newhart;
his daughter, Carol and husband
Bruce Brown, Endwell, N.Y.; his
son Joseph and his wife Jenn,
Edwardsville; his four grandkids,
Joey Newhart, Isabella Newhart,
Julian Newhart and Nico Pagan;
his brother John and wife Marlee,
Larksville; and his sister Irene and
husband Joe Biniek, Maryland.
Private funeral ser-
vices will be held at the
convenience of the fam-
ily with Deacon Tom Cesarini of
Gate of Heaven Catholic Church,
Dallas, officiating.
Family and friends may call
Wednesday from 5 to 8 p.m. at
the Edwards and Russin Funeral
Home, 717 Main St., Edwards-
ville.
ANZALONE - Mary, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. Saturday in
St. Joseph Marello Parish, William
Street, Pittston.
BARTNIKOWSKI - Lorraine, Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Wednes-
day in Holy Rosary Church, 127
Stephenson St., Duryea. Friends
may call 9 a.m. until time of Mass
at the church.
DEMBOWSKI - Lorraine, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. Thursday at
the Davis-Dinelli Funeral Home,
170 E. Broad St., Nanticoke. Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St.
Faustina Kowalska Parish / Holy
Trinity Church, 520 S. Hanover St.,
Nanticoke. Friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral
home.
FIELDING - Edward, funeral ser-
vices 10 a.m. Friday in the Green
Street Baptist Chapel, 25 Green St.
Edwardsville. Friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. Thursday at the Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home, Inc., 140
N. Main St., Shavertown.
FRANTZ - Bernard, funeral 9 a.m.
today at the Corcoran Funeral
Home, Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
in Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains.
GREGORI - Lena, funeral services
10 a.m. Wednesdsay at the Antho-
ny Recupero Funeral Home, 406
Susquehanna Ave., West Pittston.
Friends may call from 3 to 7 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
GREGORY - Jean, funeral services
10 a.m. Thursday in St. Stephen’s
Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre.
GULA - Rose, memorial service,
Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 11 a.m. at
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Dallas
with the Rev. Charles H. Grube,
pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church, officiating.
HARRING - Elizabeth, funeral
services 10 a.m. today at the Nat
& Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
HIMLIN - James, funeral services
9 a.m. today at the Peter J. Adon-
izio Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston.
HOOVER - Joyce, funeral services
11 a.m. Wednesday at the Curtis L.
Swanson Funeral Home, Inc., cor-
ners of routes 29 and 118. Friends
may call 10 to 11 a.m. prior to the
service.
HOOVER - Lester, funeral services
11 a.m. today at the Curtis L. Swan-
son Funeral Home, Inc., corners
of routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek.
Friends may call 10 to 11 a.m. prior
to the service.
KARSTEN - Marion, funeral ser-
vices at 11 a.m. Wednesday in Ss.
Clement & Peter Episcopal Church,
165 Hanover St., Wilkes-Barre.
KIWAK - Frank, funeral services 10
a.m. Wednesday at the Harold C.
Snowdon Home for Funerals, Inc.,
420 Wyoming Ave. Kingston. Mass
of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. in
the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola,
335 N. Maple St., Kingston. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
LYMAN - James, funeral services
10 a.m. today at Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St.,
Tunkhannock.
MILLS - Michael, memorial service
2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at 64 Anthra-
cite St., Wilkes-Barre.
PETROSKY - Florence, funeral
services 9:15 a.m. today at the
Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home,
Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge.
Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in
Holy Rosary Church, Duryea. .
RILEY - Karen, memorial services
11 a.m. today at Good Shepherd
Church, 87 S. Hunter Highway,
Drums. Friends may call 10 a.m.
until services.
RITCHEY - Ann, funeral ser-
vices 9:30 a.m. Wednesday at
the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m.
in Saint Robert Bellarmine Parish
at Saint Aloysius Church, Barney
and Division streets, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today
and 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday.
SCHMITT - Carl Jr., memorial
service 11 a.m. today at Hugh B.
Hughes & Son Inc., Funeral Home,
1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.
Friends may call 10 a.m. until
service.
SWISHER - Dale, funeral service
10 a.m. today at the Lawrence E.
Young Funeral Home and Crema-
tion Services, 418 S. State St.,
Clarks Summit.
WASKIEWICZ - H. Jane, funeral
services 1 p.m. today in Laurel Run
PM Church, 3835 Laurel Run Road,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
noon until the time of services at
the church.
YURKANIN - John Jr., funeral
Mass 10 a.m. Thursday in St Mi-
chael’s Byzantine Catholic Church,
North Main Street, Pittston.
Family and friends are asked to
go directly to church Thursday
morning. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Wednesday at the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home, 204 Main
St., Duryea.
FUNERALS
CALEB GINYARD, 72, died
April 28, 2013. He was born on
Sep. 22, 1940 in Jacksonville,
Fla., and was the son of the late
Caleb N. and Janie E. Ginyard.
He was raised and educated in
Philadelphia.. He was employed
by the Pennsylvania Turnpike
Commision as an Emergency
Medical Technician and custo-
dian. In addittion to his parents
he was preceded by his sister,
Lovie Brown of Phildelphia.
Mr. Ginyard is survived by
his daughters, Valleta Fossitt;
her husband, Rodney; Desiree
Wood, and son Sean Ginyard;
sister, Grace Gaston; brother,
Lawrence Ginyard and wife,
Geralyn; two grandsons; two
granddaughters; two great-
grandchildren; many nieces,
nephews, friends.
Viewing will be held Friday,
May 3, from 5 to 8 p.m. from
the Charles V. Sherbin Funeral
Home, 630 Main Road, Hanover
Township, with the Rev. Gloria
Watson officiating. Condolences
may be sent to csherbinfuner-
al@gmail.com.
HELEN KUNDA, 89, of
Sweet Valley, passed away
Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Philadelphia, she was
the daughter of the late Ignancy
and Tillie Gzeciah Okonski.
Helen was preceded in death by
her beloved husbands, Edward
Olearnick and Herman Kunda,
and grandson Chuck DePiero.
Surviving are a son, Edward
Olearnick and his wife Sharon
and a daughter Helene DePiero
Kowalski and her husband Rick;
grandson Frank DePiero and
great-gGrandchildren, Patrick,
Caleb, and Faith DePiero.
Funeral services were held
privately from The Richard H.
Disque Funeral Home, Inc.,
2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas.
CATHERINE J. KEN-
NEDY, Hanover Township, died
Sunday, April 28, 2013. Born in
Ashley, she was the daughter of
the late Thomas and Catherine
Grogan Casey, was a graduate of
St. Leo’s High School and was
a member of St. Leo’s Church,
Ashley. Mrs. Kennedy was
preceded in death by husband,
Arthur J. and several siblings.
She is survived by children,
Christopher (Peggy) Mountain
Top; Timothy (Tina) Dallas;
Adrianne Coyne, Ashley; Mat-
thew and partner, David, Wilkes-
Barre; Cathy (Paul) Hutter, Bear
Creek; John, Ashley; Patrick
(Beth) Ashley; 10 grandchil-
dren; one great-grandchild;
brother, James Casey; sister,
Regina Purcell; nieces and
nephews.
Funeral service will be at
9 a.m. Wednesday from the
Lehman Family Funeral Service
Inc., 689 Hazle Ave., Wilkes-
Barre, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Leo’s
Church, Ashley. Interment
will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery.
Friends may call today from 5 to
8 p.m. Donations may be made
to St. Leo’s Church.
Samuel Dellarte
April 12, 2013
S
amuel Dellarte, 87, of Wyo-
ming, passed away April 12,
2013 in Pensacola, Fla.
Born Oct. 4, 1925 in Wyoming,
he was the son of the late Anthony
and Rosalia (Gennaro) Dellarte.
He was a graduate of Wyoming
Memorial High School. He was a
U.S. Navy veteran of World War II.
Mr. Dellarte was a member of St.
Anthony of Padua Church of St.
Barbara’s Parish Exeter, and a 50-
year member of Bricklayers and
Allied Craftworkers.
Sam took great pride in being
part of the construction of St.
Anthony of Padua Church. He
enjoyed bowling and going to
baseball games and was an avid
Boston Red Sox fan. Sam lost his
voice to cancer in 2002, but never
lost his spirit or sense of humor.
He will always be remembered as
a kind and caring man by all who
knew him.
Preceding him in death were
an infant son, Sam Jr., 1968; sister
,Mary Giordano; brothers, Antho-
ny (Herg) and Andrew (Neary)
Dellarte.
Surviving are his wife of 63
years, Dorothy (Tryniewski) Del-
larte; daughter Susan Dellarte,
Wyoming, with whom he resid-
ed; son James Dellarte and Kim
Straub, West Wyoming; sisters,
Rose Vasile, Portageville, N.Y.;
Mae Loudon, Pittston; Rosalie
Dellarte, Wyoming; brother Jo-
seph Dellarte and his wife Joan,
Wyoming; numerous nieces and
nephews.
A memorial service
will be held Thursday
at 9:30 a.m. with a Mass
of Christian Burial in St.
Anthony of Padua Church of St.
Barbara’s Parish, 28 Memorial St.,
Exeter. Interment will be at the
convenience of the family.
The family will receive friends
from 9 a.m. until time of service
in the church.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions can be made to St.
Barbara’s Parish, 28 Memorial St.,
Exeter, PA 18643 or the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, 712 S. Keyser
Ave., Taylor, PA 18517.
Arrangements are by the
Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopeza Funeral
Home, Inc., Wyoming.
Ann C. Fox
April 28, 2013
Ann C. Fox, 77,
of Nanticoke
died Sunday.
Born Oct. 9,
1935 in Har-
veys Lake, she
was a daughter
of the late An-
thony Madden
and Bertha Madden Hornyak.
Ann was a graduate of Prin-
gle High School and Wilkes-Barre
Business College.
Mrs. Fox dedicated most of
her life to raising her family. She
previously worked at Jimeal’s in
Plymouth and Miracle Mart in
Kingston.
A member of the Parish of
Saint Robert Bellarmine, Ann was
a communicant at the Church of
Saint Aloysius for more that 42
years. She was a member of the
Altar & Rosary Society and lead-
er of the weekly rosary service,
served as a Eucharistic Minister
and taught CCD and coordinated
the Pro-Life Baby Shower at the
church for more than 20 years.
Ann was a volunteer for auc-
tions and member drives of WVIA
radio and television for nearly 30
years.
A sister, Alberta Rembish and
brothers, Anthony and James
Madden, preceded her in death.
She will be greatly missed by
her husband, Richard H. Fox; chil-
dren, Briget and her husband, Bill
Ford, of Wilkes-Barre Township;
the Reverend Richard E. Fox, pas-
tor of the Parish of Our Lady of
Mount Carmel in Lake Silkworth,
and Christopher R. Fox of Nanti-
coke; grandchildren, Mitchell and
Cameron Ford; sisters, Patricia
Uzdella of Dallas, Julia Raineri of
Wilkes-Barre, Therese Androcki-
tis of Ashley and Marion Madden
and her husband, Griffith Wil-
liams, of Ashley; nieces, nephews,
other family and friends.
Celebration of Ann’s life
will be held Friday at 9 a.m from
McLaughlin’s – The Family Fu-
neral Service, 142 S.Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre, with funeral
Mass at 10 a.m. in the Church of
Saint Aloysius, Wilkes-Barre. In-
terment will be in Saint Ignatius
Cemetery in Pringle.
Visitation will be held at
McLaughlin’s on Thursday from
6 to 9 p.m. Memorial donations
are preferred and may be made to
Pennsylvanian’s For Human Life,
31 Hanover St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702-3617.
Permanent messages and mem-
ories can be shared with Ann’s
family at www.celebrateherlife.
com.
Anna H. Toney Plevel
April 29, 2013
Anna H. Toney
Plevel, 94, for-
merly of Ed-
wardsville, and
a resident of
Golden Living
Center, Sum-
mit, in Wilkes-
Barre for the
past four years, died Monday.
She was born in Plymouth on
Dec. 18, 1918. She was the daugh-
ter of the late Anthony and Helen
(Korus) Radzawich.
Anna attended Plymouth High
School and lived in Wilkes-Barre
for several years before relocat-
ing to Edwardsville. She was em-
ployed as a seamstress in the local
garment industry. Anna enjoyed
baking, playing cards and bingo.
Anna was preceded in death
by husbands, Peter Plevel and
Samuel A. Toney; sons, Ronald
and Edward Pasek; brothers, Leo
Radzawich and Stephen Furcus.
Surviving are a daughter, Mary
Ann Toney Stillarty and her hus-
band Robert J.; grandsons, Robert
S. Stillarty and his wife, Molly;
Steven J. Stillarty and his wife
Shannon; great-granddaughters,
Nina and Alexandria Stillarty;
son, Gerald Pasek; brother, Victor
Radzawich; stepdaughters, Mary
Ann Yenason and her husband
Joseph; Patricia Monka and her
husband David; numerous grand-
children, great-grandchildren and
nieces and nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Anna will
be held on Wednesday at 10:30
a.m. from the Andrew Strish Fu-
neral Home, 11 Wilson St., Larks-
ville, with a Mass of Christian
Burial to follow at 11 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Church, Nesbitt
Street, Larksville. Interment will
be held in Mount Olivet Ceme-
tery, West Wyoming. Friends may
call on Wednesday from 9:30 a.m.
until time of service at 10:30 a.m.
The family requests that flowers
be omitted.
Rosemarie Maulbeck
April 27, 2013
M
rs. Rosemarie Maulbeck, 84,
a resident of Saint Therese
Residence, Wilkes-Barre, passed
into Eternal Life Saturday after-
noon in the Little Flower Manor
following an illness.
She was born Dec. 4, 1928
in Livingston, N.J., to the late
Charles and Louise Haug and
was educated in the Livingston
area schools. She earned her
certificate of teaching, and until
her retirement, was employed as
a school teacher for the Lincoln,
N.J. School District.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Mr. Frank Maul-
beck, later relocating to the Wyo-
ming Valley.
Surviving locally are her dear
friend and caregiver, Mr. Michael
Komnath and his family of Wilkes-
Barre Township; A brother-in-law,
Harry Maulbeck of Clark, N.J.
and two nieces Janine Maulbeck
of Rahway, N.J. and Leslie Della
Serra of Clark, N.J.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday at 8:45 a.m. from the
Walter J. Johnson Funeral Home,
803 Raritan Road, Clark, New Jer-
sey, followed by a funeral Mass
at 9:45 a.m. in Saint Agnes Ro-
man Catholic Church. Interment
will follow in Restland Memorial
Park, East Hanover, N.J. Relatives
and friends may call Wednesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to
9 p.m. at the Johnson Funeral
Home. Local funeral arrange-
ments are in the care of the John
V. Morris Family Funeral Homes
Inc. of Wilkes-Barre.
To send Rosemarie’s friends
and family online condolences,
please visit our family’s website
at www.JohnVMorrisFuneral-
Homes.com.
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Anna “Ann” (Yasulatis) Bartnikowski
April 29, 2013
A
nna “Ann” (Yasulatis) Bart-
nikowski, 95, of Hughestown,
formerly of Duryea, passed away
Monday, April 29, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township.
She was born in Duryea Aug.
9, 1917 and was the daughter of
the late Joseph and Maggie (Zev-
ingel) Yasulatis.
Ann was a member of Nativ-
ity of our Lord Parish, Duryea.
She attended Duryea schools.
Throughout her life, she worked
and retired from the local gar-
ment industry. She enjoyed many
trips to Atlantic City, but most
of all she enjoyed being with her
family and friends. She will be
deeply missed.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her hus-
band Joseph, who passed away
in February 1995; her brothers,
Thomas, Joseph and Bruno Ya-
sulatis and her sister Margaret
McGrath.
Ann is survived by her son
Ronald and his wife Maurita Bart-
nikowski, of Hughestown; her
sisters, Frances Kachinski of Old
Forge, and Irene Cimakoski, of
Duryea; her sister-in-law Florence
Bartnikowski and many nieces
and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held Wednesday, May 1, at 10
a.m. at Holy Rosary Church, 127
Stephenson St., Duryea, with Fr.
Andrew Sinnott officiating and Fr.
Thomas Maloney concelebrating.
Friends may call for visitation at
Holy Rosary Church, Wednesday
from 9 a.m. until time of Mass. In-
terment will be held at the Marcy
Cemetery, Duryea. Ann’s family
would like to thank her caregiv-
ers Linda and Sandy of Caregiv-
ers of America. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be
made to St. Ann’s Basilica, 1250
St. Ann St., Scranton Pa 18504.
Arrangements are made by
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc.,
255 McAlpine St.. Duryea.On-
line condolences may be made
to www.kiesingerfuneralservices.
com
Lorraine M. Dembowski
April 28, 2013
Lorraine M.
De mbows ki ,
66, of East
Broad Street,
N a n t i c o k e ,
passed away
Sunday eve-
ning, April 28,
2013, her birth-
day, at Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Plains Township.
Born in Nanticoke, she was
the daughter of the late John and
Catherine Ferrell Richards.
She graduated from St. Vin-
cent’s High School, Plymouth,
and Wilkes-Barre Business Col-
lege.
Prior to retiring, she was last
employed as a secretary book-
keeper at Luzerne County Recre-
ation Department, Forty Fort.
She was a member of St. Faus-
tina Kowalska Parish, Nanticoke,
and previously was a longtime
active member of St. Francis of
Assisi Church prior to its closing.
At St. Francis parish, she was
a member of Council of Catholic
Women and the Altar and Rosary
Society of the church, having
served as president.
Surviving are her husband of
32 years, Bruce Dembowski; sev-
eral cousins, sister-in-law, Cheryl
and John Lapinski; brother-in-
law, Theodore and Bonnie Dem-
bowski and brother-in-law, Jeffrey
Dembowski; nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will begin
Thursday at 9:30 a.m. from Da-
vis-Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E.
Broad St., Nanticoke with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in
St. Faustina Kowalska Parish/
Holy Trinity Church, 520 S. Ha-
nover St., Nanticoke.
Visitation will be Wednesday
from 5to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
If desired, in lieu of flowers, the
family would appreciate contri-
butions in Lorraine’s memory be
made to your favorite charity.
Joseph H. Summers Jr.
April 28, 2013
Joseph H. Sum-
mers Jr., 66, of
Sunshine Road,
Shi cks hi nny,
died Sunday
morning, April
28, 2013, in
the emergency
room at the Ber-
wick Hospital Center. Joseph was
born Nov. 24, 1946, in Union, S.C.,
a son of Joseph H. Summers, Ches-
ter, N.J. and the late Helen (Cash)
Summers.
Joe graduated from Edison
High School, Edison, N.J. and at-
tended Rutgers University. He
served in the U.S. Air Force dur-
ing the Vietnam War as an Airman
First Class (AFC1) stationed in
Thailand.
He was an active member with
the Sylvania Lodge 354 F. & A.M.
of Shickshinny for 13 years. He
had served on the Committee On
Youth, and as a Senior Master of
Ceremonies and more recently he
was appointed as the lodge’s rep-
resentative for The Pennsylvania
Masonic Youth Foundation.
Early in his career, Joe started
and owned Paul Bunyon’s Tree
Service. He went on to become a
member of the Ironworkers Union
Local 11 and later the Carpenters
Union Local 645. Throughout
his life, Joe oversaw and contrib-
uted to the construction of many
prominent local sites including
the Susquehanna Nuclear Power
Plant, the Mohegan Sun Casino
and most recently the historic res-
toration of Eckley Miners’ Village.
He also played a primary role in
the Wyoming Valley Levee Raising
Project.
Joe loved adventure and cul-
ture, which inspired him to work
as head foreman on a project build-
ing bridges and roads in the Afri-
can Congo. Joe was an avid out-
doorsman and an active member
of the United Sportsman Camp
271 of Huntington Mills and the
Wilkes-Barre Rifle and Pistol
Club. In addition, he was a mem-
ber of the National Rifle Associa-
tion (NRA) and served as an NRA
Range Safety Officer, a coach for
the local Youth Hunter Education
Challenge (YHEC) and a Hunter-
Trapper Education Instructor. As
a gifted craftsman, Joe spent much
of his time doing carpentry and
woodworking and took great pride
in building his family’s new home.
Other hobbies included fishing,
hunting, cooking and working on
his Plymouth Hot Rod. However,
Joe’s most important lifework was
his dedication to mentoring and
teaching his son Ryan. Joe made
friends everywhere he went. He
was a joy to be around and was
loved by all. He was a speaker, an
educator and a mentor to count-
less people. Many say he was like a
father, a brother and a best friend.
Joe was an active volunteer, help-
ing many individuals and organi-
zations in the community.
He recently completed his train-
ing as a Pennsylvania State Con-
stable and was to be sworn in this
coming week. In addition to his
mother, he was preceded in death
by a brother, James Summers. Sur-
viving in addition to his father are
his wife, the former Paula Martini,
whom he married on Jan.12, 1985;
two daughters, Amber Summers,
Kingston and Alison Stauffer and
her husband Brian, Julian, Pa.; a
son, Ryan, at home; and three sis-
ters, Terry McShane and husband
Thomas, Somerset, N.J.; Cindy
Tafuni and husband Michael, Long
Valley, N.J., and Jill Summers,
Flemington, N.J.
A Memorial Mass of
Christian Burial will be
held on Saturday, May 4,
at noon at Holy Spirit Parish/St.
Mary’s Church, Mocanaqua, with
the Rev. James Rafferty as cel-
ebrant. Burial will be at the conve-
nience of the family.
The family will then receive
friends at the Mayo Funeral Home
Inc., 77 N. Main St., Shickshinny,
from2 to 5 p.m. Saturday. Masonic
services will be conducted by Syl-
vania Lodge 354 at 2 p.m. Ameri-
can Legion Post 495 will conduct
military services at 5 p.m.
For additional information, or
to send condolences, please visit
www.mayofh.com.
W-B Twp. officials discuss
sewer line use agreement
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
- Township attorney Bruce
Phillips discussed a proposed
agreement with Hanover
Township for the use of its
sewage lines.
According to township of-
ficials, the new agreement is
necessary to satisfy the in-
creased sewer line use from a
planned development near the
Wyoming Valley Mall, which
will feature a Longhorn Steak-
house, Chik-Fil-A and a Buffalo
Wild Wings.
Phillips cautioned that the
existing Hanover Township
sewer lines are outdated and
breached in some areas and
are in need of $400,000 in
repairs. He stressed that Ha-
nover Township plans to apply
for grants to cover some or all
of the cost of the work and that
Wilkes-Barre Township will be
obligated for between $80,000
and $138,000, depending on
grant money received plus a
pro-rata share of maintenance
costs for the life of the agree-
ment.
“Any initial obligation out-
lined in the agreement would
be payable over a three- to four-
year period,” stressed Phillips.
Phillips added that revenue
generated by the proposed res-
taurant development will far
surpass any money spent by
Wilkes-Barre Township to ac-
commodate the increased sew-
age demand.
Increased growth in area and
use of lines prompts proposal
with Hanover Twp.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
Lyme disease cases on rise in western Pa.
TARENTUM (AP) — Penn-
sylvania leads the nation in
confirmed cases of Lyme dis-
ease, with more than 4,700 in
2011, according to the federal
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.
And the number of con-
firmed cases in the southwest-
ern part of the state spiked by
75 percent — from 315 cases
in 2010 to 552 cases in 2011,
according to Kait Gillis, depu-
ty press secretary for the state
Department of Health.
It’s hard to speculate as to
why the increase occurred in
southwestern part of the state,
she said. Several factors can
lead to a jump in the number
of reported cases, she said, in-
cluding increased awareness,
increased testing and outdoor
temperatures.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 N E W S PAGE 10A
Two public hearings on PPL’s
57-mile “Northeast-Pocono Re-
liability Project” will be held
Thursday at the Thornhurst fire-
house.
Residents along that corridor
— including those living in the
Luzerne County townships of
Bear Creek and Buck, through
the North Pocono portion of
Lackawanna County and into the
mostly rural Pocono Mountain
county of Wayne, are expected
to voice their displeasure for
how the line, with its 145-foot-
tall steel poles, will impact the
bucolic scenery.
The Pennsylvania Public Util-
ity Commission has scheduled
hearings for public comment
Thursday on the proposal by
Allentown-based PPL Electric
Utilities Corp.
The hearing will focus on
construction of the 230-kilovolt
transmission line through por-
tions of Luzerne, Lackawanna,
Wayne and Monroe counties and
on the utility’s application to use
eminent domain as part of the
project.
Hearings will be conducted by
Administrative Law Judge David
A. Salapa at 2 and 6 p.m., at the
Thornhurst Volunteer Fire Co.,
351 Old River Road, Thornhurst
Township, Lackawanna County.
Salapa will listen to the com-
pany’s application and reasons
for the project and the eminent
domain requests. He also will
listen to public comment in sup-
port or opposition to the project.
Denise McCracken, a PUC
spokeswoman, said Salapa will
use the hearings as the basis for
his findings and will make a rec-
ommendation to the PUC. The
PUC, at a future public meeting,
will use his recommendation
and either vote to affirm it, re-
ject it or modify it and vote on
the amended decision.
On Dec. 28, 2012, PPL filed
applications and petitions seek-
ing PUC approval for the siting
and construction of the project
that starts at an existing substa-
tion in Jenkins Township and
ends near Paupacken Lake in
east central Wayne County. Its
application says that it wants
construction to begin in spring
2014 for an in-service date of No-
vember 2017.
Throughout the route, there
are hundreds of properties or
right-of-ways that the utility has
sought to buy from landowners.
Most have sold or eased land
for the project, but PPL was un-
able to reach agreement with 37
landowners to secure the right-
of-ways and easements, accord-
ing to the utility’s filing with the
PUC.
Seven of them are in Luzerne
County.
In addition to the main line
and the eminent domain issues,
PPL is also seeking approval for
11.3 miles of 138/69-kilovolt
line connecting two proposed
substations in Covington Town-
ship in Lackawanna County and
Buck Township.
Several residents have already
chimed in with their opposition
to the project, which they said
would hurt the characteristic of
their surroundings.
“We are proud of the unde-
veloped rural character of our
town,” wrote Fred Ahlborn, of
Thornhurst, in a letter voicing
not only his opposition but also
urging the commission to “see
and appreciate first hand as we
try to defend our way of life and
explain the irreversible damage
we feel this line through our
lands will impose.”
State Sen. John Blake, D-Arch-
bald, said that while he under-
stands the need PPL has to do
this project, he also has concerns
about the impact it could have
on the communities it serves.
“It is my fervent hope that mu-
tual agreement can be found to
assure that the project impose
the least amount of adverse im-
pact on local citizens and prop-
erty owners while achieving the
necessary reliability and opti-
mum electrical service to North-
eastern PA,” Blake said.
M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N
Information about this project can
be found at pplreliablepower.com/
northeast-pocono
B E H E A R D
The PUC and state Office of
Consumer Advocate offer tips for
members of the public wishing to
offer testimony:
• Prepare what you are going to
say beforehand. Even though it
is not required, you may want to
write out your statement, which
can be read.
• If you have a written statement
you would like to give to the
judge as evidence, please bring
two copies for the court reporter
and several copies for the other
participants.
• Plan to be questioned. Parties
in the case may want to ask you
a question to clarify something
you said.
PPL power line subject of public hearings this week
Residents in Luzerne, Wayne,
Lackawanna counties expected
to voice displeasure.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
EDITORIAL
How about defending
rights for his species?
W
e hear a lot about rights. Nowadays,
everybody wants their rights. They
want our government to pass laws to
protect and defend their “rights.”
Minorities want their rights. If they
don’t get their rights, they’ll call you a
bigot.
Gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgen-
ders all want their rights. Anyone who
doesn’t grant their rights is labeled a ho-
mophobe. Illegal immigrants and foreign-
ers all want their rights. If they don’t get
the rights they think they’re entitled to,
you get labeled a xenophobe.
I’m just wondering if there’s a politi-
cian out there who will work as hard to
protect my rights; my rights as a white
middle-aged, English-speaking, Bible-
believing Christian, heterosexual male.
Maybe I shouldn’t be so naive as to
expect too much from our local-yokel
elected representatives.Maybe I would
have to consider packing up and moving
to the Bible belt or to the Republic of
Texas. Then maybe I could meet people
of my species who are actually concerned
for the future of this country and for
preserving and defending our American
heritage.
Curt Piazza
Kingston
TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAgE 11A TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 8 1
OTHER OPINION: SAFETY
Will public allow
Dreamliner to fly?
B
oEING’s 787 Dream-
liner was cleared to fly
last Thursday. The Fed-
eral Aviation Adminis-
tration lifted a ban on passenger
flights that it imposed in January
after two battery malfunctions in
the newjets raised serious safety
concerns.
The FAA approved Boeing’s
plan to modify the 787 battery
system and flights are expected
to resume within days.
so, the FAA says the Dream-
liner is safe. But will travelers
buy that? We think so. Here’s
why.
The innovative, fuel-efficient
Dreamliner ran into trouble be-
cause it is the first passenger
jet to make extensive use of
lithium-ion batteries. Those bat-
teries, widely used in laptops
and cellphones, have a history of
occasionally overheating. When
Boeing designed the aircraft,
the company and its suppliers
devised a series of tests to en-
sure the battery system would
be safe for flight. The tests, done
under the oversight of the FAA,
suggested the planes could go
for millions of hours without en-
countering any battery problem.
In practice, however, prob-
lems occurred not long after the
Dreamliner entered service. An
empty plane parked on a runway
in Boston filled with smoke. A
plane full of passengers in Japan
had to be evacuated.
so it was back to the drawing
board. Boeing, its suppliers, fed-
eral regulators and their global
counterparts developed new
tests to figure out what caused
the batteries to fail. Boeing hired
battery experts from outside the
aviation industry to evaluate the
testing procedures and propose
solutions.
The exact cause of the battery
failures never was identified.
When complex systems fail, it
can be difficult to pinpoint a
simple reason. Boeing, though,
developed a way to protect the
passengers and the planes.
The company redesigned the
battery system so if one cell
short-circuited, others would
not. short circuits are the most
likely reason that an undamaged
battery would overheat. Boeing
also added high-grade insulation
between cells so overheating in
one part of the battery would not
spread to other parts.
Perhaps most important from
the passenger standpoint, Boe-
ing encased the battery system
in a sealed steel enclosure, vent-
ed outside the aircraft. so even
if a battery failure occurred, the
aircraft wouldn’t be damaged.
smoke or fire would not spread.
As part of the testing, accord-
ing to news reports, Boeing went
so far as to simulate explosions
inside the steel case. The enclo-
sure is so secure that passengers
would not notice if a failure oc-
curred. These incidents were
alarming, but no one was hurt.
The credibility of Boeing, the
FAA and the airlines that fly the
Dreamliner is on the line. A bat-
tery problem that damaged a
plane or created a safety threat
would be a huge blow to the air-
line industry.
Chicago Tribune
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
Editorial Board
Mellow shows folly
of name game
T
HREE Lackawanna
County colleges have
seen the light and will
remove disgraced for-
mer sen. Robert J. Mellow’s
name from buildings that carry
it.
Will other, similarly afflicted
locations follow suit?
Lackawanna College an-
nounced the move first, with
Marywood University (motto:
“Lead on”) and Keystone Col-
lege following suit within a few
hours. There was little fanfare, in
keeping with an action designed
to eliminate what is now an ex-
ceedingly awkward tribute.
such moves point to the folly
of naming something for a per-
son who’s in elected office —
even for a non-politician, who’s
still alive. You never know what
might happen, what might
surface. Look at Joe Paterno,
for years a saint, now widely
thought to have enabled a serial
child molester.
In Mellow’s case, the long-
time senator who also served as
senate Democratic leader plead-
ed guilty last year to conspiracy
to commit mail fraud. He admit-
ted using taxpayer-paid senate
staffers for political campaign
work, and filing a fraudulent tax
return underreporting the profit
he made when he sold a building
that had housed his senate dis-
trict office. This year, while sit-
ting in a federal prison in south
Carolina, Mellow was charged
with corrupt organizations,
bribery, bid-rigging, conspiracy
and other offenses related to the
state Turnpike Commission.
Elected officials rely heavily
on donations to get re-elected.
The question of an unseemly
quid pro quo is ever-present.
By no means must institutions
and communities stop naming
buildings or public places in
honor of distinguished, worthy
individuals.
But let them stick to well-vet-
ted, outstanding teachers, scien-
tists and war heroes.
Preferably dead.
The Pocono Record
MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS
OTHER OPINION: POLITICS
qUOTE OF THE DAY
“The building has minor damages. There is nothing
serious.”
Mohammed Sohel Rana
The owner of a Bangladesh building that collapsed, reacting to inspectors’
recommendations that the building be closed a day before its collapse killed
at least 377 people
HERE ARE THREE things the obama
administration has done that you probably
didn’t know about:
Ever struggle with those accordion-style
rubber sleeves on nozzles at the gas sta-
tion? The sleeve — technically a “vapor
recovery nozzle” — was required by the
Environmental Protection Agency to keep
gasoline vapors from leaking into the air.
But most cars and trucks now have tech-
nology that does the job better, so last year
the EPA abolished the nozzle requirement.
Because each sleeve-equipped nozzle can
cost as much as $300, the change will save
gas stations thousands of dollars.
Ever apply for financial aid for a child
heading for college? Until 2010, the ap-
plication form — the Free Application for
Federal student Aid, or FAFsA — was a
parents’ nightmare. (I write from personal
experience here.) It required digging up
information from multiple sources, and
the complexity of the task discouraged
thousands of families from applying for
aid. so the Department of Education got
to work and simplified the form. some
applicants can now complete much of it
automatically, importing online data from
their tax returns. The new FAFsA still
asks too many questions — 116, compared
to 127 on the old one — but it’s a big
improvement.
Ever come back from a trip overseas,
only to find yourself stuck in a horrify-
ingly long line at immigration control?
Now there’s a program called Global Entry
that allows frequent travelers to undergo
a pre-screening process, skip the line and
run their passports through an automated
kiosk, like self-checkout at the supermar-
ket. This program actually started under
George W. Bush, but the obama adminis-
tration has expanded it big time. I’ve tried
it, and it works.
All three stories are examples of a little-
recognized push by the obama administra-
tion to streamline federal regulations.
Until last year, the effort was led by Cass
sunstein, who ran an obscure corner of the
Washington bureaucracy called the office
of Information and Regulatory Affairs.
Now a professor at Harvard Law school,
sunstein is an evangelist for simplifica-
tion and consumer-friendly language and
design.
one of his proudest accomplishments,
he says, was nudging the Department of
Agriculture toward replacing its old “food
pyramid” with a simpler “food plate” show-
ing that half your diet should be fruits and
vegetables. He presided over big-ticket
items too, including a rule to standardize
safety warning labels that could save em-
ployers as much as $2.5 billion, and a rule
to simplify doctors’ and nurses’ paperwork
that could save hospitals and medical
practices as much as $5 billion.
“My job was helping people figure out
how government can make people’s lives
better, and how we can eliminate red tape
and complexity,” he told me.
In his recent book, “simpler: The Future
of Government,” sunstein points to a
surprising statistic: In his first four years,
he says, obama issued fewer new federal
regulations than any of the four presidents
who came before him, including Ronald
Reagan. obama’s revocation of hundreds
of outmoded rules produced savings for
government, business and consumers that
will add up to billions, he says.
But wait, I hear you say. Isn’t obama
a big-government Democrat? Isn’t he
responsible for two of the biggest expan-
sions of federal power in recent history,
the 2010 Affordable Care Act (more often
known as obamacare) and the 2011 Finan-
cial Regulatory Responsibility Act?
The answer, of course, is yes: obama is
a big-government man, and so is sunstein.
They don’t hide their belief in an activ-
ist federal government; they just want to
make it smarter and more effective.
sunstein is frustrated that the ad-
ministration hasn’t gotten credit for its
regulation-trimming efforts. And indeed,
conservative critics dispute his numbers,
saying that even if the number of regula-
tions issued has declined, the number of
rules with a major economic impact has
risen.
Even those who admire the streamlin-
ing, though, say it hasn’t gotten much rec-
ognition. “They haven’t advertised it very
well,” said Elaine Kamarck, who ran the
high-visibility “reinventing government”
campaign of the Clinton administration
and is now at the Brookings Institution.
“No one knows that they’ve even been
trying, let alone that they’ve accomplished
anything.”
And that, she says, makes no sense,
especially for a Democrat. “If no one
knows about your efforts,” she says, “then
the deep-seated cynicism Americans
have about the efficiency of government
will constrain the efforts of any activist
president.”
Public opinion polls bear her out. Under
Clinton, the percentage of Americans who
said they trusted the federal government
to do the right thing gradually rose. Under
obama, it’s plummeted. A Pew Research
Poll last month found that only 28 percent
of Americans said they had a favorable
view of the federal government, down
from 42 percent in 2009, obama’s first year
in office. Even a majority of Democrats
said they had an unfavorable view of the
federal government.
For an administration that’s trying to
implement an ambitious new healthcare
program as one of its top priorities, those
are daunting numbers.
so here’s an assignment for obama’s
new director of the office of Management
and Budget, sylvia Mathews Burwell, a
Clinton administration veteran so univer-
sally respected that she won unanimous
confirmation in the senate last week: It’s
time to relaunch your boss’ government
reform agenda. It’s time to hire someone
to succeed sunstein, whose job has been
vacant for eight months. It’s time to renew
obama’s “regulatory look-back,” a program
that nominated 580 useless regulations for
the scrapheap and actually dumped a lot
of them.
And when you’ve done all that, it’s time
to make sure the American public knows
about it.
Doyle McManus is a columnist for The Los Angeles
Times. Readers may send himemail at doyle.mcma-
nus@latimes.com
COMMENTARY
DOYLE MCMANUS
Obama’s fight to streamline federal regulations
Obama’s revocation of hundreds of
outmoded rules produced savings for
government, business and consumers that
will add up to billions, he says.
reduce the number of people
who have to go out of the area.
When somebody goes out of
the area for treatment, it’s much
more difficult for the families
to participate in care and for
case management services to
be involved,” Schor said.
People who suffer from acute
psychiatric disorders and as-
sociated behaviors many times
end up being picked up by po-
lice and taken to local emergen-
cy rooms for evaluations. Many
times they require psychiatric
evaluations, and when com-
pleted, the task of trying to find
an appropriate setting begins,
he said.
“Where are they going to
go and how fast? You don’t
want people who are suffering
like that to languish in an ER.
And so many times, people of
that level of acuity do languish
there, which is bad for them
and bad for the other patients
trying to get medical care be-
cause they can be disruptive,”
Schor said.
So in addition to helping pa-
tients receive treatment locally,
the new unit also will help to
transition them out of emer-
gency rooms and into an appro-
priate setting faster.
Schor said the incidence of
psychiatric disorders hasn’t
changed much, but there is a
heightened visibility, given re-
cent mass shootings and other
events in the news. “There are
not many people who don’t
know a family member of their
family or a friend’s family who
isn’t affected in some way by
mental illness or substance
abuse,” he said.
In addition to the new unit,
further renovations completed
across the hospital create a
more welcoming environment
and reorganize the space to bet-
ter support counseling, patient
services and administrative
functions, according to a state-
ment.
“This expansion enhances
our ability to care for patients
with the most complex, acute
behavioral health concerns,”
said Dr. David Liskov, medical
director of First Hospital.
Cornelio Catena, CEO of
Commonwealth Health, noted
that the facility is the former
Nesbitt Hospital, which was
founded 30 years ago. The 700
employees who make up First
Hospital and the system’s be-
havioral health services treat
about 10,000 patients a year,
4,000 of them at First Hospital.
“We are exceedingly proud of
the great job they do,” he said.
Kingston Mayor James Hag-
gerty said the facility is im-
portant to the community and
he is delighted to see it “used
in a productive way, in an im-
portant way and in a way that
serves a great community and a
great area here in the Wyoming
Valley.”
Schor thanked Haggerty and
the Kingston community “for
opening its arms and support-
ing our campus and (helping
it) and this city (to be) known
as a place that people come
for healing and recovery and
a place where they come to
change the course and direc-
tion of their lives in a positive
way.”
The 20-bed unit is just the
beginning of expansion and
support of behavioral health
services by Community Health
Systems and area groups that
support the programs, Schor
said. He and staff are excited
that the area’s first regional cri-
sis triage center for psychiatry
will be opening in Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital’s former
emergency rooms, probably
sometime this summer.
Finally, he thanked the em-
ployees and staff “who dedi-
cated their lives and efforts to
treating the most vulnerable
members of our community
and for supporting our organi-
zation, many of them for their
entire careers.”
8
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0
2
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TuESDAy, ApRIL 30, 2013 N E W S pAGE 12A
Monterrey
91/66
Chihuahua
84/59
Los Angeles
71/58
Washington
64/54
New York
63/48
Miami
85/73
Atlanta
80/61
Detroit
80/57
Houston
82/66
Kansas City
84/56
Chicago
82/60
Minneapolis
70/41
El Paso
91/63
Denver
62/30
Billings
42/29
San Francisco
70/52
Seattle
56/39
Toronto
70/50
Montreal
68/52
Winnipeg
46/28
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
today’s weather.
Temperatures are
today’s highs and
tonight’s lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
WED FRI
SAT SUN
THU
MON
TODAY
64°
42°
Decreasing
clouds
67° 42°
Mostly
sunny and
nice
71° 43°
Mostly
sunny
71° 44°
Sunny and
pleasant
73° 48°
Times of
sun and
clouds
71° 43°
Abundant
sunshine
67° 48°
Mostly
cloudy, a
little rain
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.
Yesterday 12
Month to date 452
Season to date 5601
Last season to date 4818
Normal season to date 5945
Anchorage 45/32/c 46/34/sn
Baltimore 64/49/r 68/47/r
Boston 62/44/pc 60/44/pc
Buffalo 71/53/pc 75/50/pc
Charlotte 76/56/c 71/55/r
Chicago 82/60/t 77/44/pc
Cleveland 74/55/pc 80/52/pc
Dallas 86/66/s 84/51/pc
Denver 62/30/t 34/25/sn
Honolulu 86/72/pc 86/73/s
Indianapolis 82/58/s 82/58/pc
Las Vegas 95/67/s 83/61/s
Milwaukee 76/56/t 66/41/t
New Orleans 82/64/t 82/64/t
Norfolk 69/58/c 69/57/r
Okla. City 84/64/s 78/41/t
Orlando 85/66/t 85/65/t
Phoenix 99/72/s 96/70/s
Pittsburgh 76/52/pc 78/52/pc
Portland, ME 63/36/s 62/37/pc
St. Louis 85/63/s 84/51/pc
San Francisco 70/52/pc 75/51/s
Seattle 56/39/pc 65/45/pc
Wash., DC 64/54/r 65/51/r
Bethlehem 2.28 -0.04 16
Wilkes-Barre 4.88 -0.53 22
Towanda 2.95 -0.31 16
Port Jervis 3.28 -0.09 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Monday.
Today Wed Today Wed Today Wed
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
May 2 May 9
May 18
Last New
First Full
May 25
6:02 a.m.
12:23 a.m.
8:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 57-63. Lows: 36-42. Cloudy most of the time today and tonight
with a little rain.
Highs: 55-61. Lows: 47-53. Rather cloudy, breezy and cool today with
a little rain. A bit of rain tonight. A little rain tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 64-70. Lows: 42-48. Variable cloudiness today with a passing
shower. Partly cloudy tonight. Some sun tomorrow.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 63. Low: 48. Breezy with a little rain this morning, then some
sun this afternoon. Partly cloudy tonight.
High: 62. Low: 48. Occasional rain and drizzle today and tonight. A
little rain tomorrow morning.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Monday
High/low 55°/50°
Normal high/low 65°/43°
Record high 85° (1974)
Record low 28° (2001)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.09"
Month to date 1.80"
Normal m-t-d 3.22"
Year to date 6.77"
Normal y-t-d 10.17"
64/42
61/42
62/48
61/45
62/44
60/44
62/47
60/44
64/45
66/41
63/45
67/45
67/40
67/40
63/48
Summary: Wet weather will continue in much of the mid-Atlantic today, while
storms affect the South and areas from Kansas to Wisconsin. Cold air will charge
southward over the Rockies. Much of the West will be warm.
hand and I heard a thud.
“I looked to where Kevin
was and I couldn’t find Kevin.
I thought Kevin was stuck on
the car and…..” Stephen Miller
said.
Stephen Miller said he chased
after a red vehicle that turned
right onto North Main Street.
He was unable to obtain the li-
cense plate because the red car
was traveling too fast.
“It never slowed down,” he
said. “I never saw the car com-
ing.”
Critical evidence that alleg-
edly places Letteer in the area
of North Street came from FBI
Special Agent Larry White-
head, who analyzed Letter’s cell
phone records of Dec. 21.
The following is Whitehead’s
analysis of Letteer’s locations:
7:46 p.m. Call placed with Let-
teer’s cellphone processed
through cell tower in Pittston.
7:50 p.m., 8:46 p.m. and
10:39 p.m. Three calls with
Letteer’s cellphone processed
through cell tower in West Wyo-
ming where investigators claim
Letteer attended a party.
10:39 p.m. Call placed with
Letteer’s cellphone processed
through cell tower in area of
Wilkes-Barre and Plains Town-
ship border near the North
Cross Valley Expressway.
10:54 p.m. A Hawkeye sur-
veillance camera records a red
Pontiac turning onto North
Street from North River Street,
Wilkes-Barre.
10:55 p.m. A 36-second call
from Letteer’s cellphone pro-
cessed through cell tower on
the campus of King’s College,
Wilkes-Barre.
10:56 p.m. A 32-second call
from Letteer’s cellphone pro-
cessed through cell tower on
top of the PNC Bank Building,
North Franklin and West Mar-
ket streets, Wilkes-Barre.
10:57 p.m. A call 10-min-
ute, 47 seconds in length from
Letteer’s cellphone processed
through cell tower on the cam-
pus of King’s College.
City police Detective Charles
Jensen said other Hawkeye and
private surveillance cameras re-
corded the red Pontiac traveling
on North, North Main and Jack-
son streets, and North Pennsyl-
vania Avenue to Conyngham
Avenue minutes after Kevin
Miller was struck.
Jensen said Letteer’s Pontiac
was seized on Jan. 4, after Al-
lyson Howey, of East Strouds-
burg, spoke to investigators ear-
lier that day.
Howey testified that Letteer’s
girlfriend, Abigail Tarver, con-
fided to her on Dec. 23 that Let-
teer may have struck and killed
a boy in Wilkes-Barre.
Letteer remains free on
$200,000 bail. He is scheduled
to be formally arraigned in
county court on July 11.
Continued from Page 1A
LETTEER
sistant director of the Quinnip-
iac University Polling Institute.
“Fortunately for Gov. Corbett,
the election is not today. He
has 18 months to turn things
around.”
The polling institute has
conducted monthly polls in
Pennsylvania, and while differ-
ent questions are asked each
month, one constant has been
the approval/disapproval of the
first-term governor from Allegh-
eny County who knocked off
Democrat and fellow Allegheny
County politician Dan Onorato
in 2010.
For the fourth consecutive
survey, those polled said they
disapproved of the job Corbett
is doing. This time the margin
was 47 percent disapprove, 38
percent approve.
From April 19-24, Quinnipiac
University surveyed 1,235 reg-
istered voters with a margin of
error of plus or minus 2.8 per-
centage points.
Live interviewers called land
lines and cellphones. The sur-
vey includes 547 Democrats
with a margin of error of +/- 4.2
percentage points.
A closer look at the data
from the poll shows Corbett re-
ally struggling when it comes to
the female vote. When asked if
Corbett deserves re-election, 54
percent of women said no, com-
pared to 27 percent that believe
he does. Overall, men, women,
Democrats and Independents
all said no to four more years.
Republicans
favor re-elec-
tion 60-25
percent.
At least
eight Demo-
crats have ei-
ther created
campaign ac-
counts, been
me n t i o n e d
as potential
candidates or
have formal-
ly declared
they’re run-
ning. They in-
clude:
• Former U.S. Rep. Joe Ses-
tak, of Edgmont Township,
Delaware County, who lost to
Pat Toomey in the race for U.S.
Senate in 2010
• State Treasurer Rob Mc-
Cord of Bryn Mawr, who was
elected treasurer in 2009
• U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz
of Jenkintown, a former state
senator who’s been in Congress
since 2005
• Allentown Mayor Ed Paw-
lowski, who’s been in office
since 2006
• John Hanger, who served
as secretary of the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion from 2008-2011
• Mike Stack III, a state sena-
tor from Philadelphia who has
been in office since 2001
• Tom Wolf, businessman
and former Secretary of the
Pennsylvania Department of
Revenue, from Mount Wolf
• Max Myers, a businessman
and former pastor from Me-
chanicsburg who used to be a
Republican
Hanger, Myers, Schwartz and
Wolf have all declared, the rest
have not.
The poll conducted by Quin-
nipiac asked registered Demo-
cratic voters to choose from
a list of seven Democrats re-
garding whom they’d vote for.
The results showed Sestak and
Schwartz receiving 15 percent
of the support, Wolf and Mc-
Cord getting 3 percent and the
other three candidates regis-
tering less than 3 percent. The
remaining 59 percent were un-
decided.
“Pennsylvania voters, even
Democrats, don’t know much
about the challengers in the
2014 governor’s race,” Malloy
said.
“Right now, voters are doing
their ABCs - Anyone But Cor-
bett.”
All 1,235 people polled were
asked how they’d vote when it
came to Corbett versus one of
the Democrats.
When matched up head to
head against Corbett, Sestak,
Schwartz and McCord all fared
very well: Sestak topped Cor-
bett 48-34 percent, including 45
- 29 percent among independent
voters; Schwartz is ahead 47-34
percent, including 45 - 27 per-
cent among independent voters;
and McCord is up 44-35 percent,
including 40 - 30 percent among
independent voters.
p O L L R E S u LT S
To see the poll’s finding, go to:
http://www.quinnipiac.edu/
institutes—centers/polling-
institute/pennsylvania/release-
detail?ReleaseID=1889
Township and Kingston.
DeLeon said a walk-in
cooler was destroyed, but the
other kitchen equipment was
spared. He said extensive
damage was done to the roof
and ceiling.
Large pieces of insulation
were strewn along the exte-
rior of the building and the
smell of fire was strong at the
entrance. Inside, several Cin-
co de Mayo posters hung on
the walls, alerting customers
to the upcoming celebration.
An inspector from the
Pennsylvania Department of
Agriculture arrived to moni-
tor the disposal of food.
DeLeon said about 30 peo-
ple work in the restaurant. A
second location — LaTolteca
Express — in the Gateway
Shopping Center in Edwards-
ville remains open.
not air assault qualified.”
The 34-year-old noncommis-
sioned officer from Elizabe-
thown, Ill., even toughed out
Monday’s 12-mile road march
even after he had to repair his
leg during the march. Earlier, he
learned to rappel from a 34-foot
tower and pushed through the
strenuous obstacle course.
Robinson was wounded dur-
ing an attack during a major
military operation in 2006.
Robinson said his traumatic
injury wasn’t going to prevent
him from meeting some of the
Army’s toughest standards.
The 101st Airborne Division,
unlike other airborne units that
use planes, uses helicopters to
quickly drop troops into combat
and move equipment around
the battlefield.
Each day of the course begins
with running a couple of miles
and troops are expected to car-
ry a 35-pound ruck sack as they
complete their tasks.
His instructor, Sgt. 1st Class
Matthew Connolly, said at first
there was concern whether he
was going to make it through
when a piston in his leg stopped
working during the obstacle
course.
“He got down and fixed it,
reattempted the obstacle and
went back on,” said Connolly.
Capt. Greg Gibson, an Army
nurse with Robinson’s 2nd Bri-
gade Combat Team, said in his
experience treating amputees,
attitude and will are critical to
recovery. He said Robinson’s at-
titude was what pushed him to
finish the course.
“Some of these guys never
even learn to walk on a prosthe-
sis, let along go through the air
assault course,” Gibson said.
Sestak
McCord
Continued from Page 1A
POLL
Continued from Page 1A
AMPUTEE
Continued from Page 1A
LA TOLTECA
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Cornelio Catena, president and CEO of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, looks into one of the
private bedrooms at First Hospital’s inpatient psychiatric unit in Kingston during the facility’s
ribbon-cutting and open house Monday.
Continued from Page 1A
FIRST
C H A N G E S AT F I R S T H O S p I TA L
As part of the more than $6 million Commonwealth Health invested
in renovations at First Hospital:
• A new 20-bed adult psychiatric unit is dedicated to care for the
most complex acute behavioral health cases.
• Reception is now on the first floor to welcome patients and visitors
immediately upon entering the facility.
• A large atrium now serves as a waiting area and another provides a
classroom and therapy offices for an adolescent program.
• Admissions has four private rooms for psychiatric evaluations and
a dedicated business office.
• The former dining room now houses a suite of offices for five
psychiatrists.
• Upgrades and modernization improve safety, comfort and appear-
ance, including the renovation of patient bathrooms and showers.
First Hospital is located at 562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Call 570-
552-3900 or visit
www.bhswv.org/first_hosp.html to learn more.
BROOKLYN, N.Y. — Flourishing in-
stead of fading in the fourth quarter,
the Brooklyn Nets extended their first
season in Brooklyn.
They need one more victory to set
up the biggest game here yet.
Brook Lopez had 28 points and 10
rebounds, Deron Williams added 23
points and 10 assists, and the Nets
beat Chicago 110-91 on Monday night,
cutting the Bulls’ lead to 3-2 in their
first-round playoff se-
ries.
Recovering from
a collapse two days
earlier that sent them
home on the brink of
elimination instead
of tied, the Nets battered the Bulls on
the boards and forced Chicago into
being the team that wilted down the
stretch.
“We came out very aggressive, as we
have the past few games. I think the
difference was just we sustained it for
essentially a full 48 minutes tonight,”
Lopez said.
Andray Blatche scored 10 of his 13
points in the fourth quarter and Ger-
ald Wallace had consecutive baskets in
the finishing surge as the Nets finally
pulled away in a game they led most of
the way, but never by too much.
Two days after rallying for a 142-134
triple-overtime victory, the Bulls were
outscored 15-1 at the finish and failed
to set up a second-round series with
Miami. Instead they will host Game 6
on Thursday.
“It was just a lot of mental mistakes.
A lot of mental mistakes,” Bulls center
Joakim Noah said. “I feel like we had
our chances. We beat ourselves. They
played well. You’ve got to give credit
when credit is due and now it’s on us
to come back and be ready for Game
6.”
If the Nets win that one, they would
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Sports SECTI ON B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 timesleader.com
He played the short course
during before turning pro
at the ‘05 U.S. Amateur.
See OPEN, Page 4B
See NETS, Page 4B
See BERWICK, Page 6B
P E N N S TAT E
g O L f
8
BERwICk
1
NANTICOkE
110
NETS
91
BULLS
nba pl aYof fs
H I g H S C H O O L S O f T B A L L N f L
AP PHOTO
Webb Simpson watches his drive down the third fairway
during the final round of the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head
Island, S.C., on April 21. He hopes to defend his U.S. Open
title at Marion in June.
Simpson ready to defend U.S. Open at Merion
By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
ARDMORE — Webb Simpson
already played for an amateur
championship at Merion.
He’s ready to win a major there
on his next visit.
Simpson is one of the few ac-
tive PGA Tour members to play
at the suburban Philadelphia
course, competing at the 2005
U.S. Amateur. When he returns
in June, Simpson has a grander
goal in mind for his return visit
than finishing 72: Simpson wants
to defend his U.S. Open champi-
onship.
“I tell people all the time it is
my favorite golf course in the
world,” he said Monday. “What it
demands out of the players is so
different than most golf courses,
and it seems like most golf cours-
es now are evolving to be bomb-
ers paradise. Every par-4 is 500
yards, and you hit a driver on ev-
ery hole. Merion’s the opposite.”
The U.S. Open is set to return
in June to Merion Golf Club for
the first time since 1981. With
good reason. The U.S. Open
at Merion will be the shortest
course for a major championship
in eight years.
The U.S. Open was played at
Merion in 1934, 1950, 1971 and
1981. Bobby Jones won the U.S.
Amateur in 1930 and tourna-
ments from the Curtis Cup to the
Walker Cup have all been played
at the course.
With a shorter course, birdies
could become more expected
over the weekend. USGA execu-
tive director Mike Davis said Mer-
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Nanticoke third baseman Kara Voyton, right, tags out Berwick’s
Alley Katsock on a rundown between third and home in WVC
softball action in Nanticoke on Monday afternoon.
Tebow Time in New York
over after Jets cut QB
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The possibil-
ities appeared endless for Tim
Tebow.
Here he was, perhaps the
most popular player in the
NFL, in New York as a mem-
ber of the Jets and maybe the
biggest thing to hit Broadway
since Joe Namath himself.
There were billboards out-
side the Lincoln Tunnel in New
Jersey welcoming Tebow, and
sandwiches named after him at
Manhattan delis. He also had
a legion of fans who followed
him because of his strong
Christian beliefs, and in New
York, he would be able to take
advantage of countless media
and marketing opportunities.
And then, it all went terribly
wrong.
Or, more like it, the whole
idea was completely flawed
from the start. For Tebow. And
for the Jets.
Tebow was waived Mon-
day morning, the end of an
embarrassingly unsuccessful
one-season experiment in New
York that produced more hype
and headlines than production
on the field. And it all ended
quietly, with a three-paragraph
news release.
“Unfortunately,” coach Rex
Ryan said in a statement,
“things did not work out the
way we all had hoped.”
It also left Tebow’s football
Bridge, Berwick take
down rival Nanticoke
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
NANTICOKE — Some show-
downs don’t live up to the bill-
ing. Like on Monday.
Berwick made sure the drama
fizzled out quickly as it defeated
Nanticoke in a 8-1 Wyoming Val-
ley Conference interdivisional
softball game.
The Dawgs (7-2 Div. 2) led
7-0 after four innings thanks to
two-run doubles by Margaret
Bridge and Kylene Welsh. Welsh
and Courtney Hummel got Ber-
wick off to a good start with RBI
singles in the first inning. Abby
Remley had an RBI single in the
third.
Berwick fin-
ished with 11
hits against
N a n t i c o k e
starter Allie
Mat ul ewski ,
who had al-
lowed just 30 in 32 innings pre-
viously. The Dawgs also took
over first place in Division 2,
with Tunkhannock and Wyo-
ming Area each a half-game be-
hind.
“We hit the ball solid,” Ber-
wick coach Brian Bridge said.
“They weren’t towering home
runs, but they were all line
drives that were right on the
button. The ball was coming
through the infield and going to
the outfield pretty quickly.”
Bridge’s two-run double in the
third inning was the epitome of
Lions to play
two games
in prime time
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Penn State and Michigan won’t be in
the same division until 2014. But the
Wolverines are back on the Nittany Li-
ons’ schedule this year, and the game will
be under the lights at Beaver Stadium.
Disney (ABC/ESPN) began rolling out
its prime time schedule for the season
Monday and Penn State will have two
evening games featured on national TV.
Penn State’s Homecoming game
against Michigan will be at 5 p.m. on Oct.
12. Two weeks later, the Lions will travel
to Columbus and play the Buckeyes at 8
p.m. at Ohio Stadium.
The Michigan game will be broadcast
on either ESPN or ESPN2. The Ohio
State game will air on ABC, ESPN or
ESPN2.
It will be the third time in Michigan’s
last four trips to Happy Valley that the
game will be in the evening.
Penn State and Ohio State will be
meeting in prime time for the fifth time
in the past nine seasons.
Coaches Caravan opens today
Bill O’Brien is back on the bus.
The Penn State coach will again be
joined by others from the campus in tour-
ing the region, beginning today in Read-
ing.
O’Brien will be making his second
straight spring trip to NEPA on May 8
when he attends the annual alumni asso-
ciation chapter dinner at Genetti Manor
in Dickson City.
Men’s basketball coach Patrick Cham-
bers and men’s volleyball coach Mark
Pavlik will join O’Brien in Lackawanna
County.
Registration for the event is online at
www.alumni.psu.edu/events/coaches-
caravan.
Nets rebound fromheartbreaker
The Associated Press
Brooklyn Nets cen-
ter Brook Lopez (11),
Chicago Bulls for-
ward Carlos Boozer,
center, and center
Joakim Noah, right,
compete for a loose
ball in the first half
of Game 5 of their
first-round playoff
series Monday in
New York.
A
P
P
H
O
T
O
BrooklyntopplesBullstoremainaliveinopeninground
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2B TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 S P O R T S
TODAY’S EVENTS
HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Northwest at GAR
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Meyers at MMI Prep
HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
Northwest at Meyers
Wyoming Seminary at GAR
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS LACROSSE
(All games 4:15 p.m. unless noted)
Dallas at North Pocono
Scranton Prep at Delaware Valley
Lake-Lehman at Crestwood, 5:30 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND FIELD
(All meets 4:15 p.m.)
Hanover Area at Meyers
Nanticoke at Northwest
Pittston Area at Berwick
Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West
Dallas at North Pocono
Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Wilkes at Scranton, 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Tunkhannock at Coughlin
Pittston Area at Dallas
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Valley West
Lake-Lehman at Hazleton Area
Wyoming Area at Berwick
HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West
Dallas at Berwick
Hazleton Area at Coughlin
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Area
Nanticoke at Pittston Area
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS LACROSSE
(All games 4:15 p.m.)
Coughlin at Delaware Valley
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary
HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND FIELD
(All meets 4:15 p.m.)
Hazleton Area at Coughlin
Holy Redeemer at GAR
Tunkhannock at Crestwood
Wyoming Valley West at Dallas
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Delaware Valley at Berwick
Hazleton Area at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at Crestwood
L AT E S T L I n E
L O C A L C A L E n D A R
W H AT ’ S O n T V
H O C k E Y
T R A n S A C T I O n S
B A S E B A L L
B A S k E T B A L L
B U L L E T I n B O A R D
ON THE MARK
By MARK DUDEK
For The Times Leader
Some Kinda Beach makes his fourth career start this evening at
The Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, and to say he’s been brilliant
would be an understatement. The 3-year-old Somebeachsomewhere
colt is a perfect 3-for-3 thus far, winning each race by open lenghts,
including his most recent in a career-best mile of 1:52. It certainly
is going to be exciting watching this pacer moving forward, as the
competition will continue to get tougher. In any case look for driver
Marcus Miller to have the whip tucked away early, as this young star
cruises to his fourth straight triumph.
BEST BET: SOME KINDA BEACH (11TH)
VALUE PLAY: LEE AVE (3RD)
POST TIME 6:30 p.m.
ll races one mile
First-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
3 Pan Of Outsiders M.Miller 1-4-2 Comes right back 3-1
7 Tulfra G.Napolitano 3-9-3 Note the driver change 4-1
4 Scirocco Billy M.Kakaley 7-6-8 First time lasix user 9-2
1 Champion’s Club A.Napolitano 6-6-8 Much better post position 7-2
2 Plenty Of Spunk T.Schadel 8-8-8 Been struggling of late 6-1
5 Windmill Shark M.Romano 9-6-9 Tends to tire 8-1
6 Mr Bricks A.McCarthy 7-1-5 Off since Dec 10-1
8 Mr Hollywood Starz E.Carlson 6-7-8 Dull 15-1
9 Tim’s Castoff T.Jackson Trails throughout 20-1
Second-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 2 pm races life
4 Dagget M.Miller 6-7-1 Takes a needed drop, scores 3-1
2 Majestic Midnight J.Morrill 9-1-2 Solid, when on gate 5-2
9 Order By Don A.Napolitano 6-3-7 Has to fire off the wings 5-1
8 Amacord J.Plutino 7-2-2 Broke maiden here last season 4-1
1 Battle Ready M.Kakaley 4-6-5 Best of remainders 10-1
6 Ballagio Hanover T.Schadel 8-5-6 Todd still winless this yr 20-1
3 MM’s Rosebud T.Buter 6-9-3 Yet to blossom 4-1
5 Big Sea Liger M.Simons 4-2-5 Squashed 12-1
7 Order By Me T.Jackson 5-3-6 By-passed 15-1
Third-$9,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5
6 Lee Ave J.Morrill 6-7-8 Worth stab at a price 10-1
3 Bombastic M.Miller 7-3-9 Marcus gets the catch drive 7-2
5 Thanks For Stoppin R.Pierce 7-6-10 Big M invader 3-1
9 Quik Groom M.Kakaley 7-3-7 Sweeps in for a check 15-1
1 Dragon’s Blood T.Buter 5-4-5 Has a bit of early foot 4-1
2 Artistic Flight G.Napolitano 7-6-6 Back from Philly 6-1
4 Waylon Hanover A.McCarthy 6-6-6 Much better in 2012 9-2
7 Allstar Blues H.Parker 6-2-4 Offering little 8-1
8 Western Steel J.Pavia 4-8-2 Comes off a long layoff 20-1
Fourth-$12,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 1 pm race life
7 Shouda Cuda Wuda J.Morrill 8-3-2 Morrill the difference 7-2
8 Mystical Cheetah B.Simpson 3-5-3 Makes a late push 3-1
3 She’s Easy Breezy O.Hegdal 8-2-4 More than capable 6-1
6 Ms Wiggins T.Jackson 2-8-6 Lightly raced filly 9-2
1 Callmeclassylady E.Carlson 7-4-5 Been stuck on the outside 4-1
2 Heythergeorgiegirl B.Truitt 5-3-7 Longtime maiden 8-1
4 Marion Mayflower M.Romano 3-7-8 Bad habits 15-1
5 Chicago Fire M.Kakaley 4-7-3 Burned again 10-1
9 Chrissy O T.Schadel 6-8-4 Way behind 20-1
Fifth-$9,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5
3 Hay Beautiful B.Simpson 4-4-3 Worthy of a second chance 4-1
2 Wicked Intentions R.Pierce 7-5-4 Pierce been on a tear 7-2
5 Look Annie Hall A.McCarthy 2-5-8 Croghan trainee 3-1
4 Boots Place J.Morrill 6-3-8 Invades from Rosecroft 6-1
9 Vy Hanover M.Kakaley 9-6-5 Wait for a better post 15-1
7 I Do It Myself M.Miller 7-6-3 Best races in the midwest 9-2
6 Tia Maria Hanover H.Parker 2-4-7 Unraced since Sept 8-1
1 Nifty Ace G.Napolitano 8-8-6 Eighth yet again 10-1
8 America Ferrera T.Jackson 6-6-9 Sliding in reverse 20-1
Sixth-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 2 pm races life
4 Broadway Prince A.McCarthy 2-2-3 Prepping for big things 5-1
5 One Line Guy R.Pierce 1-1-3 Two for two lifetime 5-2
2 Keystobe Bolt T.Schadel 7-4-6 Sits a nice trip 15-1
6 Big Short R.Schnittker 2-8-1 A solid second from 9 hole 7-2
7 Valley Of Sin M.Miller 1-1-7 Yankee Glide youngster 6-1
3 Marat M.Romano 7-2-6 Made miscue in latest 8-1
1 Marion Manhattan G.Napolitano 3-2-7 In with a tough group 4-1
8 Chocolate Delight O.Hegdal 1-6-5 Just won at 39-1 20-1
9 Vitamin Hanover M.Kakaley 3-6-3 Sluggish 12-1
Seventh-$11,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $6,100 last 5
1 Alibi Hanover G.Napolitano 3-4-6 Sails coast to coast 5-2
2 Rockratese M.Kakaley 2-3-7 Raced big in most recent start 5-1
3 Honey Do Jigtime E.Carlson 2-7-5 Almost got there as a bomb 10-1
4 Kayla’s Dream M.Romano 3-3-4 Doesn’t like to win 4-1
5 Runaway Tray J.Morrill 4-3-5 Always quick off the gate 3-1
6 Bling R.Pierce 7-8-4 Drops, but a bit off target 6-1
7 Pulse A Minute A.McCarthy 7-4-8 Beat another direction 20-1
8 Farouche Hanover S.Allard 6-3-4 Not the same mare 12-1
9 Joyful Years M.Simons 6-9-8 Never gets a call 15-1
Eighth-$10,000 Clm.Trot;clm.price $12,500
2 Fool’s Revenue J.Morrill 1-2-9 Finds a bit more 4-1
8 Anastasia Willie R.Pierce 3-7-7 Very capable veteran 5-1
3 Divas Photo T.Buter 8-1-4 First start off the claim 5-2
6 I Look Special S.Allard 4-1-3 Winner of nearly $600k life 3-1
4 Peaceful Path M.Romano 5-3-5 Recent Martin purchase 10-1
7 StreetwiseHall G.Napolitano 3-1-1 Tends to tire out late 6-1
1 Take Heart M.Miller 4-9-8 Missed a few weeks 12-1
5 Woody Marvel A.Napolitano 4-3-6 Guarenteed to be a long shot 20-1
9 Touchdown Franco M.Kakaley 5-6-6 Misses the extra point 15-1
Ninth-$15,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 4 pm races life
5 Moonliteonthebeach J.Morrill 1-1-3 PASS pacer rolls 4-1
3 Shock It To Em R.Pierce 2-1-3 Continues to impress 3-1
7 Lets Rock Together A.McCarthy 3-2-4 Morrill chose #5 instead 5-2
1 Troon T.Buter 2-3-4 Marks seasonal debut 5-1
8 Story Book M.Simons 1-3-7 Wrubel having good meet 10-1
9 Golden Gun E.Carlson 3-4-1 Very good field assembled 12-1
2 Rockin Glory M.Miller 9-2-8 The grey guy 20-1
4 Tell Us More B.Simpson 6-3-1 Better out in NY 6-1
6 Humility M.Kakaley 6-3-4 Gobbled up 15-1
Tenth-$15,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $11,000 last 5
1 Don’t Know Chip R.Pierce 5-3-1 Overdue 4-1
3 Sand Wyndham J.Pavia 2-6-4 Should be good from here 3-1
4 Fox Valley Smarty M.Kakaley 3-1-4 Certainly knows this track 5-2
7 Dream Lake M.Romano 9-5-1 Often overlooked 10-1
8 M C Felix G.Napolitano 7-6-4 I’ll pass from outside post 6-1
2 Opinion Hanover M.Simons 1-2-3 Another move up in class 5-1
5 A Gentleman T.Jackson 7-2-1 10yr old trotter 15-1
6 New Indentity A.McCarthy 4-4-9 Overpowered 12-1
9 Marion Monaco M.Miller 4-8-8 Steer away 20-1
Eleventh-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
2 Some Kinda Beach M.Miller 1-1-1 In front and drawing away 5-2
5 Beachfront G.Napolitano 2-6-5 Chased choice last out 5-1
3 Quik Magic T.Buter 1-2-1 Looking for a pocket trip 7-2
1 Shark Treasure B.Simpson 5-1-3 Alagna good with youngsters 4-1
8 Courageous Cat R.Pierce 7-2-5 Just broke his maiden 12-1
9 Wishful Desire M.Kakaley 7-2-5 Burke pupil 8-1
4 Nassau County A.McCarthy 3-8-3 Well back vs these 6-1
6 Pistol Petesdragon J.Pavia 5-5-5 Gunned down 15-1
7 I’m Banksy T.Jackson 2-1-5 ….next race please 20-1
Twelfth-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $8,700 last 5
7 In Your Room M.Simons 1-1-7 Very sharp mare 3-1
4 B L Class Act T.Buter 9-3-1 Meadowlands import 7-2
8 Pekoe Fashion T.Jackson 5-1-7 Bounced off that win 8-1
9 Winning Fireworks R.Schnittker 3-7-6 July coming fast 20-1
3 My Leap Of Faith A.McCarthy 3-3-2 Likes to grind it out 9-2
6 Iron Will R.Pierce 3-4-8 Been tiring at Harrah’s 6-1
5 Like A Hush E.Carlson 6-4-2 Very quiet 15-1
2 Berkshire J.Morrill 7-7-7 Tires quickly 4-1
1 Sunland Dakota G.Napolitano 3-4-6 Not in it 10-1
Thirteenth-$11,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $6,000 last 5
3 Achillies Blue Chip M.Kakaley 7-3-3 Better draw, better results 3-1
5 Bolero Andrew G.Napolitano 3-6-4 Fits in well here 5-2
1 Mr Erv J.Morrill 1-2-1 Sharp pacer from Fhld 4-1
8 Stronski R.Pierce 2-4-6 In live hands 12-1
2 Wellthereyougo A.McCarthy 8-1-2 Florida newcomer 6-1
4 All Summer Long E.Carlson 7-4-2 Summer getting closer 15-1
6 Lettherockbegin H.Parker 7-10-7 Look for a different tune 5-1
8 Four Staz Kyle A.Napolitano 5-8-1 Meadows invader 10-1
9 Fashion Heart M.Miller 7-7-3 Lack of speed kills 20-1
Fourteenth-$9,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5
6 Fools Gold G.Napolitano 7-8-7 Time to open the treasure 7-2
8 Born To Rockn Roll E.Carlson 4-6-7 Better than he’s showing 6-1
9 Deep Finesse J.Morrill 2-2-1 Morrill still leading driver 8-1
4 American Gi T.Jackson 4-6-2 American Ideal 4yr old 4-1
2 Mega Lightning S.Allard 3-1-8 Use in super’s 15-1
3 Mattox’s Spencer M.Kakaley 6-7-5 Matt having nice year 3-1
1 Eagle Artesian T.Buter 3-5-6 Yet to fire at PD 10-1
5 Ideal Danny R.Pierce 4-5-6 Roughed up 9-2
7 Dukes Up A.McCarthy 6-5-4 Whacked around 20-1
Fifteenth-$12,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 1 pm race life
1 Jeremes General G.Napolitano 7-2-4 Nap starts the late double 3-1
8 Conors Concord J.Morrill 7-6-4 Only making 2nd career go 7-2
6 Alloysius R.Pierce 7-4-4 Pierce the new pilot 4-1
4 Lupara M.Kakaley 2-6-3 Gurfein trained pacer 9-2
3 Johnny The Wire M.Miller 4-7-4 Stamper a cold trainer 6-1
5 Ideal Rowan T.Jackson 2-3-4 Needs start or two 10-1
9 Willies Big Mac M.Simons 5-x-x Marks his debut 20-1
7 Major Kryptonite B.Simpson 8-2-5 Lacks muscle 8-1
2 Employess Go Wild A.McCarthy 6-2-5 One more race to go 15-1
Sixteenth-$12,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 1 pm race life
6 Someplace Special J.Pavia 2-5-8 Holds on late 3-1
4 Seerightthruhim M.Miller 2-2-2 Tough luck pacer 7-2
5 Talk Strategy M.Kakaley 3-6-4 Rounds out the tri 8-1
3 Bettormeboy T.Jackson 4-3-3 Bettor’s Delight colt 6-1
1 Knocking Around B.Simpson 3-4-3 Winless in 15 prior 9-2
2 Mogul Hanover D.Ackerman 6-1-7 Paint another picture 4-1
8 Snoop M.Romano 5-6-5 Lacks bark 20-1
9 Dixie Terror A.McCarthy 3-5-2 Auto toss 10-1
7 We Never Getacolt E.Carlson 2-3-6 See you tomorrow 15-1
Major LEaguE BaSEBaLL
FaVorITE LINE uNDErDog
National League
New York -115/+105 at Miami
at Atlanta -120/+110 Washington
at Chicago -140/+130 San Diego
at Milwaukee -125/+115 Pittsburgh
at St. Louis -135/+125 Cincinnati
San Francisco -110/+100 at Arizona
at Los Angeles -145/+135 Colorado
american League
at New York -280/+240 Houston
at Detroit -250/+220 Minnesota
Boston -120/+110 at Toronto
at Texas -190/+180 Chicago
at Kansas City -135/+125 Tampa Bay
at Oakland -120/+110 Los Angeles
Baltimore -115/+105 at Seattle
Interleague
Philadelphia -115/+105 at Cleveland
NBa PLayoFFS
FaVorITE LINE o/u uNDErDog
Tonight
at Denver 7½ 213½ Golden State
at L.A. Clippers 5 180 Memphis
Tomorrow
at New York 8 180½ Boston
NHL PLayoFFS
FaVorITE LINE uNDErDog
Tonight
at Chicago -240/+200 Minnesota
at St. Louis -130/+110 Los Angeles
at Anaheim -150/+130 Detroit
Tomorrow
at Boston -185/+165 Toronto
at Pittsburgh -250/+210 N.Y. Islanders
at Vancouver -140/+120 San Jose
Thursday
at Montreal -160/+140 Ottawa
at Washington -130/+110 N.Y. Rangers
odds to Win Series
Chicago -550/+375 Minnesota
Los Angeles -120/+100 St. Louis
Anaheim -140/+120 Detroit
Boston -220/+180 Toronto
Pittsburgh -600/+400 N.Y. Islanders
Vancouver -140/+120 San Jose
Montreal -170/+150 Ottawa
Washington -110/-110 N.Y. Rangers
CAMPS/CLINICS
Dallas Mountaineer Aquatic
Club is hosting a Fitter and Faster
Clinic with Peter Vanderkaay on
Saturday, May 11, at the Dal-
las Middle School natatorium.
Vanderkaay is a three-time Olym-
pian and was the 2012 Olympic
swim team captain. For more
information, visit www.dmacswim-
ming.org or call Beth Redington
at 239-3575.
Misericordia Summer Baseball
Camp is open for registration.
The camp runs July 8-12 and is
open to players age 7-12. For mor
information, visit athletics.miseri-
cordia.edu or call 674-1868.
LEAGUES
Forty Fort Soccer Club will have
fall signups May 5 from noon to
3 p.m. in the basement of the
Forty Fort borough building. For
more information, visit www.
fortyfortpioneers.org or call Brian
at 592-7148.
John Leighton Men’s Open Bas-
ketball League applications are
now being accepted. The league
will be played Monday and Tues-
day nights beginning May 28 at
Miner Park. Monday and Tuesday
leagues will be separate leagues.
Any team interested in signing up
can call John Leighton at 430-
8437. The deadline to enter will
be May 19.
Lehman Golf Club’s Thursday
Night Captain & Mate League
will begin play on Thursday, May
2. Teams can sign up in the pro
shop or by calling 675-1686.
MEETINGS
Berwick High School Boys Bas-
ketball Boosters will be having
a meeting Monday May 6 at 7
pm in the gymnasium lobby. The
upcoming summer events and
activities will be discussed. Any
questions contact Coach Jason
Kingery 394-7115.
Crestwood Boys Basketball
Booster Club will meet at 7 p.m.
on Monday, May 6, at Cavana-
ugh’s Grille.
Crestwood Football Booster
Club will meet on Wednesday,
May 15, at 7 p.m. at Tony’s Pizza.
GAR Memorial High School
Football Booster Club will meet
Thursday May 2 at 7 p.m. in the
Choral Room at the high school.
For any questions, please contact:
Ron Petrovich at 970-4110 or
829-0569.
Nanticoke Area Little League
will hold its monthly meeting May
1 at High School Cafe at 7:30 p.m.
Board Members are to meet at 7
p.m.
Pittston Area Cheerleading
Booster Club will have a reorga-
nizational meeting May 1 at 7 p.m.
at Savo’s. Election of officers will
be taking place at this meeting.
All parents of JV and varsity are
encouraged to attend.
Wyoming Area Boys Soccer Par-
ents will have a meeting Tuesday,
April 30, at 6 p.m. at the Second-
ary Center.
Wyoming Area Baseball Dia-
mond Club will hold a meeting
on Tuesday, April 30, at 7 p.m.
in Room 129 of the Secondary
Center.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Ed-Lark Hurricanes Football
and Cheer signups are on the fol-
lowing dates: today from 12:30-3
p.m.; Monday, May 6, from 5-7
p.m.; Thursday, May 16, from 5-7
p.m.; Monday, June 3, 5-7 p.m.;
Saturday, June 15, from noon to 4
p.m.; Thursday, June 20, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Signups will be at the Ed-
wardsville Borough building. The
cost is $40 for the first child and
$5 for each additional child.
Greater Pittston Stoners Youth
Soccer will have fall registra-
tion May 7 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.,
May 11 from 1-3 p.m., May 21 from
6:30-8:30 p.m. and May 23 from
6:30-8:30 p.m. Signups will be
at Exeter Scout Home, located in
the rear of the Exeter municipal
building at the corner of Wyoming
Avenue and Lincoln Street. New
players must show a birth certifi-
cate and must turn 5 by Aug. 1.
Hanover Area Youth Soccer will
hold registrations from 5:30-8
p.m. on May 2 and from noon-3
p.m. on May 18 at the HAYS field
complex on S. Preston Drive in
Hanover Township. Registration
forms can be downloaded in
advance from the handouts link
at www.eteamz.com/hays. Eligible
players must be from 4-16 years
old. First-year players will need
to bring a copy of their birth
certificate. For more information,
contact Ed Lewis at hanover73@
msn.com.
Kingston Youth Soccer will have
registrations for the fall season
May 8 from 5-8:30 p.m. at the
Kingston Rec. Center. Registration
can also be completed online at
www.kingstonlightning.org. For
more information, call Benn Miller
at 332-0313.
Kingston Township Raiders will
have registration for mini football
and cheerleading May 18 from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Kingston
Township municipal building, 180
East Center St., Shavertown. Par-
ents should bring birth certificate,
two proofs of reisdency and a
photo of the child. Registration
fees are $50 for cheer and $60
for football, with a $10 sibling
discount.
Plains American Legion Base-
ball Teams will hold tryouts at
Hilldale Park in Plains. Tryouts
with ages 13-15 will be May 4 from
1-3 p.m. Tryouts for ages 16-19
will be May 4, 5 and 11 if neces-
sary from 4-6 p.m. All interested
players are eligible to attend.
Players residing in Plains, Laflin,
Bear Creek, Parsons, Miners
Mills, North End, East End, Avoca,
Dupont, Jenkins Twp. and Pittston
Twp. east of the bypass may
participate.
South Wilkes Barre Mini Mo-
hawks will hold cheerleading and
football registration on May 4,
11, and 18 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. and
May 24 from 3 - 5 p.m. All regis-
trations will take place at Minor
park, next to Kistler Elementary.
Parents must provide a copy of
their child’s birth certificate. The
cost per child is $70 and $90 per
family.
W-B Girls Softball League will
hold registration for Senior
League only on Wednesday, May 1
from 6-8 p.m. at the field conces-
sion stand. Girls born between
July 1995 and December 1999 are
eligible for the fastpitch division
that begins the first week of June.
City residency is not required.
For info, call 822-3991 or log onto
wbgsl.com
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Back Mountain Bandits Youth
Lacrosse will be hosting the
fourth annual Back Mountian
Brawl Lacrosse Tournament, Sat-
urday, May 11 at the Back Moun-
tain Recreation Fields located
at Outlet Road in Lehman. This
event will host 50 teams, includ-
ing local teams from Scranton,
Wyoming Seminary, Valley Laxers
and Mountain Top. There is free
admission, parking, vendors,
activities and games.
Branden’s Heart Charity Fund
Raiser will be a one-day “every-
body-can-do-it” triathlon in Le-
high Gorge State Park near White
Haven. Teams of 4-6 members
will all take part in the rafting por-
tion of the event, with one team
member running and just one
team member cycling. Trophies,
medallions and T-shirts will be
offered. The event is Sunday, May
19. Participants will be meeting at
the Whitewater Challengers Raft-
ing Center near Buck Mountain
at 11 a.m. for orientation. Details
and team registrations forms are
available by calling 443-9532, or
by visiting www.whitewaterchal-
lengers.com/thriathlon.
Crestwood Comet Football Golf
Tournament will be held Sat-
urday, July 13 at Sand Springs
Country Club with a shotgun start
at 8 a.m. Following golf there will
be food and refreshments inside
the clubhouse. Cost is $80 per
player and $320 per foursome
and includes golf cart, prizes,
food and refreshments, and a gift.
The booster club is also seeking
hole sponsors for $50 and $100.
For further information call Ken
Givens at 201-294-9673 or kgiv-
ens@atlanticirrigation.com.
Children’s Service Center will
hold its 12th annual golf tourna-
ment June 3, at Huntsville Golf
Club in Dallas. The tournament
is presented by Howell Benefit
Services, and benefits programs
for children, adolescents, and
families dealing with emotional
and behavioral problems. Format
is captain and crew, and the shot-
gun start is at 9 a.m. Breakfast
and registration begin at 8 a.m.
Contact Liz Hibbard at 825-6425
or lhibbard@e-csc.org for more
information.
Good Shepherd Church Golf
Classic will be held at Sand
Springs County Club Friday, May
24, at 1 p.m. The cost is $85 per
golfer. The tourmanent includes
golf with a cart, dinner and
awards. The tournament will be a
four-person scramble. Each team
will consist of a captain and three
other members. For more infor-
mation, call 788-6760 or Sand
Springs Golf Course at 788-5845.
Hanover Township Fire District
is holding a golf tournament
at Edgewood in the Pines Golf
Course, Drums, on Saturday, May
11. It is a four-person scramble,
captain-and-crew format, with
play starting at 8 a.m. Registra-
tion is open to the first 128 golf-
ers. Entry fee is $80 for golf and
cart, refreshments, awards dinner
and a number of prizes. Hole
sponsorships are also available,
starting at $35. For more informa-
tion, contact Joe Nealon at 592-
8126 or irishj38@aol.com, or Ron
Priestman Jr. at 762-7015.
MLB
7 p.m.
CSN – Philadelphia at Cleveland
SNY – N.Y. Mets at Miami
YES – Houston at N.Y. Yankees
8 p.m.
MLB — Cincinnati at St. Louis or San Diego at
Chicago Cubs
ROOT – Pittsburgh at Milwaukee
MINor LEaguE BaSEBaLL
6:30 p.m.
SE2 – Portland at Reading
NBa
8 p.m.
TNT — Playoffs, first round, Game 5, Golden
State at Denver
10:30 p.m.
TNT — Playoffs, first round, Game 5, Memphis
at L.A. Clippers
NHL
8 p.m.
CNBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals,
game 1, Los Angeles at St. Louis
NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals,
game 1, Minnesota at Chicago
10:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals,
game 1, Detroit at Anaheim
International League
North Division
W L Pct. gB
Buffalo (Blue Jays) 16 7 .696 —
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 15 10 .600 2
raILrIDErS 11 11 .500 4½
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 10 14 .417 6½
Rochester (Twins) 10 15 .400 7
Syracuse (Nationals) 9 15 .375 7½
South Division
W L Pct. gB
Durham (Rays) 17 8 .680 —
Norfolk (Orioles) 16 9 .640 1
Gwinnett (Braves) 12 14 .462 5½
Charlotte (White Sox) 7 18 .280 10
West Division
W L Pct. gB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 19 7 .731 —
Columbus (Indians) 13 12 .520 5½
Louisville (Reds) 11 14 .440 7½
Toledo (Tigers) 7 19 .269 12
Monday’s games
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 5, Charlotte 4, 1st
game
Pawtucket 5, Columbus 1
Louisville 6, Lehigh Valley 2
Norfolk 6, Toledo 5, 11 innings
Durham 5, Syracuse 0
Indianapolis 3, Gwinnett 2
Rochester 4, Buffalo 3
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 5, Charlotte 0,
2nd game
Tuesday’s games
Gwinnett at Indianapolis, 11:05 a.m.
Lehigh Valley at Louisville, 11:05 a.m.
Buffalo at Rochester, 11:35 a.m.
Durham at Syracuse, 12 p.m.
Toledo at Norfolk, 12:05 p.m.
Columbus at Pawtucket, 12:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Charlotte, 5:15
p.m., 1st game
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Charlotte, 7:45
p.m., 2nd game
Wednesday’s games
No games scheduled
NBA PLAYOFFS
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami 4, Milwaukee 0
Sunday, April 21: Miami 110, Milwaukee 87
Tuesday, April 23: Miami 98, Milwaukee 86
Thursday, April 25: Miami 104, Milwaukee 91
Sunday, April 28: Miami 88, Milwaukee 77
New York 3, Boston 1
Saturday, April 20: New York 85, Boston 78
Tuesday, April 23: New York 87, Boston 71
Friday, April 26: New York 90, Boston 76
Sunday, April 28: Boston 97, New York 90, OT
x-Wednesday, May 1: Boston at New York, TBA
x-Friday, May 3: New York at Boston, TBA
x-Sunday, May 5: Boston at New York, TBA
Indiana 2, Atlanta 2
Sunday, April 21: Indiana 107, Atlanta 90
Wednesday, April 24: Indiana 113, Atlanta 98
Saturday, April 27: Atlanta 90, Indiana 69
Monday, April 29: Atlanta 102, Indiana 91
Wednesday, May 1: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA
Friday, May 3: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 or 8 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 5: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA
Chicago 3, Brooklyn 2
Saturday, April 20: Brooklyn 106, Chicago 89
Monday, April 22: Chicago 90, Brooklyn 82
Thursday, April 25: Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76
Saturday, April 27: Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134,
3OT
Monday, April 29: Brooklyn 110, Chicago 91
Thursday, May 2: Brooklyn at Chicago, 8 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Chicago at Brooklyn, TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Oklahoma City 3, Houston 0
Sunday, April 21: Oklahoma City 120, Houston 91
Wednesday, April 24: Oklahoma City 105, Hous-
ton 102
Saturday, April 27: Oklahoma City 104, Houston
101
Monday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Houston, 9:30
p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 1: Houston at Oklahoma City,
8 or 9:30 p.m.
x-Friday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Houston, TBA
x-Sunday, May 5: Houston at Oklahoma City, TBA
San Antonio 4, L.A. Lakers 0
Sunday, April 21: San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 79
Wednesday, April 24: San Antonio 102, L.A. Lak-
ers 91
Friday, April 26: San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89
Sunday, April 28: San Antonio 103, L.A. Lakers 82
Golden State 3, Denver 1
Saturday, April 20: Denver 97, Golden State 95
Tuesday, April 23: Golden State 131, Denver 117
Friday, April 26: Golden State 110, Denver 108
Sunday, April 28: Golden State 115, Denver 101
Tuesday, April 30: Golden State at Denver, 8 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 2: Denver at Golden State, 9 or
10:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Golden State at Denver, TBA
L.A. Clippers 2, Memphis 2
Saturday, April 20: L.A. Clippers 112, Memphia 91
Monday, April 22: L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis 91
Thursday, April 25: Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82
Saturday, April 27: Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83
Tuesday, April 30: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
p.m.
Friday, May 3: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 or 9:30
p.m.
x-Sunday, May 5: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBA
AHL PLAYOFFS
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS
BEST OF 5
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Hershey 2, Providence 0
Friday, April 26: Hershey 5, Providence 2
Sunday, April 28: Hershey 5, Providence 4, OT
Saturday, May 4: Providence at Hershey, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 5: Providence at Hershey, 5 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 8: Hershey at Providence,
7:05 p.m.
Syracuse 2, Portland 0
Saturday, April 27: Syracuse 4, Portland 3, OT
Sunday, April 28: Syracuse 4, Portland 2
Thursday, May 2: Syracuse at Portland, 7 p.m.
x-Friday, May 3: Syracuse at Portland, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 5: Portland at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m.
Springfeld 2, Manchester 0
Saturday, April 27: Springfield 2, Manchester 1,
OT
Sunday, April 28: Springfield 3, Manchester 2, OT
Thursday, May 2: Springfield at Manchester, 7
p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Springfield at Manchester, 7
p.m.
x-Sunday, May 5: Manchester at Springfield, 4
p.m.
Penguins 2, Binghamton 0
Saturday, April 27: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3,
Binghamton 2, OT
Sunday, April 28: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3,
Binghamton 2
Thursday, May 2: Binghamton at Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Binghamton at Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
x-Monday, May 6: Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at
Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Oklahoma City 1, Charlotte 1
Friday, April 26: Charlotte 4, Oklahoma City 3, OT
Saturday, April 27: Oklahoma City 5, Charlotte 2
Wednesday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Charlotte,
7 p.m.
Friday, May 3: Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7
p.m.
Toronto 2, Rochester 0
Saturday, April 27: Toronto 6, Rochester 3
Sunday, April 28: Toronto 2, Rochester 0
Wednesday, May 1: Toronto at Rochester, 7 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 2: Toronto at Rochester, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Rochester at Toronto, 3 p.m.
Houston 1, Grand Rapids 1
Friday, April 26: Houston 3, Grand Rapids 0
Sunday, April 28: Grand Rapids 3, Houston 2
Wednesday, May 1: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7
p.m.
Friday, May 3: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Houston at Grand Rapids, 7
p.m.
Milwaukee 1, Texas 1
Friday, April 26: Texas 3, Milwaukee 2, OT
Saturday, April 27: Milwaukee 2, Texas 0
Wednesday, May 1: Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 3: Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 4: Milwaukee at Texas, 8 p.m.
NHL PLayoFFS
FIrST rouND
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
EaSTErN CoNFErENCE
New york Islanders vs. Pittsburgh
Wednesday, May 1: NY Islanders at Pittsburgh,
7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 3: NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Sunday, May 5: Pittsburgh at NY Islanders Noon
Tuesday, May 7: Pittsburgh at NY Islanders, 7 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 9: NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7
p.m.
x-Saturday, May 11: Pittsburgh at NY Islanders,
TBD
x-Sunday, May 12: NY Islanders at Pittsburgh,
TBD
ottawa vs. Montreal
Thursday, May 2: Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Friday, May 3: Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Sunday, May 5: Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7: Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 9: Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 11: Montreal at Ottawa, TBD
x-Sunday, May 12: Ottawa at Montreal, TBD
New york rangers vs. Washington
Thursday, May 2: NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30
p.m.
Saturday, May 4: NY Rangers at Washington,
12:30 p.m.
Monday, May 6: Washington at NY Rangers, 7:30
p.m.
Wednesday, May 8: Washington at NY Rangers,
7:30 p.m.
x-Friday, May 10: NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30
p.m.
x-Sunday, May 12: Washington at NY Rangers,
TBD
x-Monday, May 13: NY Rangers at Washington,
TBD
Toronto vs. Boston
Wednesday, May 1: Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 4: Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Monday, May 6: Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8: Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
x-Friday, May 10: Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 12: Boston at Toronto, TBD
x-Monday, May 13: Toronto at Boston, TBD
WESTErN CoNFErENCE
Minnesota vs. Chicago
Tuesday, April 30: Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Friday, May 3: Minnesota at Chicago, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 5: Chicago at Minnesota, 3 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7 Chicago at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 9: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD
x-Saturday, May 11: Chicago at Minnesota, TBD
x-Sunday, May 12: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD
Detroit vs. anaheim
Tuesday, April 30: Detroit at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 2: Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday, May 4: Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 6: Anaheim at Detroit, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 8: Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
x-Friday, May 10: Anaheim at Detroit, TBD
x-Sunday, May 12: Detroit at Anaheim, TBD<
San jose vs. Vancouver
Wednesday, May 1: San Jose at Vancouver, 10:30
p.m.
Friday, May 3: San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 5: Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7: Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 9: San Jose at Vancouver, 10
p.m.
x-Saturday, May 11: Vancouver at San Jose, TBD
x-Monday, May 13: San Jose at Vancouver, TBD
Los angeles vs. St. Louis
Tuesday, April 30: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 2: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9:30
p.m.
Saturday, May 4: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Monday, May 6: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 8: Los Angeles at St. Louis,
TBD
x-Friday, May 10: St. Louis at Los Angeles, TBD
x-Monday, May 13: Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBD
BaSEBaLL
american League
BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned RHP Daniel
Bard to Portland (EL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Optioned LHP Scott
Barnes to Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned LHP Will
Smith to Omaha (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Placed LHP Sean
Burnett on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27.
Reinstated RHP Tommy Hanson fromthe bereave-
ment list. Traded C Chris Snyder to Baltimore for
RHP Rob Delaney.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Recalled RHP Dan
Straily from Sacramento (PCL). Optioned RHP
Jesse Chavez to Sacramento. Traded OF Casper
Wells to the Chicago White Sox for cash.
SEATTLE MARINERS—Activated OF Michael
Saunders 15-day DL. Optioned OF Carlos Pegue-
ro.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Announced LHP
Aaron Laffey refused an outright assignment to
Buffalo (IL) and elected to become a free agent.<
National League
CINCINNATI REDS—Placed OF Chris Heisey
on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Donald Lutz from
Pensacola (SL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed LHP Clay-
ton Kershaw on the bereavement list.
TUESDAY, April 30, 2013 pAgE 3B TiMES lEADEr www.timesleader.com B A S E B A L L
A M E r i C A N l E A g U E M L B S TA N D I N G S • S TAT S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 18 7 .720 — — 7-3 W-5 11-5 7-2
Baltimore 15 10 .600 3 — 7-3 L-1 7-5 8-5
New York 15 10 .600 3 — 6-4 L-1 9-5 6-5
Tampa Bay 12 13 .480 6 3 7-3 W-2 8-4 4-9
Toronto 9 17 .346 9½ 6½ 2-8 L-4 5-8 4-9
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 14 10 .583 — — 5-5 W-4 9-3 5-7
Kansas City 13 10 .565 ½ 1 6-4 L-2 6-4 7-6
Minnesota 11 11 .500 2 2½ 6-4 L-1 7-6 4-5
Cleveland 10 13 .435 3½ 4 5-5 W-2 2-6 8-7
Chicago 10 14 .417 4 4½ 4-6 L-2 7-7 3-7
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas 16 9 .640 — — 7-3 L-2 7-2 9-7
Oakland 14 12 .538 2½ 1½ 2-8 W-1 7-7 7-5
Seattle 11 16 .407 6 5 4-6 W-2 7-7 4-9
Los Angeles 9 15 .375 6½ 5½ 5-5 L-2 6-6 3-9
Houston 8 18 .308 8½ 7½ 3-7 W-1 4-8 4-10
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 16 9 .640 — — 3-7 W-1 7-2 9-7
Washington 13 13 .500 3½ 1½ 4-6 L-2 9-7 4-6
Philadelphia 12 14 .462 4½ 2½ 6-4 W-3 6-8 6-6
New York 10 13 .435 5 3 3-7 L-4 7-8 3-5
Miami 6 19 .240 10 8 3-7 W-1 3-10 3-9
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 15 11 .577 — — 7-3 L-1 8-4 7-7
St. Louis 14 11 .560 ½ — 5-5 L-3 5-5 9-6
Cincinnati 15 12 .556 ½ — 6-4 W-2 12-4 3-8
Milwaukee 13 11 .542 1 ½ 7-3 W-1 8-5 5-6
Chicago 10 15 .400 4½ 4 5-5 W-1 4-5 6-10
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona 15 10 .600 — — 6-4 W-2 8-5 7-5
Colorado 15 10 .600 — — 4-6 L-2 9-3 6-7
San Francisco 13 12 .520 2 1 4-6 L-5 8-4 5-8
Los Angeles 12 12 .500 2½ 1½ 5-5 W-1 6-6 6-6
San Diego 9 16 .360 6 5 4-6 L-1 5-7 4-9
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 3, Toronto 2
Boston 6, Houston 1
Kansas City 9, Cleveland 0, 1st game
Tampa Bay 8, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 5, Texas 0
Oakland 9, Baltimore 8, 10 innings
Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1
Detroit 8, Atlanta 3
Cleveland 10, Kansas City 3, 2nd game
Monday’s Games
Houston 9, N.Y. Yankees 1
Detroit 4, Minnesota 3
Cleveland 9, Kansas City 0
L.A. Angels at Oakland, (n)
Baltimore at Seattle, (n)
Tuesday’s Games
Houston (Humber 0-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda
3-1), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Worley 0-3) at Detroit (Verlander 2-2),
7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 4-0) at Toronto (Morrow 0-2), 7:07
p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 2-2) at Cleveland (McAllis-
ter 1-3), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 2-0) at Texas (Dar-
vish 4-1), 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 3-1) at Kansas City (Shields
1-2), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 1-1) at Oakland (Parker
0-4), 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Hammel 3-1) at Seattle (Maurer 2-3),
10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Houston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday’s Games
Miami 6, Chicago Cubs 4
Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 1
Cincinnati 5, Washington 2
Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 0
Arizona 4, Colorado 2
L.A. Dodgers 2, Milwaukee 0
San Diego 6, San Francisco 4
Detroit 8, Atlanta 3
Monday’s Games
Atlanta 3, Washington 2
N.Y. Mets at Miami, (n)
Chicago Cubs 5, San Diego 3
Milwaukee 10, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati 2, St. Louis 1
San Francisco at Arizona, (n)
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-2) at Miami (Slowey 0-2),
7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 2-2) at Cleveland
(McAllister 1-3), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-1) at Atlanta
(Hudson 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 1-3) at Chicago Cubs
(E.Jackson 0-3), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2) at Milwaukee
(Estrada 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia
2-1), 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-0) at Arizona
(Cahill 1-3), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-2) at L.A. Dodgers
(Ryu 2-1), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 12:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 1:45 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Indians 10, Royals 3
Cleveland Kansas City
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Brantly lf 4 2 2 0 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0
ACarer ss 5 2 2 1 AEscor ss 3 0 2 0
Swisher 1b 3 2 1 1 EJhnsn pr-ss 0 1 0 0
MrRynl 3b 5 1 2 0 Butler dh 3 0 1 0
CSantn dh 5 1 4 1 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0
Aviles 2b 4 1 1 5 L.Cain cf 3 0 0 1
Raburn rf 5 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 4 0 1 0
YGoms c 5 1 1 0 Francr rf 4 1 1 0
Stubbs cf 3 0 0 1 Kottars c 4 1 1 0
Getz 2b 4 0 1 2
Totals 391014 9 Totals 33 3 8 3
Cleveland 203 100 220— 10
Kansas City 000 200 010— 3
E--Getz (1), Moustakas (5), Hosmer (2). DP-
-Cleveland 1, Kansas City 1. LOB--Cleveland 7,
Kansas City 6. 2B--Butler (2), Moustakas (4), Kot-
taras (1). 3B--A.Cabrera (1), Y.Gomes (2). HR--
Aviles (2). SB--C.Santana (1). SF--Swisher, Aviles,
Stubbs, L.Cain.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
Kluber W,2-0 7 7 2 2 0 6
Pestano 1 1 1 1 2 0
C.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 2
Kansas City
W.Smith L,0-1 4 7 6 4 1 5
B.Chen 3 3 2 0 0 4
J.Gutierrez 2 4 2 2 0 1
W.Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
HBP--by B.Chen (Brantley). PB--Kottaras.
Umpires--Home, Gary Darling; First, Paul Em-
mel; Second, Clint Fagan; Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T--2:56. A--19,831 (37,903).
Tigers 8, Braves 3
Atlanta Detroit
ab r hbi ab r hbi
JSchafr cf 5 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 3 2 1 3
Pstrnck 2b 5 0 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 1 1 0
J.Upton lf 2 1 1 0 MiCarr 3b 4 2 2 3
FFrmn 1b 3 1 0 0 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 0
CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 1 VMrtnz dh 3 0 0 1
Gattis c 4 0 1 1 JhPerlt ss 4 0 0 0
Uggla dh 3 0 0 1 Tuiassp lf 3 0 1 0
RJhnsn rf 3 0 0 0 D.Kelly lf 1 0 1 0
Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 B.Pena c 3 1 0 0
Infante 2b 4 2 2 1
Totals 33 3 6 3 Totals 32 8 9 8
Atlanta 000 300 000 —3
Detroit 003 001 40x —8
LOB--Atlanta 8, Detroit 4. 2B--Pastornicky (1),
C.Johnson (6), Mi.Cabrera (6). HR--A.Jackson (2),
Mi.Cabrera (3), Infante (2). SF--V.Martinez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Minor L,3-2 6.2 6 6 6 2 6
Gearrin 0 2 2 2 0 0
Avilan 1.1 1 0 0 1 1
Detroit
Fister W,4-0 7 6 3 3 0 8
Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 2 3
Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 0
Alburquerque pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Gearrin pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP--by Fister (F.Freeman, J.Upton), by Albur-
querque (R.Johnson). WP--Alburquerque 2.
Umpires--Home, Dan Iassogna; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Brian
Knight.
Sunday’s Late Boxes
Tigers 4, Twins 3
Minnesota Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 4 0 1 0
Mauer c 4 0 0 0 Dirks lf 3 2 2 1
Wlngh dh 4 1 1 1 MiCarr 3b 2 1 0 0
Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 4 1 1 3
Parmel rf 4 1 1 0 VMrtnz dh 4 0 0 0
Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 0
Arcia lf 3 0 2 1 Avila c 3 0 1 0
Hicks cf 3 0 0 1 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0
Flormn ss 3 0 1 0 D.Kelly rf 3 0 1 0
Totals 33 3 6 3 Totals 30 4 7 4
Minnesota 110 100 000— 3
Detroit 001 003 00x— 4
DP--Minnesota 1. LOB--Minnesota 3, Detroit 5.
2B--Parmelee (2), Arcia (1), Jh.Peralta (5). 3B--D.
Kelly (1). HR--Willingham (5), Dirks (1), Fielder (6).
SB--Florimon (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Pelfrey L,2-3 5.1 7 4 4 2 1
Duensing 1.1 0 0 0 1 2
Roenicke 1.1 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Scherzer W,3-0 7.1 6 3 3 0 10
Smyly H,4 1.1 0 0 0 0 0
Benoit S,2-2 .1 0 0 0 0 0
WP--Scherzer.
Umpires--Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Chris Con-
roy.
T--2:47. A--29,878 (41,255).
Braves 3, Nationals 2
Washington Atlanta
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Span cf 4 0 1 0 JSchafr rf 1 1 1 0
Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0 Smmns ss 3 0 0 1
Harper lf 4 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 1 1
Werth rf 4 0 1 0 FFrmn 1b 3 1 1 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0
LaRoch 1b 3 1 1 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 2 0
Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 0 BUpton cf 3 0 0 0
Tracy 3b 4 0 2 1 G.Laird c 2 1 1 1
KSuzuk c 4 0 1 1 Tehern p 2 0 1 0
Strasrg p 2 0 0 0 Walden p 0 0 0 0
Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0 Pstrnck ph 0 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0
Berndn rf 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 210 2 Totals 26 3 7 3
Washington 020 000 000— 2
Atlanta 100 100 10x— 3
DP--Washington 1, Atlanta 2. LOB--Washington
6, Atlanta 6. 2B--Harper (6), Teheran (1). SB--J.
Schafer 2 (5). S--Pastornicky. SF--Simmons.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Strasburg 6 6 2 2 4 8
Clippard L,1-1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Storen 1 0 0 0 0 2
Atlanta
Teheran 5.1 10 2 2 1 5
Walden W,1-0 1.2 0 0 0 0 3
O’Flaherty H,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
Kimbrel S,9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires--Home, Laz Diaz; First, Tim Timmons;
Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mark Wegner.
T--2:52. A--22,870 (49,586).
Astros 9, Yankees 1
Houston New York
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Altuve 2b 6 1 2 0 Gardnr cf 4 1 2 0
BBarns rf-lf 5 0 3 3 Cano 2b 4 0 2 0
B.Laird 1b 5 1 2 0 V.Wells lf 3 0 2 1
Carter lf 5 2 2 0 BFrncs lf 0 0 0 0
Ankiel rf 0 0 0 0 Hafner dh 3 0 0 0
C.Pena dh 5 1 2 1 Boesch rf 2 0 0 0
RCeden ss 4 1 1 0 J.Nix 3b 4 0 0 0
Corprn c 5 2 4 4 Overay 1b 4 0 1 0
Dmngz 3b 4 1 0 0 Nunez ss 4 0 1 0
Grssmn cf 4 0 1 0 AuRmn c 3 0 0 0
Totals 43 917 8 Totals 31 1 8 1
Houston 300 240 000— 9
New York 000 001 000— 1
E--Nunez (3). DP--Houston 4, NewYork 1. LOB-
-Houston 10, NewYork 8. 2B--Altuve (6), B.Barnes
2 (3), R.Cedeno (3), Corporan (1). 3B--C.Pena (1).
HR--Corporan (1). SB--B.Barnes (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Harrell W,3-2 6.1 8 1 1 1 4
Blackley 1.2 0 0 0 2 0
R.Cruz 1 0 0 0 0 0
New York
Pettitte L,3-2 4.1 10 7 7 1 3
Warren 1.2 3 2 2 1 2
Nuno 3 4 0 0 0 2
HBP--by Harrell (Hafner, Au.Romine), by Pettitte
(Grossman). WP--Harrell, Blackley, Warren.
Umpires--Home, Ed Hickox; First, Jim Wolf;
Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jim Joyce.
T--2:59. A--34,262 (50,291).
Astros beat Yanks
at their own game
NEW YORK — Carlos Cor-
poran homered among his four
hits and drove in four runs,
Brandon Barnes three hits and
three RBIs, and the Houston As-
tros fit comfortably into the role
of a slugging American League
squad Monday night in a 9-1
romp over the New York.
In their first game in the
Bronx as an AL team, the Astros
peppered Andy Pettitte for 10
hits and seven runs, both season
highs for the lefty. Barnes and
Corporan had two-run doubles
and Barnes added an RBI single
and a double. Barnes and Corpo-
ran each set career highs for hits
and RBIs.
Houston bounced back from
a four-game sweep in Boston
with an enthusiastic win over
the Yankees, who had just taken
four straight from Toronto.
Lucas Harrell (3-2) kept New
York grounded.
Tigers 4, Twins 3
DETROIT — Prince Fielder’s
towering three-run homer in the
sixth inning put Detroit ahead,
and the Tigers held on Monday
night for their fourth straight
win, 4-3 over the Minnesota
Twins.
Detroit trailed 3-1 when Andy
Dirks reached on a bunt single
and Miguel Cabrera walked.
Fielder hit the first pitch over
the wall in left-center for an op-
posite-field homer. That part of
the fence is about 405 feet from
home plate.
Max Scherzer (3-0) allowed
three runs and six hits in 7 1-3
innings. He struck out 10 with-
out a walk. Drew Smyly finished
the eighth and got the first two
outs of the ninth, and Joaquin
Benoit finished for his second
save.
Mike Pelfrey (2-3) allowed
four runs and seven hits in 5 1-3
innings.
Indians 9, Royals 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Ub-
aldo Jimenez pitched into the
eighth inning, Ryan Raburn hit
two home runs and the Cleve-
land Indians pounded the Kan-
sas City Royals 9-0 on Monday
night to split their four-game
series.
Raburn hit a three-run shot in
the fifth inning and a solo hom-
er in the eighth, and finished the
night with four hits. Jason Kip-
nis also went deep to pace a sud-
denly potent Indians offense.
Not that all the offense was
needed.
Jimenez (1-2) allowed only
two walks and an infield single
by Billy Butler over his first
seven innings. Otherwise, he
kept the Royals off balance in a
dazzling start that brought back
memories of the pitcher who
once threw a no-hitter for the
Colorado Rockies.
Meanwhile, Wade Davis (2-2)
made a second straight miser-
able start for the Royals. The
right-hander allowed eight runs
and 12 hits and three walks in
just 4 2-3 innings.
New York Yankees pitcher Andy Pettitte, left, looks on as Hous-
ton Astros’ Brandon Laird scores on a single by Carlos Pena
during the first inning Monday at Yankee Stadium in New York.
AP PHOTO
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre continues to
have success away from PNC
Field on Monday night sweep-
ing a doubleheader from Char-
lotte winning the first game 5-4
before taking the second 5-0.
In the first game, the RailRid-
ers defeated the Knights led by
Corban Joseph, who went 2-for-
3, including his team-leading
fourth home run of the season.
He also finished with three RBI.
Joseph’s blast in the top of the
third tied the game at 1-1.
SWB wasn’t done, getting
right back at things in the next
inning with three more runs.
Cody Johnson gave the RailRid-
ers the lead at 2-1 with a run-
scoring single before Joseph
plated two more with a single to
push the score to 4-1.
After the RailRiders extended
the lead to 5-1 on an RBI hit
by Melky Mesa (2-for-3), it ap-
peared as if the lead was safe.
But closer Preston Claiborne
made things interesting in the
bottom of the seventh as the
Knights loaded the bases. Char-
lotte scored twice in the inning
before Claiborne struck out Josh
Bell to end the game and secure
the victory.
RailRiders’ starter Dellin Be-
tances only lasted 3 1/3 innings
and took a no-decision. Sam De-
mel (1-0) earned the win going
2 2/3 perfect innings with three
strikeouts.
In the second game, Zoilo Al-
monte rescued the RailRiders
twice.
The team loaded bases with
no outs in the top of the third
and almost left them there as
two outs were recorded and two
strikes were on Almonte. But he
cleared the bags with a double
for a 3-0 lead. Almonte came
through again with two outs in
the top of the fifth after SWB
had runners on first and second
with no outs. This time, he just
got one in with a single, but it
still pushed the advantage to 4-0.
That’s all Chris Bootcheck
needed. The right-hander once
again dominated on the mound
for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre go-
ing six scoreless innings to im-
prove his record to 3-0 and lower
his already microscopic ERA to
0.38. For the third time in four
starts this season he didn’t give
up any runs. In 24 innings to
date, he’s allowed just one run.
Almonte, Addison Maruszak
and Bobby Farnham all had two
hits for SWB.
Game 1
RailRiders 5, Knights 4
RailRiders Charlotte
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Joseph 1b 3 1 2 3 Short rf 4 0 1 0
Mesa rf 3 0 2 1 Sanchez 2b 4 1 1 0
Almonte cf 4 0 1 0 Morel 3b 4 0 2 2
DJohnsn dh 3 0 1 0 Anderson lf 4 0 1 0
Adams 3b 4 1 1 0 Durango pr 0 0 0 0
CJohnsn lf 3 1 1 1 Bell dh 4 1 1 0
Mahoney 2b 1 0 0 0 Phegley c 1 0 0 0
Maruszak ss 1 2 0 0 Loman 1b 3 0 1 1
Wilson c 1 0 0 0 Tolleson ss 2 1 1 0
Velazquez 2b 2 0 0 0 Gallagher cf 3 1 1 0
Totals 25 5 8 5 Totals 29 4 9 3
RailRiders 001 301 0— 5
Charlotte 100 100 2— 4
E – Morel (2). LOB—SWB 7, CHA 7. TEAM
RISP – SWB 2-for-9, CHA 4-for-13. 2B—Almonte
(6), Adams (4), Mesa (2), Morel (4). HR – Jo-
seph (4). GIDP – SWB 0, CHA 2. SAC – Wilson,
Velazquez. SF – Mesa. Outfeld assists – Ander-
son (Joseph out at second).
IP H R ER BB SO
RailRiders
Betances 3.1 5 2 2 3 6
Demel (W, 1-0) 2.2 0 0 0 0 3
Claiborne (S,3) 1 4 2 2 0 2
Charlotte
Castro (L, 0-4) 4.1 8 4 4 2 2
Marinez .2 0 0 0 0 1
Septimo 0 0 1 1 2 0
Omogrosso 2 0 0 0 1“
Septimo pitched to 2 batters in the sixth
WP: Betances 2, Demel
Umpires—Home, A.J. Johnson; First, Chad
Whitson; Second, Jon Saphire; Third, David Rack-
ley
T—2:27.
Game 2
RailRiders 5, Knights 0
RailRiders Charlotte
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Joseph 2b 4 0 0 0 Tekotte cf 3 0 0 0
Mesa cf 4 0 0 0 Sanchez ss 3 0 0 0
Almonte rf-lf 4 0 2 4 Morel dh 3 0 0 0
DJohnsn 1b 4 0 0 0 LAndrsn 1b 3 0 1 0
Murton dh 4 0 0 0 BAndrsn c 2 0 0 0
CJohnsn lf 2 0 0 0 Tolleson 3b 2 0 1 0
Velazquez ss 1 0 0 0 Gallgher rf 3 0 0 0
Maruszak ss-rf 3 2 2 0 Garcia 2b 2 0 0 0
Mahoney 3b 1 2 1 1 Durango lf 2 0 1 0
Farnham c 3 1 3 0
Totals 30 5 8 5 Totals 23 0 3 0
RailRiders 003 011 0— 5
Charlotte 000 000 0— 0
E – Tolleson (2). PB – Farnham (1). LOB—SWB
6, CHA4. TEAM RISP – SWB 5-for-12, CHA0-for-
3. 2B—Maruszak 2 (4), Almonte (7), Tolleson (4).
SB — Tolleson (2). CS — Durango (4, 2
nd
base by
Bootcheck/Farnham)
IP H R ER BB SO
RailRiders
Bootcheck (W, 3-0) 6 2 0 0 2 6
Spence 1 1 0 0 0 0
Charlotte
Zaleski (L,1-2) 5.2 6 5 5 2 7
Moskos .1 2 0 0 0 1
Troncoso 1 0 0 0 0 1
Inherited runners-scored: Moskos 1-1.
Umpires—Home, A.J. Johnson; First, Chad
Whitson; Second, Jon Saphire; Third, David Rack-
ley
T—2:02. A—1,339.
RailRiders
sweep DH
from Knights
The Times Leader staff
T r i p l E - A
Indians 9, Royals 0
Cleveland Kansas City
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Brantly lf 5 2 3 0 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0
Kipnis 2b 4 2 1 1 AEscor ss 4 0 0 0
ACarer ss 3 1 2 2 Butler dh 2 0 1 0
Aviles ss 1 0 0 0 MTejad ph 1 0 0 0
Swisher 1b 5 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0
MrRynl dh 4 1 2 1 L.Cain cf 2 0 0 0
CSantn c 3 1 1 1 Mostks 3b 3 0 1 0
YGoms c 0 0 0 0 Francr rf 3 0 1 0
Raburn rf 4 2 4 4 S.Perez c 2 0 0 0
Chsnhll 3b 4 0 0 0 Kottars ph-c 1 0 0 0
Brewers 10, Pirates 4
Pittsburgh Milwaukee
ab r hbi ab r hbi
SMarte lf 3 1 0 0 Aoki rf 4 2 1 1
RMartn c 4 0 1 0 Segura ss 5 1 3 2
McCtch cf 4 1 1 1 Braun lf 5 1 2 0
GJones rf 4 2 1 2 Lucroy c-1b 4 0 0 0
GSnchz 1b 4 0 1 1 Weeks 2b 3 1 0 0
PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 CGomz cf 3 3 2 1
Inge 2b 4 0 1 0 YBtncr 3b 4 1 2 3
Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 Maldnd 1b-c 4 0 2 2
WRdrg p 2 0 0 0 Gallard p 3 1 1 1
JSnchz p 1 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0
JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Figaro p 0 0 0 0
Mazzar p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 5 4 Totals 36101310
Pittsburgh 101 000 020— 4
Milwaukee 500 22010x—10
E--P.Alvarez (4), Maldonado 2 (3). DP--Pitts-
burgh 1. LOB--Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee 6. 2B--G.
Sanchez (3), Braun (4). 3B--Segura (3), C.Gomez
(2), Maldonado (1). HR--G.Jones (3), Aoki (3), Se-
gura (2), C.Gomez (4), Y.Betancourt (5), Gallardo
(2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
W.Rodriguez L,2-1 3.2 6 7 7 4 2
J.Sanchez 2.1 4 2 2 0 4
J.Hughes 1 2 1 1 0 0
Mazzaro 1 1 0 0 0 2
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,3-1 7 3 2 1 2 5
Figaro 1 2 2 2 0 1
Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires--Home, Marty Foster; First, Scott Bar-
ry; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Mike Everitt.
T--2:44. A--21,255 (41,900).
N AT i o N A l l E A g U E
Braves beat Nationals
and Strasburg yet again
ATLANTA —Andrelton Sim-
mons hit a tiebreaking sacrifice
fly in the seventh inning, then
made an eye-popping play to
start the ninth as the Atlanta
Braves beat the Washington Na-
tionals 3-2 on Monday night and
ended their four-game losing
streak.
Atlanta beat the Nationals for
the eighth straight time dating
to last season. The Braves swept
three games at Washington ear-
lier this month.
Washington’s Stephen Stras-
burg ended his career-worst
streak of losses in four straight
starts. He allowed two runs in
six innings.
Ian Desmond off the ninth
with a slow grounder that Sim-
mons charged. The Atlanta
shortstop slipped as he fielded
the ball and fell on his back-
side, but somehow fired a strike
from the seat of his pants that
first baseman Freddie Freeman
caught his a big stretch.
Desmond was called out on a
close play, and disagreed with
the decision. Washington man-
ager Davey Johnson came out
to argue with umpire Tim Tim-
mons.
Gerald Laird led off the
Braves’ seventh with a walk
from Tyler Clippard (1-1). Laird
moved up on pinch-hitter Ty-
ler Pastonicky’s sacrifice bunt
and was held at third on Jordan
Schafer’s single.
Brewers 10. Pirates 4
MILWAUKEE — Brewers
pitcher Yovani Gallardo hit one
of five home runs for Milwau-
kee, which went back-to-back
twice in a 10-4 rout of the Pitts-
burgh Pirates on Monday night.
Gallardo also tossed three-hit
ball over seven innings, retir-
ing his final 13 batters while
improving to 10-2 against Pitts-
burgh. He and Norichika Aoki
hit consecutive homers in the
fourth before Carlos Gomez and
Yuniesky Betancourt repeated
the feat in the fifth.
Jean Segura also connected
for the Brewers, who added
three triples and matched a sea-
son high for runs.
Stanton leaves game
MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton
has left the Miami Marlins’ game
against the New York Mets with
a strained right hamstring.
Stanton hit a tapper in front
of the plate in the 10th inning
Monday, and clutched his right
hamstring just before he crossed
first base trying in vain to beat
the throw. He then fell face-first
to the turf.
Stanton rose slowly and
limped off the field. He was re-
placed in right field after.
The 2012 NL slugging leader
had shaken an early-season
slump recently, hitting his first
home run Saturday and two
more Sunday.
This Date in Baseball —April 30
1903 — The New York Highlanders won their
home opener at Hilltop Park, 6-2 over Washington.
1919 — Philadelphia’s Joe Oeschger and
Brooklyn’s Burleigh Grimes pitched complete
games in a 9-9, 20-inning tie. Both teams scored
three runs in the 19th inning. Oeschger gave up 22
hits and walked fve, while Grimes allowed 15 hits
and walked fve.
1922 — Charlie Robertson of the Chicago White
Sox pitched a 2-0 perfect game against the Detroit
Tigers. Johnny Mostil, playing left feld for the only
time, made two outstanding catches.
1946 — Bob Feller struck out 11 New York Yan-
kees en route to his second of three career no-
hitters, a 1-0 victory at Yankee Stadium.
1961 — Willie Mays of the San Francisco Giants
hit four home runs and drove in eight runs in a 14-4
victory over the Braves in Milwaukee. Hank Aaron
hit two homers for the Braves.
1967 — Steve Barber and Stu Miller of the Balti-
more Orioles combined on a no-hitter in a 2-1 loss
to the Detroit Tigers in the frst game of a double-
header.
1969 — Jim Maloney of the Cincinnati Reds
struck out 13 en route to a 10-0 no-hitter over the
Houston Astros, the third of his career.
1988 — New York and Cincinnati hooked up in
a wild game at Riverfront Stadium that the Mets
pulled out 6-5, on a delayed call by frst base um-
pire Dave Pallone. The call resulted in a $10,000
fne and 30-day suspension of Reds manager Pete
Rose when Pallone accidentally poked Rose in the
cheek and Rose shoved Pallone twice.
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 Getz 2b 2 0 0 0
EJhnsn ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 914 9 Totals 29 0 3 0
Cleveland 101 060 010— 9
Kansas City 000 000 000— 0
DP--Cleveland 1, Kansas City 2. LOB-
-Cleveland 4, Kansas City 4. 2B--Brantley 2 (5),
A.Cabrera (4), C.Santana (9), Moustakas (5). HR-
-Kipnis (1), Raburn 2 (2). CS--C.Santana (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
U.Jimenez W,1-2 7 3 0 0 2 4
Hagadone 1 0 0 0 0 2
Allen 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
W.Davis L,2-2 4.2 12 8 8 3 3
Hochevar 1.1 1 0 0 0 1
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 0
K.Herrera 1 1 1 1 0 1
Collins 1 0 0 0 0 0
U.Jimenez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Umpires--Home, Paul Emmel; First, Clint Fagan;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Gary Darling.
T--2:37. A--14,255 (37,903).
Reds 2, Cardinals 1
CincinnatiSt. Louis
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Choo cf 4 1 1 0 Jay cf 2 0 0 0
Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 0 1 0
Votto 1b 4 0 2 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 0
Phillips 2b 3 0 1 0 Craig rf-1b 4 1 2 0
Bruce rf 4 1 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 3 1
Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0
Paul lf 4 0 0 1 Wggntn 1b 2 0 0 0
DRonsn lf 0 0 0 0 Beltran ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Mesorc c 2 0 0 0 Kozma ss 4 0 0 0
Latos p 2 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 2 0 0 0
Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0
Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0
Cubs 5, Padres 3
San Diego Chicago
ab r hbi ab r hbi
EvCarr ss 4 2 3 0 Sappelt cf 4 0 0 0
Denorf rf-cf 4 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 0 1 0
Headly 3b 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0
Quentin lf 3 0 0 0 ASorin lf 4 1 2 0
Alonso 1b 5 0 1 2 Castillo c 3 1 1 0
Gyorko 2b 4 0 0 0 Hairstn rf 3 1 1 1
Venale cf 3 0 0 0 Borbon rf 1 0 1 0
Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 Ransm 3b 4 2 2 2
Brach p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 0 2 2
Hundly c 4 0 1 0 Smrdzj p 1 0 0 0
Richrd p 3 0 0 0 Bowden p 0 0 0 0
Bass p 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt ph 1 0 0 0
Blanks ph-rf 1 0 1 0 Camp p 0 0 0 0
Russell p 0 0 0 0
Gregg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 3 8 2 Totals 32 510 5
San Diego 100 020 000— 3
Chicago 020 102 00x— 5
E—S.Castro (5). DP—San Diego 1. LOB—
San Diego 11, Chicago 6. 2B—Ev.Cabrera (3),
A.Soriano (5), Castillo (5), Barney 2 (3). HR—Hair-
ston (2), Ransom (2). SB—Borbon (2). S—Sa-
mardzija.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Richard L,0-3 5 2-3 7 5 5 2 1
Bass 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Brach 1 2 0 0 0 2
Chicago
Samardzija 5 4 3 3 4 8
Bowden W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Camp H,4 1-3 2 0 0 1 0
Russell H,6 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 3
Gregg S,4-4 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2
WP—Samardzija 2.
Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson; First, Gerry
Davis; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Dan Iassogna.
T—3:01. A—32,169 (41,019).
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 SRonsn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 33 1 7 1
Cincinnati 100 100 000— 2
St. Louis 000 000 010— 1
DP—Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 1. LOB—Cincinnati
5, St. Louis 10. 2B—Choo (7), Frazier (5), Craig
(9), Y.Molina (7). SB—Y.Molina (2). S—Cozart.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Latos W,2-0 6 5 0 0 3 4
Ondrusek H,1 1 0 0 0 1 1
Broxton H,3 1 2 1 1 0 0
Chapman S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Wainwright L,4-2 7 5 2 2 2 6
Choate 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Rosenthal 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2
HBP—by Latos (Jay). WP—Latos.
Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert; First, Angel
Hernandez; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, John
Tumpane.
T—2:53. A—36,681 (43,975).
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING—CJohnson, Atlanta, .367; Segura,
Milwaukee, .364; Harper, Washington, .356; MY-
oung, Philadelphia, .352; CGomez, Milwaukee,
.349; MEllis, Los Angeles, .342; Choo, Cincinnati,
.340.
RUNS—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 21; JUpton, At-
lanta, 21; Choo, Cincinnati, 20; CCrawford, Los
Angeles, 20; CGonzalez, Colorado, 20; Pagan,
San Francisco, 19; 6 tied at 18.
RBI—Phillips, Cincinnati, 24; Buck, New York,
23; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 22; Braun, Milwaukee,
21; YBetancourt, Milwaukee, 20; Frazier, Cincin-
nati, 19; Rizzo, Chicago, 19; Sandoval, San Fran-
cisco, 19; JUpton, Atlanta, 19; DWright, New York,
19.
HITS—Choo, Cincinnati, 33; Harper, Washing-
ton, 32; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 32; GParra, Arizona,
32; Segura, Milwaukee, 32; Sandoval, San Fran-
cisco, 31; MYoung, Philadelphia, 31.
DOUBLES—Desmond, Washington, 10; Craig,
St. Louis, 9; GParra, Arizona, 9; Pollock, Arizona,
9; Rollins, Philadelphia, 9; Schierholtz, Chicago,
9; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 8; DeJesus, Chicago, 8;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 8.
TRIPLES—Segura, Milwaukee, 3; DWright,
New York, 3; EYoung, Colorado, 3; CGomez, Mil-
waukee, 2; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 2; Nelson, Colo-
rado, 2; GParra, Arizona, 2; Utley, Philadelphia, 2.
HOME RUNS—JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Harper,
Washington, 9; Buck, New York, 8; Rizzo, Chi-
cago, 8; Braun, Milwaukee, 7; Fowler, Colorado,
7; 5 tied at 6.
STOLEN BASES—ECabrera, San Diego, 7;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 7; Segura, Milwaukee, 7; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 6; Pierre, Miami, 6; DWright,
New York, 6; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; Rutledge,
Colorado, 5; JSchafer, Atlanta, 5.
PITCHING—Lynn, St. Louis, 4-0; Harvey, New
York, 4-0; Zimmermann, Washington, 4-1; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 4-2; 12 tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS—ABurnett, Pittsburgh, 48; Sa-
mardzija, Chicago, 47; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 47;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 43; Harvey, New York, 39;
Latos, Cincinnati, 37; Strasburg, Washington, 36.
SAVES—Grilli, Pittsburgh, 10; Kimbrel, Atlanta,
9; Romo, San Francisco, 8; League, Los Angeles,
8; RBetancourt, Colorado, 8; RSoriano, Washing-
ton, 7; Henderson, Milwaukee, 6; Chapman, Cin-
cinnati, 6.
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING—CSantana, Cleveland, .386; Tor-
Hunter, Detroit, .375; MiCabrera, Detroit, .367;
AJones, Baltimore, .352; McLouth, Baltimore,
.351; CDavis, Baltimore, .349; Lowrie, Oakland,
.344.
RUNS—AJackson, Detroit, 25; Crisp, Oakland,
22; AJones, Baltimore, 22; McLouth, Baltimore, 21;
Jennings, Tampa Bay, 20; MiCabrera, Detroit, 19;
Ellsbury, Boston, 18; Gordon, Kansas City, 18.
RBI—CDavis, Baltimore, 28; Napoli, Boston,
27; MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; Fielder, Detroit, 25;
AJones, Baltimore, 20; MarReynolds, Cleveland,
20; NCruz, Texas, 19; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 19.
HITS—AJones, Baltimore, 37; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 36; TorHunter, Detroit, 36; Altuve, Houston,
35; Cano, New York, 33; Gordon, Kansas City, 32;
Lowrie, Oakland, 32; Machado, Baltimore, 32.
DOUBLES—Napoli, Boston, 13; Crisp, Oakland,
10; Donaldson, Oakland, 10; AJones, Baltimore,
10; Lowrie, Oakland, 10; Seager, Seattle, 10;
Machado, Baltimore, 9; CSantana, Cleveland, 9.
TRIPLES—Ellsbury, Boston, 3; 10 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS—CDavis, Baltimore, 9; Arencibia,
Toronto, 8; Bautista, Toronto, 7; Cano, New York,
7; Encarnacion, Toronto, 7; Morse, Seattle, 7; Mar-
Reynolds, Cleveland, 7.
STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 11;
McLouth, Baltimore, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7; Pedroia,
Boston, 6; 10 tied at 5.
PITCHING—Buchholz, Boston, 5-0; MMoore,
Tampa Bay, 5-0; Lester, Boston, 4-0; Fister, De-
troit, 4-0; Darvish, Texas, 4-1; Masterson, Cleve-
land, 4-2; Sabathia, New York, 4-2.
STRIKEOUTS—Darvish, Texas, 49; Scherzer,
Detroit, 46; FHernandez, Seattle, 44; Dempster,
Boston, 43; AniSanchez, Detroit, 41; Buchholz,
Boston, 39; Masterson, Cleveland, 39; Peavy,
Chicago, 39.
SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 10; Rivera, New
York, 9; Nathan, Texas, 8; Reed, Chicago, 8; Wil-
helmsen, Seattle, 8; Perkins, Minnesota, 6; GHol-
land, Kansas City, 6; Janssen, Toronto, 6.
School: Crestwood
Grade: Senior
Sport: Tennis
Position: No. 1 Singles
All in the Family: Ross, 17, is the son of
David and Kimberly Gladey of Fairview
Twp. His sister Taylor, a Crestwood grad, is
a field hockey player at William & Mary.
Stats: Gladey won both of his matches in
straight sets last week, capturing a 6-1, 6-3
victory in the top singles match against
Berwick, then polishing off a near-perfect
match against Dallas with a 6-0, 6-1 vic-
tory. That ended his final regular season
at 9-2 heading into District 2 playoff com-
petition this week, and boosted Gladey’s
career record to 32-20.
Hitting winners: Gladey’s performance led
Crestwood to its second consecutive Wyo-
ming Valley Conference Class 3A champi-
onship, with Ross playing in the top singles
spot both seasons. A four-year starter,
Gladey played through a blister, which
hampered him during his two losses earlier
this season. He only began playing tennis
in the seventh grade, but his dynamic
kick serve proves hard for opponents to
handle because it has a lot of topspin, and
his quickness on the court leads to some
surprising returns and points. His dominat-
ing victory over Dallas helped the Comets
wrap up their division title.
Coach’s corner: “He doesn’t have that one
powerful shot to just hit it by the person,”
Crestwood coach Scott Lenio said. “He’s
more of a technician. What he does is, he’s
so quick, he gets to balls that the other
players think are by him. He keeps himself
in the point. He’s done well for us. He’s re-
ally improved his game. He really enjoys it,
he takes a lot of pride in it.”
Did you know? The fluid swing Gladey
features on the court wasn’t developed
exclusively through tennis. He’s an avid
ping-pong player - “I asked for a ping-pong
table one year for Christmas, I got into
ping-pong before I got into tennis,” Gladey
said. And if you think Gladey’s hard to beat
on the tennis court, just watch him work
the ping-pong table. “I’m pretty good,” he
said.
From his angle: “It felt pretty good to
clinch that win in your senior year,” Gladey
said of Crestwood’s second straight league
championship. “I really just go for the win.
I try to play as hard as I can against every
opponent. I try to go no-mercy rule.”
Week in review: In the high-scoring
sport of lacrosse, a couple kids came up
with some big stops on defense. George
Pfeiffer of Dallas stopped 15 of the 16
shots against him during a 9-1 victory in
the boys league. And on the girls league,
Coughlin’s Paige Tedik made 11 saves
and her team needed every one of them
to walk away with a 9-8 victory over
Lake-Lehman. Of course, last week still
produced some prime-time scorers, as
Crestwood’s Jay Popson popped home
six goals during a boys victory over North
Pocono and Dallas’ Cara Pricher scored
five times in a girls victory over Crest-
wood. … It was another record-breaking
week in track and field, where Wyoming
Valley West’s Will Butkiewicz set a track
record in the 800-meter run with a time
of 2:02 against Coughlin. In that same
meet, Coughlin’s 400-meter relay team of
Corey Keen, Zac Evans, Pat Malone and
Mujahid Chesson set a track record with
a time of 43.2 seconds. Tunkhannock’s
Stefan Schlachter was impressive enough
without setting new standards, winning
the 100 and 200 dashes, the discus and
running on the first-place relay team dur-
ing a victory over Pittston Area. … On the
girls track, Lake-Lehman’s Cayle Spencer
set a school record by throwing the javelin
124 feet, 11 inches. Danielle Spencer set a
Dallas school record by clearing 8 feet, 8
inches in the pole vault. And Dallas’ Katie
Kravitsky matched a school record with
a high jump of 5-2. … Wyoming Area’s
three-sport star Nick O’Brien didn’t set
any records, unless there’s one for excel-
ling at double-duty. On the track, O’Brien
finished first in the 100 and 200-meter
dashes, the javelin throw and was a
member of the winning 400 relay team.
O’Brien, known more as a football star
for the Warriors, kept right on running to
the baseball field, where he had two of
his team’s four hits in a loss to Coughlin
at PNC Field; drove home two runs in a
victory over Hazleton Area; and had two
hits and scored a run in a 2-1 victory over
Dallas during a week in which he batted
.364. … Fortunately for Tunkhannock’s
baseball team, Jeremy Lee brought a hot
bat into last week. His early two-run homer
against against Wyoming Valley West was
the difference in a 2-1 victory, and the most
significant blow in a week where Lee hit
.500 with a double and four RBI as the
Tigers went 3-0 to move into first place
in the WVC Division 2. Will Amesbury
used a 14-strikeout performance to help
Meyers move into second place in the
WVC Division 3. Hanover Area’s Mickey
Ferrence twirled a three-inning no-hitter
at Wyoming Seminary. And Dallas’ Brian
Stepniak did a little of both, driving home
seven runs with two doubles and a homer
and picking up the victory on the mound
against division-leading Berwick. Stepniak
hit the first home run and recorded the
first win on Dallas’ new baseball field. … On
the softball field, Tunkhannock’s Ryleigh
Fitch launched a three-run homer in
the top of the seventh inning to lead the
Tigers past Crestwood, and also had two
hits and three of the team’s four RBI in a
one-run victory over Coughlin. But pitch-
ing in the circle was equally impressive.
Hazleton Area’s Becky Demko pitched a
complete-game no-hitter against Dal-
las. Wyoming Area’s Alex Holt threw a
five-inning no-hitter at Pittston Area and
finished with a complete-game two-hitter
against Nanticoke Area. Northwest’s
Kelsey Yustat pitched a one-hitter against
Wyoming Seminary with eight strikeouts
and struck out six while collecting two
hits at the plate against Scranton Prep.
And Redeemer’s Kaya Swanek allowed
just one run in two victories while striking
out 11, and adding a home run at the plate
against Northwest. … Valley West’s John
Butchko did a little hitting himself on the
volleyball court. He made 42 assists, seven
digs, three kills and served up eight points
in a defeat against Dallas and recorded 21
assists and seven aces against Tunkhan-
nock. James DelPiore made 39 assists,
five blocks and five digs to help Dallas hold
off Valley West and Hazleton Area’s Brett
Barron turned in a 39-assist performance
against Lake-Lehman. Holy Redeemer’s
Jeremy Myslowski made 25 assists and
pounded home 17 kills against Coughlin,
and Nanticoke Area’s John Pietrzak had
15 kills, four blocks and served nine aces in
a victory over Crestwood.
-- Paul Sokoloski
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4B TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 S P O R T S
Continued from Page 1B
Continued from Page 1B
nets
open
on campus
BILL ARSENAULT
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Crestwood tennis player Ross Gladey won both of his matches last week.
athlete of the Week
Ross Gladey
WVc products take on penn Relays
Syracuse University junior Donald Pol-
litt came up with a solid effort in last
week’s 119th Penn Relays in Philadelphia.
Pollitt (Hazleton Area) finished second
in the tough 110 meter hurdles Champion-
ship Division race. He posted a personal
record time of 13.85 losing only to Wayne
Davis of Texas A&M.
Pollitt also helped the 4x100 finish
fourth in the IC4A Division. He ran the
anchor leg with the group posting a time
of 41.25.
“Donald has made good progress this
outdoor season,” sprinter-hurdles coach
Dave Hegland said. “His run at Penn is a
reflection of how well he has been training
on a daily basis. We expect that to contin-
ue as we move into the championship sea-
son. He has great things ahead and we’re
very excited for him.”
The Orange will compete in the Big
East Conference Championships Friday
through Sunday in Piscataway, N.J. and
then compete in the IC4A Championship
May 11-13 in Princeton, N.J.
RECORD FOR HAYWARD – Fresh-
man Dannah Hayward finished third in
her heat and 21st overall in the 400 meter
hurdles in the Championships race at the
Penn Relays and she did it in record fash-
ion.
Hayward (Coughlin) posted a time of
1:01.25 for the school record in that event.
She had set the previous record (1:01.41)
at the Colonial Relays.
“I’m not disappointed but I know that
I could have run better,” she said of her
Penn Relays effort. “But to break a school
record, you can’t really be disappointed
with that.”
Hayward later ran with the 4x400 relay
which finished 47th out of 79 teams with
a time of 3:54.49. Her effort earned her At-
lantic-10 Conference Rookie of the Week
honors.
Junior Mercedes Yanora (Holy Re-
deemer) also competed for the Hawks and
helped the 4x100 finish 56th in 49.05.
Up next will be the league champion-
ships Saturday and Sunday in Charlotte,
N.C.
“Dannah is in the top five in the confer-
ence in the intermediate hurdles and has
a strong chance to medal,” coach Kevin
Quinn said. “She is a terrific competitor
and always makes it her goal to do her best.
This attitude makes her a real threat.”
The coach calls Yanora a valuable asset
to the team.
“Mercedes has consistently been our
top sprinter, runs a strong leadoff leg on
our 4x100 and has shown well on the occa-
sions she has run with the 4x400,” Quinn
said.
GOOD MEET FOR BLACK – Penn
State freshman Shelley Black (Cough-
lin) competed in her first Penn Relays and
posted a pair of solid efforts. Black fin-
ished 15th in the 400 meter hurdles with
a season and personal best time of 1:00.44.
Then she helped the 4x400 relay fin-
ish fourth in the meet’s Champions of
America race. The team posted a time of
3:33.47, the second fasted in the Big Ten
Conference this season. Black, running in
leg three, had a time of 54.4.
The Big Ten Championships is set for
May 10-12 in Columbus, Ohio.
COLLEY READY TO GO – Sopho-
more Gavin Colley (Tunkhannock) will
lead the Widener men’s track team into
the Middle Atlantic Conference Outdoor
Track Championships starting Thursday
in Annville.
Colley prepped for the meet by help-
ing the team’s 4x400 relay finish fourth in
the Pop Haddleton MAC race at the Penn
Relays. Prior to that, he finished fourth in
both the 100 (11.18) and the 200 (23.09)
at the West Chester Invitational. And the
day after he competed at the Penn Relays,
he helped the 4x100 relay win at the Col-
lege of NewJersey Invitational with a time
of 42.46.
Colley won the 60 meter title and helped
the Pride capture its sixth MAC Indoor
Championship in the last seven years dur-
ing the winter.
“Gavin is the top-ranked runner in the
100 meters,” coach Vince Touey said. “And
he will anchor our 400 relay team, which
is also the top-rated squad entering the
championships.”
Freshman Michael Ambrulavage
(Holy Redeemer) also competes for Wid-
ener and he finished third in the 3,000
steeplechase at West Chester.
ALEXANDER PITCHING IN – Fresh-
man Tommy Alexander (Wyoming Val-
ley West) is pitching for the Old Dominion
baseball team. The 6-foot-3, 180-pound
right-hander has a 2-3 record and a 5.35
earned run average in 13 games and one
start for the Monarchs, who are 23-21
overall and 13-11 in the Colonial Athletic
Association.
In 35.1 innings, he’s given up 38 hits and
22 runs, 21 earned, with 14 walks and 29
strikeouts.
“Tommy has really improved as the
season has gone on and we are all excited
about his future at ODU,” coach Chris Fin-
wood said. “He got off to a slow start but
has really rebounded well and continues to
improve with each outing.”
Alexander proved the coach right in
his latest effort. He pitched five innings
of shutout relief, giving up just two hits,
walking one and striking out three in Old
Dominion’s 7-3 league victory over Dela-
ware last Saturday.
HERR JUMPED RIGHT IN – Juniata
junior Justin Herr (Crestwood) compet-
ed in three events at last weekend’s Land-
mark Conference Outdoor Track Champi-
onships in Towson, Md. He finished fourth
in the triple jump (42-10 ¾), fifth in the
high jump (5-10) and 10th in the long
jump (19-11).
“Justin has been more consistent this
spring, but we are still waiting for the big
jump in performance” coach Jon Cutright
said. “After setting personal bests in every
meet last year, this year seemed dull for
him.”
BIG YEAR FOR WENNER – Junior
tri-captain Shannon Wenner of Drums
(MMI Prep) hit .388 (26-for-67) with three
doubles, two triples, three home runs,
15 runs scored and 16 RBI for the Cedar
Crest softball team, which posted a 10-18
overall record and an 8-14 mark in the Co-
lonial States Athletic Conference.
Wenner, who played first base, made
just four errors on 180 chances (.978).
KOHLI HELPED OUT – Sophomore
Sarah Kohli (Dallas) played in 15 games
and started 13 for the LaRoche softball
team, which finished its season with a 7-23
overall record and a 4-12 mark in the Al-
legheny Mountain Collegiate Conference.
Kohli, an infielder, hit .375 (12-for-32)
with four runs scored, two stolen bases
and an RBI.
PHOTO PROVIDED
Hazleton Area alum Donald Pollitt
placed second in his 110 hurdles race at
the Penn Relays for Syracuse.
PHOTO PROVIDED
Coughlin grad Shelley Black made her
Penn Relays debut last week at Franklin
Field for Penn State.
host Game 7 on Saturday.
Nate Robinson had 20 points
and eight assists starting in
place of point guard Kirk Hin-
rich, who bruised his left calf in
Saturday’s game.
Only eight NBA teams have
overcome a 3-1 deficit, but the
Nets remained confident af-
ter Saturday’s collapse, feeling
they had outplayed the Bulls for
long stretches during the series.
They have led by double digits
in four of the five games.
But they need two more wins
against a Bulls franchise that is
12-0 all-time when holding a 3-1
lead.
Robinson scored 29 of his 34
points after the third quarter
Saturday in a game the Nets led
by 14 late in regulation. Coming
off his big game and agitating to
opposing fans even when he’s
struggling, Robinson was loudly
booed during introductions, and
each time he touched the ball
early on.
Hawks 102, Pacers 91
ATLANTA — Josh Smith
scored 29 points as the Atlanta
Hawks built a 17-point lead at
halftime, then withstood an In-
diana comeback over the final
two quarters to even the series.
After struggling much of the
second half, Smith made every
big play down the stretch. He
swished a rare 3-pointer, came
up with an offensive rebound to
set up a 3 by Kyle Korver, then
finished off a fast break with a
right-handed dunk.
ion will play at 6,996 yards on
the scorecard. The last major
course that was under 7,000
yards was Shinnecock Hills
for the 2004 U.S. Open, which
played 6,996 yard. Merion will
be the shortest since Southern
Hills, which was 6,973 in 2001.
“There’s going to be more
birdies made at this U.S. Open
than any we have seen in recent
history,” USGA executive direc-
tor Mike Davis said. “There’s
just some holes out here that
lend themselves to it. Which is
wonderful. Then there’s some
holes that are very tough. I
would contend that you’ve got
this balance of some of the easi-
est holes for U.S. Opens that
you’ll see in the modern era, yet
at the same time, they have got
some tough holes.”
Davis and club officials spoke
on a rainy Monday at Merion
that certainly didn’t dampen the
enthusiasm of the return of ma-
jor golf to the Philadelphia area.
Simpson, who Skyped in for the
event, had last year’s champion-
ship trophy by his side.
“It’s even more of an honor at
a place I love,” he said. “I can’t
wait to get there.”
Simpson emerged last year
on a fog-filled final day at The
Olympic Club in San Francisco
with four birdies around the turn
and a tough chip out of a hole to
the right of the 18th green that
he converted into par for a 2-un-
der 68. He outlasted former U.S.
Open champions Jim Furyk and
Graeme McDowell and finished
at 1-over 281.
Aside from the boost in his
bank account and tour ranking,
Simpson has been noticed more
because of the win.
“When I used to sign auto-
graphs the kid would ask the
mom who I was, and sometimes
she would say, ‘I don’t know
who that is,’” he said. “But now
people know who I am more.”
The USGA decided to cut
down on tickets because Merion
is not a big piece of property like
Bethpage Black or Pinehurst.
The USGA will take a financial
hit compared with other venues,
but it felt it was worth it. Merion
expected about 25,500 fans dur-
ing the peak days of the tourna-
ment.
“We don’t look at this as a one-
year financial exercise,” USGA
vice president Tom O’Toole
said. “We look over a period of
years, and we’re perfectly com-
fortable that we could come
back and have a less financially
significant Open.”
Merion’s famed wicker basket
flagsticks will be in place. So
will an increased focus on pace
after 14-year-old Guan Tianlang
got a one-shot penalty for slow
play during the second round at
the Masters.
“We want to make sure that
the pace-of-play policy is consis-
tent with what the challenge is
here at Merion,” O’Toole said.
“We’ll be looking at it closely.”
All eyes will be on Merion,
which opened in 1912, for a
weekend. Ben Hogan won the
second of his four Opens at
Merion. Lee Trevino beat Jack
Nicklaus in a playoff. History is
all around the famed course. It’s
time to make some more.
“When we closed up in 1981,
it’s not as if the course didn’t
play well, but we really thought
this was the last time, at least
at a national Open Champion-
ship, you would ever see Merion
played on TV,” Davis said. “It
had nothing to do with the golf
course in terms of howit played,
in terms of a test of golf. But it
had everything to do with, how
do you fit a modern day U.S.
Open on this 111 acres?”
TUESDAY, April 30, 2013 pAgE 5B TiMES lEADEr www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
SECOND TEAM AL L- STARS
By JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
TI MES L EADER BOYS SWI MMI NG AL L- STARS
Tigers’ Spencer
kept getting better
In the Lackawanna-centric Wyoming
Valley Conference North Division, it’s easy
to overlook Ben Spencer and his Tunkhan-
nock team.
But Spencer made sure his name, his
team, and his athleticism wouldn’t be dis-
counted with a record-breaking set of per-
formances.
The Times Leader names Tunkhan-
nock’s Ben Spencer the 2013 Boys Swim-
ming and Diving Athlete of the Year, in
honor of a season in which he collected
two district championships and two state
medals.
Spencer’s claim to fame came in the
200 IM in which he broke former Bishop
Hoban star Mark Bellow’s 1990 record of
1:58.94 with a newdistrict mark of 1:58.09.
For Spencer, it’s a goal he’s had his eyes on
since his sophomore season.
“During my sophomore year, I dropped
something like 10 seconds off my time,”
Spencer said. “I said then that my goal was
to break a district record. It seemed in my
grasp.
“I’m happy with my performance. I
never really had anything in my life that
I could relate to this. I’m going to enjoy it
while I can.”
Spencer followed his 200 IMvictory with
a first-place finish in the 100 back in 53.65
seconds – just off another district record.
He followed suit at PIAAs with two state
Class 2A medals. Spencer garnered fifth in
the 200 IM at 1:58.24. He then took sixth
in the 100 back in 53.21 seconds.
Like any good swimmer who strives for
perfect, Spencer said he felt honored to be
on the awards podium but lamented that
his times could have been better at states.
“It’s funny because I was still sad and
upset,” Spencer said. “I bettered my times
but I still know that I didn’t go as low as I
wanted.”
Spencer will have plenty of opportu-
nities to lower his times after signing a
scholarship to swim at Division II Clarion
University. He plans on majoring in busi-
ness administration.
For now, Spencer is content on mak-
ing his teammates faster for next season,
taking a mentor role during his final sea-
son. Two of his relays finished second at
districts and qualified for states. His 200
medley relay teamplaced in ninth – one off
of a state medal – with a 1:40.43.
“I basically want to them to practice as
hard as I do,” Spencer said. “When I was
a freshman, I worked my butt off to keep
up with our faster seniors. I tried enforcing
that mentality with them.
“It was great qualifying for relays be-
cause my teammates were there this time
for me.”
Now that all is said and done, Spencer
goes down as one of the most accom-
plished swimmers in Tunkhannock’s his-
tory.
“I definitely think I matured. That’s how
I think I was able to make all of my goals.
My coach (Tim Mislevy) really taught me
life lessons along the way.”
AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER
Tunkhannock High School senior Ben Spencer won two district championships and two state medals to earn The Times Leader
Boys Swimming top athlete honors.
MicHaeL DuBinSki
Holy Redeemer
PaTrick GeLSo
Dallas
anDrew GreenwaLD
Wyoming Valley West
cory HiMLin
Wyoming Valley West
roBerT JacoBS
Wyoming Valley West
eD kovac
Hazleton Area
cHriS LukaSewSki
Crestwood
reiD LukSic
Dallas
PaTrick MaDaya
Dallas
Joe MoffiTT
Tunkhannock
MaTT MiLLer
Tunkhannock
anDriy MoLcHanov
Wyoming Seminary
ezra Moore
Dallas
coDy SMiTH
Holy Redeemer
DuSTin zeiLer
Lake-Lehman
MaTTHew eDkinS
Lake-Lehman
So. – Diving
In just two years, Edkins trans-
formed a once-perennial bottom
dweller of the WVC to one of the
district’s top diving programs.
His near perfection on the diving
board merited him a bronze medal
at the PIAA Class 2A champion-
ships. The Black Knight sophomore
registered a 407.35 to secure third
place against an underclassmen
cast at states. Earlier in the year,
Edkins tabbed his second –straight
district championship with a
454.65 score.
Ben SPencer
Tunkhannock
Sr. – Medley/Back
A record-breaking performance at
districts and two state medals earned
Spencer the distinction of The Times
Leader Boys Swimming and Diving
Athlete of the Year in 2013. Spencer
was nothing short of remarkable,
breaking a 23-year old district record
in the 200 IM with a 1:58.09. He later
claimed the 100 back gold in 53.65
seconds and placed second in two
relays. Spencer had the highest WVC
swimming showing at states, grab-
bing fifth in the 200 IM. The next day,
he took sixth in the 100 back in 53.21
seconds.
TyLer farLey
Hazleton area
Sr. – Medley/Breaststroke
Farley erased 5.48 seconds off
his seed time to secure his place
on the top of the 200 IM podium,
finishing the race in 2:02.56. The
Cougar senior won two relays –
400 free, 200 medley – to pave
the way for his team’s regional
championship. At states, he took
32nd in the 200 IM and his two
relays finished 20th and 22nd. He
took second in the 100 breast at
regionals
Troy vaLkuSky
Hazleton area
Jr. – Sprints/Distance
In leading his team to a regional
title, Valkusky participated in two
championship relay teams. His
400 free relay team clocked in at
3:15.65 to get 20th at states, and
the 200 medley relay produced a
1:39.2 time to take 22nd. Individu-
ally, Valkusky finished second in
the 50 free (22.13) and fourth in
the 500 free (5:06.29).
JoSePH GrzecH
crestwood
Jr. – Backstroke/free
Joseph was a multi-event state
qualifier with two second-place
swims at districts. He trimmed
4.8 seconds off his 200 freestyle
time for a 1:48.33 to make the
race surprisingly interesting down
the finish. Grzech later swam a
55.25-second 100 backstroke to
claim silver. In Lewisburg, he made
the B-final in the 100 back for a
16th place finish took 22nd in the
200 free.
coLLin veST
wyoming valley west
Sr. – Diving
Vest ended his high school career
as one of the most prolific divers
in District 2 history. The Spartan
senior won his fourth district
championship with a 481.8 score.
For the second-straight year, Vest
medaled with a seventh-place
performance at states, registering
a 434.7. In Lewisburg, he was the
only diver to complete a triple-
somersault pike. In 2012, he set
the Class 3A district record of an
astounding 534.4. Vest is a 2011-12
NISCA all-American.
JoSH GrzecH
crestwood
Jr. – Butterfly/Sprints
Josh’s state medal showed he
doesn’t need a complete team to
be successful. Grzech took seventh
at states in the 100 butterfly at
52.28 seconds. He later took 12th
in the 100 free at the Lewisburg-
based championships. He was a
multi-event winner in his most
successful districts to date. Grzech
narrowly defeated Dallas’ Brian
Stepniak in the 100 free (48.2 sec-
onds) and won the 100 butterfly
with ease in 53.02 seconds.
Terry vraBec
Holy redeemer
So. – Butterfly/Breaststroke
Vrabec electrified the Royals at
districts with his first-place swim
in the 100 breaststroke at 1:00.53 –
the first career gold medal for the
Holy Redeemer sophomore. He fin-
ished two off of a state medal with
a 10th place performance in the
100 breast at states; his 1:00.98
was within a quarter-second of
the seventh and eighth place
finishers’ finals time. Vrabec also
placed fourth in the 100 butterfly
at districts.
Jeff HickS
Hazleton area
Sr. – freestyle
Hicks secured a regional crown in
the 200 free, clocking in at 1:49.62.
He also qualified for states with
a first in the 400 free and 200
medley relays. At states, his 400
free relay garnered 20th at a time
of 3:15.65, and the 200 medley
bested their seed time with a
1:39.2. Hicks was third in the 100
free at regionals as his Cougars
won a regional championship.
MarcuS waGner
Dallas
Sr. – Distance
Add four district golds and an-
other state medal to Wagner’s im-
pressive resume. Wagner claimed
the 200 free in 1:47.13 at districts.
He then lapped the competi-
tion in the 500 free; his winning
time of 4:51.64 was 14.17 seconds
faster than the next finisher. After
winning two relays at districts,
his 200 free relay team medaled
in seventh at states in 1:30.35. In
Lewisburg, Wagner earned 12th in
the 200 free and 14th in the 500
free. He leaves Dallas with four
district team championships and 11
district gold medals.
Jack MaTuSiak
Dallas
Sr. – Medley
Matusiak contributed to two dis-
trict relay championships en route
to a fourth district team champi-
onship and a WVC South Division
crown. His 200 free relay earned
a state medal with a seventh-
place performance at 1:30.35. At
districts, he took third in the 200
IM (2:05.71) and sixth in the 100
breast (1:05.58).
THoMaS MiSSaL
wyoming valley west
Sr. – Medley/Butterfly
Missal put the finishing touched on
a storied career with two second-
place swims at the District 2-4 re-
gionals. He cut 6-plus seconds off
his seed time to earn silver in the
200 IM with a 2:02.55. A 2-second
underdog, Missal nearly pulled off
one of the biggest upsets of re-
gionals when he touched the wall
three-tenths of a second behind
the leader in the 100 fly at 53.32
seconds. His 200 free relay team
won a district gold and finished
24th at PIAAs.
ryan PaiSLey
Hazleton area
Sr. – Butterfly/Backstroke
Paisley broke a district record in
the 100 backstroke, setting the
new mark at 52.68 seconds. The
record was just the tip of the
iceberg as he won first in all four
events he swam in at regionals.
Paisley squeezed out a 53.02-sec-
ond victory in the 100 butterfly,
narrowly defeating Wyoming Val-
ley West’s Thomas Missal. His 200
medley and 400 free relays both
won regional championships in
easy fashion. Paisley claimed 21st
in the 100 back and 25th in the
100 butterfly as his Cougars won
the team title.
Brian STePniak
Dallas
Sr. – Sprints
Everything came up sevens for
Stepniak in his final state meet:
seventh in the 50 free at 21.76,
seventh in the 100 free at 47.98,
and seventh in the 200 free relay
at 1:30.35. His three state medals
couple with a three district golds.
He won the 50 free in 21.88 sec-
onds and trailed by two-tenths of
a second in the 100 free. Stepniak
ends his Mountaineer swimming
career with eight district gold
medals. He was keystone in the
Mountaineers’ four consecutive
district championships and guided
Dallas to a WVC South Division
title this season.
eD zawaTSki
wyoming valley west
So. – Sprints
Zawatski’s sophomore campaign
further supported his case as one
of the fastest young talents in the
state. “Fast Eddie” claimed his first
state medal, finishing fifth in the
50 free at 20.92 seconds. He fell
two spots short of a state medal
in the 100 free with a 10th place
finish. Zawatski was a tenth of a
second off of a district record in
the 100 free, finishing in 46.66
seconds. The Spartan sophomore
won the 50 regional gold at 21.01
seconds.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6B TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 S P O R T S
Continued from Page 1B
BERWICK
HAZLETON — Josh Mc-
Clain went the distance on the
mound, striking out eight to
lead Tunkhannock to a 2-1 win
over Hazleton Area on Monday.
McClain also drove in the
winning run in the fifth inning,
hitting a sacrifice fly to center
with the bases loaded.
Lance Sherry hit a solo hom-
er in the top of the third to tie
the game for the Tigers (7-2).
Hazleton Area (5-4) took an
early lead in the first inning on
an RBI double by Tony Craig.
Anthony Hernandez went the
distance for the Cougars, fan-
ning five.
Pittston Area 8,
Holy Redeemer 3
Tyler McGarry and James
Emmett (double) each drove in
two runs to help the Patriots (2-
6) snap their skid.
Michael Schwab struck out
five in four innings for the win.
Jim Strickland went 2-for-3
with two double and an RBI to
lead the Royals (1-8).
Holy Redeemer AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Michael Kosik cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
John Yurkoski 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Marty Cirelli 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Tommy Cosgrove rf 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jim Strickland ss 3 0 2 1 2 0 0
Eric Kerr p 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jason Hoggarth p 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nick Oley 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vito Malacari dh 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ian McGrane dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Alex Stashik lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dan Seasock ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brian Leighton c 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brandon Sandrowicz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Dacey 1b 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 23 3 5 2 2 0 0
Pittston Area AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Josh Razvillas 1b 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Michael Schwab p 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Nick Bolka ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cody Rowan rf 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Michael Delaney cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justin Glasgow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Faggotti p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Mott p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tyler McGarry dh 3 2 2 2 0 0 0
John Kielbasa lf 2 2 1 1 0 0 0
Felix Mascelli ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
James Emmett 2b 3 1 1 2 1 0 0
Justin Martinelli 3b 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Jordan Houseman c 3 0 1 0 1 0 0
Totals 24 8 7 7 2 0 0
Holy Redeemer 002 100 0 — 3
Pittston Area 305 000 x — 8
Holy Redeemer IP H R ER BB SO
Kerr (L, 1-2) 2.1 6 8 8 3 2
Hoggarth 3.2 1 0 0 0 3
Pittston Area IP H R ER BB SO
Schwab (W, 1-3) 4.0 3 3 3 6 5
Glasgow 1.0 0 0 0 2 0
Faggotti 1.0 1 0 0 0 1
Mott 1.0 1 0 0 0 1
Coughlin 10, Dallas 0
Dave Marriggi pitched a five-
inning shutout against Dallas
while Coughlin scored five runs
in the fourth and fifth to end
the game early.
Marriggi allowed just three
hits and struck out seven for
the Crusaders (6-3). Josh Feath-
erman (double) and Pat Hall
finished with three RBI apiece.
Justin Brojakowski doubled
for Dallas (5-4).
Dallas AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Ryan Zapoticky cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Bill Gately c 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Greg Petorak ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brian Stepniak 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eric Zawatski rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan McCrumm 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justin Brojakowski dh-p 2 0 1 0 1 0 0
Nigel Stearns p 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Domenic Oliveri lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Murray 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ben Narcum 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rosario Bevevino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dylan Pilger ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 16 0 3 0 1 0 0
Coughlin AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Dave Parsnik cf 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Dave Marriggi p 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Kyle Lupas 1b 2 2 1 1 0 0 0
Josh Featherman p 2 1 1 3 1 0 0
Christian Rivera 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pat Hall dh 2 0 2 3 0 0 0
Eric Adamczyk c 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
SamAndrews rf 2 2 2 0 0 0 0
Hunter Bednarczyk lf 2 2 0 0 0 0 0
Mike Wozniak ss 3 2 2 2 0 0 0
Totals 20 10 9 10 1 0 0
Dallas 000 00 — 0
Coughlin 000 55 — 10
Dallas IP H R ER BB SO
Stearns (L, 2-2) 3.2 5 5 5 7 7
Bevenino 0.1 0 0 0 0 0
Oliveri 0.2 1 4 4 1 0
Brojakowski 0.0 3 1 0 1 0
Coughlin IP H R ER BB SO
Marriggi (W, 2-2) 5.0 3 0 0 2 7
Wyoming Area 4,
Wyoming Valley West 2
Jake Granteed scattered nine
singles and held off a late Valley
West rally in a complete-game
victory.
Seven different players re-
corded a hit for the Warriors (6-
3). Bart Chupka doubled while
Zach Lopatka, Mike Carey and
Joe Gavenonis all drove in a
run.
Valley West (4-5) got three
hits apiece from Evan McCue
and Jeremy Sabecky. Chris
Nixon went the distance on the
mound.
Wyoming Area AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Zach Lopatka rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Mike Carey 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Tino Romanelli ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Joe Gavenonis dh 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
Trent Grove c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bart Chupka 1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 0
Jake Granteed p 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan Zezza 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Erik Walkowiak cf 2 2 1 0 0 0 0
Tyler Wrubel lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 4 7 3 1 0 0
Wyoming Valley West AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Jeremy Sabecky cf 4 0 3 1 0 0 0
Ricky Stayer rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Mike Leonard 2b 3 0 0 1 0 0 0
Nick Hogan lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Evan McCue 1b 3 0 3 0 0 0 0
Chris McCue ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Chris Nixon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dan Flaherty dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Labashosky 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Collin Harrison c 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 28 2 9 2 0 0 0
Wyoming Area 021 001 0 — 4
Valley West 000 010 1 — 2
Wyoming Area IP H R ER BB SO
Granteed (W, 4-1) 7.0 9 2 2 1 2
Valley West IP H R ER BB SO
Nixon (L, 2-1) 7.0 7 4 3 6 3
Lake-Lehman 6,
Crestwood 2
Scott Bean pitched a com-
plete game and struck out nine
to lift the Black Knights (3-6) to
a win at home.
Cahil Carey led the Lehman
offense, finishing 2-for-3 with
two RBI. Tyler Kolb added a
double.
Justin Rinehimer (RBI),
Drew Munisteri and Tom
Goyne each had two hits for the
Comets (4-6).
Crestwood AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Tyler Sadvary 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Drew Munisteri cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 0
Anthony Caladie 3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
Brian Markowski lf 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Abhay Metgud lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jon Wychock 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Josh Grzech ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Curt Yenchik c 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tony Grottola p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ethan Markowski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ryan Murphy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Corey Eyerman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justin Rinehimer dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 0
Freudy Reyes dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tom Goyne rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 0
Elliot Snyder ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
John Chupka ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 2 10 2 0 0 0
Lake-Lehman AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Tyler Kolb lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 0
John Van Scoy cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Cody Paraschak c 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Connor Balloun 3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Jeff Carter ss 2 2 1 1 0 0 0
Scott Bean p 2 1 0 1 0 0 0
Pete Borum 1b 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
A.J. Antonitis rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zach Brucher dh 2 0 0 1 0 0 0
Cahil Carey 2b 3 0 2 2 0 0 0
Totals 21 6 7 6 1 0 0
Crestwood 002 000 0 — 2
Lake-Lehman 100 230 x — 6
Crestwood IP H R ER BB SO
Grottola (L, 0-1) 3.1 1 3 3 5 2
E. Markowski 1.1 4 3 3 1 2
Murphy 0.0 0 0 0 2 0
Eyerman 1.1 2 0 0 1 0
Lake-Lehman IP H R ER BB SO
Bean (W, 1-3) 7.0 10 2 2 5 9
Boys volleyball
Crestwood 3, Hazleton 1
Crestwood overcame a first
set loss to win the next three
for a victory over Hazleton
Area. Nick Banos led the Com-
ets with 14 kills and 13 digs.
Corey Manship produced 12
kills and two blocks.
Brett Barron had 32 assists
and eight digs for the Cougars.
Alex Gregoire recorded seven
service points and 10 kills.
Crestwood 19 25 25 25
Hazleton Area 25 20 23 21
Crestwood: Nick Banos 11 service points, 5
aces, 7 blocks, 15 assists, 14 kills, 13 digs; Corey
Manship 12 kills, 2 blocks; Kyle Price 5 service
points, 12 assists, 5 digs. Hazleton Area: Brett
Barron 32 assists, 8 digs, 6 service points, 2 kills;
Alex Gregoire 10 kills, 7 service points, 7 digs;
Paul Collado 17 kills, 2 blocks.
Delaware Valley 3,
Lake-Lehman 0
The Warriors used a 26-as-
sist effort from Tyler Brady to
upend the Black Knights. Jason
Clader had 10 service points,
11 kills and eight digs.
Kevin Masters contributed
nine kills and seven digs for the
Black Knights. Zack Bevan tal-
lied 17 service points and seven
digs.
Delaware Valley 25 25 25
Lake-Lehman 19 22 22
Delaware Valley: Jason Clader 10 service
points, 11 kills, 8 digs; Tyler Brady 26 assists, 10
service points; James Mathews 8 service points,
2 digs. Lake-Lehman: Kevin Masters 9 kills, 7
digs, 3 blocks; Zack Bevan 17 service points, 7
digs; Joe Wojcik 15 assists, 5 service points.
Hanover Area 3,
Tunkhannock 1
The Hawkeyes came from
behind to defeat Tunkhannock
in four games. TomBogarowski
led the way with six aces, 13
kills and 16 digs. Derek Brod-
ginski accumulated 11 assists
and 13 digs, and Brandon Mis-
hanski had 12 digs and seven
assists.
No statistics were made avail-
able for Tunkhannock.
Hanover Area 23 25 25 25
Tunkhannock 25 22 23 22
Hanover Area: Tom Bogarowski 13 kills, 16
digs, 6 aces; Derek Brodginski 11 assists, 3 kills,
13 digs; Brandon Mishanski 12 digs, 7 assists.
Tunkhannock holds off Hazleton
The Times Leader staff
h I G h S c h o o L R o U n D U P
that. She ripped a knee-high
liner down the left-field line that
didn’t even give Nanticoke third
baseman Kara Voyton a chance
to react.
Bridge, though, did the most
harm to Nanticoke while in the
circle. She struck out seven and
surrendered just four hits. She
got out of a bases-loaded jam in
the first when second baseman
Welsh caught a line drive and
turned it into an inning-ending
double play.
After that, she allowed just
one hit over the next four in-
nings.
“She’s been pretty consistent
with her control this year,”
Brian Bridge said. “Happy with
that. We don’t like to give free
ones away. When we can keep
them off the bases without
walks, that’s definitely a plus.”
Nanticoke (7-3 Div. 1) got its
only run on an RBI single by
Voyton in the sixth. It scored
Kayley Schinski, who singled
and stole second. Bridge then
recorded the final four outs via
strikeouts. Taylor Briggs had
Nanticoke’s only extra-base hit,
a double in the third.
Nanticoke had lost only three
WVC regular-season games over
the last three years. But with
the core of those teams having
graduated, first-year coach Ryan
Stetz remained optimistic.
“The teams we’ve lost to are
quality teams and there’s noth-
ing for our girls to keep their
heads down about,” Stetz said.
“Wyoming Area and Hazleton
played for district champion-
ships last year and have senior
pitchers on the mound. We
knew what the challenges were
coming in.”
SCHEDULE NOTE
The Hazleton Area at Nanti-
coke game scheduled for Mon-
day, May 13, has been moved.
The game will be played Sat-
urday, May 11, starting at 11
a.m.
Berwick AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Moriah Lynn 3b 4 3 2 0 1 0 0
Kylene Welsh 2b 3 2 2 3 0 0 0
Margaret Bridge p 3 1 1 2 1 0 0
Courtney Hummel lf 4 1 2 1 1 0 0
Taylor Kern dp 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Abbey Remley ss 3 0 1 2 0 0 0
Cassondra Dianese 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Katie Gallagher pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sara Berlin c 3 0 1 0 1 0 0
Ashton Mensinger rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Abbi Favata cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 8 11 8 4 0 0
Nanticoke AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Rachel Roccograndi 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Kayla Benjamin c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Madeline O’Donohue c 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kayla Gronkowski ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kayla Schinski ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Kara Voyton 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Allie Matulewski p 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Baylee Steininger lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stevie Potoski lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kelsey Rinehamer dp 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arica Grabowski rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hunter Watson rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Taylor Briggs cf 1 0 1 0 1 0 0
Jessica Sedorchuk cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Alexis Seery 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 25 1 4 1 1 0 0
Berwick 203 100 1 — 8
Nanticoke 000 001 0 — 1
Berwick IP H R ER BB SO
Bridge (W, 7-2) 7 4 1 1 2 7
Nanticoke IP H R ER BB SO
Matulewski (L, 3-3) 7 11 8 7 0 3
Hazleton Area 6,
Tunkhannock 5
The Cougars rallied from a
four-run deficit to top Tunkhan-
nock.
Maria Trivelpiece had two
RBI for Hazleton Area and
scored the winning run on a
wild pitch in the sixth. Becky
Demko’s two-run double pulled
the Cougars within 5-4 after
four innings.
Erin Smith homered for
Tunkhannock and was charged
with the loss, her first of the
season.
Tunkhannock 012 200 0— 5
Hazleton Area 010 302 x— 6
WP — Samantha Varela (3-0) 3.1 IP, 2 H, 0 R,
0 ER, 1 BB, 3 K; Becky Demko 3.2 IP, 8 H, 5 R, 4
ER, 2 BB, 1 K. LP — Erin Smith (4-1) 1 IP, 1 H, 2
R, 2 ER, 2 BB, 0 K; Kirsten Gilpin 5 IP, 10 H, 4 R,
4 ER, 3 BB, 1 K.
2B — Jess Brennan (T), Becky Demko (H). HR
— Smith (T).
Top hitters — TUN, Smith 2 hits; Ryleigh Fitch
2 hits; Emily Forba 2 hits. HAZ, Trivelpiece 3-3, 2
RBI; MacKenzie Yori 2 hits, 2 stolen bases.
Coughlin 6, Lake-Lehman 5
Marissa Ross hit a game-
ending, two-run double in the
bottom of the seventh to lift
Coughlin over Lake-Lehman.
The Crusaders trailed by three
runs before posting four runs in
the seventh.
Keighlynn Oliver also led the
Crusaders with a 2-for-4 perfor-
mance with a triple.
Sara Schuler contributed two
hits and a double for the Black
Knights.
Lake-Lehman 000 050 0 — 5
Coughlin 010 010 4 — 6
WP — Julie Suchocki (3-7) 7 IP, 9 H, 5 R, 3 ER,
1 BB, 3 K. LP — Jordan Hodle (0-7) 7 IP, 9 H, 6 R,
4 ER, 0 BB, 3 K.
2B — Sara Schuler (LL), Vickey Cadwalder
(LL), Marissa Ross (C), Danyelle Schweit (C). 3B
— Keighlyn Oliver (C).
Top Hitters — LL, Sara Schuler 2-3; Vickie
Cadwalder 1-3. COU, Oliver 2-4; Ross 2 RBI.
Wyoming Valley West 4,
Dallas 3
Wyoming Valley West’s Alex
Gonda drove in the winning run
in the bottom of the seventh.
Casey Dolan tripled and had
two RBI for the Spartans, who
used a three-run third inning to
take the lead.
Chloe Ruckle earned her
third victory by allowing just
two earned runs on three hits in
seven innings.
Dallas’ Taylor Kelley went
3-for-4 with a double, triple and
two RBI. Taylor Baker allowed
four earned runs over 6.2 in-
nings.
Dallas 100 020 0 — 3
Wyoming Valley West 003 000 1 — 4
WP — Chloe Ruckle (3-4) 7 IP, 3 H, 3 R, 2 ER,
o BB, 2 K; LP — Taylor Baker (4-5) 6.2 IP, 5H, 5
R, 4 ER, 3 BB, 0 K.
2B —Taylor Kelley (D). 3B — Kelley (D), Casey
Dolan (WVW).
Top Hitters — DAL, Kelley 3-4 2 RBI; Maddie
Perez 1-4; Sam Missal 1-3; Sydney Kern 1-3.
WVW, Leanne Dellarte 2-3, RBI; Megan Kane 1-3;
Kelcie Senchak 1-3; Casey Dolan 1-3, 2 RBI; Alex
Gonda RBI.
Wyoming Area 9,
Crestwood 1
Bree Bednarski hit a grand
slam to lead Wyoming Area to
a victory. Alex Holtz did not al-
low an earned run in a complete
game, and she helped her own
caused with three hits and a
home run. Emily Wolfgang also
produced three hits.
For Crestwood, Ashley Casem
struck out eight in three innings
of relief work. Casem had a hit
for the Comets.
Wyoming Area 052 002 0 —9
Crestwood 000 010 0 — 1
WP — Alex Holtz (7-2) 7 IP, 6H, 1 R, 0 ER, 1
BB, 5 K. LP — Alyssa Davies (4-5) 3 IP, 9 H, 7
R, 7 ER, 2 BB, 1 K; Ashley Casem 3 IP, 3 H, 2 R,
0 ER, 0 BB, 8 K; Colleen Borum 1 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 0
ER, 0 BB, 0 K.
HR — Bree Bednarski (WA), Holtz (WA).
Top Hitters — WA, B.Bednarski 2-4, 4 RBI;
Holtz 3-4; Emily Wolfgang 3-4, 2 runs. CRE,
Casem 1-2; Juliet Wotherspoon 1-3, run.
Holy Redeemer 11,
MMI Prep 2
Kaitlyn Kaluzny and Biz Ea-
ton tripled, and Chelsea Skre-
penak homered as the Royals re-
mained unbeaten in Division 3.
Kaluzny finished with three
hits.
Kirsten Young had a triple for
MMI Prep.
MMI Prep 000 200 0 — 2
Holy Redeemer 005 231 x — 11
WP — Kaya Swanek (5-0) 7 IP, 5 H, 2 R, 2 ER,
0 BB, 11 K. LP — Kayla Karchner (0-5) 6 IP, 13 H,
11 R, 10 ER, 2 BB, 3 K.
2B — Jen Ringsdorf (HR), Alexis Shemanski
(HR). 3B — Kirsten Young (MMI), Kaitlyn Kaluzny
(HR), Biz Eaton (HR). HR — Chelsea Skrepenak
(HR).
Top hitters — MMI, Young 2-3. HR, Kaluzny
3-3; Julie Kosik 2-3.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Berwick shortstop Kylene
Welsh fields a grounder
against Nanticoke in WVC
softball action in Nanticoke
on Monday afternoon.
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JOHN J. HOLOHAN
John J Holahan, President
and Partner at Liberty Homes
Custom Builders began his ca-
reer at Liberty Homes in 1985
as a sales person. Having no
experience in construction and
new homes sales, John sought
out the local builders associa-
tion. With the help of local developer and home builder, Chuck Hannig of
Spread Eagle Development, John joined the Pocono Builder’s Association,
becoming its President in the early 1990’s.
In 1994, John Holahan, and partner Frank Repholz took ownership of Lib-
erty Homes, and through their affliation with the Pocono and Pennsylvania
Builders Associations, as well as the National Association of Home Build-
ers soon became one the highly recognized names in the Northeast Penn-
sylvania building industry.
John Holahan continues to remain active within the local community as
well as the building and business associations.
John Holahan is a Life Director of Pennsylvania Builders Association
and a recipient of the Hammers and Gavels Award. John is a former Re-
gional Legislative Offcer for the Northeast.
John received the Hall of Fame Award from the Pocono Builders Associa-
tion in 2004.
John is a board member with the BIA of NEPA; a member of the Pocono
Builders Association; a member of the Carbon County Builders Associa-
tion and is on the advisory Board for the Pennsylvania Housing Research
Centre at Penn State University.
John holds the NAHB designations of Certifed Green Professional,
(CGP) and Certifed-Aging-in-in Place Specialist (CAPS I and II)
John is a member of the Pocono Mountains Economic Development Corp;
Liberty Homes is a member of the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau.
John is a member of the executive board for the Greater Pocono Moun-
tain Chamber of Commerce;
John is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Clymer Library.
John is a member of the Board of Supervisors for Tobyhanna Township;
deputy emergency coordinator for Tobyhanna Township and on the Board
of Directors for the Pocono Mountain Regional Emergency Services.
John is also married to Millie, a RN, for over 37 years (though it sounds
as though I’m never at home).
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
135 Legals/
Public Notices
INVITATION
TO BID
Luzerne County
Community College
Purchasing Depart-
ment will receive
sealed bids related
to: 8.5 X 11
Copier / Printer
Paper. Each bid
must be accompa-
nied by a bid guar-
anty, which shall not
be less than 10% of
the total bid. Firms
interested in sub-
mitting a bid should
call the College’s
Purchasing Office at
570-740-0370
Monday through Fri-
day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
to request specifi-
cations. Bids must
be received before
3:00 p.m. local
prevailing time,
on Friday, May 17,
2013 at which time
the bids will be
opened and publicly
read at the College.
Luzerne County
Community College
reserves the right to
waive any informali-
ties, irregularities,
defects, errors, or
omissions in, or to
reject any or all bids
or parts thereof.
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
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LOGISTICS EXPEDITOR/
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Immediate Opening
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with an expanding
flooring company in
the Hazleton area.
The candidate
should have a
2 year degree
in logistics or
equivalent experi-
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and organizational
skills, self starter
able to multi task,
detail oriented
and strong problem
solving skills.
Responsibilities
include purchase
order creation
and processing,
experience in
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Purchase orders/
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Please send
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Box 667
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-0231
Email:
donna.reimold@
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TUESDAY, April 30, 2013 pAgE 7B TiMES lEADEr www.timesleader.com N H L
Penguins hold top seeding in East
By IRA PODELL
AP Sports Writer
Alook at the first-round series
in the NHL playoffs:
EASTERN CONFERENCE
No. 1 Pittsburgh Penguins (36-12-
0) vs. No. 8 New York Islanders
(24-17-7)
2013 series record: Pittsburgh
4-1. Playoff History: New York 3-0.
Last meeting: New York 4-3 in 1993
Patrick Division finals.
PITTSBURGH: The Penguins were
23-4 in their final 27 games but will
need to be on their game to avoid
a third straight first-round exit.
The Penguins are getting healthier
all over as Evgeni Malkin returned
earlier in the week after he sat
out four because of an upper body
injury. Sidney Crosby (jaw) is back
practicing and could soon receive
medical clearance to play in games.
Reinforcements acquired at the
trade deadline -- Brenden Morrow,
Jussi Jokinen and Jarome Iginla
-- have helped Pittsburgh offset its
injuries.
N.Y. ISLANDERS: The Islanders
are in the playoffs for the first time
since 2007 and will be looking for
their first series win since they
reached the conference finals in
1993. John Tavares emerged as a
legitimate MVP contender by scor-
ing 28 goals and adding 19 assists in
48 games.
OUTLOOK: Islanders are ready
for playoffs, but not quite ready to
knock off playoff-tested Pittsburgh.
Penguins in 5.
No. 2 Montreal Canadiens (29-
14-5) vs. No. 7 Ottawa Senators
(25-17-6)
2013 series record: Both teams
2-1-1.
Playoff History: First meeting.
MONTREAL: The Canadiens closed
the regular season going 4-6 in
their last 10 games. Most alarm-
ingly is Montreal yielded 29 goals in
those six losses. Carey Price was in
goal for nine of 10 games before the
finale vs. Toronto. Price earned 21
wins in his 39 appearances, posting
a 2.59 GAA.
OTTAWA: The Senators were 6-3
in their final nine games. ... G Craig
Anderson had played seven straight
and nine of 10 before resting for the
season finale. OUTLOOK: This back-
yard brawl could go back and forth
for quite a while. Ottawa will be still
standing at the end. Senators in 7.
No. 3 Washington Capitals (27-
18-3) vs. No. 6 New York Rangers
(26-18-4)
2013 series record: New York 2-0-1.
Playoff History: Washington 4-3.
Last meeting: New York 4-3 in 2012
conference semifinals.
WASHINGTON: Alex Ovechkin fu-
eled the Capitals’ surge to their fifth
Southeast Division title in six years
by leading the NHL with 32 goals.
Ovechkin scored an NHL-record 14
goals in April.
N.Y. RANGERS: Rick Nash broke
out of a scoring slump with two
goals in the finale to reach 20 for
the ninth straight season. Brad
Richards enters the playoffs on a
six-game point streak, and Henrik
Lundqvist has allowed two goals or
fewer in 16 of the past 20 games.
OUTLOOK: These teams went
seven games last season, with
the final two being decided by 2-1
scores. Expect more of the same.
Rangers in 7.
No. 4 Boston Bruins (28-14-6)
vs. No. 5 Toronto Maple Leafs
(26-17-5)
2013 series record: Boston 3-1-0.
Playoff History: Boston 8-5. Last
meeting: Boston 4-0 in 1974 quar-
terfinals.
BOSTON: Boston is in the postsea-
son for the sixth straight season. ...
David Krejci scored a team-high 23
goals, followed by Patrice Bergeron
with 22.
TORONTO: The Maple Leafs lost
four of their final six and were out-
scored 20-15 in that stretch. ... Phil
Kessel netted his 20th goal of the
season, giving him 10 in 10 games.
OUTLOOK: Boston outlasts Toronto
in matchup of skidding clubs. Bruins
in 7.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
No. 1 Chicago Blackhawks (36-
7-5) vs. No. 8 Minnesota Wild
(26-19-3)
2013 series record: Minnesota 2-0-
1. Playoff History: First meeting.
CHICAGO: Chicago started the sea-
son 21-0-3 and then cruised to a 10-
3-2 mark in April. ... The Blackhawks
are one of the most balanced teams
in the league, with Patrick Kane and
Jonathan Toews tying for the club
lead with 23 goals.
MINNESOTA: Much was expected
after the team’s big free-agent
signings of forward Zach Parise
and Ryan Suter last summer. Parise
led the club with 18 goals, and his
Stanley Cup playoff experience
from New Jersey should help his
teammates. Suter was fourth on the
team with 32 points, including 28
assists.
OUTLOOK: If Chicago is going to
be seriously tested on the way to
the finals, it won’t be by the Wild.
Blackhawks in 5.
No. 2 Anaheim Ducks (30-12-6)
vs. No. 7 Detroit Red Wings (24-
16-8)
2013 series record: Anaheim 2-1-0.
Playoff History: Detroit 3-2. Last
meeting: Detroit 4-3 in 2009 con-
ference semifinals.
ANAHEIM: Top-line forwards Ryan
Getzlaf and Corey Perry tied for the
team lead with 15 goals each, and
Teemu Selanne and Bobby Ryan
combined for only 23 goals.
DETROIT: Jimmy Howard will have
to be the ultimate backstop now
after having a fine regular season in
which he won 21 games and posted
a 2.13 GAA.
OUTLOOK: The Red Wings returned
to the postseason again, but won’t
stick around too long. Ducks in 6.
No. 3 Vancouver Canucks (26-
15-7) vs. No. 6 San Jose Sharks
(25-16-7)
2013 series record: San Jose 3-0-
0. Playoff History: Vancouver 1-0.
Last meeting: Vancouver 4-1 in 2011
conference finals.
VANCOUVER: The Canucks
mustered just 127 goals this season
-- 28 fewer than Central champion
Chicago and 13 less than Pacific
champion Anaheim. Alex Burrows
led the Canucks with 13 goals.
SAN JOSE: The Sharks were 17-2-5
at home but only 8-13-2 on the road,
though one of the wins was in Van-
couver. Logan Couture led the team
with 21 goals.
OUTLOOK: San Jose is used to long
playoff runs. Its success over Van-
couver continues into the playoffs.
Sharks in 6.
No. 4 St. Louis Blues (29-17-2)
Vs. No. 5 Los Angeles Kings (27-
16-5)
2013 series record: Los Angeles
3-0-0. Playoff History: St. Louis 2-1.
Last meeting: Los Angeles 4-0 in
2012 conference semifinals.
ST. LOUIS: The Blues surged in
April to an 11-2 mark in the final
month. G Brian Elliott led the way
down the stretch for St. Louis, giv-
ing up 16 goals in the final 13 games.
LOS ANGELES: The Kings won
the franchise’s first Stanley Cup
title last year, and they did it from
the No. 8 seed. G Jonathan Quick
earned Conn Smythe Trophy honors
last year as the playoff MVP when
he went 16-4 with a minuscule 1.41
GAA. Jeff Carter paced the offense
with 26 goals, and Anze Kopitar
topped the team with 42 points.
OUTLOOK: Los Angeles is ready
for another lengthy playoff stay. It
starts here. Kings in 7.
K
BUSINESS
SECTI ON B
IN BRIEF
New jewelry store opening
Ron Antolick and Carol Hannon,
who are former Bartikowsky Jewlery
employees, will hold a grand opening
today of their new jewelry store in
Wilkes-Barre Township.
RACO Jewelry will host its grand
opening today from noon to 2 p.m.
with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at
12:30 p.m. Refreshments will be pro-
vided. The location is on Route 309 at
228 Wilkes-Barre Township Boulevard.
It’s a full-service jeweler specializing
in jewelry and watch repair, including
Rolex. They offer verbal and written
appraisals that are done by a Gradu-
ate Gemologist (GIA). RACO Jewelry
also buys gold, silver, estate jewelry,
sterling flatware, and coins.
Oil above $94 on US data
The price of oil rose above $94
per barrel Monday as positive U.S.
economic data added to optimism for a
rate cut in Europe.
Benchmark crude for June delivery
gained $1.50 to finish at $94.50 a bar-
rel in New York. Oil hadn’t finished
above $94 since April 10.
The U.S. government said Ameri-
cans spent more in March as their
incomes went up. And pending home
sales hit their highest level in three
years. Traders also think the European
Central Bank will cut its benchmark
interest rate from the current record
low of 0.75 percent to 0.50 percent, in
a further attempt to turn around the
economy there.
A weaker dollar also helped boost
oil prices by making crude priced in
dollars cheaper for traders using other
currencies. On Monday, the euro was
up to $1.3100 from $1.3065 late Friday
in New York.
S&P 500 reaches new high
Technology companies led the Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500 index to an all-time
closing high Monday.
The stock market has recovered all
the ground it lost over the previous
two weeks, when worries over slower
economic growth, falling commodity
prices and disappointing quarterly
earnings battered financial markets.
The S&P 500 index rose 11.37
points to close at 1,593.61. The 0.7 per-
cent increase nudged the index above
its previous closing high of 1,593.36,
reached on April 11.
A pair of better economic reports
gave investors some encouragement.
Wages and spending rose in the U.S.
last month, and pending home sales
hit their highest level in three years.
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 timesleader.com
GAS PRICES
YESTERDAY MONTH AGO YEAR AGO
Average price of a gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline:
RECORD
$3.40 $3.62 $3.83
$4.06
7/17/2008
Source: AAA report for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton area
Consumers upped spending 0.2 % last month
By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON — Americans kept
increasing their spending in March
and their income grew, further indi-
cation that consumers are shaking off
higher taxes.
The Commerce Department said
Monday that consumer spending
rose 0.2 percent in March fromFebru-
ary. That followed a 0.7 percent jump
in February and a 0.3 percent gain in
January.
Income increased 0.2 percent last
month, following a gain of 1.1 per-
cent in February. After-tax income
also rose 0.2 percent.
Higher income has helped offset an
increase in Social Security taxes that
took effect on Jan. 1. On Friday, the
government said consumer spend-
ing rose from January through March
at the fastest pace in more than two
years.
“The consumer is doing reasonably
well,” Joseph LaVorgna, an econo-
mist at Deutsche Bank, said in a note
to clients.
Spending on services drove the
March increase. That was partly
due to an unseasonably cold March,
which required Americans to pay
more to heat their homes.
Higher spending on utilities does
not signal consumer confidence the
way purchases on household goods,
such as new appliances or furniture,
typically do. And other reports sug-
gest consumers may be starting to
feel the impact of the tax increase.
Sales at retail stores and restaurants
fell in March by the most in nine
months.
The 2 percentage point tax increase
has reduced tax-home pay for nearly
all Americans. A person earning
50,000 a year will have about $1,000
less to spend this year. A household
with two highly paid workers will
have up to $4,500 less.
That may slow consumer spending
and economic growth in the April-
June quarter. Consumer spending
accounts for about 70 percent of eco-
nomic activity.
Other trends may offset some
of the impact of the taxes this year.
Consumers have cut their debts and
rising home values and stock prices
have increased household wealth.
In addition, gasoline has become
cheaper. The national average price
for a gallon of gas has fallen by 29
cents since Feb. 27 to $3.50. A de-
cline in gas prices leaves consumers
with more money to spend on other
things.
SAN FRANCISCO — Google is try-
ing to upstage Siri, the sometimes droll
assistant that answers questions and
helps people manage their lives on Ap-
ple’s iPhone and iPad.
The duel began Monday with the re-
lease of a free iPhone and iPad app that
features Google Now, a technology that
performs many of the same functions
as Siri.
It’s the first time that Google Now
has been available on smartphones and
tablet computers that aren’t running
on the latest version of Google’s An-
droid software. The technology, which
debuted nine months ago, is being in-
cluded in an upgrade to Google’s search
application for iOS, the Apple Inc. soft-
ware that powers the iPhone, iPad and
iPod Touch. It’s up to each user to de-
cide whether to activate Google Now
within the redesigned Google Search
app, which is available through Apple’s
app store.
Google Now’s invasion of Siri’s turf
marks Google Inc.’s latest attempt to
lure iPhone and iPad users away from
a service that Apple built into its own
devices.
Google quickly won over millions
of iPhone users in December when it
released a mapping application to re-
place the navigation system that Apple
dumped when it redesigned iOS last
fall. Apple’s maps application proved to
be inferior to Google’s ousted service.
The app’s bugs and glitches made Ap-
ple the butt of jokes and fueled demand
for Google to develop a new option.
Apple has been losing to Google on
other fronts in a rapidly growing mobile
computing market, an arena that was
revolutionized with the iPhone’s release
in 2007. Smartphones and tablet com-
puters running Google’s free Android
software have been steadily expanding
their market share in recent years, partly
because they tend to be less expensive
than the iPhone and iPad. At the end
of 2012, Android devices held about 69
percent of the smartphone market while
iOS held about 19 percent, according to
the research firm IDC.
Android’s success has been particu-
larly galling for Apple because its late
CEO Steve Jobs believed Google stole
many of its ideas for the software from
the iPhone. That led to a series of court
battles over alleged patent infringe-
ment, including a high-profile trial last
year that culminated in Apple winning
hundreds of millions in damages from
Samsung Electronics, the top seller of
Android phones. That dispute is still
embroiled in appeals.
Google Now
tries to beat
Apple’s droll
assistant Siri
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE
AP Technology Writer
WASHINGTON — The number of
Americans who signed contracts to
buy homes rose in March to the high-
est level in three years, pointing to
higher sales this spring.
The National Association of Re-
altors said Monday that its season-
ally adjusted index for pending home
sales rose 1.5 percent to 105.7. That’s
the highest since April 2010, when a
homebuyer’s tax credit boosted sales.
It’s also above February’s reading of
104.1.
There is generally a one- to two-
month lag between a signed con-
tract and a completed sale. Contract
signings rose in the South, West and
Midwest, and were unchanged in the
Northeast.
Steady job gains and near-record
low mortgage rates have helped drive
home sales up over the past year.
Signed contracts are 7 percent higher
than the same month a year earlier.
But completed sales have slowed
in recent months — and dipped in
March — because of a limited supply
of available homes on the market. The
number of homes for sale has fallen
nearly 17 percent in the past year to
1.93 million, the Realtors’ group said
last week. At the current sales pace,
that supply would be exhausted in 4.7
months, below the 6 months that is
typical in healthier markets.
Buyer traffic is 25 percent higher
than it was a year ago. Rising demand
and low supply is fueling more home
construction.
U.S. builders started work on more
than 1 million homes at an annual
rate in March. That’s the first time
the pace has topped that threshold in
nearly 5 years.
The housing recovery is helping
boost economic growth this year.
Builders are starting work on more
homes, creating more construction
jobs. And home prices are rising.
Higher prices tend to make home-
owners feel wealthier and encourage
more spending.
Mortgage rates, meanwhile, remain
near record lows. The average rate on
the 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.4
percent last week, from 3.41 percent.
That’s not far from the record low of
3.31 percent, reached in November
The average rate on the 15-year
fixed mortgage fell to 2.61 percent
last week, the lowest on records dat-
ing back to 1991.
Pending US home sales reach 3-year high
By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
AP PHOTO
A worker helps frame a new home under construction in Matthews, N.C.
JPMorgCh 48.92 +.04 +12.0
JacobsEng 52.03 +.38 +22.2
JohnJn 85.58 +.46 +22.1
JohnsnCtl 35.10 +.01 +14.4
Kellogg 65.48 -.22 +17.2
Keycorp 9.91 +.11 +17.7
KimbClk 103.31 +.19 +22.4
KindME 90.10 +.45 +12.9
Kroger 34.45 +.17 +32.4
Kulicke 11.15 +.11 -7.0
L Brands 49.94 -.55 +6.1
LancastrC 78.60 +.58 +13.6
LillyEli 56.01 -.45 +13.6
LincNat 33.64 +.37 +29.9
LockhdM 99.06 +.09 +7.3
Loews 44.53 +.09 +9.3
LaPac 18.16 +.10 -6.0
MDU Res 24.40 +.27 +14.9
MarathnO 32.60 +.88 +6.3
MarIntA 41.62 +.05 +11.7
Masco 20.42 -.20 +23.2
McDrmInt 10.56 +.17 -4.2
McGrwH 53.45 +1.45 -2.2
McKesson 104.49 +.31 +7.8
Merck 47.82 -.05 +16.8
MetLife 39.15 +.62 +18.9
Microsoft 32.61 +.82 +22.1
MorgStan 22.21 +.81 +16.2
NCR Corp 26.85 +.31 +5.4
NatFuGas 62.56 +1.54 +23.4
NatGrid 63.34 +.95 +10.3
NY Times 8.87 -.05 +4.0
NewellRub 26.37 -.08 +18.4
NewmtM 33.97 +.50 -26.9
NextEraEn 81.26 +.72 +17.4
NiSource 31.15 +.33 +25.2
NikeB s 62.63 +.74 +21.4
NorflkSo 76.60 +1.04 +23.9
NoestUt 45.06 +.20 +15.3
NorthropG 74.96 +.72 +10.9
Nucor 43.14 +.35 0.0
NustarEn 49.86 -.64 +17.4
NvMAd 14.81 -.03 -2.6
OcciPet 87.86 +1.20 +14.7
OfficeMax 11.04 -.10 +13.1
Olin 24.58 +.14 +13.8
ONEOK s 51.19 +.37 +19.7
PG&E Cp 48.35 +.40 +20.3
PPG 147.02 +2.09 +8.6
PPL Corp 33.31 +.28 +16.3
PVR Ptrs 24.91 +.24 -4.1
Pfizer 30.43 +.34 +21.3
PinWst 60.88 +.18 +19.4
PitnyBw 16.20 +.30 +52.3
Praxair 114.38 +1.65 +4.5
PSEG 36.43 +.31 +19.1
PulteGrp 21.21 -.14 +16.8
Questar 25.25 +.18 +27.8
RadioShk 3.15 +.05 +48.6
RLauren 177.00 +1.40 +18.1
Raytheon 60.72 +.52 +5.5
ReynAmer 47.50 +.60 +14.7
RockwlAut 84.85 -.02 +1.0
Rowan 32.13 +.25 +2.8
RoyDShllB 69.39 +.77 -2.1
RoyDShllA 67.48 +.70 -2.1
Safeway 23.51 +.20 +30.0
Schlmbrg 74.03 +.69 +6.8
Sherwin 182.71 -.51 +18.8
SilvWhtn g 24.04 +.41 -33.4
SiriusXM 3.07 -.05 +6.2
SonyCp 16.56 +.08 +47.9
SouthnCo 48.14 +.19 +12.5
SwstAirl 13.54 +.15 +32.2
SpectraEn 31.36 +.19 +14.5
SprintNex 7.12 ... +25.6
Sysco 35.01 +.21 +11.6
TECO 19.01 +.18 +13.4
Target 70.64 +.12 +19.4
TenetHlt rs 43.84 +2.68 +35.0
Tenneco 37.91 +.28 +8.0
Tesoro 53.86 +.02 +22.3
Textron 26.14 +.08 +5.4
3M Co 103.83 +.04 +11.8
TimeWarn 60.13 +.46 +25.7
Timken 52.50 +.45 +9.8
Titan Intl 21.88 +.55 +.7
UnilevNV 42.43 +.89 +10.8
UnionPac 147.42 -.10 +17.3
Unisys 19.00 +.43 +9.8
UPS B 86.27 +.56 +17.0
USSteel 17.54 +.18 -26.5
UtdTech 91.62 +.47 +11.7
VarianMed 64.79 +.67 -7.8
VectorGp 16.25 +.12 +9.3
ViacomB 63.65 +.03 +20.7
WestarEn 34.69 +.29 +21.2
Weyerhsr 30.43 -.10 +9.4
Whrlpl 116.07 -.13 +14.1
WmsCos 38.22 +.18 +16.7
Windstrm 8.49 +.04 +2.5
Wynn 135.80 +.30 +20.7
XcelEngy 31.58 +.36 +18.2
Xerox 8.45 +.07 +23.9
YumBrnds 67.60 +.74 +1.8
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 15.52 +.08 +11.0
GlblRskAllB m15.77 +.05 +2.6
American Cent
IncGroA m 31.10 +.28 +14.4
ValueInv 7.21 +.05 +13.4
American Funds
AMCAPA m 24.26 +.18 +11.8
BalA m 22.16 +.09 +9.1
BondA m 12.98 ... +0.9
CapIncBuA m57.17 +.33 +9.3
CpWldGrIA m40.73 +.31 +10.0
EurPacGrA m43.60 +.39 +5.8
FnInvA m 45.15 +.30 +11.0
GrthAmA m 37.80 +.22 +10.0
HiIncA m 11.59 +.02 +4.1
IncAmerA m 19.60 +.10 +9.5
InvCoAmA m 33.79 +.21 +12.5
MutualA m 31.94 +.15 +13.2
NewPerspA m33.95 +.27 +8.6
NwWrldA m 56.24 +.34 +3.2
SmCpWldA m44.10 +.24 +10.5
WAMutInvA m35.01 +.18 +12.8
Baron
Asset b 55.45 +.08 +13.4
BlackRock
EqDivI 21.87 +.16 +10.3
GlobAlcA m 20.98 +.10 +6.3
GlobAlcC m 19.49 +.10 +6.0
GlobAlcI 21.09 +.11 +6.4
CGM
Focus 33.24 +.13 +13.4
Mutual 31.54 +.12 +11.0
Realty 32.02 +.19 +9.4
Columbia
AcornZ 33.27 +.17 +9.3
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 20.25 +.13 -0.7
EmMktValI 29.33 ... -1.7
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 11.32 +.02 +0.6
HlthCareS d 31.23 +.15 +19.7
LAEqS d 32.75 +.09 +0.2
Davis
NYVentA m 39.28 +.24 +12.9
NYVentC m 37.77 +.24 +12.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 85.89 +.50 +10.6
Income 13.94 ... +1.3
IntlStk 37.26 +.35 +7.6
Stock 138.36+1.10 +14.0
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 34.97 +.26 +1.4
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.67 +.01 +4.6
HiIncOppB m 4.68 +.01 +4.3
NatlMuniA m 10.36 ... +2.5
NatlMuniB m 10.36 ... +2.2
PAMuniA m 9.18 ... +1.0
FPA
Cres d 30.53 +.14 +8.5
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.44 +.02 +2.6
Bal 21.53 +.10 +7.1
BlChGrow 54.10 +.42 +10.3
Contra 85.17 +.57 +10.8
DivrIntl d 32.50 +.29 +8.6
ExpMulNat d 24.09 +.13 +10.1
Free2020 15.12 +.08 +5.7
Free2030 15.23 +.10 +7.0
GrowCo 103.14 +.74 +10.6
LatinAm d 44.66 +.22 -3.6
LowPriStk d 44.53 +.29 +12.7
Magellan 80.63 +.55 +10.0
Overseas d 35.40 +.33 +9.5
Puritan 20.65 +.08 +6.8
StratInc 11.45 +.02 +2.0
TotalBd 11.02 ... +1.5
Value 86.78 +.64 +13.7
Fidelity Advisor
NewInsI 25.51 +.17 +10.8
ValStratT m 32.94 +.24 +11.9
Fidelity Select
Gold d 24.46 +.29 -33.9
Pharm d 17.49 +.15 +18.2
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 56.50 +.41 +12.4
500IdxInstl 56.50 +.41 +12.4
500IdxInv 56.49 +.40 +12.4
TotMktIdAg d 46.27 +.33 +12.5
First Eagle
GlbA m 51.75 +.27 +6.5
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.56 ... +1.6
Income A m 2.35 ... +7.0
Income C m 2.37 ... +6.7
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 31.52 +.20 +10.1
Euro Z 22.57 +.14 +6.8
Shares Z 25.04 +.15 +11.4
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 13.64 +.03 +3.2
GlBondAdv 13.60 +.04 +3.3
Growth A m 21.41 +.22 +10.2
Harbor
CapApInst 46.37 +.38 +9.1
IntlInstl d 65.39 +.85 +5.3
INVESCO
ConstellB m 22.91 +.16 +8.0
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.00+.09 +14.2
PacGrowB m 22.06 +.19 +8.8
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect12.09 ... +0.9
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 54.04 +.84 +1.7
AT&T Inc 37.30 +.26 +10.6
AbtLab s 36.73 +.27 +17.2
AMD 2.68 +.04 +11.7
AlaskaAir 61.16 +.50 +41.9
Alcoa 8.42 +.15 -3.0
Allstate 49.25 +.16 +22.6
Altria 36.61 +.54 +16.4
AEP 51.31 +.77 +20.2
AmExp 67.63 -.12 +18.1
AmIntlGrp 41.31 +.44 +17.0
Amgen 106.67 -1.71 +23.7
Anadarko 84.51 +.67 +13.7
Annaly 15.89 +.22 +13.2
Apple Inc 430.12+12.92 -19.2
AutoData 67.14 +.55 +17.9
AveryD 41.71 +.26 +19.4
Avnet 31.99 +.12 +4.5
Avon 22.24 +.19 +54.9
BP PLC 42.63 +.43 +2.4
BakrHu 44.88 +.75 +9.9
BallardPw .90 -.04 +47.3
BarnesNob 18.18 +.03 +20.5
Baxter 70.56 +1.07 +5.9
BerkH B 106.61 -.49 +18.9
BigLots 36.53 -.37 +28.4
BlockHR 27.95 -.71 +50.5
Boeing 91.90 -.95 +21.9
BrMySq 39.91 -.37 +23.8
Brunswick 31.64 -1.88 +8.8
Buckeye 61.49 -.14 +35.4
CBS B 46.28 +.01 +21.6
CMS Eng 29.75 +.32 +22.0
CSX 24.61 +.24 +24.7
CampSp 46.38 +.18 +32.9
Carnival 34.82 +.36 -5.3
Caterpillar 84.80 +.12 -5.4
CenterPnt 24.52 +.26 +27.4
CntryLink 37.45 +.30 -4.3
Chevron 121.32 +1.28 +12.2
Cisco 20.98 +.31 +6.8
Citigroup 46.82 -.10 +18.4
Clorox 86.26 -.41 +17.8
ColgPal 119.37 +.38 +14.2
ConAgra 35.39 +.11 +20.0
ConocPhil s59.90 +.99 +3.3
ConEd 63.63 +.79 +14.6
Corning 14.41 +.18 +14.2
CrownHold 42.09 +.36 +14.3
Cummins 113.25 +2.05 +4.5
DTE 72.19 -.07 +20.2
Deere 88.83 +3.34 +2.8
Diebold 30.15 +.13 -1.5
Disney 63.00 +1.13 +26.5
DomRescs 61.21 +.20 +18.2
Dover 69.70 +.60 +6.1
DowChm 33.87 +.45 +4.8
DryShips 1.85 +.04 +15.6
DuPont 54.10 +1.20 +20.3
DukeEn rs 75.20 +.34 +17.9
EMC Cp 22.49 +.10 -11.1
Eaton 60.28 +1.63 +11.3
EdisonInt 53.98 +.63 +19.5
EmersonEl 55.31 +.87 +4.4
EnbrdgEPt 29.87 +.35 +7.1
Energen 47.50 +1.70 +5.3
Entergy 70.86 +1.75 +11.2
EntPrPt 61.05 +.26 +21.9
Ericsson 12.25 +.11 +21.3
Exelon 37.78 +.45 +27.0
ExxonMbl 88.21 +.21 +1.9
FMC Cp s 60.67 +.78 +3.7
Fastenal 49.92 +.45 +7.0
FedExCp 93.75 -.43 +2.2
Fifth&Pac 21.09 +.01 +69.4
FirstEngy 46.32 -.16 +10.9
Fonar 7.09 -.07 +63.7
FootLockr 33.92 +.23 +5.6
FordM 13.66 -.01 +5.5
Gannett 20.00 -.54 +11.0
Gap 37.51 +.02 +20.8
GenCorp 13.01 -.05 +42.2
GenDynam 73.28 -.02 +5.8
GenElec 22.27 +.06 +6.1
GenMills 50.21 +.53 +24.2
GileadSci s 51.09 -.29 +39.1
GlaxoSKln 52.42 +.26 +20.6
Hallibrtn 41.57 +1.00 +19.8
HarleyD 54.76 +.72 +12.1
HarrisCorp 44.59 +.66 -8.9
HartfdFn 27.21 +.09 +21.3
HawaiiEl 28.10 +.24 +11.8
HeclaM 3.27 +.04 -43.9
Heico 43.41 +.18 -3.0
Hess 72.20 +1.21 +36.3
HewlettP 20.50 +.53 +43.9
HomeDp 73.67 +.32 +19.1
HonwllIntl 73.80 -.10 +16.3
Hormel 41.24 +.03 +32.1
Humana 73.12 -.37 +6.5
INTL FCSt 16.68 +.03 -4.2
ITW 64.83 +.45 +6.6
IngerRd 54.24 +.26 +13.1
IBM 199.15 +4.84 +4.0
IntPap 47.20 +.79 +18.5
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
90.34 76.11 AirProd APD 2.84 86.54 +.95 +3.0
42.53 32.75 AmWtrWks AWK 1.00 41.35 +.19 +11.4
46.00 37.00 Amerigas APU 3.20 44.07 +.06 +13.8
33.28 21.86 AquaAm WTR .70 31.50 +.09 +23.9
34.28 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 34.03 +.56 +24.2
408.50 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 403.87 -2.86 +13.9
12.94 6.72 BkofAm BAC .04 12.38 -.04 +6.6
29.13 19.30 BkNYMel BK .60 28.08 +.19 +9.3
15.35 3.50 BonTon BONT .20 15.05 -.25 +23.8
58.50 43.30 CVS Care CVS .90 57.44 -.29 +18.8
66.94 39.01 Cigna CI .04 66.07 +.26 +23.6
42.96 35.58 CocaCola s KO 1.12 42.24 +.14 +16.5
42.61 28.09 Comcast CMCSA .78 41.49 +.12 +11.1
29.95 25.38 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 28.76 +.19 +5.1
48.59 20.71 CmtyHlt CYH .25 45.09 +1.56 +46.7
53.65 34.78 CoreMark CORE .76 52.36 +.17 +10.6
58.67 43.59 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 55.31 +.87 +4.4
60.24 34.00 EngyTEq ETE 2.58 59.17 +.30 +30.1
8.42 4.74 Entercom ETM ... 8.01 +.01 +14.8
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 12.70 +.22 -11.8
5.15 3.06 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.14 +.06 -3.3
18.80 13.06 Genpact G .18 18.60 -.03 +20.0
9.81 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 7.81 +.15 +32.4
72.70 52.29 Heinz HNZ 2.06 72.45 ... +25.6
91.99 65.43 Hershey HSY 1.68 88.12 +.55 +22.0
39.98 24.76 Lowes LOW .64 38.25 +.55 +7.7
105.90 76.92 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 99.81 -.01 +1.4
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 102.18 +1.29 +15.8
32.10 24.27 Mondelez MDLZ .52 31.62 +.07 +24.2
22.89 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 20.09 +.12 -.9
27.38 6.00 NexstarB NXST .48 24.01 -.52 +126.7
69.65 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 68.41 +.31 +17.3
33.15 27.00 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 33.31 +.28 +16.3
20.29 11.81 PennaRE PEI .72 20.31 +.15 +15.1
84.32 65.68 PepsiCo PEP 2.15 82.65 +.14 +20.8
96.60 81.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 95.96 +.65 +14.7
82.54 59.07 ProctGam PG 2.41 77.68 +.58 +14.4
61.94 44.47 Prudentl PRU 1.60 60.29 +1.04 +13.1
2.67 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 2.61 +.07 +91.9
21.02 12.85 SLM Cp SLM .60 20.53 +.01 +19.8
62.97 42.35 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 60.75 ... +14.6
48.83 39.46 TJX TJX .58 48.84 +.44 +15.1
41.07 27.78 UGI Corp UGI 1.08 40.98 +.60 +25.3
53.71 39.85 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 53.46 -.17 +23.5
79.50 58.27 WalMart WMT 1.88 78.39 -.65 +14.9
45.96 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 41.58 +.82 +6.2
38.20 29.80 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 37.88 ... +10.8
USD per British Pound 1.5492 +.0006 +.04% 1.6034 1.6269
Canadian Dollar 1.0111 -.0059 -.58% 1.0008 .9809
USD per Euro 1.3097 +.0068 +.52% 1.2904 1.3259
Japanese Yen 98.01 -.21 -.21% 79.82 80.39
Mexican Peso 12.1658 +.0199 +.16% 13.0805 12.9669
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.23 3.19 +1.29 -9.49 -15.86
Gold 1467.40 1453.60 +0.95 -14.23 -11.78
Platinum 1507.40 1475.20 +2.09 -2.39 -4.10
Silver 24.12 23.76 +1.53 -24.64 -22.08
Palladium 698.10 680.85 +2.53 +17.19 +2.40
Foreign Exchange & Metals
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.36 +.06 +6.3
LifGr1 b 14.53 +.08 +7.9
RegBankA m 15.52 +.12 +9.2
SovInvA m 17.54 +.13 +9.7
TaxFBdA m 10.47 ... +1.2
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.28 +.08 -1.3
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 15.59 +.05 +4.7
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.65 ... +1.2
MFS
MAInvA m 23.82 +.20 +10.9
MAInvC m 22.96 +.18 +10.6
Merger
Merger b 15.90 ... +0.4
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 11.02 ... +2.3
TotRtBd b 11.02 ... +2.1
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 14.81 +.08 +10.9
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 21.18 +.22 +10.2
Oakmark
EqIncI 30.11 +.16 +5.6
Intl I 23.29 +.26 +11.3
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 46.04 +.39 +8.7
DevMktA m 35.39 +.19 +0.3
DevMktY 35.01 +.19 +0.4
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.82 +.05 +2.8
AllAuthIn 11.12 +.02 +1.2
ComRlRStI 6.45 +.11 -2.4
HiYldIs 9.82 +.02 +3.9
LowDrIs 10.53 ... +0.9
TotRetA m 11.34 ... +1.6
TotRetAdm b 11.34 ... +1.7
TotRetC m 11.34 ... +1.4
TotRetIs 11.34 ... +1.8
TotRetrnD b 11.34 ... +1.7
TotlRetnP 11.34 ... +1.7
Permanent
Portfolio 47.87 +.26 -1.6
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.69+.10 +9.0
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 34.03 +.22 +9.0
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 17.61 +.19 +10.3
BlendA m 20.25 +.20 +9.8
EqOppA m 17.55 +.13 +10.7
HiYieldA m 5.84 +.01 +4.4
IntlEqtyA m 6.86 +.06 +9.2
IntlValA m 21.26 +.20 +6.7
JennGrA m 22.76 +.19 +9.0
NaturResA m 44.64 +.63 -1.0
SmallCoA m 24.54 +.22 +9.5
UtilityA m 13.90 +.13 +17.0
ValueA m 17.53 +.17 +12.3
Putnam
GrowIncB m 16.37 ... +12.2
IncomeA m 7.38 ... +2.6
Royce
LowStkSer m 13.56 +.13 -2.0
OpportInv d 13.30 +.11 +11.3
ValPlSvc m 14.85 +.09 +7.4
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 24.94 +.17 +12.4
Scout
Interntl d 35.15 +.39 +5.4
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 49.72 +.29 +9.0
CapApprec 24.21 +.09 +8.8
DivGrow 29.48 +.17 +12.2
DivrSmCap d 19.52 +.13 +11.9
EmMktStk d 33.37 +.14 -2.0
EqIndex d 42.96 +.30 +12.4
EqtyInc 29.67 +.21 +12.7
FinSer 16.85 +.10 +12.8
GrowStk 41.15 +.20 +8.9
HealthSci 48.98 +.25 +18.8
HiYield d 7.22 +.01 +5.6
IntlDisc d 49.94 +.43 +8.3
IntlStk d 15.06 +.13 +4.6
IntlStkAd m 14.99 +.12 +4.5
LatinAm d 37.21 +.16 -2.2
MediaTele 59.39 +.30 +11.4
MidCpGr 63.25 +.24 +12.0
NewAmGro 39.19 +.28 +9.1
NewAsia d 16.86 +.09 +0.3
NewEra 43.61 +.56 +4.1
NewHoriz 37.89 +.09 +14.2
NewIncome 9.88 ... +1.2
Rtmt2020 19.12 +.09 +6.9
Rtmt2030 20.46 +.12 +8.1
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.3
SmCpVal d 42.89 +.27 +9.5
TaxFHiYld d 12.03 ... +2.3
Value 30.37 +.23 +15.1
ValueAd b 30.05 +.23 +15.0
Thornburg
IntlValI d 29.43 +.21 +5.2
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.52 +.16 +9.8
Vanguard
500Adml 147.02+1.05 +12.4
500Inv 147.01+1.05 +12.4
CapOp 40.07 +.40 +19.2
CapVal 12.79 +.12 +15.3
Convrt 13.54 +.05 +7.5
DevMktIdx 10.65 +.12 +9.2
DivGr 19.00 +.13 +14.2
EnergyInv 61.90 +.81 +4.8
EurIdxAdm 64.00 +.81 +6.2
Explr 89.59 +.58 +12.7
GNMA 10.90 ... +0.7
GNMAAdml 10.90 ... +0.7
GlbEq 20.59 +.16 +10.3
GrowthEq 13.45 +.09 +9.5
HYCor 6.19 +.01 +3.2
HYCorAdml 6.19 +.01 +3.3
HltCrAdml 69.87 +.31 +18.5
HlthCare 165.61 +.73 +18.5
ITGradeAd 10.29 +.01 +1.6
InfPrtAdm 28.62 -.04 +0.6
InfPrtI 11.66 -.01 +0.7
InflaPro 14.57 -.02 +0.6
InstIdxI 146.08+1.04 +12.4
InstPlus 146.09+1.04 +12.5
InstTStPl 36.18 +.26 +12.6
IntlExpIn 16.14 +.15 +9.7
IntlStkIdxAdm 26.45 +.27 +5.9
IntlStkIdxIPls 105.79+1.09 +5.9
LTInvGr 10.96 -.02 +2.9
MidCapGr 22.54 +.12 +10.7
MidCp 25.66 +.15 +14.2
MidCpAdml 116.46 +.69 +14.2
MidCpIst 25.73 +.16 +14.3
MuIntAdml 14.42 ... +1.3
MuLtdAdml 11.16 ... +0.7
PrecMtls 12.29 +.09 -22.9
Prmcp 81.37 +.76 +17.1
PrmcpAdml 84.42 +.79 +17.1
PrmcpCorI 17.27 +.14 +15.7
REITIdx 24.72 +.20 +14.0
REITIdxAd 105.48 +.86 +14.0
STCor 10.82 ... +0.7
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.7
SelValu 23.83 +.13 +13.6
SmGthIdx 27.80 +.20 +11.1
SmGthIst 27.86 +.20 +11.1
StSmCpEq 24.51 +.18 +12.9
Star 22.27 +.11 +7.1
StratgcEq 24.50 +.16 +14.2
TgtRe2015 14.19 +.06 +6.1
TgtRe2020 25.47 +.12 +6.9
TgtRe2030 25.33 +.15 +8.3
TgtRe2035 15.37 +.10 +9.1
TgtRe2040 25.38 +.18 +9.5
Tgtet2025 14.63 +.08 +7.7
TotBdAdml 11.09 ... +0.9
TotBdInst 11.09 ... +0.9
TotBdMkInv 11.09 ... +0.9
TotBdMkSig 11.09 ... +0.9
TotIntl 15.81 +.16 +5.8
TotStIAdm 39.94 +.29 +12.5
TotStIIns 39.95 +.29 +12.5
TotStIdx 39.92 +.28 +12.5
TxMIntlAdm 12.26 +.14 +9.4
TxMSCAdm 34.53 +.26 +10.8
USGro 23.31 +.18 +9.6
USValue 13.62 +.08 +14.8
WellsI 25.37 +.08 +6.0
WellsIAdm 61.48 +.22 +6.0
Welltn 36.80 +.18 +9.4
WelltnAdm 63.56 +.31 +9.4
WndsIIAdm 58.76 +.42 +12.7
WndsrII 33.10 +.24 +12.7
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.86 +.05 +12.6
DOW
14,818.75
+106.20
NASDAQ
3,307.02
+27.76
S&P 500
1,593.61
+11.37
RUSSELL 2000
942.43
+7.18
6-MO T-BILLS
.08%
-.01
10-YR T-NOTE
1.67%
...
CRUDE OIL
$94.50
+1.50
p p q q p p p p
n n p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$4.39
+.24
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
K
Put down the mega-latte! Women’s
Health has five healthier ways to get a
lasting boost for your day.
FIRE UP YOUR IPOD: Blasting Jay-Z
may snap you out of your stupor, but not
just because you dig his furious beats.
Music stimulates almost every region of
the brain.
When you perform the same tasks
each day it’s easy to get lulled into
sleepiness, but background tunes combat
the monotony, enhancing concentra-
tion and focus. For a stronger jolt, play
a feel-good favorite for three minutes.
Anything from Britney to Bach will work,
as long as it’s upbeat.
WATCH THAT RIDICULOUS YOU-
TUBE CLIP: Laughter doesn’t actually
release endorphins, it does however,
increase your heart rate and activate
your muscular system, making you feel
instantly revived.
BREAK YOUR HOARDING HABITS:
A messy desk or kitchen counter can be a
serious drain.
The reminder of everything we haven’t
gotten to yet really drags us down. If you
don’t have time for an overhaul, simply
filing loose papers into folders can clear
your mind. Try using a tray for critical
items, so you can remove them from
sight without worrying they’ll be forgot-
ten.
TAKE A MEDITATION MOMENT: It
may seem counterintuitive, but silence
can really revive you. Your brain and
body are constantly responding to
stimuli, which is exhausting.
But it takes only 60 seconds of quiet
time to replace all that dissipated energy.
Sit quietly and breathe deeply for five
breaths, concentrating on inhaling and
exhaling slowly.
GRAB SOME PEPPERMINT: Aro-
matherapists have long relied on
peppermint oil as a natural stimulant.
Researchers found that sniffing pepper-
mint immediately improves both athletes’
running speed and office workers’ typing
speed. Its scent acts as a mood enhancer
that boosts your motivation and concen-
tration. So grab an infusion, whether it’s
breath mints, lip gloss, or hand lotion.
- MCT Information Services
YO U R H E A LT H : Five ways to get an energy boost
Health
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013
SECTI ON C
IN BRIEF
Free training session
“Intellectual Disabilities and
Changing Demographics” will
be the focus of an upcoming
training session from 10 a.m.
to noon May 7 at the Luzerne
County West Side Annex Build-
ing, Forty Fort.
The free training is being
sponsored by the Luzerne-Wy-
oming Counties Mental Health
& Developmental Services in
conjunction with the Luzerne-
Wyoming Counties Training
Council on Quality and The
Advocacy Alliance Northeast
PA Health Care Quality Unit.
To register, call 825-9441
or (800) 816-1880 or email:
mhmr@mhmr.luzerne.pa.us.
Free headache program
The Alliance Medical Group
will conduct a free “Another
Headache?” educational pro-
gram from 6 to 7 p.m. May 9
at the Hazleton Health & Well-
ness Center, 50 Moisey Drive
in Hazleton.
Dr. Shu Xu, a board-certified
neurologist with Alliance Medi-
cal Group, will discuss some
of the most common causes
of headaches, symptoms, and
available treatment options.
Dr. Xu will also provide
information regarding the new
Alliance Headache Clinic at the
Hazleton Health & Wellness
Center.
Pre-registration is required.
Visit www.ghha.org and regis-
ter online through the Calen-
dar of Events or call 501-6204.
Dental Health Alumni
Day scheduled at LCCC
The Luzerne County Commu-
nity College Alumni Associa-
tion and Dental Health Depart-
ment will host the 14th annual
Dental Health Alumni Day on
May 10 at the college’s Educa-
tional Conference Center.
Guest speaker Patti DiGangi
will present “Having Mo-
ments with Seniors” and “Oral
Systemic Health: Medical/Den-
tal Emergencies, More Than
CPR.”
The program is open to
LCCC dental alumni and area
dental health professionals.
Registration will be held at 8
a.m. and the program will be
held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information or for
registration fees, contact the
LCCCAlumni Office at 740-0735
or (800) 377-LCCC, ext. 7735 or
email alumni@luzerne.edu.
Diabetic education
session set for May 8
A diabetic education session
sponsored by Allied Services
Integrated Health System
Home Health Division will be
held from 10 a.m. to noon May
8 at the John Heinz staffing
conference room, 150 Mundy
St., Wilkes-Barre Township.
For information, call 830-
2070.
timesleader.com
See BRIEFS, Page 2C
Stems cells taken from just a few
grams of body fat are a promising
weapon against the crippling effects of
osteoarthritis.
For the past two decades, knee, hip
or other joint replacements have been
the standard treatment for the dete-
rioration of joint cartilage and the un-
derlying bone. But artificial joints only
last about 15 years and are difficult to
repair once they fail.
Stem cell injections may offer a new
type of therapy by either stopping the
degenerative process or by regenerat-
ing the damaged cartilage, said pio-
neering researcher Dr. Farshid Guilak,
a professor of orthopedic surgery and
director of orthopedic research at
Duke University.
Guilak, one of the first researchers
to grow cartilage from fat, explains
why stem cells are a bright light in
osteoarthritis research and why wide-
spread clinical use is still years away.
Below is an edited transcript of the
interview.
Q: How are stem cell injections pur-
ported to help?
A: Several studies in animals show
that stem cell injections may help by
reducing the inflammation in the joint.
Stem cells appear to have a natural ca-
pacity to produce anti-inflammatory
molecules, and once injected in the
joint, can slow down the degenerative
process in osteoarthritis.
(Since this interview, research pub-
lished in Stem Cells Translational
Medicine has found that stem cells
may also be an effective way to deliver
therapeutic proteins for pain relief re-
lated to rheumatoid arthritis.)
Q: Does the bulk of research look at
how stem cells heal traumatic injuries,
or does it look at degenerative condi-
tions such as arthritis?
A: Nearly all previous studies on
stem cell therapies in joints have fo-
cused on trying to repair small “focal”
Can stem
cells help
those with
arthritis?
By Julie DeArDorff
Chicago Tribune
See STEM CELLS, Page 2C
In the heat of the moment, it’s a good
bet sexually transmitted infections are
the last thing on a teen’s or young adult’s
mind.
Thus, according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention in At-
lanta, young people ages 15-24, who
make up just more than one-quarter of
the sexually active population, account
for half of the 20 million new sexually
transmitted infections that occur in the
U.S. each year.
With this being Sexually Transmitted
Disease Awareness Month, officials are
emphasizing efforts to educate teens
and their parents about the public health
issue to slow the spread of diseases
among young people.
In addition to providing testing, some
localities are leveraging social media to
help informthe public about treatments,
prevention strategies and the need to get
tested.
“It is a sobering reality that so many
young people are infected with STDs
and even more startling, the number
of these young people who aren’t even
aware of it,” said Dr. Patrick O’Neal, di-
rector of health protection at the Geor-
gia Department of Public Health. “Our
goal is to reduce incidence of STDs and
the disparity in numbers of young peo-
ple infected, and cutting down sexual
transmission of STDs.”
While sexually transmitted infections
affect people of all ages, they take a par-
Teens, young adults bear disproportionate share of STDs
By GrAcie BonDs stAples
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
STDS BY THE NUMBERS
• 1 million diagnosed and reported chla-
mydia cases in 2011
• 200,000 diagnosed and reported gonor-
rhea cases in 2011
• 4,700 diagnosed and reported syphillis
cases in 2011
- U.S. figures
See STDS, Page 2C
W
hen the alarm goes off at 6 a.m.,
getting out of bed and heading
to the gym may seem like an impos-
sible task. Good news! Recent stud-
ies have found that exercising with a
partner boosts motivation — and it’s
more fun than doing it alone.
Ivy Ingram Larson, the West Palm
Beach, Fla., trainer and star of the
“Full Fitness Fusion” DVD, created
this partner workout. Larson suggests
moving quickly between exercises in
order to keep your heart rate elevat-
ed. Repeat the circuit three times.
wORkINg IT OUT
Partner exercise routines can be more fun than going it alone
MCT PHOTO
Ivy, left, and Andy Larson fromFull Fitness Fusion demonstrate toe tip squats: Face each other with your arms out in front
of you, holding hands. Stand on tiptoes. Bend knees, squat down and push bottomback until thighs are parallel to floor.
By DAnielle BrAff
Tribune Newspapers
Medicine ball toss
Face your partner while stand-
ing 6 feet apart. From a standing
position, toss a weighted medicine
ball (4 pounds is good for begin-
ners) to your partner, who will
catch it while moving into a squat,
thighs parallel to the floor. Your
partner should toss the ball back to
you while rising into a standing po-
sition. Each partner should throw
and catch the ball 20 times.
Airplanes holding hands
Stand at your partner’s side with
both hands outstretched to your
sides. You should be far enough
away from your partner that only
your hands are touching. Hold one
of your partner’s hands while you
both face forward, looking in the
same direction. Both of you should
lean forward at the same time
while raising your innermost legs
up and back. Stretch the leg up and
back until your chest, abdomen
and innermost legs are parallel to
the floor. Hold this position for 3
seconds before returning to an up-
right position. Repeat 10 times be-
fore turning to face the other way
to exercise your other leg.
Armresistance shoulder toning
Facing your partner, stand arm’s
length apart. Raise your arms to
shoulder level in front of your
body at about 45 degrees. Your
hands should face the floor. Start
by having your partner push your
See PARTNER, Page 3C
Howcanyoumakesureyour heart’s intheright place?
Turntothehospital that performs
themost cardiacprocedures inthearea.
The Affiliate Hospitals of Commonwealth Health: Berwick Hospital Center • First Hospital • Mid-Valley Hospital • Moses Taylor Hospital
Regional Hospital of Scranton • Special Care Hospital • Tyler Memorial Hospital • Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
To learn more about Wilkes-Barre General Hospital’s commitment to
improving heart care for our community, visit CommonwealthHealth.net.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2C TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 H E A L T H
Health briefs are limited to non-
profit entities and support groups.
To have your health-oriented
announcement included, send
information to Health, Times
Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA18711-0250 or email health@
timesleader.com.
Participants sought for
cancer preventionstudy
The American Cancer So-
ciety is seeking participants
to enroll in and promote the
American Cancer Society’s
Cancer Prevention Study-3
(CPS-3) at the Wyoming Val-
ley Relay For Life on June 15
at King’s College Robert Bet-
zler Fields in Wilkes-Barre
Township. The relay will be
held from noon until 4 p.m.
The Cancer Prevention
Study-3 will help researchers
understand what causes can-
cer and how to prevent it.
Individuals need to be will-
ing to commit to the study
long term, be between the ages
of 30–65, and never haven been
diagnosed with cancer.
To participate in the
study, interested individuals
can stop by the enrollment
tent at the Relay For Life.
They can also call Jennifer
Washney, health initia-
tives representative for the
American Cancer Society, at
562-9749 ext. 320 or by email
at jennifer.washney@cancer.
org before May 13.
BRIEFS
Continued from Page 1C
damage to the cartilage.
Only a fewrecent studies have
begun to examine the possibil-
ity for treating the whole joint,
either to grow enough cartilage
to resurface the entire joint or to
use stem cells to prevent further
degeneration.
Q: Meaning one day, entire
joint surfaces such as hips and
knees could be grown in a lab?
A: That has been one of our
primary research goals, so that
people with arthritis can simply
resurface the cartilage in their
joints without having a total
joint replacement.
To do this, we have developed
a fabric “scaffold” that can be
created in the exact shape of the
joint, while allowing stem cells
to form new cartilage.
One of our most exciting find-
ings was the discovery that fat
tissue contained large numbers
of stem cells that could form
cartilage and bone.
In this way, we could easily
get enough cells from a small
liposuction procedure to com-
pletely resurface a person’s
worn-out hip or knee.
Q: Is it legal to get stem cell
treatment for osteoarthritis in
the U.S.?
A: While there is great prom-
ise for stem cell therapies,
there’s little clinical evidence
supporting it for arthritis; we
don’t yet know if this type of
treatment is safe in humans,
or for that matter, that it even
works.
Some physicians are offering
these treatments without FDA
approval, but I feel it is irrespon-
sible and potentially dangerous
to perform such a procedure
without having a clear under-
standing of the possible risks
and benefits.
Several clinical trials are
planned and ongoing, mostly
outside the U.S.
BACK MOUNTAIN FREE
MEDICAL CLINIC: 6:30 p.m.
Fridays, 65 Davis St., Shaver-
town. Volunteers, services and
supplies needed. For more
information, call 696-1144.
BMW FREE COMMUNITY
HEALTH CLINIC: 6-8 p.m.,
second Thursday, New Cov-
enant Christian Fellowship
Church, rear entrance, 780 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Free
basic care for people without
health insurance and the un-
derserved. Call 822-9605.
CARE AND CONCERN FREE
HEALTH CLINIC: Registra-
tion 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
former Seton Catholic High
School, 37 William St., Pittston.
Basic health care and informa-
tion provided. Call 954-0645.
PEDIATRIC HEALTH CLINIC
for infants through age 11,
former Seton Catholic High
School, 37 William St., Pittston.
Registrations accepted from
4:30-5:30 p.m. the first and
third Thursday of each month.
Parents are required to bring
their children’s immunization
records. For more information,
call 855-6035.
THE HOPE CENTER: Free
basic medical care and preven-
tive health care information
for the uninsured or under-
insured, legal advice and
pastoral counseling, 6-8 p.m.
Mondays; free hearing tests
and hearing aid assistance,
6-8 p.m. Wednesdays; free
chiropractic evaluations and
vision care, including free
replacement glasses, for the
uninsured or underinsured,
6-8 p.m. Thursdays; Back
Mountain Harvest Assembly,
340 Carverton Road, Trucks-
ville. Free dental hygiene ser-
vices and teeth cleanings are
available 6-8 p.m. on Mondays
by appointment. Call 696-5233
or email hopecenterwv@gmail.
com.
VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE:
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through
Friday, 190 N. Pennsylvania
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Primary
and preventive health care for
the working uninsured and un-
derinsured in Luzerne County
with incomes less than two
times below federal poverty
guidelines. For appointments,
call 970-2864.
WILKES-BARRE FREE
CLINIC: 4:30-7:30 p.m. Tues-
days and 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
on the first Wednesday, St.
Stephen’s Episcopal Church,
35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre.
Appointments are necessary.
Call 793-4361. A dental clinic is
also available from 1 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday by appointment. Call
235-5642. Physicians, nurse
practitioners, pharmacists,
RNs, LPNs and social workers
are needed as well as recep-
tionists and interpreters. To
volunteer assistance leave a
message for Pat at 793-4361.
FREE CLINICS
STEM CELLS
Continued from Page 1C
SCREENING RECOMMENDATIONS:
• Annual chlamydia screening for all sexually active women
age 25 and younger.
• Yearly gonorrhea screening for at-risk sexually active
women with new or multiple sex partners and women who
live in communities with a high incidence of disease.
• Syphilis, chlamydia and hepatitis B screening for all preg-
nant women, and gonorrhea screening for at-risk pregnant
women at the first prenatal visit to protect the health of
mothers and their infants.
• Screening at least once a year for syphilis, chlamydia,
gonorrhea and HIV for all sexually active men who have
sex with men. Those who use illicit drugs or whose sex
partners participate in these activities should be screened
more frequently.
• For information, log onto www.cdc.gov/std.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
ticularly heavy physical toll on
young people, said Dr. Gail Bo-
lan, director of the CDC’s Divi-
sion of STD Prevention.
This is true especially for
young women going through
puberty because biological fac-
tors make it easier for organ-
isms to enter their reproduc-
tive systems.
Although most women will
clear infection with medical
treatment, some are left with
debilitating pelvic pain and are
at increased risk of developing
ectopic pregnancies.
Among the eight common
sexually transmitted infec-
tions, she said, the human
papillomavirus, or HPV, is by
far the most common among
teens and young adults.
Though most HPV infec-
tions will clear on their own,
some will take hold and can
lead to serious disease, includ-
ing cervical cancer.
Chlamydia, gonorrhea, geni-
tal herpes and trichomoniasis
are also common among the
young age group.
Undiagnosed infections
cause 24,000 women to be-
come infertile each year, ac-
cording to the CDC.
“I think we’ve known for a
long time that young people
are at greater risk for sexually
transmitted disease and the
prevalence of infection among
them is very high,” Bolan said.
“The way we reduce infection
is by identifying people as
quickly as possible so that they
can get treated.” Bolan said
her office is partnering with
other public health agencies to
raise awareness not only about
the impact of infections, but
the causes and what teens and
young adults can do to protect
themselves.
A lack of access to health
care, confidentiality concerns,
even being too embarrassed to
tell anyone, all feed the spread
of infections, she said.
Bolan said sexually active
teens and young adults should
be checked periodically for dis-
ease. If they suspect they’ve
been infected, they should
seek care from their pediatri-
cian or primary care doctor. If
they don’t know where to go,
they can call their local health
department.
STdS
Continued from Page 1C
Dr. Margaret Ace Breznay
was recently listed in the Federal
Motor Carrier
Safety Ad-
ministration’s
national list of
certified medi-
cal examiners.
She completed
the manda-
tory training
program and
passed The
Federal Motor Carrier Safety
Administration’s medical examin-
ers certification test. She is the
owner of Be Wise Occupational
Health in Avoca where she spe-
cializes in DOT/CDL (commercial
drivers license) physicals and also
provides third party administra-
tive services for both DOT and
Non-DOT drug testing.
Dr. Breznay is an honors gradu-
ate of Marywood College where
she received her Bachelor of
Science and Master of Science
degrees. She later attended Penn-
sylvania College of Chiropractic
and graduated magna cum laude.
She is a member of The American
Chiropractic Association and a
member of TeamCME, a national
network of DOT certified medical
examiners.
She resides in Pittston Township
with her husband, Christopher,
and two children, Anna Rose and
Margaret Lin.
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arms down by placing pressure on the back
of your hands and wrists. Actively resist
your partner’s efforts so that it takes about
3 seconds for your arms to be down at your
waist level, and then start raising your arms
against your partner’s continued pressure
for 3 more seconds until you are back at
shoulder level. Repeat this 10 times before
switching positions and letting your partner
do 10 repetitions.
Tip-toe squats
Face each other with your arms fully ex-
tended in front of you, holding hands with
your partner. Both should be standing on
tiptoes and holding that position for 3 sec-
onds. Next, both should drop into a chair
position by bending your knees, squatting
down and pushing your behind backward
until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
While doing this, you should still be on your
tiptoes holding hands. Hold the chair posi-
tion for 3 seconds before lifting back up to
the starting position on your toes. Repeat
10 times.
Single-leg bridge with foot press
Lie on the floor on your back in a straight
line so that your feet touch your partner’s.
The sole of your right foot should touch
the sole of your partner’s left foot. Lift your
right foot and your partner’s left foot about
2 feet off the floor. Keep your left leg bent
to allow you to push your body off the floor
into a bridge position. Your thigh, abs and
chest should form a straight line with your
lower back, and your glutes should be off
the floor. Your partner should be doing the
same thing using his opposite leg. Keep
your right leg engaged by actively pressing
into your partner’s left foot as your raise and
lower your body from bridge position to
floor position 10 times, holding the bridge
position for 3 seconds with each repetition.
Then switch feet and work the other side
10 times.
Couple’s hamstring and bicep curls
Lie on the floor face down. Your partner
should kneel on the floor on a mat, rug or
towel, just behind your feet and grasp the
back of your ankles as you raise your feet
toward your back while keeping your knees
on the ground. Stop the motion once your
lower legs are perpendicular to the floor.
Your partner should actively resist this
movement. It should take about 3 seconds
for your feet to travel from the floor to the
upright position. Once at the top, your part-
ner will start to actively pull your ankles
and feet back down to the floor as you re-
sist the effort for 3 more seconds. Your
partner should remain kneeling on the floor
so biceps and arms are working. Repeat 10
times, then switch.
Single-leg squats
Face your partner and extend your arms
toward each other so you are holding hands.
Lift your right foot while your partner lifts
his left foot until both of your thighs are par-
allel to the floor and your toes are touching
each other’s. Squat with the other leg, try-
ing to get as low as possible. Stay in the low
squat for 3 seconds before lifting back to
upright position. Keep your toes touching
each other’s and continue holding hands the
entire time. Do 10 repetitions per leg.
PARTNER
Continued from Page 1C
A
n amino acid commonly found in the brains of
Alzheimer’s patients has been discovered in the
spinal fluid of people without dementia whose close
relatives were diagnosed with the disease, according
to a study led by Duke University researchers.
Duke study finds Alzheimer’s
markers in patients’ relatives
By Renee eldeR
The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.)
MCT PHOTOS
Ivy, right, and Andy Larson from Full Fitness Fusion demonstrate single leg bridge with foot press: Lye on floor with feet touching
partner, right foot to left foot. Lift right foot and partner’s left foot up two feet off floor.
Ivy and Andy Larson from Full Fitness Fusion demonstrate arm resistance shoulder
toning: Face each other at arms length. Raise your arms out to shoulder level 45
degrees with hands facing floor. Have partner push your arms down to the floor by
placing pressure on the back of your hands and wrists.
Editor’s note: The complete health calendar can be
viewed at www.timesleader.com by clicking the Health
link under the Features tab. To have your health-ori-
ented event listed, send information to Health, Times
Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250; by
fax: 829-5537; or email health@timesleader.com.
The researchers also found
people closely related to an
Alzheimer’s patient were more
likely to have a smaller-than-
normal hippocampus, the
portion of the brain linked to
memory. The findings could
help lay the
groundwork for
development of
early- detection
tools, said Erika
Lambert, a Duke
researcher in-
volved in the
project.
“It’s possible
that these chang-
es are among the
reasons people
with a family his-
tory of Alzheim-
er’s are more
likely to get Al-
zheimer’s,” Lam-
bert said
People with a
close family his-
tory of Alzheim-
er’s — such as a
brother, sister or
parent — have a
two- to four-times greater risk
of developing it themselves.
The study, published last
week in the online journal
PLOS ONE, involved 257 peo-
ple ages 55 to 89, all of whom
had average memory functions
or were considered “mildly
forgetful,” said P. Murali Do-
raiswamy, Duke professor of
psychiatry and medicine and
senior author of the study.
Each person in the study
underwent cognitive assess-
ments, as well as biological
tests. Researchers found that
about 50 percent of healthy
people with a close family con-
nection to Alzheimer’s could
be considered to have early
signs of the disease, compared
to only about 20 percent of
people without a family his-
tory.
Memory loss significant
enough to disrupt daily activi-
ties is aprimarysymptomof Al-
zheimer’s, according to the Al-
zheimer’s Association. About
25 million people around the
world have Alzheimer’s dis-
ease — a number
that is expected
to grow as the
population ages.
There is no cure.
Common ge-
netic variations
explain about 50
percent of the
heritability of
Alzheimer’s, but
other genetic fac-
tors influencing
the disease re-
main unknown.
“So far we have
been looking for
genetic factors
with big effects,
but there might
turn out to be a
number of genes
involved,” Do-
raiswamy said.
The amino acid found in the
subjects’ spinal fluid is known
as amyloid beta or Abeta,
a component of the plaque
buildup found in the brains of
people with Alzheimer’s dis-
ease.
Doraiswamy said people
who have Alzheimer’s in the
family may want to consider
volunteering for research
studies to enhance scientific
knowledge of the illness and
also to reassure themselves
about their own cognitive per-
formance.
“If you want to help scien-
tists make advances in the
field, you could … volunteer
as a subject in research studies
that involve regular testing of
memory,” he said. “That’s also
a way to get reassurance that
your memory is normal.”
Researchers
found that about
50 percent of
healthy people
with a close fam-
ily connection to
Alzheimer’s could
be considered to
have early signs
of the disease,
compared to only
about 20 percent
of people without
a family history.
NATIONAL
HOMEBREW DAY!
Saturday, May 4th at
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4C TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
King’s College hosts annual care summit
The King’s College Physician Assistant Studies Program recently coordinated the college’s partici-
pation in the fourth annual Northeast/Central Pennsylvania Interprofessional Education Coalition
(NECPA IPEC) Collaborative Care Summit. More than 150 students from health-related fields of study
and faculty facilitators from King’s and nine other area colleges and universities attended the King’s
portion of the summit. The goal of the summit was to prepare all health professions students so that
they can collaboratively work together with the common goal of building a safer and better patient-
centered U.S. health care system. Participants, from left, first row, are some of the student attendees,
Ashley Benz, occupational therapy, Misericordia; Jennifer Foy, nursing, Wilkes; Christopher Tobias,
physician assistant studies, King’s; Timothy Rigotti, paramedic, Luzerne County Community College;
and, Rahul Sharma, third-year medical student, The Commonwealth Medical College. Second row:
faculty representatives Maria Grandinetti, assistant professor of nursing, Wilkes; Diana Easton, chair
of the physician assistant studies program, King’s; and, Dr. Joanne Chipego, chair of the nursing
program, Luzerne County Community College.
Saturday, May 11, 8 p.m. | Haas Center for the Arts |Mitrani Hall
Tickets: $34.50 Adult | 19.50 Child
S | C f |
Nai-Ni Chen with the Ahn Trio
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Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania Celebrity Artist Series
Supported by
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Living Alone Made Easy
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Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your child’s birthday.
Your information must be typed
or computer-generated. Include
your name and your relationship
to the child (parent, grandparent
or legal guardians only, please),
your child’s name, age and
birthday, parents’, grandparents’
and great-grandparents’ names
and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
Without one, we may be unable
to publish a birthday announce-
ment on time.
We cannot guarantee return of
birthday or occasions photos
and do not return community-
news or publicity photos. Please
do not submit precious or origi-
nal professional photographs
that require return because
such photos can become dam-
aged, or occasionally lost, in the
production process.
Email your birthday announce-
ment to people@timesleader.
com or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. You
also may use the form under the
People tab on www.timesleader.
com.
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 5C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Emily S. Harkenreader
Emily Suzanne Harkenreader,
daughter of Danny Harken-
reader and Mary Harkenreader,
Wilkes-Barre Township, is
celebrating her ninth birthday
today, April 30. Emily is a grand-
daughter of David and MaryAnn
Harkenreader, Laurel Run,
and Joe and Brenda Hartman,
Larksville. Emily is a great-
granddaughter of Pauline Har-
kenreader and Elizabeth Disler,
both of Laurel Run, and Nancy
Washiski, Wilkes-Barre. Emily
has a sister, Candice, 17, and a
brother, Stephen, 2 months.
DALLAS: First Friday
Group, Assumpta Council
3987, Knights of Columbus
will attend the 8 a.m. Mass
on Friday at the Church of St.
Frances Cabrini, Carverton.
The group will attend break-
fast at Leggio’s Restaurant,
Dallas, after the service. Res-
ervations can be made with
Chet Daniels at 696-2096.
TAYLOR: Volunteer Visitors
Association is holding an infor-
mation seminar and luncheon
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on
May 11 at Riverside Rehabilita-
tion and Nursing Center, 500
W. Hospital Street. Volunteers
are needed to visit residents.
Breakfast refreshments and
lunch will be provided. Reser-
vations are due by May 9. Call
Kelly Flannery at 780-6189.
EXETER: The Cosmo-
politan Seniors will meet
at 1 p.m. today in St.
Anthony’s Center. Hosts
and hostesses are Virginia
Craig, Shari Dailey, Fran
Lepo, Kathy Loucks and
Marion Kratzer.
Eileen Cipriani, an aide
to Rep. Phyllis Mundy,
was a guest speaker at
the previous meeting. She
discussed various senior
programs.
Fifty-fifty winners were
Virginia Craig, Shari Daley,
Maureen Gosart, Rosemary
Golenski and Tony Oliveri.
New member, Ann Doggett,
and Ann Mattei shared
the special game prize and
Charlie Cheskiewicz was
the jackpot winner.
A trip to Mount Airy Ca-
sino is scheduled for May
8. Pick ups are in Exeter
and Pittston. For details,
call Johanna at 655-2720.
FALLS: The Falls Senior
Center will host Sharon
Hinchey, a representative
from “Women Heart,” from
11:30 to 11:55 a.m. on
Monday. She will demon-
strate a few simple tech-
niques to promote body
and mind wellness.
There will be a Mother’s
Day luncheon and celebra-
tion on May 7.
LUZERNE COUNTY:
The Senior Peer Counsel-
ing Program of Community
Counseling Services, Lu-
zerne and Wyoming Coun-
ties, is recruiting home-
bound senior citizens, 60
and older, who would like
a weekly visitor to come to
their homes for conversa-
tion and socialization.
The program selects
and trains volunteers who
provide support and com-
panionship to identified
individuals.
Male and female volun-
teers are at least 55 years
of age, able to drive and de-
vote a few hours each week
relating to new people.
Registration for the next
series of training classes
is underway. There is no
cost to participate in this
program.
Contact Rhoda Tillman,
program coordinator, at
836-3118 to discuss oppor-
tunities as a Senior Peer
Counselor or to request a
weekly visitor. Relatives of
home-bound seniors may
call for more information.
MINERS MILLS: The
Miners Mills Community
Club will meet at 1 p.m.
on May 7 at Holy Trinity
Russian Orthodox pavilion.
Hostesses are Antoinette
Stec, Mary Suchoski,
Marion Thomas and Fran
Mattiucci.
MOUNTAIN TOP: The
Mountain Top Social Club
will have a Mother/Fa-
ther’s Day dinner at 12:30
p.m. on May 14 at the Sand
Springs Country Club.
Members and guests are
asked to come at noon. The
cost is $15 for members
and $18 for guests. To reg-
ister call Otto or Roberta
Malone.
Upcoming trips are May
16 to Rainbow Dinner The-
atre, Lancaster, and May
23 to Mount Airy Casino.
Money is due Wednesday
for the May 16 and June 14
trips. For reservations, or
more information, call Otto
at 403-5338.
PLAINS TWP.: The
Plains Senior Citizens
Project met in April at
SS. Peter and Paul school
cafeteria, Hudson Road.
There were 50 members in
attendance.
The trip to Hunts Land-
ing is May 14. For informa-
tion on the trip call Mike
Boncheck at 823-2871. A
final report on the trip will
be given at the next meet-
ing on Wednesday. .
Hostesses are Barbara
Silvi, Shirley Sitek, There-
sa Tempalski, Jean Trosky
and Florence Warabak.
They are asked to report
to the cafeteria at 11:30
a.m. New members are
welcome.
SWOYERSVILLE: The
Swoyersville Senior Citi-
zens will meet at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday at the St. Eliza-
beth Ann Seton social hall.
President Liz Zdancewicz
will preside.
Representative Phyllis
Mundy will be the guest
speaker. She will discuss
programs available to
seniors.
Winners of the 50-50 fun-
draiser at the last meeting
were Eleanor Gudak, Dan
Shumack and Liz Zdance-
wiz.
WILKES-BARRE: The
Firwood Senior Citizens
Club will meet at 1 p.m. on
Thursday in the meeting
room at the church, Old
River Road and Dagobert
Street.
Refreshments will be
served, followed by the
business meeting conduct-
ed by President Tom Wahl.
Rose Cichy, representing
the Osterhout Free Library,
will give a presentation on
available programs.
The following trips are
available: May 9, Dutch
Apple Theater to see Briga-
doon; June 27, Hershey
Hotel, includes luncheon
and tour of Hershey
Gardens and a stop at the
Hollywood Casino; July 24,
“Escape on the Lake” at
Ehrhardt’s Resort, includes
a boat ride on Lake Wallen-
paupack, buffet luncheon
and the Joey Vincent show.
Trips are open to all.
Call Maureen at 824-6538
for more information.
NEWS FOR SENIORS
IN BRIEF
PETS OF THE WEEK
Name: Koda
I.D. No.: A18885722
Sex: male
Age: 6
Breed/type: Pointer, German
shorthaired mix
About this dog: white/cream;
large; neutered
Name: Misty
I.D. No.: A19109847
Sex: female
Age: 9 months
Breed/type: domestic, medium
hair
About this cat: black/orange/
calico; spayed
How to adopt: The
SPCA of Luzerne County,
524 East Main St., Plains
Township.
For more information call
825-4111.
Adoption hours are 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to
7 p.m. Monday through
Friday and from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturdays and
Sundays.
Visit the SPCA of Luzerne
County online at http://
spcaluzernecounty.org.
Walk for Recovery and Mental Health Fair to be held May 19
The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Wilkes-Barre Chapter and community mental health agencies are holding the 12th annual Walk for
Recovery and Mental Health Fair on May 19. The theme for this year’s walk is ‘Walking Today, Recovery Every Day.” Walkers will gather at noon at the
Guard Insurance Group parking lot, River and W. Market streets, Wilkes-Barre. The walk to Kirby Park will begin at 12:30 p.m. and conclude at the park
where a picnic and mental health fair will be held. A cookout, refreshments and a Chinese auction will also be part of the afternoon activities. Infor-
mation on mental health topics will be available. The event is free. For more information, call NAMI at 371-3844. Members of the planning group, from
left, first row: Paul Radzavicz, NAMI Wilkes-Barre; Marie Gavlick, Northeast Counseling Services; Beth Hollinger, chairperson, Community Counseling
Services; George Morgan, Greenhouse Center; and Kelly Nice Martini, Children’s Service Center. Second row: Joseph J. Fedak, NAMI; Marjo Moore and
Ron Borland, Greenhouse Center; Jerri F. Sydlo and Diane McDevitt, Northeast Counseling Services; Debbie Karlak, United Rehabilitation Services;
Gail Perrins and Edward Lord, Greenhouse Center; Robert Schertzer, Volunteers of America; and Glenda Race, NAMI.
Oakwood Terrace holding jewelry sale
Oakwood Terrace memory care community, 400 Gleason Drive, Moosic, is holding a jewelry sale fundraiser
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday in the community’s lobby area. The fundraiser will benefit The Walk to
End Alzheimer’s. Twenty percent of the proceeds will go towards the walk. For more information, contact Syl-
via at 570-451-3171 ext. 116. Assisting with the fundraiser preparations, from left, first row: Trish Slusarczyk,
health and wellness director, and Bernice Hinkle, resident. Second row: Janet Zaleski, recreation director;
Deidra Ellis, resident attendant; Cassandra Whitlock, licensed practical nurse; Debbie Lahey, Silver Sojourner,
show presenter; Nancy Babcock, resident attendant; and Sylvia Kolosinsky, community relations coordinator.
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PAIN & GAIN (XD) (R)
10:45AM 1:45PM 4:45PM 7:45PM
10:45PM NEW MOVIE
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \”®”\ indicate reserved seating.
42 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
10:50AM 1:50PM 4:40PM 7:35PM 10:30PM
BIG WEDDING, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:55PM 3:10PM 5:25PM 7:40PM 9:55PM
NEW MOVIE
CALL, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
(11:50AM 2:20PM 4:40PM NOT SAT. 4/27 OR
WED. 5/1/13) (7:05PM 9:25PM NOT ON WED.
51/13)
COMPANY YOU KEEP, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
10:55AM 1:45PM 4:35PM 7:25PM 10:15PM
NEW MOVIE
CROODS, THE (3D) (PG)
2:15PM 7:15PM
CROODS, THE (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:35AM 4:50PM 9:45PM
EVIL DEAD (DIGITAL) (R)
12:40PM 3:00PM 5:15PM 7:55PM 10:15PM
GI JOE: RETALIATION (3D) (PG-13)
11:25AM 4:45PM 10:05PM
GI JOE: RETALIATION (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
2:00PM 7:20PM
IDENTITY THIEF (DIGITAL) (R)
(11:05AM 1:55PM 4:30PM NOT ON SAT.
4/27/13) 7:50PM 10:40PM
JURASSIC PARK (2013) (3D) (PG-13)
1:25PM 4:25PM 7:25PM 10:25PM
LORDS OF SALEM, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
11:10AM 1:40PM 4:10PM 7:10PM 9:40PM
OBILIVION (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:30AM 12:30PM 1:30PM 2:30PM 3:30PM
4:30PM 5:30PM 6:30PM 7:30PM 8:30PM
9:30PM 10:30PM
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (DIGITAL) (R)
12:25PM 3:15PM (6:40PM 10:00PM NOT ON
WED. 5/1/13)
OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (3D) (PG)
12:55PM 6:55PM
OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (DIGITAL) (PG)
3:55PM 10:10PM
PAIN & GAIN (DIGITAL) (R)
12:15PM 3:15PM 6:15PM 9:15PM
NEW MOVIE
PLACE BEYOND THE PINES, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM 4:00PM 7:10PM 10:20PM
SCARY MOVIE 5 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:55AM 2:05PM 4:15PM 6:25PM 8:35PM
10:45PM
SIDE EFFECTS (DIGITAL) (R)
11:20AM 5:05PM 10:35PM
TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (DIGITAL)
(PG-13)
2:25PM 8:00PM
Pain & Gain – R – 140 min –
(1:15), (1:40), (4:10), (4:40), 7:00, 7:20, 9:50,
10:10
The Big Wedding – R – 100 min –
(2:20), (4:40), 7:20, 9:30
**Oblivion – PG13 – 130 min –
(1:30), (2:00), (4:15), (4:50), 7:05, 7:30, 9:40,
10:15
Oblivion -DBox Motion Seating - PG-13
- 130 min.
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:40
**The Place Beyond The Pines – R – 150
min.
(1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 10:00
Silver Linings Playbook - R - 130 min.
(2:00), (4:40), 7:20, 10:00
Scary Movie 5 – PG13 – 95 min –
(2:35), (5:00), 7:40, 9:50.
42 – PG13 – 135 min –
(1:05), (1:40), (3:55), (4:25), 7:15, 7:35, 9:45,
10:15.
Evil Dead – R – 100 min –
(1:50), (4:10), 7:20, 9:40.
***Jurassic Park in RealD 3D – PG13
– 135 min –
(1:20), (4:15), 7:15, 10:00
Olympus Has Fallen – R – 130 min –
(1:45), (4:40), 7:30, 10:10.
The Croods – PG – 110 min –
(1:10), (3:40), 7:00, 9:30.
Oz: The Great and Powerful 2D – PG – 140
min –
(1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 9:50
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
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(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
THE MET OPERA
04/27/2013 - Giulio Cesare - 12:00PM - 275 min
SPECIAL EVENTS
Advance Ticketing Available Now For
Iron Man 3
OPENING 5/2/13
**Iron Man 3 -PG-13 - 140 min. 9 PM
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6C TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 T E L E V I S I O N
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Splash (N) (CC)
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Sanford &
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The
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Be a Mil-
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League of Extra.
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Happy Gilmore (PG-13, ‘96) ›› Adam
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FNC
Special Report With
Bret Baier (N)
FOX Report With
Shepard Smith
The O’Reilly Factor
(N) (CC)
Hannity (N) On Record, Greta
Van Susteren
The O’Reilly Factor
(CC)
HALL
Brady
Bunch
Brady
Bunch
Brady
Bunch
Brady
Bunch
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
HIST
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Counting
Cars
Counting
Cars
Counting
Cars (N)
Counting
Cars (N)
Restora-
tion
Restora-
tion
Chasing
Tail (CC)
Chasing
Tail (CC)
H&G
Property
Virgins
Property
Virgins
Hunters
Int’l
House
Hunters
Flip or
Flop
Flip or
Flop
Income Property
(CC) (TVG)
House
Hunters
Hunters
Int’l
Flip or
Flop (N)
Flip or
Flop (N)
LIF
Dance Moms (CC)
(TVPG)
Dance Moms (CC)
(TVPG)
Dance Moms Abby’s dancers compete in
New York. (N) (CC) (TVPG)
Preachers’ Daugh-
ters (N) (TV14)
(:01) Preachers’
Daughters (TV14)
MTV
Teen
Mom 2
Teen Mom 2 “The End of the
Road” (TVPG)
Ke$ha:
My Cr.
Girl Code Awkward. Awkward. Awkward.
(N)
(:31) Girl
Code (N)
Ke$ha:
My Cr.
Awkward.
NICK
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
Bob
Drake &
Josh
Full
House
Full
House
Full
House
Full
House
The
Nanny
The
Nanny
Friends
(TV14)
(:33)
Friends
OVAT
Song by
Song
Song by
Song
Song by
Song
Song by
Song
Mississippi Burning (R, ‘88) ››› Gene Hackman, Willem
Dafoe, Frances McDormand. (CC)
Mississippi Burn-
ing (R, ‘88) ››› (CC)
SPD
NASCAR Race
Hub (N)
Pass Time Pass Time Gearz
(TVPG)
Gearz
(TVPG)
Dreams Dreams Translogic The List
(TV14)
Gearz
(TVPG)
Gearz
(TVPG)
SPIKE
Auction
Hunters
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Worst
Tenants
Worst
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Urban
Tarzan
Worst
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SYFY
Fact or Faked: Para-
normal Files
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normal Files
Fact or Faked: Para-
normal Files
Weird or What?
“Alien Encounters”
Weird or What? “Life
After Death”
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“Alien Encounters”
TBS
King of
Queens
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
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Big Bang
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Last
Laugh?
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Conan (N) (CC)
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The Angry Hills (‘59) ›› Robert Mit-
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A Stolen Life (‘46) ›› Bette Davis,
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The Loves of Carmen (‘48) ›› Rita
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TLC
Island
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American Gypsy
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19 Kids-
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TNT
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Castle (CC) (TVPG) NBA Basketball Golden State Warriors at Denver
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24/7: Mi
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The Layover with
Anthony Bourdain
Anthony Bourdain:
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M*A*S*H
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Love-Ray-
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CSI: Crime Scene
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VH-1
Menace II Society
(4:50) ›››
The Gossip Game
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T.I. and
Tiny
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Love & Hip Hop:
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I’m Married to A...
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WE
Charmed “Out of
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CSI: Miami “Back-
stabbers” (TV14)
CSI: Miami “Internal
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CSI: Miami “Throw-
ing Heat” (TV14)
WGN-A
Old Chris-
tine
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tine
America’s Funniest
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How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine
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House-
Calls
Let’s Talk Topic A: Live at Five Legally
Speaking
Ghost
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Chef Lou Storm
Politics
Late Edition Classified Beaten
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YOUTO
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fight and end the spread of malaria.
Ice Age: Continental Drift
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Romano, Denis Leary. (CC)
The Campaign (R, ‘12) ››
Will Ferrell, Zach Galifianakis,
Jason Sudeikis. (CC)
Game of Thrones
“Kissed by Fire” (CC)
(TVMA)
HBO2
The Horse Whis-
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‘98) ››› (CC)
Collateral (6:55) (R, ‘04) ››› Tom
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cabdriver for his jobs. (CC)
Louis C.K.: Oh My
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Real Time With Bill
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Veep (CC)
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Boxing
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American Reunion (6:05) (R, ‘12) ››
Jason Biggs. The gang from “American
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The Long Kiss Goodnight (R, ‘96) ›››
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In Time (PG-13, ‘11) ›› Justin Timber-
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Rushmore (R, ‘98) ››› Jason
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Dark Shadows (PG-13, ‘12) ›› Johnny
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The Watch (R, ‘12)
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Stepmom (PG-13, ‘98) ›› Julia Roberts.
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50/50 (9:15) (R, ‘11) ››› Joseph Gor-
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Outnumbered Texans fight to secede from Mexico.
Ghost Rider: Spirit of Ven-
geance (PG-13, ‘12) › (CC)
Bad Santa (10:40) (R, ‘03)
››› Billy Bob Thornton.
7 a.m. 3, 22 CBS This Morn-
ing Dr. Phil McGraw; Tony Award
nominations. (N)
7 a.m. 16 Good Morning Amer-
ica Diane Sawyer previews her
interview with Amanda Knox; Isla
Fisher; Kenny Chesney; Sherri
Shepherd. (N)
7 a.m. 28 Today Journalist Maria
Shriver; ice cream; double duty
style. (N)
7 a.m. CNN Starting Point (N)
8 a.m. 56 Better Singer Joey
Fatone; Olympian Apolo Ohno;
spring gardening. (N) (TVPG)
TV TALK TODAY
TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 Page 7C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: My hus-
band, “Rick,” and I
are planning a trip
with our two chil-
dren next month. We
will visit family while
we are there, but
they don’t have room
for us to stay in their home.
Rick wants to bring his mother
with us. It will be a tight fit in our car,
but I don’t have a problem with that.
What bothers me is that Rick wants
her to stay with us in our hotel room.
I am a very private person. I have a
problem sharing such close quarters
with her. There is NO privacy in a
hotel room!
I offered to get two rooms, but he
feels I am being unreasonable. I feel
three adults plus two children is a lot
to pack into a small hotel room.
AM I being unreasonable? Or
should I just accept it and deal with
being miserable?
— Frustrated in the South
Dear Frustrated: Although there
may be exceptions, as a general
rule, adults need their privacy. I am
surprised your mother-in-law would
be willing to go along with such an
arrangement. This is a vacation, and
you should not be miserable when
you’re supposed to be enjoying it.
A better solution would be to get
two rooms, and the children should
bunk with their grandmother. That
way you and your husband could en-
joy some private time together.
Dear Abby: I have been with my
boyfriend for seven years. We have
no children together, but he has two
young children from a previous rela-
tionship whom I have been raising as
my own. They call me “Mom,” but
they know I’m not their biological
mother. Their mother has not con-
tacted them — or cared to — since
the younger one was just months old.
My fear is now that the kids are
getting older, they may want to form
a relationship with her later on. I
don’t want to seem selfish, but they
are MY kids. Any girl can have a baby,
but it takes a real woman to be a
mom. How should I handle this when
that time comes?
— Dreading the Future in Arizona
Dear Dreading The Future: It is nat-
ural for children to want to know who
their biological parents are; that’s the
reason adoption records are no longer
sealed. You appear to fear that your
boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend will want
to swoop in and steal your maternal
spotlight. From all indications, it’s
not the case; you are the only mother
they know.
If the children want information
about their birth mother, the truth
should not be kept from them. Meet-
ing her does not guarantee they will
love you any less.
Dear Abby: What is the protocol for
in-person conversations vs. phone
interruptions? When talking with
someone, I feel it’s rude for the other
individual to respond to voice or text
messages. Can’t people take a break
long enough to actually have a real
LIVE conversation? How do other
readers handle this? Do they walk
away? Patiently wait? Or speak up?
— Technologically Overloaded in
Virginia
Dear Overloaded: The best approach
is the direct approach. Tell the per-
son, “I wish you wouldn’t do that.”
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
If three is considered a crowd, then five is a guarantee of misery
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently re-
quested — poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). In those
moments when your attention
goes to problems, you are ignor-
ing successes. Progress will
occur faster when you focus on
what’s right in your world.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Greater self-control will be
necessary in order to navigate
today’s many temptations. If you
muster up the willpower, you’ll
immediately be rewarded.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Yes, your
responsibilities are many. But
you don’t have to handle every-
thing at once. Ordering your
tasks by priority, size and tim-
ing will help you avoid feeling
overwhelmed.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). If you
ask people to do things that
do not come naturally to them,
the process will be a struggle
for both of you. Observe the
strengths of others, and align
your requests accordingly.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Don’t under-
estimate how deeply people
might fall in love with you. Your
strange power over heartstrings
is nothing to toy around with. It
won’t be fun to be loved much
more than you love.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Just
because something is legal
doesn’t mean it’s moral, and nei-
ther are all illegal acts immoral.
Use your judgment and heed
your conscience.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll
roll with what happens, not let-
ting any single event deter you
from your purpose. At the same
time, you realize that it is more
important to keep moving along
than it is to arrive at any one
destination.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Most
vengeance is small-minded
and shows a lack of character.
Noble people are also merciful
people. If there are exceptions
to the rule, they are few and far
between.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Your natural passion sometimes
presents itself in the form of
anger. You can avoid getting
angry by removing yourself from
situations that have the potential
to make you blow your stack.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Your mountain-goat side will
be activated. Just because you
don’t reach the highest peak
today doesn’t mean your climb
was in vain. The altitude you
achieve now will help you with
tomorrow’s climb.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
People show and interpret affec-
tion differently. What you rec-
ognize as genuine caring might
not register with another person.
Through trial and error, you’ll
figure out how best to communi-
cate your love.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When
you think of a certain person,
conflicting emotions arise. To
hold these tumultuous feelings
inside takes complexity, intelli-
gence and a deep soul.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (April 30).
You are talented and powerful.
Honor your many gifts by paying
attention to those who do the
work you don’t have to do. The
efforts of outsiders allow you to
grow and master your craft. By
giving your loved ones what they
need, you ensure your happy
existence. Your lucky numbers
are: 10, 8, 5, 6 and 9.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 1D
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NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
civitasmedia.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
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new apartment?
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INVITATION
TO BID
Luzerne County
Community College
Purchasing Depart-
ment will receive
sealed bids related
to: 8.5 X 11
Copier / Printer
Paper. Each bid
must be accompa-
nied by a bid guar-
anty, which shall not
be less than 10% of
the total bid. Firms
interested in sub-
mitting a bid should
call the College’s
Purchasing Office at
570-740-0370
Monday through Fri-
day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
to request specifi-
cations. Bids must
be received before
3:00 p.m. local
prevailing time,
on Friday, May 17,
2013 at which time
the bids will be
opened and publicly
read at the College.
Luzerne County
Community College
reserves the right to
waive any informali-
ties, irregularities,
defects, errors, or
omissions in, or to
reject any or all bids
or parts thereof.
ESTATE NOTICE
Robert Cronauer of
50 Longdale
Avenue, Shaver-
town, PA 18708,
died on December
20, 2012. Letters
of Administration
have been granted.
Administrator: Mr.
Kenneth Cronauer
c/o Bernard Walter,
Esq.
1674 Memorial
Highway
Shavertown, PA
18708
570-674-9000
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Letters Testamen-
tary in the Estate of
Mary C. Kearney
a/k/a Mary Hopkins
Kearney, deceased,
who died March 25,
2013, late of the
Township of
Pittston, Luzerne
County, PA, having
been granted, all
persons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to
Robert J. Kearney,
Administrator, c/o
William F. Burke,
Esquire
Burke Vullo Reilly
Roberts
1460 Wyoming
Avenue
Forty Fort, PA
18704-4237
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HERE-
BY GIVEN that Let-
ters Testamentary
have been granted
in the Estate of Eva
Letinski, late of
Plains, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia, who died on
March 8, 2013. All
persons indebted to
said estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims or
demands to pres-
ent the same with-
out delay to Mary
Elaine Iorio,
Executrix c/o
Joseph G. Albert.
JOSEPH G.
ALBERT, ESQUIRE
458 Wyoming
Avenue
Suite 201
Kingston, PA
18704
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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PUBLIC NOTICE
The Northwest Area
School District
announces the fol-
lowing upcoming
meetings
to be held in the
High School Library:
Curriculum Commit-
tee Meeting:
Tuesday, May 7,
2013 at 4:00 PM
Budget & Finance
Committee
Meeting:
Wednesday, May 8,
2013 @ 6:00 PM
The June School
Board meeting orig-
inally scheduled for
June 12,2013 has
been changed and
will now be held on
June 26, 2013.
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of MAR-
GARET T. PETRILL
late of Hazleton,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who
died March 17, 2013
to Robert J.
Dougherty and
Albert G. Stefanik.
All persons having
claims against the
estate are request-
ed to make known
the same to the
executor, c/o Peter
J. Fagan, Esquire,
P O Box 904,
Conyngham,
Pennsylvania.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
The Wilkes-Barre
Area Career and
Technical Center is
requesting propos-
als for “Repair and
Sealing of Asphalt-
Surfaced Pave
ments”.
Sealed Proposals
are to be submitted
to:
Wilkes-Barre
Career and Techni-
cal Center Attn:
Teresa
Rostock
P.O. Box 1699,
350 Jumper Road
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18705-0699
A mandatory pre-
RFP meeting will be
held on Wednesday,
May 15, 2013 at
9:30 a.m. at the
school, 350 Jumper
Road, Wilkes-Barre,
18705.
Deadline for sub-
mission of propos-
als is 10:00 a.m.,
Wednesday, May
29, 2013.
The Wilkes-Barre
Area Career and
Technical Center
Board of Education
reserves the right to
accept or reject any
and/or all proposals
or to accept the
proposal that it
finds, in its sole dis-
cretion, to be in the
best interest of the
school district.
LEGAL NOTICE
The Joint Operating
Committee of the
Wilkes-Barre Area
Career and Techni-
cal Center solicits
sealed proposals
for:
SHOP SUPPLIES
AND TOOLS
Interested vendors
may obtain copies
of the bid specifica-
tions at the Busi-
ness Office of the
school located at
350 Jumper Rd.,
P.O.Box 1699,
Plains Twp., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18705,
between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. and
2:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
Deadline for sub-
mission of bids is
10:00 a.m., Tues-
day, May 14, 2013
David Evans
Secretary
Joint Operating
Committee
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
The Wilkes-Barre
Area School District
is soliciting sealed
proposals for
School Tax Collec-
tion Services until
2:00 P.M., Wednes-
day, May 22, 2013.
All proposals shall
be addressed to
Leonard B. Przy-
wara, Secretary,
730 S. Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711. The enve-
lope containing the
proposal shall be
marked “Proposal
for Tax Collection
Services.” Specifi-
cations may be
secured from the
Office of the Board
Secretary by calling
(570) 826-7106.
The Board of
School Directors
reserves the right
to reject any and all
proposals.
BY ORDER OF THE
BOARD
Leonard B.
Przywara, Board
Secretary
____________________
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150 Special Notices
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PAGE 2D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
WEDNESDA WEDNESDAY Y SPECIAL SPECIAL
40¢ Wings
THURSDA THURSDAY Y SPECIAL SPECIAL
Large Pie for $7.95
In House Only; Cannot be combined with other offers;
Wing Special requires minimum purchase of a dozen.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
MAGNIFICENT
ANTIQUE AUCTION
AUCTIONS BY MARVA
213 E. LUZERNE AVE., LARKSVILLE
WEDNESDAY - MAY 1 -
4:00 P.M. START
DOORS OPEN AT 2:00 P.M.
DECORATED BLUE CROCKS, DROP
LEAF TABLE WITH SUPER FANCY
CARVED BASE, VIOLINS, MAHOGANY
BEDROOM SET WITH POSTER BED,
EARLY BENCH, PARTNERS DESK,
JELLY CUPBOARD, STEP BACK CUP-
BOARD, WICKER 3 PC. SET, BELEEK,
LENOX, SETS OF CHINA, MARBLE
TOP TABLE, COAL & ELECTRIC
STOVE, ROSEVILLE, STAINED
GLASS, CLOCKS, GLASSWARE,
WHEEL BARREL, UNUSUAL
LIGHTING, LANTERNS,
TOO MUCH TO LIST!!!
AUCTIONEER: MARVA MYSLAK
AU-3247L FOR INFO: 822-8249
WWW.AUCTIONZIP.COM I.D. 3473
WE ACCEPT ALL CREDIT CARDS
AUCTIONEERS NOTE: ALL FRESH
MERCHANDISE OUT OF ONE
SUPER DALLAS ESTATE!
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
462 Auto
Accessories
SUNVISORS, Lund.
94-03 Dodge, $125,
99-06 Chevy Silver-
ado, $150, 94-01
Dodge ram, $125.
after 3pm 655-3197
468 Auto Parts
VITO & GINO’S
LIKE NEW
USED TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & UP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
472 Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston home.
Licensed.
Infant to 6 years.
570-283-0336
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
CINDERELLA
Sat. May 25th
$169
Orchestra Seats
MATILDA
July 17 $140
(Mezz Seats)
MOTOWN ON
BROADWAY
Wed. Aug 7th
$159
Orchestra Seats
JERSEY BOYS
Wed. Aug. 7th
$129
(Front Mezz)
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS &
SHOW TICKETS
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
___________________
WE’RE
BAAACK!!
___________________
NYC
Sat. May 18
Kips Bay
Showhouse
Roosevelt Island
Via Tram/
FDR Memorial
NYC
Fathers Day
Sun., June 16th
Sneaker Sunday
Brooklyn Flea
Ground Zero
Chelsea Market
NYC
Tues. July 16
High Tea & Tour of
Gracie Mansion
Morgan Library
COMING UP
Oct. 5 & 6
Frank Lloyd
Wright’s
Falling Water/
Shanksville
9/11 Memorial
————————
————
for more info
570-655-3420
FUN GETAWAYS!
Yankees
Oakland 5/5
Seattle 5/15
Philadelphia
Sightseeing &
Eastern State
Penitentiary
Tour 5/18
Niagara Falls
June 7-9, includes
2 cruises, tours
& 5 meals
Island Hopping
in New England
5 Day - 6/23-27
Phillies vs. Mets
6/23
Boston/Salem &
Gloucester
4 Day - 7/11-14
1-800-432-8069
MARTZ CURBSIDE
EXPRESS TO NYC
Only $25 round trip
from convenient
locations in the
Dallas & W-B area.
Direct to NYC!
Available every Sat-
urday & select Sun-
days & Wednes-
days through May.
Go to martztrail-
ways.com for full
details and to pur-
chase your
e-ticket.
NEW SHOPPERS
SPECIAL NYC
Wed. & Sat.
Broadway
Shows
JERSEY BOYS
5/22 $99.
MATILDA
SMASH HIT
6/29 $155.
CINDERELLA
5/22 $144.
WATKINS GLEN
WINE FESTIVAL
7/14 $69.
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM
PARK & RIDE
Rt. 309 or Rt. 315
380 Travel
ESCOR ESCORTED TED
GROUP GROUP CRUISE CRUISE
New Lower Rates
and Past
Passenger
Specials
9/14-9/22/2013
Sat. to Sun.
Carnival Splendor
to Turks,
HalfMoonCay
and Nassau
Bus to NYC,
Baggage
Handling, All Taxes
Plus the
“The Chatter”
Band performs
From $799.
per person
ASK ABOUT THE NEW
DRINK PACKAGE
Space Limited
Call this week!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
NEPA TOURS
Travel more.
Do more
BROADWAY
5/26 Jersey Boys
Bus, Orchestra
Seats, Post Theater
Dinner Packages
Starting @ $160
Dave Matthews
Band
@ Montage 5/29
Bus-Ticket-Tailgate
Double Reservation
@ $90
Kenny Chesney
6/8
Bus-Ticket-Tailgate
Best Prices &
Seats in Town!
@ $220
www.NepaBus
Tours.com
570-239-0031
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`05 450R
Only used for 50
hours Looks like
new $3,500, OBO.
$3,500.
570-702-6023
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVROLET `97
LUMINA LS
Fully equipped, cold
air conditioning.
New tires. 68,000
miles. $1,975
570-299-0772
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
DODGE ‘99
STRATUS
71,000 original
miles, 4 cylinder,
great on gas
$4,495
FORD `87
ECONOLINE 350
CARGO VAN
With 11’ extended
back, motor
replaced. Including
trailer hitch.
Reduced to $995
(570)333-4827
FORD ‘02
TAURUS SEL
Electric blue
metallic. One
owner. Leather,
moonroof.
Excellent condi-
tion. $4,295
MANUAL Honda,
1999, CR-V manual,
$2,800. 736-6555
SATURN `01 LS1
Silver, 106K, looks &
runs like new.
$3,300, OBO
570-702-6023
570-814-2344
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `07 LUCERNE
Clean & Classy.
Only 45,000 miles.
Well appointed &
well maintained,
Well, what are you
waiting for?
Call to see it.
570-287-0384
$10,200
BUICK `97 LESABRE
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $3,200.
570-287-0600
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
silver, V6, 50k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
blue, auto, V6
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
black, auto, 4 cyl..
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 AUDI A8L
grey, blue leather,
navigation AWD
05 AUDI A6
All Road. Green
2 tone, leather
AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS
grey, black leather,
sunroof, alloys
04 CHEVY MALIBU LT
Blue
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 SUZUKI AERO
Silver, 5 speed
01 VOLVO V70 CROSS
OVER SW, blue,
blue leather, AWD
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
spd, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 JEEP PATRIOT
SPORT black, 4
cyl. 5 speed 4x4
07 GMC YUKON 4X4
DENALI black, 3rd
seat, Navigation
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS grey V6
AWD
’06 PONTIAC
MONTANNA AWD
blue, entertain-
ment center 7 pas
senger mini van
06 HONDA PILOT EX
silver, 3rd seat,
4x4
06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB
truck red, 4x4
06 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
gold, V6 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
black, 3rd seat,
entertainment
center, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 DODGE DURANGO
SXT blue,
3rd seat, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO
CLUB CAB grey
4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING,
blue, 7 passenger
mini van
05 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS
silver, V6, 4x4
05 MERCURY MARINER
PREMIUM. Seafoam
green, leather,
V6, FWD
05 MERCURY MARINER
PREMIER white, tan
leather, AWD
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Red, V6 4x4
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
gold, 7 passenger
mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
04 FORD EXPLORER
XLT green 3rd seat
4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
silver V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
LT green, grey
leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 MITSUBISHI
OUTLANDER XLS
red, V6, 4x4
03 FORD F150 XLT
SUPERCREW 4x4
truck, gold
02 DODGE DURANGO
SLT blue, 3rd seat
4x4
02 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XCAB TRUCK
white 4x4
01 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT
blue, V6, 4x4
truck
01 FORD RANGER REG
CAB TRUCK white,
V6 2WD
01 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
SLT 5.9 liter,
brown, 8’ box 4x4
truck
99 FORD F150 SUPER
CAB, silver 4x4
truck
LEO’S AUTO SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
BMW ‘99 323 is
2 door, 6 cyl, auto,
82,000 original
miles. One owner.
excellent condition.
$5,995.
Buick ‘94
LeSabre
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto,
$850
Ford ’89
Bronco II
2 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4WD.
Runs good.
$795.
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
CADILLAC ‘05
DEVILLE DTS
Metallic green,
beige leather, moon
roof. 73K Warranty
$10,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE `02
INTREPID
White, 4 door,
good condition.
151,000 miles.
Asking $2,700
570-954-7459
DODGE ‘06 STRATUS
4 door, 4 cylin-
der. Excellent
gas mileage.
$5,495
FORD `98 MUSTANG
Black, V6 auto,
82,000 miles, all
power, Good condi-
tion. $3,700.
570-868-6321
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$6800 negotiable.
570-578-9222
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
‘00 Toyota
Corolla
4 door, 4 cylin-
der, automatic.
Runs great.
$2,995
Grand Cherokee
V8. Runs great.
Power windows
& doors.
$2,495
‘96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$1,995
‘96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K. $2,395
‘01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
‘99 Chevy S10
Blazer 4 door,
power windows,
doors & seats.
126,000 miles.
$2,995
‘03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
96,000 miles.
$3,400
‘04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
‘09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
HONDA ‘03
ACCORD EX-L
V6, , black/tan
leather, moon roof,
99k. Warranty.
$8,495
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
HONDA ‘12 ACCORD LX
4 cylinder, grey, 9K.
Factory Warranty.
$18,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
HONDA ‘05 CIVIC EX
5 speed manual,
sun roof, alloys,
dk. blue, 62k.
Warranty.
$9,200
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KIA `10 RIO LX
4 door sedan, auto,
air, CD, 51,470
miles, Runs great,
good gAs mileage,
excellent condition.
$9,000.
(570) 459-0360
412 Autos for Sale
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES ‘01 BENZ
CLK 320
Coupe. 1 Owner.
Extra clean.
$9,999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
NISSAN ‘07
ALTIMA SEDAN
Automatic, power
windows & locks,
CD- perfect inside
& out. 75k. $8,200.
570-287-1150
or 570-301-4102
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
NISSAN ‘01 ALTIMA
GXE
4 cyl. 5 speed.
ECONOMY!
$2995.
570-696-4377
TOYOTA `00
CELICA GT
5 speed manual
transmission. 193k
miles. Runs well, as
is. REDUCED to
$850, OBO.
570-240-7539
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA CAMRY
One owner, auto,
air. Warranty.
$6,900
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
VOLKSWAGEN `03
BEETLE TURBO
Blue, leather heat-
ed seats. 100,000
miles, automatic,
all power. Runs
110% $5,000, OBO
(570)362-0581
VW ‘04 JETTAS
CHOOSE FROM 2
Starting at $7,350.
Leather or cloth,
moonroof &
warranties
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `70
CAMARO Z28
Arizona car, auto,
original 350 engine,
black with white
stripes, 63,000
miles. $23,500.
570-825-6259
FORD `95
MUSTANG GT
Mint condition.
garage kept.
58,000 original
miles. asking
$8500. 570-814-
6091 or 825-8195
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
418 Auto
Miscellaneous
AUTOMOTIVE
PARTS, 1950’s
pumps, fans, carbs,
dist. caps, coils,
etc., $800.
570-883-4443
421 Boats &
Marinas
BAYLINER ’88 CAPRI
171/2 ft. with out-
board 85hp motor.
Bikini top, trailer
included. Runs ex-
cellent. $2,500,
OBO. 570-714-3300
570-675-8693
MASTERCRAFT ‘95 JET
DUO
Kraze jet ski with
trailer & custom
cover. $1,000. OBO.
570-840-4112
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
TRAILER ‘09
FOOD CONCESSION
6’ X 12’, tow
behind. Turnkey
operation. $14,000.
570-899-8478
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘06 SOFTAIL
Standard.UNDER
5K MILES. Chrome
engine, lower forks,
primary covers,
sprocket, matching
flame grips/pegs,
Sampson exhaust,
mini sissy bar,
power commander
/high flow air clean-
er, garage kept and
new rear tire, Chop-
per Blue paint. Ask-
ing $10,900 obo.
call Tony @
570-905-7066
HARLEY DAVIDSON,
883. $2,500.
570-736-6555
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
442 RVs & Campers
SUNLINE ‘82
17’, sleeps six,
four burner stove
with oven, bath with
sink, shower & toi-
let, heat, awning.
$975, good condi-
tion. 570-388-6926
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `00
TAHOE Z17
Automatic, 91K,
4wd, 4 door.
$3,500
(570)654-0542
CHEVROLET PICK
UP`99 S-10 ZR2
132,000 miles, red
in color, new tires,
runs good. R-title,
Must See! $3,200
Call after 3:30.
(570) 825-0429
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘04
SILVERADO
2WD, 6 cyl. One
owner. Extra
Clean $5995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘04
SILVERADO Z71
4x4 Contractor’s
cap. One Owner.
NICE CLEAN
TRUCK! $7995.
570-696-4377
DODGE `05
DAKOTA SPORT
Four door. 4 WD,
cloth interior, excel-
lent condition.
88,000 miles. Dal-
las area. $9,000
570-690-4363
DODGE `98 CARAVAN
Newer tires, ideal
delivery van, or for
flea markets $1,000
(570) 287-8410
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed, 2WD.
EXTRA SHARP!
$5995.
570-696-4377
FORD `93 RANGER
Power steering and
power brakes,
rebuilt engine with
less than 10,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. $2,450
(570)885-0418
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather,
LIKE NEW!
$3995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
GMC ‘03 ENVOY
4X4, V6, DVD, 3rd
row seat, LIKE
NEW! $5995.
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘05 SUPER
CAB 4X4
Fiberglass cap.
ONE OWNER
$7995.
570-696-4377
JEEP `06
COMMANDER, LIMITED
2006, white.
Engine, 4.7L, V8,
16V, 4WD, premi-
um wheels, air,
alarm system, ADJ
AM/FM/CD, Sun-
roof, third seating,
ABS brakes,
onstar, towing
package, safari
wrap, and
MUCH MORE!
88,000 miles,
never off-road.
Excellent condition.
$13,600
(570)709-7210
JEEP ‘04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder, 4x4.
Select Trac, silver,
105k. Very good
condition. Fully
Serviced. Warranty.
$7,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP ‘04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LIMITED
108k, V8, AWD,
leather, moon-
roof. Stunning!
$7,995
JEEP ‘10 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
V6, 4x4, 29k, white.
Factory Warranty.
$20,495
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LEXUS ’03 ES 300
V6, light green/tan
leather, one owner.
Fully serviced.
Extended Warranty.
$9,850
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
SUBARU `10 OUTBACK
Very Low Mileage,
52,000. Car was
garaged kept, and
owned by a non-
smoker. $17,000.
(570) 474-0595
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
55,000 miles, one
owner, garage kept.
Michelin Tires,
Owner is unable to
drive anymore.
$12,995
570-706-5033
TOYOTA ‘05
HIGHLANDER
V6, AWD, red
leather, sunroof.
95K, mint condition.
Warranty. $12,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
TOYOTA ‘07 TACOMA
Regular cab, 4 x 2,
4 cylinder, white.
27K. Warranty.
$10,595
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
BOOKKEEPER
AP & AR; Bank &
CC Reconciliation;
Other related
duties.
8:30-5:00 M-F.
Email resume to:
NEPAJOB@
GMAIL.COM
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
SHEETROCKERS
WANTED
Must have at least
7 years exp.
Own hand tools.
Sub-contractors
welcome. Must
have workers
comp.
207-692-3002
522 Education/
Training
FULL TIME
TEACHER WANTED
working with young
toddlers
Little People
Day Care School
280 Hanover St
Wilkes-Barre
littlepeopleWB.com
Experience preferred
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MAINTENANCE
For housing
complex Freeland,
PA. Duties:work
orders & turn-overs
Electric,plumbing,
and janitorial
exp necessary.
email resume:
esther@thecapital-
realty.com
or fax:
845-636-2195
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
Karchner Logistics
is now hiring
*Local & Jockey
Drivers
*Regional drivers
Must have Class A
CDL. We are
rapidly growing and
offer competitive
wages. Please call
570.579.0351
548 Medical/Health
MEDICAL
RN Part-Time
11p-7:30a
CNAs 2nd
and 3rd shift
245 Old Lake
Road Dallas, PA
18612
570-639-1885
E.O.E.
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
551 Other
POWERSPORTS
MECHANIC
Must have 5 years
motorcycle exp.
Must be willing to
work on all makes
& models. PLEASE
EMAIL RESUME
TO: service@
hlpowersports.com
551 Other
Is now hiring
for the following
part time
positions:
Security
Officers
and Produce
Clerks.
Previous experi-
ence preferred.
Apply at:
400 South Main
St., Wilkes Barre
E.O.E
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
554 Production/
Operations
PRODUCTION JOBS
Full-time
paid sick,vacation,
holidays. Apply at:
Community Family
Services
102 Martz Manor
Plymouth
570-779-4570
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
IF YOU ARE FROM
Hanover
Green
Buttonwood
Korn Krest
Nanticoke
• Are at least
14 years old
• Are dependable
• Have a great
personality
• Can work
evenings &
Saturdays
•Would like to
have fun while
working with
other teenagers
Then call
Mr. John
@ 735-8708
leave message
Find a
newcar
online
at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 3D
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes .
As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f M a rc h 2 0 13 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery IN STO CK V EHICLE O N LY. All o ffers ex pire 4 /3 0 /12 .
®
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
500
N EW
V EH ICL ES
AV AIL ABL E
2013N IS S A N S E N TRA
1.8S M /T
4 Cyl, 6 S p eed M a n u a l, PW ,
PDL , Pro tectio n Pkg, F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y
FOR
$
16,595
*
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
199
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11157.30; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= 0.
STK#N23416
M O DEL# 12063
V IN# 689662
M SRP $17,710
70Altim a sAva ila b le
120Rogu esAva ila b le
45Pa th fin d ersAva ila b le
25Ju k esAva ila b le
100’S
MO RECARS,
TRUCK S, & SUV S
TO CH O O SEFRO M!
2013N IS S A N
JUK E S A W D
T u rb o 4 Cyl, Au to , A/ C, Allo ys , PW , PDL , Cru is e,
T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y FOR
$
19,999
*
W / $750 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR $
219
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
STK#N23232
M O DEL# 20213
M SRP $23,050
W
H
E
E
L
O
F
D
E
A
L
S
W
H
E
E
L
O
F
D
E
A
L
S
You rPen n sylva n ia
MASSIV EIN V EN TO RY!
COM E IN
YOU W IN!
ODDSAR E
YOU’LL SAVE
BIG $$$
2 A T TH IS P R IC E
SA VE SIM ILA R $$ O N A LL
SENTR A S IN STO C K O NLY
$0 DO W N LEA SE!
2013N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Zero Gra vity S ea ts , F lo o rM a ts
& S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y
FOR
$
20 ,925
*
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
249
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
*$249 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14594.25; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= 0.
STK#N23471
M O DEL# 13113
V IN# 243717
M SRP $23,925
2 A T TH IS P R IC E
SA VE $3000 O R M O R E O N A LL
2013 A LTIM A SEDA NS IN
STO C K O NLY
$0 DO W N LEA SE!
2013
N IS S A N
ROGUE
S A W D
S P E CIA L
E DITION !
*$259 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14571.20; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fes ; T o ta l d u e @
d elivery= 0. $1100 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te, $500 Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h & $500 NE R Bo n u s Ca s h.
14 A T TH IS P R IC E
SIM ILA R SA VING S
O N A LL 100
2013 R O G U ES IN STO C K
2013N IS S A N
P A THFIN DE R
S 4X4
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,702; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC
@ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2000.
2 A T TH IS P R IC E
4 Cyl, CVT , AW D, Allo ys , S p ec E d tPkg, A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, a n d M u ch, M u ch M o re!
B U Y
FOR
$
21,520
*
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H , $50 0 CU S TOM ER B ON U S CAS H & $50 0 N ER B ON U S CAS H
OR
$
259
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
STK#N22669
M O DEL# 22213
V IN# 108387
M SRP $26,020
$0 DO W N LEA SE!
V6, CVT , Allo ys , All New Des ign , 3 Ro w S ea tin g,
PW , PDl, Cru is e, T ilt, a n d M u ch, M u ch M o re!
W / $50 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
B U Y
FOR
$
28 ,170
*
OR
$
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
STK#N23017
M O DEL# 25013
V IN# 608503
M SRP $31,170
LEA SE W /O NLY
$2000 TO TA L DO W N!
SA VE $3000 O R M O R E O N
A LL NEW 2013 P A TH FINDER S
IN STO C K O NLY
*$219 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13138.50; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2000.
10 A T TH IS P R IC E
LEA SE W /O NLY
$2000 TO TA L DO W N!
SIM ILA R SA VING S O N
A LL 2013 NISSA N JU KES
IN STO C K O NLY
2013N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , Co n v Pkg, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys ,
Blu eto o th & M u ch M o re
OR
B U Y
FOR
$
23,995
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC B ON U S CAS H
$
269
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
*$269 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14537.90; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+)
p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,000.
STK#N22778
M O DEL# 15113
V IN# 140942
M SRP $27,430
3 A T TH IS P R IC E
LEA SE W /O NLY
$2000 TO TA L DO W N!
SA VE $3400 O R M O R E O FF
M SR P O N A LL 2013 A LTIM A
C O U P ES IN STO C K O NLY !
2013N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S S DN
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , F lo o r
M a ts , & M u ch, M u ch M o re!
OR
B U Y
FOR
$
27,995
*
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
& $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E
FOR
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19630.80; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1790.50 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+)
p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,000.
$1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
STK#N23095
M O DEL# 16113
V IN# 817180
M SRP $34,440
3 A T TH IS P R IC E
LEA SE W /O NLY $2000
TO TA L @ DELIVER Y !
SA VE O VER $6000 O FF
M SR P O N A LL 2013
M A XIM A S IN STO C K O NLY
H U R R Y IN!
LA ST
DA Y !
PAGE 4D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
of Scranton - NEPA
www.rjburnecadillac.com
Leather, 3.6 Liter Engine, Heated Seats, Lane Departure Warnings,
Safety Alerts, Seat Forward Collision Alert, XM, OnStar, Premium
Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
2013 SRX Luxury by Cadillac
$
399
Down Payment $2,999
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
Lease price based on a 2013 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition $44,395 MSRP.$399 per month plus 9% sales tax total $434 per month.
36 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 36 Monthly payments total $14,364 $.25/mile penalty over 30,000 miles. $2999 down
payment plus $399 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery,Total due at delivery $3398 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE
A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA,
MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE. Must take delivery by 4/30/2013. Requires ALLY Bank Tier
S, A or B credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA,
MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE.
2013 ATS Standard by Cadillac
2013 XTS Standard by Cadillac 2013 CTS AWD by Cadillac
Down Payment $0
Security Deposit $0
Term 39 Months
Down Payment $0
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
Down Payment $999
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
2.5 L, Sunroof, Spoiler, Driver & Front Passenger Heated Seats,
XM, OnStar, Premium Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Cadillac User Experience (CUE), Rear Vision Camera,
Stabilitrac, Remote Start, 19” Wheels, 3.6 V6, XM,
OnStar, Premium Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Heated Seats, Memory Settings, All Wheel Drive, XM, OnStar, Premium Car
Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
$299
$459
$399
Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $34,440, MSRP. $299 per month plus 9% sales tax total
$326 per month. 39 Month lease, 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $12,714 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $299 first payment plus $0 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $299 plus tax and tag
fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GMVEHICLE, OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999
OR NEWER GM VEHICLE WITH A LEASE EXPIRATION DATE BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2013.
Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 4/30/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval.
Please see sales person for complete details.
Lease price based on a 2013 XTS FWD Sdn $44,995 MSRP. $459 per month plus 9% sales
tax total $501 per month. 36 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 36 Monthly payments total
$18,042 $.25/mile penalty over 30,000 miles. $0 down payment plus $459 first payment
plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $459 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT
LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON GM OR GMVEHICLE That Lease Expires Prior to December
31, 2013. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 4/30/13.
Requires Ally Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
Lease price based on a 2013 CTS Sdn AWD Luxury $42,660 MSRP $399 per month plus
9% PA sales tax total $435 per month. 39 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 38 Monthly
payments total $15,162 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $399 first payment plus
$999 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1398 plus tax and tag fees.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS
TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO,
JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER
CADILLAC THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013. Leasee responsible for
excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 4/30/13. Requires US Bank Tier S & 1 credit
approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM VEHICLE, OR
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE WITH A LEASE
EXPIRATION DATE BEFORE
DECEMBER 31, 2013.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY
INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER,
PORSCHE OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE WITH A LEASE
EXPIRATION DATE BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2013.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY
INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER,
PORSCHE OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE THAT HAS A CONTRACT
END DATE SET TO END PRIOR TO DEC. 31, 2013.
6 to choose From
Leather, XM, Onstar,
Premium Car 5Yrs/50,000 mi
$
25,991
Gold Mist/
Leather, 3rd Seat,
Ultraview sunroof,
Navigation, 18”
Wheels, XM,
OnStar
2008 SRXAWD
by Cadillac
$
18,998
White Diamond/
Leather, Only 24,731
miles, Chromes,
XM, OnStar,
Heated Seats,
Memory Seats
2009 DTS
by Cadillac
$
26,999
White Diamond/
Shale Leather, 22”
Chrome Wheels,
Navigation, XM,
OnStar, Heated &
Memory Settings
2012 SRX
Performance
AWD by Cadillac
$
38,992
Black
Diamond, Only
168 Miles,
6-Speed
Original MSRP
$72,800
2013 CTS-V
by Cadillac
$
63,993
Black/Black
Leather 22”
Chrome Wheels,
Navigation, XM,
Onstar,
Sunroof
2012 Escalade
AWD by Cadillac
$
59,992
White Diamond/
Shale Leather,
Sunroof, Chrome
Wheels, Heated
Seats, Memory
Settings, XM, OnStar,
Only 40,150 Miles
2009 DTS Luxury
by Cadillac
$
24,999
Radiant Silver/
Titanium Leather,
Heated & Cooled
Seats, XM,
OnStar,
Sensors
2009 DTS Luxury
by Cadillac
$
18,999
Blue/Leather,
Heated &
Memory Seats,
Only 8,906
Miles
2013 CTS
Luxury AWD
by Cadillac
$
33,993
Black/Black
Leather, Ultraview
Sunroof, Memory
& Heated Seats,
XM, OnStar. Only
8,991 Miles
2011 SRX
Luxury AWD
by Cadillac
$
33,991
White Diamond/
Cashmere
Heated & Memory
Settings, All Wheel
Drive, XM, Onstar,
Navigation, Only
10,997 Miles
2011 CTS
Performance Cpe
AWD by Cadillac
$
35,991
2011 CTS AWD by Cadillac
White Diamond/
Shale Leather,
Sunroof, Heated
Seats, Memory
Settings. XM,
OnStar
2009 CTS
Luxury AWD
by Cadillac
$
27,999
Black/Black
Leather, 20
Inch Chromes,
Ultraview Sunroof,
Heated & Memory
Seats, OnStar, XM,
Navigation
2010 SRXAWD
Performance
by Cadillac
$
29,990
White Diamond/
Cashmere Sunroof,
Heated & Memory
Settings, All Wheel Drive,
XM, Onstar, Only 22,087
Miles in the word
2009 CTS
Luxury AWD
2 to Choose From
$
26,999
FROM
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537 • www.rjburnecadillac.com
Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Fri 9-5 • Sat 9-4
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
Certified Cadillac's Available • Rates Starting @ 0.9%
1-LT, 1-LS,
1-LTZ In Stock
2012 Captiva’s
by Chevrolet
From
$18,992
Sonic Blue/
Leather,
Sunroof,
Navigation,
Heated Seats,
Satellite
Radio
2012 Focus
SEL by Ford
$17,992
Red Rock
Crystal, Hard
Top, Automatic
2010Wrangler
Sport 4X4 by Jeep
$17,990
PW, PL,
Hybrid
2011 Insight
Hybrid by Honda
$15,991
Sunroof, Leather,
Heated Seats, All
Wheel Drive
2006 325 XI
by BMW
$13,996
Sand Storm/Leather,
Ultraview Sunnroof,
Heated Seats, Memory
Settings, XM, OnStar
2006 SRXAWD
by Cadillac
$12,996
White Diamond/
Leather, Ultraview
Sunroof, Memory
Settings, Heated
Seats, XM, OnStar
2005 SRXAWD
by Cadillac
$10,995
Sunroof,
Navigation,
Chromes, Memory
& Heated Seats
2007 S550
by
Mercedes-Benz
$
29,997
Vanilla Latte/
Shale Leather,
AWD, XM, OnStar,
Memory & Heated
Seats
Only 19,455 miles
2011 STSAWD
by Cadillac
$
31,991
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 5D
506 Administrative/
Clerical
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
506 Administrative/
Clerical
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
506 Administrative/
Clerical
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOCIATE
Full Time
Emery Waterhouse is currently looking for a
Full Time Administrative Associate for their
Distribution Center.
The ideal candidate will possess the following:
•Excellent interpersonal skills
•Outgoing positive personality •Must be highly motivated
•Excellent organizational skills
• Must be proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel
Work hours: Monday – Friday, 8AM – 4:30 PM
We offer a competitive salary as well as an excellent
benefit package!
Interested candidates may submit their resume to:
knason@emeryonline.com
No telephone calls, please.
As a company, we strive to be fair, accurate and informative. To our
customers, we believe in delivering superior quality and service.
Most importantly, we believe in the power of teamwork.
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP
PART TIME
20-25 hours per week, Weekends and Holidays a must.
Pleasant personality and ability to handle a fast-paced
environment, working with customers on the telephone
on incoming and outgoing calls.
Please send cover letter and resume to:
jmccabe@civitasmedia.com
or to: Jim McCabe
The Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18711
A Civitas Media Company
573 Warehouse
LOGISTICS EXPEDITOR/
INVENTORY PLANNER
Immediate Opening
for a Logistics
Exp./Inv. Planner
with an expanding
flooring company in
the Hazleton area.
The candidate
should have a
2 year degree
in logistics or
equivalent experi-
ence, strong verbal
and organizational
skills, self starter
able to multi task,
detail oriented
and strong problem
solving skills.
Responsibilities
include purchase
order creation
and processing,
experience in
customs/freight air
quotes. Analyze
sales and inventory
data to review and
plan materials.
Purchase orders/
requisition creation.
SAP, order man-
agement and inven-
tory tools, MS office
especially Excel
are needed.
Excellent benefits
and competitive
salary based on
qualifications.
Please send
resume and salary
requirements to:
ATTN: HR Dept.
Box 667
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-0231
Email:
donna.reimold@
forbo.com
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
ESTABLISHED SALON
FOR SALE
Owner retiring.
Two stylists & 1 nail
tech, all with
clientele. Very Rea-
sonably Priced! Call
570-239-0917
VISUAL
COMMUNICATIONS
BIZ FOR SALE
B to B Services
Repeat Client
Base
Low Overhead
Great Location
High Net to Gross
No Experience
Necessary
Finance & Training
Available
1-800-796-3234
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER,
Haier 5000 BTU,
used April 2012-
October 2012.
Works great. $50.
570-357-7926
AIR CONDITIONER.
Carrier, through the
wall. 16,000 BTU
220v. $50
570-430-9077
MICROWAVE.
Whirlpool. Over
stove mount. Very
good condition.
$100. 570-406-5661
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL CARDS,
(800) 1994 Topps,
$8. Boston Red Sox,
(150), $5. N.Y. Yan-
kees, (150), $5. Very
nice for a young
baseball collector.
570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
BOOKS. War History
collection on all
wars of the United
States and Foreign.
15 books. $30 Call
Jim at 655-9474
bing1124.1@
netzero.com
VANITY, Antique
with mirror and 6
drawers. Good con-
dition. $150
570-446-8672
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
DRESSER, low
curved, $100, Sec-
retary warm gold
finish, $125, Dress-
er, tall with mirror,
$150, Vanity, Petite
style dresser, mir-
ror, $125, Bed, full
size, rounded foot-
board, $125, pair
leather turn of the
century rockers,
$150, copper boiler,
%65, cocoa cola
clock, $30, pastel
braided Pottery
Barn rug, $60. Will
email photos, call
for details.
570-675-2057
WHEELBARROW
with steel front
wheel, $25 OBO.
LOG ROLLING tool,
$40. SHOVEL, old
coal, $25. 693-1918
YEARBOOKS.
Coughlin (30) ‘28-
2000. GAR -(18))
‘37-’06, Meyers (15)
‘53-’03, Pittston (6)
‘67-’75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,Kingston
(11) ‘32-’52, Hazle-
ton, (8) ‘40-’61,
Plains, (3) ‘66-’68,
Hanover ‘51-’74.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details &
additional school
editions. 570-825-
4721 arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
DRYER. GE electric.
5 cycle, heavy duty,
extra large capacity.
$175. 735-8730
FREEZER. Kenmore
upright. 22x57, 6.5
cu ft. New in box,
never opened, sac-
rifice $225.
570-457-7854
MICROWAVE.
Amana. Small. $20
570-545-7006
MIXER, Sunbeam
Mix Master, brown
trim with all stain-
less steel metal, 12
speed, two bowls,
small and large. 225
watts, beater and
dough hooks. Excel-
lent condition. $70
570-824-9049
REFRIGERATOR.
Black, Frigidaire
Gallery. 18 cu. ft.
with icemaker. New
in Dec. ask $600
570-288-5801
REFRIGERATOR.
Whirlpool. 6 years
old. Excellent condi-
tion. $150
570-709-6664
STOVE, Tappan,
white with black
front, electric. 2
years old, excellent,
self clean oven.
$200. 301-3755
VACUUMS, two, Bis-
sell, upright, less
than 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
12 amps with
onboard tools and
12” lighted glide
path. Uses #7 filtrate
bags. $40, OBO.
Royal Hand, like
new with onboard
tools. Bagless, pow-
erful suction. Needs
filter cover. $35,
OBO. 570-357-7926
712 Baby Items
BEDDING & DECOR
Nursery, comforter,
bed skirt, bumper,
lamp and wall hang-
ing, like new. $40,
CAR SEAT, Evenflo,
$20, ROCKER, Oak,
Excellent, $25
570-256-0962
BOOSTER SEAT,
Fisher Price deluxe,
$6. DIAPER GENIE,
$6. BABY BATH, $6.
All in new condition.
570-788-0621
FISHER PRICE
Natures Touch
papasan bouncy
seat neutral color
$15. FP Natures
Touch BABY SWING
swings forward and
sided to side neutral
$35. Peg Pergo high
chair silver $25.
Leap Frog activity
table $8. All good
condition.
570-675-7069
STROLLERS Graco
Metro-Lite, blue
/gray pattern. Chic-
co Capri, tangerine
color. Both light-
weight & easy to
fold. Like new. $20
each.
Call 570-883-7049.
714 Bridal Items
WEDDING DRESS
White beaded halter
type. Pearls, full sip
and veil included.
Size 9/10. $120 for
all. 570-655-1414
716 Building
Materials
DOORS, (6) solid
wood. Oak. $150 ea.
MAILBOX, hand-
made, solid wrought
iron. $100
570-735-8730
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
KITCHEN REMODEL
items. cabinets,
island, formica
countertops, table
and chairs, $125,
Light fixture, fluo-
rescent, $80, Sink,
S/S double, $50,
Chandelier, $50
Electric range,
ceramic countertop,
1.5 ovens $500.
Bifold doors, $40
(2). Avail 5/22-make
appt to see now.
570-779-3653
PVC SEWER PIPE
10”LX3”D, 4 pieces
$12. each. Heavy
duty steel shelving,
like new, 8 sections
8’lx39”w. made in
USA $200 Per sec-
tion. 570-902-5273
TOILET & PEDESTAL
SINK light grey
porcelain, excellent
condition. $40 obo.
570-262-6627
716 Building
Materials
STORM DOOR,
wooden glass, with
screen. 30”X80”
and wooden screen
door, 30” X 80” both
open on left, both
for $25. WOOD
PIECES, (2) pres-
sure treated 2” X8”
X6”, average, 25
pieces for $20. OBO
570-693-1918
TOILET AND LARGE
PEDESTAL SINK.
Light grey porcelain,
excellent condition.
$40 OBO 262-6627
WINDOWS Re-
placement new 1-
16”x27.5” & 1-
18”x27” white vinyl
double hung insulat-
ed glass 1/2 screen
$55. each or 2 for
$100. (2) 16”x16”
concrete chimney
caps $10. each. Sof-
fit panels, white 41
pieces, $115, Call for
details.
570-735-7658
726 Clothing
COMMUNION SUIT,
Boys. Navy, size 8
reg. comes with off
white dress shirt.
Excellent condition.
$45. 570-609-5012
JACKETS, women’s,
$2 each.
570-823-6986
MATERNITY
CLOTHES. Summer.
XL. 13 shirts, 1
dress, 3 pants. All
for $30. Will deliver.
570-762-6322
RAIN COAT, ladies,
size M, 1/2 length.
for fishing and casu-
al wear. Reversible.
New. $5. 696-1927
SUIT. Boys Commu-
nion. Navy blue,
worn once. Truly
like new. 12 Husky.
Inner seam. 24”
$35 570-474-9866
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
MONITER , HP,
almost new, $10.
PRINTER, HP, $15.
570-288-4847
PRINTER, A10 HP,
two years old, touch
screen, easy to
operate. Excellent
condition. $35.
570-357-7926
732 Exercise
Equipment
HARD CORE GYM,
Plate loaded cable
pulley machine; lat
pull down, chest
press, pec deck, leg
ext, lower pulley for
curling. $150.
570-868-6024
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
TREADMILL, manu-
al, very good condi-
tion, and clean. $30
570-735-0436
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
AFFORDABLE,
clean, safe and effi-
cient wood heat.
Central Boiler OUT-
DOOR WOOD FUR-
NACE. Heats multi-
ple buildings. B & C
Wood Furnaces LLC
570-477-5692
FURNACE. 55,000
BTU hot air from
mobile home. LP
gas. $125
570-655-1399
HEATER portable
outdoor water
heater. Battery
operated with bat-
tery charger. Cole-
man model#2300-
700. Used only sev-
eral times. Excellent
condition $100.
570-825-2961
HEATER, portable,
propane gas. Used
as a back up
source. $250.
570-693-3978
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BAKER’S RACK
gray steel with glass
shelves & 4 stools.
$195. Leave mes-
sage for Florence.
570-474-5142
BED FRAME, pol-
ished brass, head
board and foot-
board. 54”x75”, full
size. Excellent con-
dition. Free delivery
within 10 miles.
$300. 824-9049
BEDFRAMES, (2)
twin, steel. Included
head and foot
pieces. $60
KITCHEN TABLE, 3
ft. X 4 ft. with two
chairs and extra
leaf. $100. OBO
570-693-1918
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
CHAIRS. 2 Wing
back with ottoman,
$100, 2 heavy duty
computer, $50
each. TV, Mitsubishi,
65” HDTV 3D. Limit-
ed hours, delivery
available. $400
570-362-3626
DRESSERS Tall
chest, long dresser
with mirror & night-
stand. $100.
570-775-7069
744 Furniture &
Accessories
COUCH bonded
leather large couch,
love seat & large
chair. 3 pieces. paid
$1800 sell for $800.
2 oak side tables
with glass tops $50.
570-947-1703
CURIO CABINET
oak, large, with light
,rounded glass
front, claw feet &
glass shelves.
Excellent condition
$400. Kitchen table
with 4 upholstered
chairs on wheels
$200.570-654-2275
DESK, 8 drawer with
lock, $50. DRESS-
ER, 4 drawer, $30.
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTERS, (2) $30
each. CHINA CABI-
NET and buffet, $90.
COF F EE TABL E,
made of wood and
glass, $40. DINING
ROOM SET, wood-
en, $50. KITCHEN
SET, 2 piece, $150.
570-736-6555
DI NI NG T A B L E .
Round Oak
Pedestal. Expanding
insert, 4 matching
chairs. Excellent.
$200. 362-3626
FLOOR LAMP with 2
matching table
lamps. Arts & Crafts
style. White frosted
glass shades &
taupe metal bases.
Excellent condition
$50 for all.
570-825-2961
FURNITURE. Out-
door patio. Glass
top cast aluminum
dining table with 6
chairs PLUS 2 teak
Adirondack chairs
with foot stools.
$500 all.
570-696-1869
FUTON. Grey, excel-
lent condition. $75
570-991-5300
HUTCH, white metal
with glass sliding
doors on top and
bottom cabinet.
65”Hx30”Wx20”D,
$60. 570-655-1217
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
PATIO DINING SET.
glass top table, 3
chairs and 2 swivel
chairs. $250.
570-655-0792
SOFA BED, navy
blue, microsuede,
$75. LOVE SEAT,
blue and white flo-
ral, $25. 696-0187
SOFA matching sofa
& loveseat - plush,
micro-suede, neu-
tral light olive/brown
color. Clean and
comfortable. $325
OBO. 570-262-6627
STOOL, four leg oak
framed, legs with
upholstered lift-up
seat, 3” deep, 18” H
by 15” seat. Neutral
upholstery. Recently
purchased, $125,
sell for $30 firm.
CARPET, crescent
shaped persian
look, black on beige.
36” by 24” at widest
point, new. $10.
FLOOR LAMP, Pot-
tery Barn, modern,
adjustable. Brushed
nickel finish on
steel. Very stable.
40” tall. $200 OBO.
570-357-7926
TABLE. drop leaf, 4
chairs. Approxi-
mately 42” long.
$250. 288-5801
TABLE. Glass patio.
66 x 39. $80
570-545-7006
TABLE. Magazine.
with marble top.
$300.. KNEELERS,
prayer, $50.
570-735-8730
WALL UNIT. Very
good. 41/2x15x6.
Top is glass
enclosed,
adjustable shelves,
2 large storage
units. Very heavy,
needs at least 2
people to move.
Cash and carry. $70
570-779-2706
ATTENTION VENDORS
Decorative/Sea-
sonal/Accent
Pieces for sale.
Purchase sepa-
rately or all.
Call 675-5046
after 6PM
WILKES-BARRE
CONDUCTED BY:
The Women of
St. Stephen’s
Episcopal Church
35 S. Franklin St.
WED 5/1, 10AM-4PM
THURS 5/2, 10AM-3PM
THURSDAY IS BAG
DAY. Mini boutique,
will run 2 days.Light
lunch available.
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LAWN MOWER
Skag, walk or ride
behind, with safety
shield and grass
catcher. Brand new
Kohler motor, solid
body, $1,600.
570-836-2765
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
LAWNMOWER 21”
Craftsman, rear
bagger - mulcher
4.5 hp engine,
excellent condition.
$40. 570-735-6638
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
WINDMILL BLADES,
(4) plastic, about 7”
X 28”. Set of two for
$25. 570-693-1918
754 Machinery &
Equipment
LAWN TRACTOR.
38” cut, 15 hp, runs
great, $400 firm.
L AWN MOWE R ,
Craftsman, with
bag, $200, LAWN
MOWER, gas pow-
ered, with bag, $60
570-655-3197
RI DI NG MOWER.
Cub Cadet. Good
condition, needs
minor repair. $200
firm. 570-362-3626
TILLER, garden.
Troy Bilt. 6.5 HP,
very good condition.
$450. 881-3929
756 Medical
Equipment
CANE, aluminum,
adjustable. $10.
PORTA POTTY, $10.
CRUTCHES, $10.
SCOOTER, Pride
Legend, 3 wheel,
$500. OBO.
570-693-1918
LIFT CHAIR, electric,
Rust colored,
Velour, Tufted back
and very good con-
dition. $500.
570-693-3978
R E CL I NE R L I F T
CHAIR. Pride Mobili-
ty. Green. 375 lb
weight limit. Seat is
22” wide. $300
FIRM. 696-2208.
WALKER with fold-
ing seat & basket.
Dolomite Maxi $50.
570-824-0248
WHEELCHAIR
Electric, Jazzy 1113,
9 years old. Great
shape, new wheels
& batteries. Never
used outdoors
$1,300.
570-283-3157
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BIKES. (1) Recum-
bent, pro form, carb
counter, program-
mable, built in face
fan. CPT program,
$65. (3) Boys, 20”
tires, $15 each,
HOCKEY TABLE,
Wilson, barely used,
$50, DRESSER, grey
and white, 5’ tall,
$10, (25) DVD
cases, $5.
570-430-6434
To place your
ad call...829-7130
BOOKS, “The Rise
and Fall of the Third
Reich” 1959-1960,
$28. HOLSTER, belt,
holds 22 bullets,
size 36-38. $60.
CARS, Bruce Lee,
1:24, car still in the
box $15. Star Wars,
Episode 1, car still in
the box, $23.
570-574-0271
CART, fold-up,
wheeled. Great for
groceries, laundro-
mat. 38” height.
$20. CHAIR, heavy
duty, steel, folds up.
Like new, $20 OBO.
570-357-7926
758 Miscellaneous
CHAR-BROIL, gas
grill, $40 OBO.
570-262-9273
Ask for Jim.
CROCHET COLLEC-
TION, hand made
crafts. Call for
details. All for $15.
570-696-1927
DVD’s. Insanity.
$80 for all
570-690-8386
ENCYCLOPEDIAs of
United States Histo-
ry, set of four, $15.
NURSING BOOKS,
from Wilkes College
1978 to 1982, $2 a
piece. DISHES, 8
piece place setting,
$20. 570-822-9668
after 5 p.m.
FREEZER. Relatively
new. $35. Exercise
bike. $20
570-829-0841
GIFT CARD for (2)
white water rafting
trips down the
Lehigh from Lehigh
Gorge State Park.
Good Sun - Fri until
10/20/13. $35.
570-655-6770
GRILL, Char-Broil,
never used. Full gas
tank, also brand
new grill utensils
included. $150.
SWING, with
canopy, good condi-
tion. $100.
570-655-0330
GRILL, charbroil,
charcoal, $35.
LETTER FOLDER,
Pitney Bowes, $25.
WINDOWSCREEN,
Anderson, $15.
570-288-4847
HOOD from ‘06
Tahoe burgundy, no
dents will fit ‘00-6
Pickups, Suburbans,
Tahoes $175. Hood
from ‘00 S10 white
$70. Auto trans
from 00 Chevy Mal-
ibu, low miles $225.
Leer fiberglass cap
will fit 90-98 Chevy
or GMC 6’ stepside
boxes only $250.
Auto trans from ‘01
Chevy cavalier low
miles $250. CAP,
Leer, Fiberglass, will
fit 90-98 Chevy or
GMC. 6 ft, stepside
boxes, only $250.
TRANSMISSION,
from 01’ Chevy Cav-
alier, low miles.
$250. 378-2886
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
L OG S P L I T T E R .
Ryobi. Good condi-
tion. 4 ton split
capacity, $250.
POOL PUMP, Hay-
ward above ground.
Good condition, 1
HP, $300.
570-779-9432
LUGGAGE, 45”
expandable. Red.
Brand new. $50
570-313-7590
LUGGAGE. 3
pieces, 24” 23” &
21” $10. AIR CONDI-
TIONER. Haier,
5000 BUT, used 1
season. $50
570-779-3653
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
merchants
village.com
(Former
Walmart Bldg)
Oak St. Pittston
GOING GOING
OUT OUT OF OF
BUSINESS BUSINESS
30% off
all inventory
owned by
Merchants
Village
(Booth 262)
Food, Home
Goods, Health
& Beauty Aids
& Lots More!
STOCK UP
NOW!
ON FRESH
INVENTORY
LAST
CHANCE
EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
570-891-1972
POSTCARDS:
Vintage folder,
1930’s. Harrisburg,
Pa. 18 different
views. like new,
never mailed! $4.
Laurel Line pictures.
3” x 5” copies of
original postcards.
6 different showing
stations at Wilkes-
Barre, Pittston,
Scranton &
Rocky Glen. $5. all.
Electric clothes iron
repair kit by Rodale,
1940’s. 48 total
parts (15 different)
in original box & 3
victory (wwii) flat
iron elements in
original envelopes.
all for $15.654-1622
RIMS set of 4 16”
chrome rims with
tires & lug nuts. Like
new & ready to
mount. Bought 1
year ago for $950 at
Sears. 5 bolt pattern
& locks sacrifice
$350 Firm.
570-313-5538
STOVE, Coal Burn-
ing, White Dickson.
$550. CANES &
WALKING sticks,
over 30, made from
slippery maple trees
$5 each. Christmas
& household items.
over 200 items,
Samsonite belt
massager, luggage
much more! all for
$60! Telephone,
used and working,
$10 each. 735-2081
758 Miscellaneous
TIRE, BF Goodrich,
215/75/R14, $20,
Tub, sone laundry
$45, Cabinet, Curio,
$75, Chair mat,
heavy plastic
48x60, $30, Sofa,
chair,and ottoman,
$125.570-868-4444
TIRES (2) Winter-
force snow.
175/70R/ 13, mount-
ed on ‘92 Geo Prizm
rims. Like new, $100
for all
570-825-8438
TIRES 17” Good
used set of four-
265/70/17. Asking
$25. for all
(570) 675-0005
TIRES. (4) LT 265-
70-R17 $60 all, (2)
225-55-R17, $30
both. 570-690-2721
TOOL BOX alu-
minum for pick-up
truck. $100. Call
Bob 570-822-2074
VACUUM, Hoover
Deluxe, upright with
attachments, mint
condition, $40.
MAILBOX, wall-
mount and lockable,
new in the box, $10.
570-655-1217
VIDEO. Titanic A&E,
3 hours with histori-
cal newsreels, inter-
views, etc. New
never opened. $5
570-654-1622
WHEELS, for
stroller, carriage,
wagon or lawn
mower, (40) FREE.
YEARBOOK, Kings
College, (Regis)
1965, $20. BOT-
TLES, (30) very old,
$.50 each. CANS,
for beer, (200) very
old, $.25 each.
RECORDS, (50)
each are $1 or less.
OPENERS, for beer,
(20) $.50 each.
IRONS, (6) old elec-
tric, $1 each. MAGA-
ZINES, (10) old, $1
each. FANS, (3) $3
each. OWNERS
GUIDE, 1980 Ford,
$1. 570-823-6986
762 Musical
Instruments
ORGAN, Conn, with
rhythm box and
bench. $50.
570-822-9668
PIANO. Livingston
upright player, pump
style. 35 music
rools. Ground floor
removal. FREE
570-479-2322
PIANO,
1960’s STEINWAY
UPRIGHT
Recently tuned, in
beautiful condition.
Serial Number
45382331. $4,995.
570-714-9955
772 Pools & Spas
SPA
5 seats with lounge.
Fiberglass sides,
foam insulated.
Easy lift, one person
lid. 3 jet settings, 2
speeds each, foot
massage with two
waterfalls, includes
two extra filters,
chlorine and test
strips. $2,000
570-836-2765
776 Sporting Goods
BASEBALLS, (22)
new, Wilson, in box
$50. Trampoline
springs, heavy duty,
5.5 inches long from
hook to hook; 72
springs, $75 for all.
OBO, 570-693-1918
BICYCLE
20” GIRLS
MURRAY “DAZZLER”
Powder blue with
pink trim accents &
wheels, white tires.
Front & rear brakes
plus coaster foot
brake. Good
condition $25.
570-814-9574
BOWLING EQUIP-
MENT, (2) bowling
balls, one 10.5 LB
light blue, Ebonite
with bag, $25, and
one 15 LB black
Brunswick with bag,
$25. SHOES, Men’s
size 10 1/2, $5 and
women’s size 9, $5.
570-760-3883
G U N C A B I N E T.
holds 6 guns,
etched glass doors.
$45 570-332-2715
PLAYSET large
wooden outdoor
playset. yellow slide
included. Platform
for fort and steps
included. Space for
rope or climbing
wall, three sets of
rings and/or swings.
Boards for canopy
on top. Area for
sandbox under-
neath. Very good
condition. $125
OBO. 570-262-6627
SKIS, 2 sets, cases
are included. $50.
570-736-6555
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION, stan-
dard 6 years old,
36” RCA entertain-
ment series. Heavy
Duty, sturdy with
excellent crystal
clear picture. Has a
semi-flat screen
and is Xbox ready.
Asking $300.
570-736-6606
Ask for Sandy
TELEVISION. 13”
Zenith color with
remote. $25
570-313-7590
TELEVISION. 24”
LCD. Remote, hmi
inputs. Excellent
condition. $75
570-288-3352
784 Tools
STEP LADDER. 8’
wooden by Werner.
Excellent condition.
$20. 954-2029
784 Tools
LADDER, extension,
36’, aluminum,
heavier gauge. D-
shaped rungs.
Needs rope, $95.
570-696-1238
570-855-0095
TOOL CHEST
Craftsman chest on
wheels. Completely
stocked with tools.
$200. 825-2961
WRENCHES, (30)
very old, $.25 each.
BRACE AND BIT, $3.
HAND AUGER, $3.
CAR JACK, $3.
FENCE CLAMPS,
Galve (25) $.10
each. WHEEL BAR-
ROW, $4.
570-823-6986
786 Toys & Games
BIKE girl’s 16” Bar-
bie bike with training
wheels $15. Step 2
naturally playful
sandbox with lid
$35. Picnic table for
children L.T. fold n
store $45.
570-696-4020
ULTIMATE EASY
BAKE Oven-brand
new, never used.
$15. 570-883-7049.
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, Sauder,
$75. 570-288-4847
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
HOT TUB. 8 person.
Good condition.
$100
570-592-3811
LADDER, for a
swimming pool, and
a frame for a 4 ft.
pool, $40. OBO
570-693-1918
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
April 29 - 1,467.50
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
AKC
Males and Females,
red and rust, call
Cooper’s
Dobermans.
570-542-5158
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
MALTESE POODLE
MIX PUPPIES, MORKIE
MIX PUPPIES
2 year health guar-
anteed, references
available. $475.
Call or Text:
570-765-1914
POMERANIAN
Puppies
AKC registered.
1 sable male.
1 female, 2 males,
black & party
colored. Ready
Now. $550.
Vet checked, first
shots, wormed.
Home Raised
570-864-2643
ROTTIES HUSKIES
Yorkies, Chihuahuas
Labs & More
Bloomsburg
389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
845 Pet Supplies
CAGE, FERRET,
Deluxe. $100
570-545-7006
CAGE. Bird, extra
large. $50.
570-313-7590
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
$42,000
68 N. Main St.
MLS: 12-3845:
Excellent invest-
ment property, 4
bedroom, large
kitchen, living room,
and dining room.
Great price!
Call Melissa
570-237-6384
AVOCA
$59,900
902 William St.
Corner lot in
Pittston Twp., 2
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, move in con-
dition. Newer gas
furnace and hot
water heater, new
w/w carpet in dining
room & living room.
Large yard.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-767
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear Creek
Blvd.
A well maintained
custom built two
story home, nestled
on two private
acres with a circu-
lar driveway. Three
bedrooms, large
kitchen with center
island, Master bed-
room with two walk
in closets, family
room with fireplace,
a formal dining
room.
$275,000
MLS#13-1063
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
DALLAS
4 bedroom
home, new
construction,
with deck &
patio. Public
water & sewer,
2 car garage.
$223,900
Lots Available
Build To Suit
Call 822-1139
or 829-0897
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 6D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
551 Other
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
551 Other
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
551 Other
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
551 Other
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
522 Education/
Training
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
522 Education/
Training
468 Auto Parts
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
$900.00
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
Routes Currently Available:
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
Coal St. • Custer St. • Hayes Lane
N. Meade St. • NewMarket St.
170 Daily Papers • 194 Sunday Papers
$735 Monthly Proft
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
Academy St. • Carey Ave. • Edison St.
Elizabeth St. • Orchard St. • S. River St.
108 Daily Papers • 141 Sunday Papers
$500 Monthly Proft
PITTSTON/PITTSTON TWP.
Broad St. • Market St. • Bryden St.
Norman St. • Flag St. • Ford St.
Parnell St. • Sunrise Dr.
139 Daily Papers • 140 Sunday Papers
149 Sunday Dispatch
$765 Monthly Proft
No telephone calls, please.
We are an equal opportunity employer, committed to diversity in the workplace.
As a company, we strive to be fair, accurate and informative. To our customers, we believe in delivering superior quality and service.
Most importantly, we believe in the power of teamwork.
Digital Sales Specialist
Immediate opening for a resourceful, highly motivated, experienced Sales Specialist.
If you are motivated by the ability to make more money by bringing in more sales, and have a
persistent, professional business attitude, this is the opportunity for you.
The ideal candidate will have a proven track record of selling and leading digital sales efforts.
This role will incorporate training and mentoring our existing sales staff in digital media solutions,
as well as meeting and exceeding revenue targets. It requires the ability to create comprehensive
marketing programs for clients, assist other reps with presentations, and identify and generate new
digital sales opportunities.
You are expected to be out in front of clients, closing sales.
This is a fast-paced, deadline-oriented environment.
If you are hungry for a challenge and the opportunity for success, send a cover letter, resume and
salary history to:
dsellers@civitasmedia.com Denise Sellers
VP/Chief Revenue Officer
The Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18711
or
A Civitas Media Company
GWC WARRANTY CORPORATION
W Wilkes-Barr ilkes-Barre, P e, PA A
Business Business Analyst Analyst
Come grow with us! GWC, a nationwide leader in vehicle service contracts,
is seeking a bright, energetic and ambitious individual to join our business
analytics team in our brand new Wilkes-Barre executive office. The Business
Analyst provides analytical, financial and reporting support for actuarial per-
formance, risk-based pricing and related considerations. In addition,
the Business Analyst will design meaningful dashboards to measure the impact
of strategies using SQL Server Management Studio and SQL Server
BI Development Studio. This job is MBA-level work but may also be perfect
for the high-performing individual aiming to gain business experience and
make a mark before embarking on pursuit of an MBA. Candidates must pos-
sess a bachelor’s degree and have strong working knowledge of SSRS, SSIS,
OLAP Cubes, Excel VBA & Macros and Microsoft Dynamics NAV. Additional
knowledge of other analytical and presentation software is a plus.
GWC Warranty offers a competitive salary and comprehensive
benefits package including medical and 401k.
Interested candidates may submit their resumes via email to
careers@gwcwarranty.com or by fax at 570-456-0967.
Please visit our website at: www.gwcwarranty.com
WAREHOUSE
We are GROWING and need to fill positions on 2nd and 3rd
shifts. We are a National Convenience Store
Distribution Company hosting an OPEN HOUSE on
Wednesday 5/01/13 between 9 am until 4 pm
Show up and be interviewed!
Will be interviewing to fill the following needed positions:
stockers,
full case order selectors, a loader and
Order Selectors 2nd and 3rd shifts.
Also a driver check-in person.
Previous Forklift experience a plus for all Stocker positions.
All positions are Full-time 40 hours per week, with a
competitive salary, generous benefit package, and various
bonus programs! Work for the Best!
Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE
SHOW UP AND BE INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants subject to pre-employment drug and
background check. EOE
CORE-MARK
WORK FOR THE BEST !! We are GROWING and need Drivers NOW to
service our customers. We are a National Convenience Store Distribution
Company hosting an OPEN HOUSE on:
Wednesday 5/01/13 from 9 am until 4 pm.
Show up and be interviewed!
We are looking to fill the following Full-Time Positions:
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
Competitive Salary, Generous benefit package to include
Medical/Dental/Vision/STD/LTD and 401k. $1,500 sign on bonus as well
as Attendance/Safety and Performance Bonus programs available. Annual
and merit increases. Designed Route Deliveries with great equipment and
company provided uniform and work boots. Guaranteed 40 hours per week!
We also have Part-Time opportunities available for drivers, if you are
looking to supplement your income.
Apply @
100 West End Rd
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE
SHOW UP AND BE INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants subject to pre-employment drug and background check. EOE
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
FULL TIME TEACHING
POSITIONS FOR THE
2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
• High School Guidance Counselor
• High School Technology Education
• Middle School Technology Education
• Middle School/High School Music
concentration in band.
If a complete application packet is on file,
please submit a letter of interest only. All others
submit a complete application packet. For
details visit the Employment page of the district
web site, www.dallassd.com All application
packets must be received by
Deadline: May 9, 2013
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
906 Homes for Sale
BERWICK
VICTORIAN
Beautiful details
throughout include
exquisite wood-
work, hardwood
floors, stained
glass. Open stair-
case, 3 bedrooms,
2 full baths, 2 half
baths. Second floor
office, finished 3rd
floor, in-ground pool
& 3 car garage.
MLS#12-698
$199,900
Call Patsy
570-204-0983
570-759-3300
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
Nestled in the trees
on a 1.5 acre cor-
ner lot. 4 bedroom,
2 bath home in
Glendalough.
MSL#13-693
$220,000
JOSEPH P.
GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
This 4 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath Cape Cod
style home has so
much to offer!
Plenty of room for
everyone. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet and full
bath, family room
with fireplace, re-
creation room with
half bath in lower
level. Hardwood
floors on 1st floor,
new windows,
above ground pool.
MLS #13-1109
$184,900
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
696-0723
DALLAS
Priced to sell on
West Center Hill Rd.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with finished
basement.
MLS 13-770
$134,900
JOSEPH P.
GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Beautiful home in a
lovely setting in the
Village of Orange. 2
or 3 bedrooms, 1st
floor bedroom,
hardwood flooring,
large eat in kitchen,
1st floor laundry,
2nd floor cedar
closet. Detached
garage, barn style
shed with loft, many
upgrades. New fur-
nace, kitchen floor &
recently drilled pri-
vate well & PIX
plumbing. Don’t
wait, make this
home yours & enjoy
serenity on the back
deck. $119,900
MLS# 13-283
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or
Tony Wasco
855-2424
570-901-1020
DALLAS
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
9 Westminster Dr.
4 bedroom brick
ranch. 2,800 sq. ft.
Totally renovated. 2
1/2 car garage. Low
taxes, corner lot.
See ZILLOW for
details. $274,000.
Call 570-878-3150
MINERS MILLS
170 E. Thomas St.
Remodeled, 3 bed-
rooms 1 bath. Large
fenced in back yard.
$110,000.
(570) 239-8556
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
3 Crestview Drive
Sprawling multi-
level, well-con-
structed and contin-
uously maintained.
5,428 sq. ft. of living
space. Living room
and formal dining
room with two-way
gas fireplace and
hardwood flooring.
Eat-in kitchen with
island. Florida room
with flagstone floor.
5 bedrooms, 4
baths, 2 half-baths.
Lower level rec-
room with fireplace
and wet bar leads to
heated, in-ground
pool. Beautifully
landscaped two-
acre lot. $525,000.
MLS#13-1309
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
NEW GOSS MANOR
28 Highland Drive
PRICE REDUCED
Beautiful brick
ranch. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
family room,
multiple fireplaces,
Large eat-in
kitchen. $177,700.
(570) 590-4442
DALLAS
SALE BY OWNER
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths. Completely
restored from
top to bottom.
Excellent location.
$235,000
570-829-2022
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Newberry Estate -
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo
with view of ponds
& golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2
floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2
car garage & more.
$425,000
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Three bedroom, all
brick ranch, modern
kitchen with all
stainless appli-
ances. 1 3/4 bath.
Hardwood floors
throughout, finished
basement, attached
one car garage.
$189,000
All calls after 5 p.m.
570-706-5014
DALLAS TWP.
REDUCED
2691 Carpenter Rd.
Magnificent raised
ranch on estate set-
ting. Total finished
four bedroom, 2
bath home. This
house features
hardwood floors
throughout. Finished
basement with
working fireplace.
Large deck with
swimming pool, two
car detached gar-
age set on 2.4
acres.
MLS# 12-3158
$277,900
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico Real
Estate, Inc.
826-1600
DRUMS
PRICE
REDUCTION!
BEECH MTN. LAKES
Charming 3 bed-
room, 2 bath 1,800
sq. ft. home with
lower level office,
family room & laun-
dry. Propane fire-
place, 2 car garage.
Quiet cul-de-sac,
right near lake.
MLS# 13-916
$167,500
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
DRUMS
PRICE
REDUCTION!
BEECH MTN. LAKES
Charming 3 bed-
room, 2 bath 1,800
sq. ft. home with
lower level office,
family room & laun-
dry. Propane fire-
place, 2 car garage.
Quiet cul-de-sac,
right near lake.
MLS# 13-916
$167,500
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DRUMS
SUGARLOAF
COUNTRY ESTATE
Private 18 acre
estate with south-
ern exposure &
panoramic views!
Quality constructed
& custom built, this
New England split
level offers 3-4
bedrooms, three
baths, solarium with
hot tub, two fire-
places, extra large
gameroom & other
attractive ameni-
ties! Matching 2
story brick barn,
cozy “A” frame
guest cottage &
more......absolutely
ideal for horses,
mini farmette &
children. 20
minutes from
Wilkes-Barre &
Pocono Resorts.
Broker Owned
Call Mike @
570-455-9463
M.S. Pecora
Realtor
DURYEA
OPEN HOUSE
SUN MAY 5TH
12-2
1219 SOUTH ST
Own this cozy 1/2
double for less than
it costs to rent.
$44,900
Ed Appnel
570-817-2500
570-654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
For Sale by Owner.
229 Pringle Street
Single home, 3 bed-
rooms. Remodeled,
Kitchen & bath,
concrete cellar,
huge walk up attic,
deck & new roof.
570-287-3927
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
$84,895
137 Lidy’s Road
Large 4 bedroom, 2
story home with
new roof and chim-
ney liner in April
2013. Plenty of liv-
ing space for the
price. www. atlas-
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-215
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
DUPONT
REDUCED
$68,500
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
$339,900
316 Raspberry
Rd.
Blueberry Hills
Like new 2 story
home with first
floor master
bedroom and
bath. Inground
pool on nice
corner lot with
fenced in yard.
Sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 2
car garage, full
unfinished
basement
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-610
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
DURYEA
$79,00
AFFORDABLE
RENOVATED
HOME! You’ll
enjoy the space
of the living
room/dining
room open floor
plan with hard-
wood floors.
Large trendy
kitchen with
new appliances.
Spacious 2 bed-
rooms and bath
with tiled jetted
tub for relaxing.
Peace of mind
with new fur-
nace, hot water
heater & electri-
cal box. Plenty
of parking and
nice yard.
MLS 13-96
Michele
Hopkins
570-540-6046
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remod-
eled two bed-
room home.
Kitchen is very
nice with granite
counters and tile
floor, bathroom
is modern with
tub surround,
tile floor and
granite vanity.
New vinyl win-
dows through-
out. Off street
parking for 2
cars. MLS #12-
3966 For more
information and
photos visit
www. atlasreal-
t y i n c . c o m .
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
EXETER
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, Colonial 2
story. Upper scale
neighborhood. 2
car garage, custom
oak cabinets, gran-
ite countertops,
Jacuzzi tub, 10x15
deck. Beautiful
stone fireplace.
$264,900
570-599-0825
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
PENDING
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remodeled
two bedroom home.
Kitchen is very nice
with granite coun-
ters and tile floor,
bathroom is modern
with tub surround,
tile floor and granite
vanity. New vinyl
windows through-
out. Off street park-
ing for 2 cars. MLS
#12-3966 For more
information and
photos visit www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
DURYEA
REDUCED
$85,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3
bedrooms and 2 full
baths. Extra large
room sizes, stained
glass and natural
woodowork. Not
flooded in 2011.
MLS #13-190. For
more information
and photos visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
EDWARDSVILLE
Beautiful, Large
Brick Home with 5
bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 2 car gar-
age, large fenced-in
yard, sunporch.
Patio, lots of closets
& storage. Hard-
wood floors, large
kitchen with appli-
ances, 1st floor bed-
room suite. 2nd
kitchen in base-
ment. Was an old
rectory so has much
room to entertain.
Must see this home
to appreciate all it
has to offer. No
Water 2011 Flood.
MLS# 12-1536
$184,500
Linnea Holdren
570-371-1798
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
570-455-8521
EDWARDSVILLE
This home has been
totally renovated
throughout & fresh-
ly painted on the
outside! Move-
right-in to this cozy
home with 1 car
detached garage,
fenced yard & rear
deck. Gas heat.
Very nice.
MLS#13-1399
$85,000
Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 7D
758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous
THE TIMES LEADER
Birthday
Parties & More
Dolphin Plaza
1159 Rt 315
Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18702
(570) 208-2908
wbarrepa@
gymboreeclasses.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL 970.7130
Call 825-8381
or 793-9390
79 Blackman Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA18702
Banquet Room
Available For Parties
$250 for 5 hours.
Bring Your Own Food.
“Club 79”
Free Birthday Party Setup
10-15 Customers
Free Pool Games
& Free Beef Hot Dogs
8pm-10pm
W-F-S
Like Us On
The Best In
Live Music
For Weddings &
Private Parties
David Chaump
654-8368
www.GrooveTrainBand.com
PARRISH
LIMOUSINES
Proudly Providing Premium
Transportation for Over
3 Generations!
Weddings – Proms – Airports
NewYork Shows – Dinners
Corporate Functions
Sporting Events – Concerts –
Casino Trips - Wine Tours –
Nights Out
Pittston PA
570-655-3737 or 570-654-3681
www.parrishlimos.com
Banquet Hall
Laflin Road, Laflin
An Elegant Atmosphere
With Plenty Of Parking &
Easily Accessible.
570-655-8956
www.stmaria
goretti-laflin.org
DJ JOEY
7000+SONGS
ALL ERAS!
NEWEST
TECHNOLOGY!
WEDDINGS,
GRADUATIONS,
ANNIVERSARIES,
ALL PARTIES
BOOKINGNOW!
570-829-8106
May 12, 2013
Call for Reservations 570-825-6477
A Traditional Buffet
Serving 11:30am to 2:30 pm • Every Half Hour
Chicken Noodle Soup
Fresh Fruit Display
Cheese & Cracker Display w/ Kielbasa
Vegetable & Dip Display
Macaroni Salad • Broccoli Salad • Coleslaw
Tossed Garden Salad Bowl w/ Italian, French & Ranch Dressing
Fresh Baked Bread Sliced to Order
Carved Turkey Breast • Carved Prime Rib
Chicken w/ Sausage, Onions, Peppers, Tomato & Mushrooms
Cranberry Glazed Porkloin • Seafood Newburg • Rice Pilaf
Homemade Mashed Potatoes with Gravy
Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Italian Style Green Beans • Buttered Corn
Penne w/ Marinara Sauce
Squash Ravioli w/ Butter Brown Sugar Sauce
Dessert:
Assorted Cakes & Pies • Rice Pudding
Gus’ Ice Cream Shoppe • Genetti Chocolate Fountain
UNLIMITED SODA
Adults – $23.95
Children 10 & Under – $8.95
Children 4 & Under – No Charge
All prices are subject to 6% Tax and 20% service charge
For All Special Events:
Buffets, Sit-Down Dinners,
Dances or Meetings
AMERICAN LEGION
POST 350
NANTICOKE
BANQUET HALL
Some Graduation
Sates Still Open
2 rental Halls Available
Upstairs Banquet Hall
for larger occasions &
recently refurbished
downstairs hall for
smaller get-togethers.
Call
Thelma 570-735-9872
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$69,900
1156 Wyoming Ave.
Large home with 4
bedrooms, yard
with detached 2 car
garage, private
yard. Home needs
a little updating but
a great place to
start! www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-865
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER TWP.
NEW PRICE
Stately brick 2
story, with in
ground pool, cov-
ered patio, finished
basement, fireplace
& wood stove. 3
car attached gar-
age, 5 car
detached garage
with apartment
above.
MLS #11-1242
$499,000
Call Joe 613-9080
GLEN LYON
Always wanted an
investment property
but didn't know
where to start???
Look no further! 5
unit!! Everything is
updated in great
condition. Beautiful
apts, fully rented.
This opportunity lets
you buy, sit back &
collect the rents.
2011 new roof, vinyl
siding, cellulose in-
sulation, refubished
staircase, 2012 new
carpet, stove &
fridge in 3 apts, the
list goes on. Don’t
miss out.
$109,999
MLS #12-3868
Cal/text Tony
at 855-2424 or
Donna @ 947-3824
901-1020
JENKINS TWP
$89,900
40 Friend St.
MLS 12-3731
Well maintained 2-
story, 2 bedroom
home, taxes less
than $1,000 annual-
ly, large backyard,
rear parking from
access alley in
back, large deck,
modern kitchen.
Call Melissa
570-237-6384
906 Homes for Sale
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
REDUCED
$120,000.
This large Chalet
has a full kitchen on
the ground floor
with full bath. Great
for two families to
share, or in-law’s
quarters. In Big
Bass Lake Commu-
nity with indoor &
outdoor pools, club
house, gym & lake-
front beaches. Con-
veniently located
near Rts. 380, 435
& 307.
Call Tom
cell 516-507-9403
570-842-2300
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 2
story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situ-
ated on a generous
lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st
floor family room, 2
car garage, deck
and soooo much
more!
MLS #11-2429
$269,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
Custom built colo-
nial two-story. 4
bedrooms, 4 baths,
two vehicle garage.
View of the Wyo-
ming Valley. Located
on a dead end, pri-
vate street, just
minutes from the
Wyoming Valley
Country Club, Han-
over Industrial Park,
& public transporta-
tion. Sun room, fam-
ily room with wood
burning fireplace,
hardwood floors on
1st & 2nd floors, 1st
floor laundry room &
bathroom. Central
cooling fan. Lower
level recreation
room with bar, lots
of closets & stor-
age, coal/wood
stove, office/5th
bedroom & bath.
MLS #12-4610
PRICE REDUCED
TO
$269,900
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
283-9100
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
All ready for new
owners! This home
has been well cared
for and will surprise
you once inside.
Spacious rooms
with new sheet rock
walls, soft carpet-
ing. The basement
is clean and dry with
plenty of storage.
Worth a look!
#13-756
$67,000
Paul Pukatch
696-6559
696-2600
HARDING
$224,900
605 Apple Tree Rd
Brick Ranch that
needs nothing,
located on over 1
acre lot with 2 car
attached garage
and 3 car
detached. Modern
kitchen with center
island and granite
countertops mod-
ern tile bath, gas
fireplace, central
air, full basement.
This home could
qualify for 100%
financing through a
rural housing mort-
gage. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-3522.
Lu Ann
570-602-9280
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HARDING
Cozy Cape Cod
with eat-in kitchen.
Gas heat, replace-
ment windows and
newer roof. Vinyl &
brick exterior. Two
car detached
garage with drive-
way on each side of
the house.
In-ground pool with
pool house.
MLS# 13-6
$79,500
Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARVEYS LAKE
PRICE REDUCED!
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with
lake rights, close
to the public boat
dock. New kitchen
& living room ceil-
ings & insulation
just completed.
Enjoy this place
during the Summer
months or year
round. Recently
updated with new
roof & floors.
MLS# 12-3820
$64,900
Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HAZLETON
VALLEY VIEW
TOWNHOMES
State of the art
Townhomes conve-
niently located to I
80 & 81. Gorgeous
interiors with many
upgrades that are
standard features.
Natural gas heat
and central air.
Limited edition
“Ridge” homes
available with a “mil-
lion dollar” view.
Two car garage.
Located in Butler
Township just off the
Airport Beltway.
100% financing is
available to the
qualified. Ask for
Cheryl or Donna.
MLS# 12-484
M.S. Pecora,
Realtor
455-9463 or
436-3790
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
$72,500
64 Center St.
Large 4 bedroom
with master bed-
room and bath on
1st floor. New gas
furnace and water
heater with updated
electrical panel.
Large lot with 1 car
garage, nice loca-
tion. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
Must be sold to
settle estate
MLS 13-294
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$189,900
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
NEW PRICE
Absolutely Beautiful!
Move right in to this
elegant 2 bedroom,
2 full bath condo,
located out of the
flood zone. Hard-
wood floors, new
carpet, granite &
stainless kitchen,
airy loft, private rear
deck, lots of light,
tons of storage,
tastefully decorat-
ed, and low HOA
fees!
$229,000
Call Christine @
332-8832
613-9080
JENKINS TWP.
$129,900
689 R. Westminster
Very private 2 bed-
room home located
on 1.48 acres. Cen-
tral air, screened in
porch, 1.5 baths,
large living/dining
room, extra 1 story
building could be
converted into 2
car garage. 16x8
screened in porch,
fresh paint.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 13-1622
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor
Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential
in quiet neigh-
borhood. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath
with off street
parking and nice
yard.
Directions: Rt
315, at light turn
onto Laflin Rd to
bottom of hill.
Turn right onto
E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Have a large
family? Check out
this 4 bedroom, 3
bath home. Living
room with gas fire-
place, formal dining
space, fully finished
basement with wet
bar. AS IS sale.
MLS#12-3933
PRICE REDUCED TO
$124,900
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
LAFLIN
$109,000
147 Haverford Drive
Nicely kept 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath
townhome in desir-
able neighborhood.
Great looking family
room in lower level.
Spacious rooms
with plenty of clos-
ets. Outdoor patio
with pavers and
trees for privacy.
Carpet, tiled kitchen
counter and AC unit
are ALL NEW! Move
in condition. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-909
Call Terry
570-885-3041
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
NEW LISTING!
561 Mercer Ave.
Very nice 2-story,
off-street parking,
new front porch,
fenced yard, 2
level deck & mature
plantings. Modern
kitchen & bath, liv-
ing & dining rooms,
3 bedrooms & a
lower level family
room. 2 free-stand-
ing gas stoves. For
more details on this
home & to view the
photos online go to:
www. pr udent i al -
realestate.com &
enter PRU8N9T9 in
the HOME SEARCH.
Call today for an
appointment.
MLS #13-1538
$94,500
Walter Belchick
696-2600 ext. 301
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in
Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage
and large corner
lot. Lots of space
for the large or
growing family.
www. atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LAFLIN
$262,000
5 Fairfield Drive
California style all
brick Bi-level home
with mountain
views, gourmet
kitchen, stainless
steel appliances,
gas fireplace, heat-
ed 2 car garage,
208 sq. ft. pool
cabana with kitchen
& bath. Built in
stone BBQ, heated
pool, covered patio
& fire pit all in pri-
vate picturesque
setting.
MLS 13-1628
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
3 bedroom Bi-Level
situated on lovely
lot with formal din-
ing room, lower
level family room
with gas fireplace,
central air, conven-
iently located to
interstates &
Casino.
A must see!
MLS # 13-1100
$199,000
Marie Montante
881-0103
288-9371
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort &
charm, you’ll love
this sparkling 4,100
+ sq. ft. 5 bedroom,
4 bath two story tra-
ditional home in per-
fect condition in a
great neighborhood.
Nothing to do but
move right in. Off-
ers formal living &
dining rooms, 1st
floor family room
with fireplace, gran-
ite countertops in
kitchen & baths,
lower level recre-
ation room with fire-
place & wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $335,000
Call
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LAFLIN
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English
Tudor in a desirable
neighborhood.
Modern kitchen
with cherry cabi-
nets, granite coun-
tertops, stainless
steel appliances,
island with Jenn air
and tile floor. Sepa-
rate glass sur-
rounded breakfast
room. Family room
with gas fireplace,
and hardwood
floors. Formal din-
ing room with bay
window. French
doors throughout.
Master bedroom
suite with master
bath, walk-in closet
and separate sitting
room. Lower level
rec-room and
office. Two car
garage.
MLS#13-1076
$325,000
Call
Sandra Gorman:
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
OPEN HOUSE
Sun. May 5th, 1-3
REDUCED PRICE
$229,900
Two story, 1,900 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, eat
in kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors. 2
car garage, central
air. Lot 100’ x 125’.
Move in Condition.
Call 570-655-4294
LARKSVILLE
For Sale by Owner
Must see, move in
condition 3 bed-
room ranch, nice
n e i g h b o r h o o d
behind State St.
Elementary Center.
All new carpet,
paint, interior doors,
new tile counter-
tops, tile floor, stain-
less steel appli-
ances, 3 season
patio, beautiful
16x34 in ground
pool. $144,900. Call
570-301-7291
More info & photos
on Zillow.com
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
NEW PRICE
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split
Level home with
hardwood
floors, 1 car
garage, large
yard and cov-
ered patio in
very convenient
location. Great
curb appeal and
plenty of off
street parking.
Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on
left.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Land for sale?
Place an ad
and SELL
570-829-7130
LAFLIN
PRICE REDUCED
$360,000
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18’
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LARKSVILLE
Immaculate home in
move-in condition
just waiting for a
new buyer. Over-
sized Bi-Level has
many perks i.e.,
new eat-in kitchen,
dining room with
French doors to 4
season sunroom.
Nice sized bed-
rooms. Lower level
hosts family room
with fireplace, den,
laundry room and 3
Season Sunroom.
Built-in 1 car garage
& attached 2 car
carport for extra
coverage, large
fenced yard.
MLS#13-1396
$190,000
Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
MOOSIC
$92,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. APRIL 28
NOON - 2PM
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAIN TOP
16 KARIN DRIVE
Well cared for, spa-
cious Split Level
home on a corner
acre lot. Featuring 3
bedrooms, 1 1/2
modern baths, for-
mal dining room,
modern kitchen.
Huge family room
with a wet bar &
propane fireplace,
glass & screened
enclosed back
porch & 2 car
garage.
MLS# 13-1004
$ 189,900
Call Florence
Keplinger
814-5832
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
5 Pine Tree Road
Five bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family,
living, dining &
laundry rooms. Eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with
storage room,
attached 2 car
garage. Asking
$255,000. For
appointment call
570-474-5463
MOUNTAINTOP
316 Cedar Manor
Drive Bow Creek
Manor.
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom,
3 1/2 bath, 2 story
on almost 1 acre.
Master bedroom
suite. Two family
rooms. Two fire-
places. Office/den.
Central vac., secu-
rity system. Many
extras. Large deck
overlooking a pri-
vate wooded yard.
3 car garage.
$355,000
MLS# 13-1360.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
822-5126.
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAINTOP
Search No More!
This five-year old
home is totally
energy efficient &
exquisitely design-
ed. Every room has
gorgeous details &
lots of upgrades.
The landscape is
breathtaking & the
location could not
be better. This
home truly stands
out in every way!
MLS# 13-1359
$389,900
Robert Altmayer
570-793-7999
Rundle
Real Estate
570-474-2340
NANTICOKE
Lovely 1/2 double
sitting high on the
hill in the Honeypot
section of Nanti-
coke. Nice hard-
wood floors, original
woodwork, gener-
ous room sizes &
high ceilings make
this home feel
grand. Off street
parking for 2 cars in
front, & room for
additional parking or
garage in rear.
$40,000
Call Christine
332-8832
613-9080
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCED
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$27,500
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. New roof
installed 11/17/12.
This home also has
a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
18 Prospect Street
BY OWNER
$26,900
3 bedroom,1 bath
570-970-0650
jtdproperties.com
PAGE 8D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
FIREARMS WANTED CASH PAID
We buy Guns, Ammunition, Gun Accessories,
Military and War bring back items
1 year old or 100 we buy guns of any age or condition
(570) 735-1487 or 1-855-HDI-GUNS
Licensed, insured, and locally owned and operated with thousands of satisfed customers nationwide.
Do not give your guns away. We have expert appraisers in store who are prepared to offer fair market
value for your frearms.
We will legally purchase and transfer any unwanted frearms off your name and pay you cash
instantly.
We will pay an additional bonus of $50 for any frearm brought back from war eras and a 10% bonus
for 3 guns or more with this ad.
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
265 Kirmar Park-
way. 3 bedroom
Cape Cod style
home on large lot
with off street park-
ing. 1st floor master
bedroom, 2 season
sunroom, partial fin-
ished basement,
fenced yard, lots
of storage, large
modern eat in
kitchen.
MLS 13-1077
$89,900
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
Patricia Lunski
570-735-7497
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bed-
rooms, gas heat,
large yard.
Central location.
Affordable @
$64,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
260-262
E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking
with paved back
alley. Close to
LCCC. New roof
installed in 2007
along with a kitchen
& bath update
in #260.
MLS #13-694
$65,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$175,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level house fea-
tures 2 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths, recre-
ation room with
propane stove. Wall
to wall, 3 season
porch. Profession-
ally landscaped
yard. Storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
$114,900
67 Carroll St.
The WOW factor!
Move right in and
enjoy this renovat-
ed home with no
worries! 3 bed-
rooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full
baths including a 4
piece master bath
with custom tile
work, open floor
plan with modern
kitchen with island,
corner lot with off
street parking and
nice yard. Come
and take a look!
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
$119,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home
with Victorial fea-
tures, large eat in
kitchen with laun-
dry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath
with claw foot tub,
lots of closet
space. Move in
ready, off street
parking in rear.
MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
$134,900
15 High St.
Well kept newly
remodeled, 2 story
home, with modern
kitchen, central air,
new triple pane
replacement win-
dows and custom
made blinds for
each window.
Home is in move in
condition, with plas-
ter walls and design
ceilings, plus much,
much more. A
MUST SEE!
MLS 13-1088
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PITTSTON
$89,900
57 Dewitt St.
Cute Cape Cod with
3 bedrooms, vinyl
replacement win-
dows, Pergo floor-
ing and walk up
attic. Put this one
on your list.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1038
CALL CHARLIE
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
Amazing Property!!!
Five bedrooms, 4
with private bath.
spectacular master
suite with sitting
room + 3 room clos-
et. Four fireplaces
All hardwood floors.
Gazebo style ceiling
in library. 3 car
garage. Resort-like
yard with in-ground
pool with cabana &
outside bath. Adult
amenities, full fin-
ished basement.
PREQUALIFIED
BUYERS ONLY
MLS# 12-1091
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
Room for all your
needs! 4 bedroom
home offers living
& dining rooms
AND an extra room
for whatever you
need. Separate
laundry room on 1st
floor, new carpeting
in 3 bedrooms, new
water heater in
2010, new Bath
Fitter tub/shower.
Recently re-grav-
eled driveway, nice
sized outdoor stor-
age shed & plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #13-360
$95,000
Call/text Donna at
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
$139,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLAINS
Perfectly pretty
two story, 3 bed-
room starter home
in immaculate
condition on
great street.
MLS# 13-907
$59,500
Deanna Farrell
696-0894
696-3801
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level
townhome features
2 car garage, 3
bedrooms, 3.5
baths, lower level
patio and upper
level deck, gas fire-
place, central air
and vac and stereo
system www.atlas-
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
REDUCED!
Great 3 bedroom, 1
bath with a large
eat in kitchen &
finished basement
with a dry bar.
Large fenced yard
& extra lot included
for additional park-
ing. With-in walking
distance of Wyo-
ming Valley Mall!
$129,000
MLS#12-2479
Dave Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
SHAVERTOWN
2 years old, open
floor plan, hard-
wood floors 1st &
2nd floors. 2 story
great room with
floor to ceiling fire-
place, 3 sides brick
exterior. Lower level
finished with French
doors out to patio,
breathtaking views,
upgraded landscap-
ing with 3 waterfalls.
MLS #12-4215
PRICE REDUCED
$585,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
SHAVERTOWN
Nice building lot
centrally located in
the Back Mountain.
Has it's own well
and public sewer
already in place. All
set for you to start
building!
$47,000
Call Christine
332-8832
613-9080
WILKES-BARRE
EAST END SECTION
Great starter
home, 3 bedrooms,
1 modern bath.
Updated kitchen,
new roof, windows
& furnace. Off
street parking,
fenced in back
yard. New back
porch. All appli-
ances included.
$42,500
570-235-1210 after
5:30 pm.
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
NEW LISTING
Midway Manor
Traditional 2 story,
2-3 bedrooms,
great closet space,
1.5 baths, garage,
laundry room, 3
season porch, in-
ground pool, gas 2
zone heat.
MLS #13-1383
#$144,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
SHAVERTOWN
Newer 2 story with
large eat-in kitchen,
center island, hard-
wood floors, full
basement, central
air & maintenance
free deck.
$179,900
MLS#13-1232
Call Tony
474-6307 or
715-7734
Smith Hourigan
Group
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny Lake!
4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Two
car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, above
ground pool, dock &
100' lake frontage.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Kenneth Williams
570-542-2141
Five Mountains
Realty
SUGARLOAF
Beautiful home in a
beautiful location.
2003 custom built
Cape Cod offers
4.89 cleared acres.
Heated in ground
pool, 3 full baths, 1st
floor master bed-
room & laundry & an
updated kitchen. 2
car attached gar-
age with bonus
room above. Close
to Humboldt Indus-
trial Park & Eagle
Rock Resort.
MLS# 13-894
$309,000
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or
Tony Wasco
855-2424
570-901-1020
SWOYERSVILLE
$124,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in
this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable
neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen
with new flooring.
Finished basement
with theater/rec
room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
SWEET VALLEY
NEW LISTING!
Charming chalet
style home located
on 4.05 acres in the
beautiful Back
Mountain area.
House has been
completely renovat-
ed. Living room has
vaulted ceilings and
new hardwood.
With a two story
Deck & small pond
in the back yard.
MLS #13-1222
$215,000
Call Dave, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Totally Redone! This
cozy Cape Cod has
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Modern kitchen with
granite countertops,
ceramic tile back-
splash and floor, all
new hardwood
throughout, new
furnace, new wiring,
new windows, duct
work in place for
central air, much
more! Vinyl siding,
large unfinished
basement, deck,
Off street parking.
24 hour notice to
show.
Asking $135,000.
Call Don at
814-5072
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of
the flood zone.
Formal dining room,
family room, master
bedroom suite, pri-
vate guest suite
also on upper level.
Central air and cen-
tral vacuum. Deck,
garage + many
extras. Freshly
painted and carpet-
ed, so move right in!
PHFA financing
$5,200 down,
monthly payment
$797. interest rate
of 4%. $172,000.
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldn’t
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
112 Clear
Springs Court
Updated town-
house, new granite
countertops & vani-
ties, new hardwood
floors, full, finished,
walk out basement
with fireplace.
$159,900
Call Joe
613-9080
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road.
Single family two
story - a place for
kids! Four bed-
rooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has
formal dining room,
living room, family
room & laundry
room. Master bed-
room & bath added
to the 1st floor.
Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on
1 acre. Wyoming
Area School Dis-
trict.
MLS # 13-700
$119,900
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
WHITE HAVEN
Nice home in
Hickory Hill Comm-
unity. Great bi-level
with open floor plan
and plenty of space
for all your needs.
Serene wooded lot
and a stream that
runs trough it. Make
this your seasonal
home or your per-
manent place to call
home. House sold
as is. Inspections
for buyers informa-
tion only. Owner will-
ing to consider rent
to own option.
MLS #12-4331
$95,000
Call/text Donna
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
WHITE HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$42,000
70 N. Meade
3BR, 1 bath in move
in condition with
new electric box,
water heater, and
plumbing. Off
street parking in
rear for 3 cars,
good credit and
your house, taxes &
insurance would be
under $400/month.
MLS #12-3900. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington
Street
Spacious 2 story, 3
bedrooms with 2 ca
detached garage,
good starter home,
needs TLC. MLS #12
3887. For more
information and pho
tos visit www.atlasre
altyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
REDUCED
$39,900
61 Puritan Lane
Are you spending
more than $400/mo
on rent?? Owning
this home could
cost you less! With
3 bedrooms and a
fenced in yard, this
home makes a per-
fect place to start
your homeowner-
ship experience.
Ask me how!
MLS #12-1823. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WILKES- BARRE
$112,000
43 Richmont Ave.
Worth more than
listed price, this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
Cape Cod home
has central air,
hardwood floors,
fenced yard, above
ground pool, mod-
ern kitchen and
baths. www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
Large move-in con-
dition 2-story with
10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 3 baths & off
street parking. Loc-
ated near Barney
Farms. This is a well
maintained home
with a large eat-in
kitchen with maple
cabinets & a par-
quet floor. The fur-
nace/central air
conditioning is only
2 years old. Buy this
home & enjoy your
summer days &
nights in your large
screened in rear
porch or in your
fenced yard with a
blacktop patio/bas-
ketball court.
MLS# #13-69
$159,900
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x 28
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
$72,900
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
$87,500
Best of both
worlds...Commer-
cial space plus 2-3
bedroom home
complete with
detached garage
and off street park-
ing with yard.
Home has been
nicely remodeled
with 1 3/4 baths,
hardwood floors,
move in condition.
Commercial space
is 14x26 with end-
less possibilities.
www. atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 13-982
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING!
Charming bungalow
style Cape Cod
home with a unique
layout & character
galore. Four bed-
rooms, two baths
and second floor
great room. Corner
lot, two-car garage,
nice South Wilkes-
Barre location.
MLS#13-1295
$99,900
Karen Ryan
283-9100, ext. 14
283-9100
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but
move right in! This
home has every-
thing you need...3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced
in yard, screened in
porch, off street
parking, quiet
neighborhood.
Home recently
remodeled inside &
out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING
Charming 1,000+ sq.
ft. 2 bedroom, 1/1/2
bath with separate
driveway on a quiet
street. Lower level
was finished for for-
mer business - has
separate entrance,
1/2 bath & electric
baseboard heat (not
included in total sq.
ft).
MLS #13-1592
$52,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WILKES-BARRE
159 Gardner Ave.
Big Family wanted!!
Great 5 Bedroom,
with 2.5 baths, very
well kept, move
right in. Outside was
total updated, New
furnace and hot
water heater too!!!
MLS #13-1342
$125,000
Call Dave, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
Two bedroom single
home, owner willing
to hold mortgage in-
house. There are no
closing costs or
bank fees involved.
$59,000 or $350 a
month toward pur-
chase. $900 securi-
ty deposit required
and 1st months rent.
570-288-9050
after 5 p.m.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 9D
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
8
0
6
5
3
3
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design
• Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
• Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Officenter–250
250 Pierce Street
Officenter–270
270 Pierce Street
Park Office Building
400 Third Ave.
Officenter–220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
Located on quiet
Westminster Street.
One story ranch
home in very good
condition with nice
yard & off street
parking. This 2 bed-
room, 1 bath home
features an eat-in
kitchen with new
appliances, which
are included, living
& dining rooms.
Roof is 2 years old &
new water heater
recently installed in
full, unfinished, dry,
concrete basement
with included wash-
er and dryer.
Virtually all furniture
is included, if de-
sired. Directions:
From S. Main to
Hanover St. to
Westminster.
MLS# 13-32
$59,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real
Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$242,000
Beautifully kept split
level in desirable
Barney Farms. 3
car attached
garage, finished
basement & attic.
Landscaped lot,
covered deck with
custom pull down
shades. Hard-
wood living room,
formal dining room,
cathedral ceilings in
living room &
kitchen. Full wet
bar in finished
basement, walk out
patio for your
parties/cookouts.
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
Classic
Properties
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit,
PA 18411
WYOMING
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
Motivated
seller
Reduced
$173,000
570-885-6848
YATESVILLE
$139,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bed-
room townhome
with master bath on
2nd floor. Needs a
little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
YATESVILLE
$69,900
9 Pittston Ave
2 story home
located in a very
privet setting. 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths and work-
shop attached
to living space,
great for home
business or the
hobbyist. Low
taxes, great
community.
Garage has 1
detached space
and 1 built in.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1009
CALL CHARLIE
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
YATESVILLE
REDUCED
$169,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit
townhouse, no
fees. 2 bedrooms,
3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathe-
dral ceiling with
skylights. Large
family room with
propane stove and
it’s own ductless
air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
$53,900
936 William St.
Very nicely kept 2
unit home with 2
bedrooms each
side. Large yard
with driveway for
each side. Separate
electric. Clean and
neat, in move in
condition.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1569
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run
Rd.
Bear Creek
Twp., large com-
mercial
garage/ware-
house on 1.214
acres with addi-
tional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground
fuel tanks. May
require zoning
approval. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Commercial
Building For Sale.
502 Market St,
Kingston. 2000 Sq
Ft $229,000 1-story,
PRIME LOCATION
with parking lot.
Take a look. If
interested, call
570-814-4940.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DURYEA
REDUCED
$34,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EDWARDSVILLE
Landmark location
ready for new life.
Formerly used as a
restaurant, can be
converted into any-
thing! Full bar area,
& kitchen, multiple
cool storage areas.
Living & office
space also avail-
able. Parking lot
included.
MLS#13-874
$115,900
Call Dave, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HAZLETON
LANDMARK
FOR SALE
All brick bar/
restaurant/attached
ranch home....
Historic, ultra suc-
cessful & updated
throughout. Turn
key, licenses, fix-
tures, etc. Owner
retiring....possible
owner financing.
MLS #11-420
M. S. PECORA,
REALTOR
570-455-9463
or Cheryl at
570-436-3790
HUNTINGTON
MILLS
Great Old 80 Acre
Farm, Location Next
to Northwest High
School with approx.
35 acres of fields &
45 acres wooded.
Small pond, barn,
old farmhouse with
out buildings(in poor
condition - little or
no value) plenty of
road frontage.
MLS #13-807
$359,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
570-675-4400
KINGSTON
Great opportunity
for this 2,900 sq. ft.
professional office
building in high traf-
fic area. Last used
as a veterinary clin-
ic, but is easily
adapted for other
uses. See how this
space can be used
for you! Open
entry space, individ-
ual offices, full base-
ment for storage,
central air, and gas
heat. Parking for 12
cars.
MLS-12-416
$339,000
Call Rhea for
details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
341 Wyoming Ave.
3 story Victorian
home located in a
high exposure area.
Has all the lovely
signature wood-
work of a grand
VIctorian of yester-
year! Can be
restored for use as
a residential home
or a landlord invest-
ment. Currently
subdivided into mul-
tiple office spaces
and 2 apartments.
MLS 12-617
$149,000
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
Newly remodeled,
immaculate office
building. 1,600 sq.
ft, central air, plenty
of parking, abun-
dant storage areas,
h a n d i c a p p e d
accessible.
MLS #13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-9333
NANTICOKE
R. 395
E. Washington St.
Nice double block.
Two bedrooms
each side. Sepa-
rate heat & electric.
Close to College.
Affordable @
$49,500
Towne & Country
R.E. Co.
735-8932
or 542-5708
PITTSTON
$115,000
142-144 Carroll St.
Well maintained,
fully rented 4 unit
investment property
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Owner took
good care of this
property. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-4514
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
$129,900
224 William St.
Are you a hair-
dresser or barber?
Need a space for
an in home busi-
ness? This might be
just what you’re
looking for. Well
maintained 4 bed-
room home with
salon (previously a
barber shop for 60
years). Very well
established, high
visibility location
and additional home
with 3 bedrooms
currently rented to
a tenant. Must be
sold as one pack-
age. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-216
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
68 William St.
Great investment
property with 3
units and separate
utilities. Each unit
has 2 entrances
and washer hook
up. Roof is 5 years
old. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON AREA
$134,900
Well established
meat and deli store
with large variety of
specialty items for
sale. Homemade
sausage, porketta-
prosciutto, to men-
tion a few. Owners
will sty on to teach.
give recipes and
contacts. Also a
newly remodeled
apartment above
store and 4 car
garage to help pay
the mortgage.
MLS 13-535
For an appointment
call:
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
PLYMOUTH
$52,900
New Listing! Afford-
able for you!. Set
back off Main st.,
this double block
has had many
updates. Unit #1:
formal dining room
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
and deck. Unit #2:
spacious open floor
plan, large living
room, formal dining
room, genuine
hardwood floors, 4
bedrooms with new
carpeting, 1.5
baths, lots of closet
space and enclosed
balcony.
MLS 13-1176
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SWEET VALLEY
3.8 acres, zoned B2
commercial with
home & pond.
Priced for quick
sale. High traffic
area Located at the
intersection of
Rt. 118 & Main Road.
$89,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a
2 car garage, all
rented. Off street
parking for 8 cars.
Great investment.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established
Italian Restaurant
on the West Side
with seating for 75.
Business only
includes good will,
all furniture and fix-
tures, all kitchen
equipment and
delivery van for
$150,000. Building
sold separately.
Restaurant on 1st
floor and 2 bed-
room luxury apart-
ment on 2nd floor
for $250,000.
www.atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
Everything is Ready!
Just bring your busi-
ness to this great
location with over
15,000 sq. ft. of
parking space. The
building is equipped
for fast food,
restaurant, pizza,
carry-out, etc. Will
rent with option to
buy. Excellent
opportunity for the
right party!
$269,000
Call Ruth
@ 570-696-1195
or 570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan
Group
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
Bear Creek Blvd.
Wonderful opportu-
nity! Beautiful 3.45
acre wooded build-
ing lot for your new
home. 200' front-
age.
MLS #13-157
$39,900
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
DALLAS
Commercial -
Vacant Land
2.12 acres of
commercial land
in a prime Back
Mountain location.
Ideal spot to build
an office or profes-
sional building.
Corner wooded lot.
Water, electric &
gas available to be
run to site. Call
Rhea for details
MLS#12-4281
570-696-6677
$249,900
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR RETIRE-
MENT COMMUNITY
Only eight lots
left. Custom
design you home
the way you want it.
Call 570-675-1300
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
This scenic 2 acre
building lot is perked
and surveyed and
ready for your
dream home. This
building lot package
is $74,000. Located
on Lake Louise Rd.,
within 1/2 mile of
Twin Oak Golf Club.
570-820-5990
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about
5,000’ roadfront on
2 roads. All Wood-
ed. $385,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
SWOYERSVILLE
100 x 150, cleared,
surveyed level
building lot. Utilities
are available.
$24,900.
Call: 570-288-4899
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS TWP.
Campground Road
1 acre with 173’
road frontage.
Base installed for
140’ ft driveway.
Partially cleared,
private lot. close to
schools. Lot will
pass perk test.
Asking $52,000.
570-675-4594.
DRUMS
Build your dream
home on this five
acre wooded
lot off paved
public road. 275’
frontage. Well and
septic needed.
Close to major
highways.
MLS#12-3134
$55,000
Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
DURYEA
LAND
Two parcels being
sold together total-
ing 2.26 acres.
Suitable for any
number of
commercial uses.
$59,900
Call Christine @
332-8832
613-9080
EARTH CONSERVANCY
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
• 61 +/- Acres
Nuangola $88,000
• 46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$69,000
• Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
•Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Acreage Zoned
R-3
• Sugar Notch Lot
$11,800
See Additional
Land for Sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot
with utilities avail-
able. Ideal home
site. Affordable at
$12,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY RE CO
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
HARVEYS LAKE
Don't miss this one!
Partially cleared lot
ready for you to
build your home. It
has the sewer per-
mit already. Waiting
for you to add the
finishing touches to
it. Great price!!
MLS# 13-1291
$9,950
Call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 13-23
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 13-23
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
ATLAS REALTY,
INC.
570-829-6200
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman
Outlet Road. 470’
front, over 1,000’
deep. Wooded.
$125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
WEST PITTSTON
Level building lot.
50’ x 100’. All public
utilities available.
Asking $18.000
570-299-5415
912 Lots & Acreage
LAFLIN
$99,500
2.44 acres of land
zoned R-3 for town-
house or could be
used for single fam-
ily building lots (with
approval). Public
water and sewer
available.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1389
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
MOOSIC
BUILDING LOT
REDUCED
$28,500
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
NANTICOKE
Good Location.
Level building lot
with access to all
utilities. Curbs and
sidewalks in front of
property. Close to
schools &
Community College.
$15,000.
MLS#08-2588
Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100’
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 ‘ frontage
158’ deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
PLAINS TWP.
VACANT LAND
KING OF THE
MOUNTAIN!
Truly a 360 degree
view from the high-
est point of this
property. 48.49
acres to be sold as
one parcel. Build
your dream house
here or buy and
sub-divide. Will
require well and
septic system. Just
minutes from High-
way 315, near the
Casino but very pri-
vate. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4142
Only $149,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre
building lot located
in established back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Buy now and
start building your
dream home in the
spring. Lot has
underground utili-
ties, public sewer
and private well.
MLS #13-137
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of
wooded land and
farmland with barn
in good condition
and a nice travel
trailer. Well on
property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
26 acres of mostly
open land for
a beautiful
homesite near
Shickshinny Lake.
MLS #12-3394
$130,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
To place your
ad call...829-7130
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
CHOICE LOCATION
A most unique &
desirable lakefront
property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a
centrally situated
lot with an
unmatched view of
this beautiful lake.
If you are looking
for that special
building site, this is
it! MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains
Realty
570-256-3343
912 Lots & Acreage
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new
home here. 2 new
developments,
prices range from
$35,000 to
$39,900. Public
water sewer & gas
available. NOT in
flood zone. Lot
sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
570-829-6200
915 Manufactured
Homes
GOULDSBORO
EAGLE LAKE
This is a 2008 Park
Model in beautiful
Eagle Lake. Walk to
the pool, tennis
courts & basketball
courts. This is the
most beautiful
Community in the
Pocono's. Swim in
the huge pool or lay
in the sand at one
of the lake front
beaches.
Call Tom
516-507-9403
570-842-2300
938 Apartments/
Furnished
HARVEYS LAKE
LAKE FRONT
Furnished, 2/2,
Dock/deck. Beautiful
views. $1,500/
month, 1 year lease.
Short Term Available
570-639-1469
PLYMOUTH
APARTMENT
FOR RENT
ALL UTILITIES
INCLUDED!
PLEASE CALL
570-881-0636
WILKES STUDENT
Housing Available.
Fully furnished
move right in, all
utilities included.
3 BEDROOM
AVAILABLE $495
PER STUDENT
Safe, secure pre-
mesis in great
neighborhood. 3
minute walk to
classes.Conve-
nience and living at
it’s best! Parents
encouraged to visit
home. 1 year lease
beginning June 1st.
Security, refer-
ences and parental
co-signer required.
Call 570-592-3113
or email
colleen5@ptd.net
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED
1 BEDROOM
ŠShort or long term
ŠExcellent
Neighborhood
ŠPrivate Tenant
Parking
Š$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St.
Fully furnished,
1 bedroom, All
appliances and
most utilities
included. Secure,
private off street
parking. Historic
building is non
smoking/no pets.
Base rent
$700/mo. Securi-
ty, references
required. View at
houpthouse.com.
570-762-1453
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
AVAILABLE NOW
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Off street
parking. Washer/
dryer hook-up in
basement. Appli-
ances. Bus stop at
the door. Water
Included. $575 +
utilities & security.
No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1st floor,
stove & refrigera-
tor. Washer/dryer
hook up. $500/mo.
+ utilities, security &
references
570-779-1684
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
BACK
MOUNTAIN
Large 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen
with appliances,
tiled bath, deck.
No Pets. $425.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
Available May 1st. 3
bedroom, 2nd floor
of century home in
beautiful area. All
appliances, heat &
gas for dryer includ-
ed. Lease, security
& references re-
quired. No pets.
$800/month.
Call 570-675-2486
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry *Elevator.
*Video Surveilence
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-675-5944
8a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-675-6936,
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
FORTY FORT
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor. Off street
parking. Heat, hot
water & trash
included. Coin op
washer/dryer.
$625/month,
references,
security & lease.
No smoking.
No pets
Available May 1st
Call 570-760-4830
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor apt. Living
room, kitchen, full
bath, heat, hot
water & garbage
fee included. Tenant
pays electric. $575/
month + security.
Call or text
201-304-3469
GLEN LYON
Newly remodeled 1
bedroom. New
kitchen & bath. All
new appliances,
including washer &
dryer. $500 +
utilities. Call
570-881-0320
HANOVER GREEN
Three rooms and
bath. Includes,
stove, wall to wall
carpet, heat, water,
sewage and trash.
$450+security. No
pets, No smoking.
570-829-0854
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK
APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
West End Road
Clean & bright
3 bedroom apart-
ments. Heat, water,
garbage & sewer
included with appli-
ances. Off street
parking. No pets,
non smoking, not
section 8 approved.
References, securi-
ty, first and last
months rent.
$725/month
570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3 bedrooms, 1.5
bath, no pets. $850
+ utilities, 1st month,
last month + securi-
ty deposit.
Call 570-417-3427
HANOVER TWP.
LUXURY
APARTMENT
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
with newly renovat-
ed kitchen, bath.
Master bedroom
with double closets,
large living/dining
room combo. Hard-
wood & tile floors
throughout, wash-
er/dryer. Storage.
off street parking,
with 1 car garage.
Gas heat, all utilities
by tenant. Credit
check required.
$700 + security. Call
Lynda at 262-1196.
HANOVER TWP.
Newly remodeled
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
refrigerator & stove.
All electric. $425/
mo. + utilities & sec-
urity. Call Natalie at
570-357-1138
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
KINGSTON
116 or 118 Main St.
Near Kingston Cor-
ners. 2nd floor,
newly remodeled,
4 rooms, bath, laun-
dry room. Walk up
attic, water, sewer
& parking. No pets.
No smoking. $525 &
$575 + utilities.
570-288-9843
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple Ave.
2 story 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath @
$850. + utilities.
Two story 3 bed-
room, 2.5 baths @
$1,110. + utilities.
Central heat & air,
washer/dryer in
unit, on site park-
ing. 1 mo. security
570-262-6947
PAGE 10D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 PAGE 11D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call
570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen
acres.com
Call today for
move-in
specials.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
•Equipped Kitchen
•Free Cable
•Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1015 Appliance
Service
A.R.T. APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service
all major
brands.
570-639-3001
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Windows and
Doors
ASK HOW A
BUILDING
INDUSTRY
MEMBERSHIP
CAN BENEFIT
YOU.
CALL JANET
570-287-3331
FOR INFO
or go to
www.bianepa.com
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding
Carpentry
40 yrs experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan
570-881-1131
www.davejohnson
remodeling.com
Baths/Kitchens
Carpentry A to Z
570-819-0681
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Home Renovat-
ing. Siding and
More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-237-7318
PA040387
1024 Building &
Remodeling
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Now Offering
Plumbing,
Heating/AC
570-406-6044
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete
& metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
Connie’s Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE!
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
DEB & PAT’S
CLEANING
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-793-4773
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
DEMPSKI
MASONRY
& CONCRETE
Licensed & Insured
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-824-0130
DempskiMasonry.com
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA MASONRY, INC.
Stonework - stucco
- concrete - patios
- pavers - brick -
block - chimneys
www.nepa
masonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,
pavers, retaining
wall systems,
flagstone, brick
work, chimneys
repaired. Senior
Citizen’s Discount
570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool
closing & retain-
ing walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
Demolition, Exca-
vating, Dozing, Dri-
veways. Call Chris
570-574-5018
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
SPRING SALE:
Discounts on wood,
vinyl, chain link,
aluminum and
more! Call today for
a FREE ESTIMATE!
570-602-0432
FREDERICK FENCE CO.
Locally Owned
Vinyl, Chain Link,
Aluminum, Wood.
570-709-3021
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
EVAN’S HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
Lending a hand
since 1975.
570-824-6871
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL PHASE HANDYMAN
SERVICE
You Name It,
We Can Do It!
Over 30 Years
Experience in
General
Construction
Licensed & Insured
570-313-2262
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL.
SPRING CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate
Cleanups, Attics,
Cellars, Yards,
Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
Mike’s $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BAREFOOT
GROUNDS KEEPING
- Grass Cutting,
aerating, fertilizing,
mulching, weeding,
pruning, garden
tilling.
- Painting, fencing,
stonewalls,
power washing.
- Tree and snow
removal.
Fully insured
Credit cards
accepted
Commercial or
Residential
Please contact
Roger:
570-760-7249
email:
schichi@ptd.net
FOLTZ LANDSCAPING
Skid-Steer
Mini Excavating
New Landscapes/
Lawns. Retaining
walls/patios.
Call: 570-760-4814
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
Brizzy’s
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump grinding,
Cabling. Shrub &
hedge sculpting &
trimming. Spring
cleanup, retaining
walls and repair.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
KELLER’S LAWN CARE
SPRING CLEANUP
Landscaping,
mowing, mulching,
trimming, planting.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
NEED HELP NEED HELP
LAWN CUT?
LEAVES RAKED?
GENERAL YARD
WORK?
MULCHING?
Responsible Senior
student.
Mountain Top,
White Haven,
Drums &
Conygham area.
Call Justin
570-868-6134
SPRING CLEAN UPS
•Lawn Cutting
•Shrub Trimming,
•Mulching
•Landscaping
Services
25+ Years Exp.
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
570-287-4780
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping.
Tree pruning. Gar-
den tilling. Spring
Clean Ups. Leaf
removal. Weekly &
bi-weekly lawn
care. Accepting
new customers.
Fully Ins.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
1165 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn
Care Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Mike 570-357-8074
Leave Message
AFFORDABLE
LAWN SERVICES
Greater Pittston
Area. Mowing,
Mulching, Tilling &
Deck Washing.
Call 570-885-5858
or 570-954-0438
for Free Estimate
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD
CARE
Lawns - Shrubs
Tilling - Mulch
Senior Discount
Westside Specials
Family Owned
570-287-3852
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
LOW COST
LAWN CARE SERVICE
Specializing in
grass cutting
rates start at $20
Free Estimates
570-706-5035
MR. TILLER
We Will Till & Fert-
ilize Your Garden
& Flower Beds.
SPRING SPECIAL
Free Garden
Starter Kit With
Every Job!
Call 328-2755
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1183 Masonry
ATIE’S CONSTRUCTION
50 Years Experience
Stone mason, stuc-
co, pre-cast stone,
paving, custom
cover & design.
570-301-8200
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SPRING SPECIAL
$100 + materials for
average size room.
18 years experience
Power washing,
sidewalks & decks,
deck staining.
570-820-7832
Advanced Paint
Company
Expert in
Refinishing,
Exterior Siding of
any kind. You name
it,we know how
to paint it. Water
Blasting, Many
Ideas, Many
Colors, 30 Years
Experience.
570-313-2262
F & F PAINTING
AND CONTRACTING
SERVICES
30 Years
Experience
570-793-7909
JACOBOSKY PAINTING
Need a new look,
or just want to
freshen up your
home or business?
Let us splash your
int./ext. walls with
some vibrant colors!
Reasonable prices
with hard workers.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719
OR
570-704-8530
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
L & F, INC.
Paving, Excavating,
Sealcoating & Con-
crete.
Fully Insured.
Free Estimates.
570-417-5835
1231 Pool & Spa
Repair/Services
RK POOLS & MORE
Pool openings, liner
changes, and
installations. Patios,
Decks and fencing.
Insured.
570-592-2321
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
BK CONSTRUCTION
ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF
RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION
570-760-9065
1252 Roofing &
Siding
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
‘til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
SUMMIT PEAK
ROOFING, INC.
Toll Free:
(855)768-7325.
Shingled roofing,
Rubber roofing,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed and Insured.
24 hour emergency
services.
Spring Special 5%!
www.summit-
peakroofing.com
PA#096716
1297 Tree Care
APEX TREE AND
EARTH
Tree removal
Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain and
Surrounding areas.
570-550-4535
TREE SERVICE
Removal, Trimming,
Stump Grinding,
etc. PA098936
570-574-5018
1336 Window
Cleaning
PJ’s Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun-
room, bath, 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets, built-in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood & car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included. 1
year lease + securi-
ty. $950
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpeted,
entry system.
Garage. Extra stor-
age & cable TV
included. Laundry
facilities. Air Con-
ditioned. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $785 +
utilities. Call.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
First floor, one bed-
room, freshly paint-
ed, new washer and
dryer, off-street
parking, no smoking
or pets. $575+utili-
ties, lease, one
month security
and references.
Call (570) 332-3567
KINGSTON
Nice second floor 2
2 bedroom apart-
ment. Stove,
fridge, washer &
dryer. Lots of stor-
age space. $670.
Heat included. $25
application Fee. Call
570-592-7336
Viewing May 2nd
LAKE SILKWORTH
Newly remodeled, 1
bedroom, 2nd floor,
own deck, all utilities
included except
cooking gas. No
pets. Lake rights,
swimming & boat-
ing. $650/month.
570-477-5001
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on
2 floors. $650/mo.
570-760-0511
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Recently remodeled
1st floor apartment
with 1 bedroom, 1
bath & electric heat.
Off street parking.
No pets. Credit
check & security
deposit required.
$575/month. Call
Nicole Dominick
@570-715-7757
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin laun-
dry, water, sewer &
garbage included.
$495/month +
security & lease.
HUD accepted.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
MOCANAQUA
1 BEDROOM APT.
$425/mo. includes
water & sewer.
(570) 204-5693
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom, all
appliances includ-
ed. No pets, no
smoking. $650/
month + 1st, last &
security.
570-578-8580
NANTICOKE
Heat & water
included. 1 bed
room, 1st floor, off
street parking, coin-
op washer/dryer on
premises, no pets.
$495. Call
570-287-9631 or
570-417-4311
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON LEXINGTON
VILLAGE VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments.
Refrigerator,
stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water & garbage
fees included.
Washer/dryer avail-
able, stove, refrig-
erator, air condi-
tioning. No pets/no
smoking. $525 +
security.
Call 570-542-5610
PARSONS
1 or 2 bedrooms.
Heat and hot water
incl. No pets, no
smoking. $450-
$500 plus electric.
Security deposit,
references required
570-868-6177
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 1 bath,
living room, kitchen,
2nd floor, off street
parking. Clean &
neat. $440/month.
New carpeting
throughout, refriger-
ator & stove includ-
ed. Available 5/1/13.
Call Steve
(570) 468-2488
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 4 rooms &
bath. Washer/dryer
hook up. Heat & hot
water furnished. No
smoking, no pets.
Security & refer-
ences. $695/mo.
570-654-1193
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
stove & refrigerator.
Laundry hook-up.
Heated garage, off
street parking.
Heat, sewer, water
& garbage included.
$695/month + sec-
urity & lease. No
smoking or pets.
570-430-0123
PLAINS
1st floor, 1 bedroom.
total remodel, great
n e i g h b o r h o o d .
Fridge, stove, wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Water & sewer in-
cluded. No smoking.
Security & refer-
ence. $525/month.
Call 570-693-1468
PLAINS
Small 1 bedroom
with a bonus room,
Four rooms. Stove
and refrigerator
included. $450 a
month +security and
references.
(570) 855-6641
(585) 298-3858
PLYMOUTH
Large 1 bedroom
apartment. $500/
month + security
deposit. Heat,
water, sewer, fridge
& range included.
Call Bernie at
ROTHSTEIN REALTORS, INC.
288-7594
SHAVERTOWN
1 bedroom apart-
ment with living
room & kitchen.
Freshly painted &
ready for you to
move in. Utilities
included. One
month security
required. No
smoking or pets.
$750/month.
Call Jolyn @
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan
Group
SHAVERTOWN
One bedroom, living
room & kitchen
apartment. Security
required. No pets.
$500/month + util-
ities. Call
Jolyn Bartoli
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
SWOYERSVILLE
1st floor, 5 rooms +
basement cozy 1
bedroom, newly
remodeled eat in
kitchen, all appli-
ances shared wash-
er/dryer or hook up.
Very energy effi-
cient, Utilities by
tenant Safe location,
off street
parking. Non-smok-
ing, No pets. 1 year
lease/security. $500
(267) 872 4825
SWOYERSVILLE
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor. Heat included,
appliances & wash-
er dryer included.
$675/mo.
MINERS MILLS: 2
bedrooms. No utili-
ties. Appliances,
Washer/dryer hook-
up. $575/mo.
Both ready May 1.
Prefer no pets.
Jim 570.392.9434
W-B/
PLAINS AREA
BUS STOP/
STORES
BRICK DUPLEX
BRAND NEW -
CLEAN. 2nd
floor. 1 bedroom
remodeled!
Maple kitchen,
built-ins, porch,
tiled bath, laun-
dry. Convenient
neighborhood.
BUS STOP MINI
MART & MORE!
Managed. $550
+ utilities. No
Pets. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT.
APPLICATION,
EMPLOYMENT
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor, finished attic.
$600/month
+ utilities.
570-299-5471
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, washer/dryer,
fridge and stove,
dishwasher, central
air, electric heat, no
pets, $600 Call John
570-654-1909
WEST PITTSTON
BALTIMORE AVE
2nd floor. 1 bed-
room, living room,
dining room, kitchen
washer/ dryer hook-
up. Stove, fridge, no
pets, no smoking.
References. Off
street parking. $550
& utilities, 1st & last
month rent + securi-
ty. 1 year lease.
WYOMING AVE
2nd floor. 1 bedroom
Includes stove &
refrigerator. $600
month includes heat
& water. Off street
parking. No pets, no
smoking. 1st & last
month rent + securi-
ty. 1 year lease.
570-655-9325
WEST PITTSTON
Charming, spacious
clean 1.5 bedroom.
Washer/dryer
hookup. Front
porch, off street
parking. Quiet
neighborhood.
No pets. $625/mo.
includes water.
570-693-2148 or
570-654-6537
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
Second floor, 1 bed-
room 1 bath, very
nice. Gas heat, all
appliances, washer
& dryer, three sea-
son porch, off street
parking. Nice neigh-
borhood. No Pets.
$565/month+utili-
ties, security and
references.
570-954-2972
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
* WILKES-BARRE *
1 or 2 bedroom.
Heat & hot water
included. Rent
based on income.
Call 570-472-9118
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, recently
refurbished,
separate kitchen/
living room, tenant
pays utilities.
$465/480 +
security. Call
570-401-9124
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom apart-
ment. 1 bath. Eat in
kitchen. Closed in
terrace. Full usable
attic. $625 + utilities
& security.
Call: 718-809-3338
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartment near
General Hospital.
No Pets. $525 +
utilities, first, last +
security deposit.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St.
1.5 bedrooms, new-
ly renovated build-
ing. Washer & dryer
available. $650/mo.
includes heat, hot
water & parking.
646-712-1286
WILKES-BARRE
PARK AVENUE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom.
Water included.
$500 + utilities,
security & lease. No
pets. 570-472-9494
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
1 bedroom - $450.
2 bedroom - $550.
Water & sewer paid
1 month security
deposit. Email
obscuroknows@
hotmail.com or Call
570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to
schedule an
appointment
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, 2nd floor
apartment. 1 bed-
room. Heat & hot
water included. No
smoking. No pets.
$500 + security. Call
570-823-6829
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included.
1 Bedroom$550
2 Bedroom$650.
Call Jazmin
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 + tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 2nd Floor
$540 + utilities.
Security, Refer-
ences, Background
check.
570-332-8792
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIVERSITY
CAMPUS
Studio 1, 2, 3 or 4
bedrooms, starting
at $425. All utilities
included.
570-826-1934
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor, recently
remodeled. Washer
& dryer hookup. Off
street parking. No
pets. $550/mo.
includes water &
sewer.
570-714-7272
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 bedroom
water included
Š2 bedroom
water included
Š3 bedroom
single
HANOVER
Š2 bedroom 1/2
double.
Š3 bedroom
single
Š4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
Š2 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
ŠLarge 1 bed
room water
included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 12D TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom.
Wall to wall carpet.
Some utilities by
tenant. No pets.
Non-smoking. Eld-
erly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
WYOMING
TOWNHOUSE
TYPE
APARTMENT
Carpet, tile bath,
new appliances,
washer/dryer,
hook up, sewer,
parking by front
door. $650 + util-
ities, security &
lease. No smok-
ing, no pets.
570-693-0695
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
EXETER
OFFICE SPACE
Newly remodeled
120 sq. ft. All
utilities included,
except phone.
$250/month.
Lease. Call
570-602-1550
GLEN LYON GARAGE
3 bay garage, new
roof & new garage
doors. Over 1,200
sq. ft. $395/month.
Call 570-881-0320
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue,
Various sized
spaces available;
500 sq. ft. to
1,500. sq. ft.
570-696-1600
LAFLIN
GYM FOR RENT
Set up as a full
court basketball
court with hard-
wood floors, men’s
& ladies room and
changing room.
Could be put to any
related use ie: fit-
ness gym, basket-
ball camp or any-
thing that requires a
large open space.
Lots of free parking,
heat and utilities
are included. Rent
is is $3,000 per
month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
3,000 square feet.
Suitable for many
businesses. Plen-
ty of Parking
$600/month + secu-
rity. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for
rent on the Pittston
By-Pass. Highly vis-
ible location with
plenty of parking.
$1,800 sq. ft. of
beautifully finished
space can be used
for any type office
use. $1,750/ mo.
plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW LISTING
Busy, high visibility
location. Body
shop, garage, car
lot. Situated on
over 1 acre with
9,000 sq. ft. of
Commercial Space.
$389,900
Call Joe
613-9080
613-9080
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
WAREHOUSE/
OFFICE SPACE
5,000 sq. ft. with
parking lot. Office,
1,000 sq. ft. with
2,000 sq. ft. ware-
house. Off I-81,
Exit 165. Call
570-823-1719
Mon. through Fri.
7 am to 3 pm.
WILKES-BARRE
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES YOU’LL
EVER SEE!
Warehouse, light
manufacturing. Gas
heat, sprinklers,
overhead doors,
parking for 30 cars.
Yes, that $1
sq. ft. lease!
We have 9,000
sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 32,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing
this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Zoned M-3 for
manufacturing,
warehouse storage.
Electric, gas heat,
sprinkler. HE light-
ing, 21’ ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided.
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
WILKES-BARRE/
PLAINS TWP.
WAREHOUSE
LAIRD STREET
COMPLEX,
Easy interstate
access.
Lease 132,500 s.f.,
will subdivide, 12
loading docks, 30ft.
ceilings, sprinkler,
acres of parking.
Offices available.
Call 570-655-9732,
X312
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
1/2 double, 3 bed-
rooms, modern,
new paint and car-
pet. $550 + utilities.
security, references
lease. No pets. 570-
332-1216/592-1328
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom, 6
rooms. Off street
parking. Stove,
fridge, washer &
dryer. All gas. Mod-
ernized. No dogs.
$600 + utilities.
570-417-5441
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
HALF-DOUBLE
6 rooms. Newer gas
stove and newer
refrigerator. All win-
dows are vinyl ther-
mal pane. Steel
insulated entry
doors with dead
bolts. Located on
small quiet lane. Off
street parking.
Lease. $525 month-
ly + utilities. Refer-
ences checked.
(570) 650-3803
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom, deck,
water view. $650/
month.
(703)583-5067
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
1/2 double. Living
room, dining room,
eat-kitchen off
street parking. No
smoking, no pets. 1
year lease. $750.
month + security.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1.5
bath, large kitchen,
dining & living
rooms. Newly paint-
ed, gas heat. Close
to shopping center.
$750/month + utili-
ties & security.
570-288-0510
NANTICOKE
HALF-DOUBLE
Two bedrooms,
new paint. Stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer included.
NO Pets. $560
/month + security +
utilities. References
& credit check.
570-239-5322
NANTICOKE
Large 3 bedroom
with 2 full baths,
includes Stove,
Fridge, Washer &
Dryer. Sewer and
garbage also includ-
ed. $750. a month.
$40 application fee.
570-736-6068
PLAINS
LUXURY DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities in-
clude: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Tile bath,
stacked wash-
er/dryer. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
“Must See!” $1,000
+ utilities, lease &
security. NO PETS,
NO SMOKING
570-793-6294
WEST PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 2 bath
$680/mo. Wyoming
area School.
Jerry 570-891-0988
or 570-656-8406
950 Half Doubles
PLAINS TWP.
(1.5 miles North
of Casino)
2 bedroom, 1/2
double, includes
modern kitchen,
bath and living
room. Plenty of off
street parking and
large yard.
$550/mo + utilities.
NO PETS. 1 year
lease & security
Call Charlie
570-829-1578
PLAINS TWP.
Large 1/2 double.
Two large bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room (used to be
3rd bedroom), large
3 car wide drive-
way, 1 1/2 bath.
$650. month. Call
Jeff 215 356-2338.
WILKES-BARRE
Totally renovated 8
room apartment
includes two bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
laundry room, new
spacious backyard
deck. New gas
heating system.
Beautiful kitchen
cabinets, wall to
wall carpeting, cer-
amic floors, new
windows, draperies,
blinds. Washer/dry-
er, refrigerator, con-
vection oven, build
in microwave &
snack bar with
stools. Exterior of
dwelling and other
unit still under reno-
vation. Walking dis-
tance to King’s Col-
lege/Public square.
No smoking.
$750/month + utili-
ties & security.
(570)762-8265
WYOMING
6 rooms completely
remodeled. Fenced
yard, gas heat.$675
FORTY FORT
5 rooms, complete-
ly remodeled. $675
+ utilities. No pets,
no smoking.
570-693-3104
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
DORRANCE TOWNSHIP
Crestwood School,
7 minutes to 81. 3-4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, with an
above ground pool.
$1,200/month, first
and last months
rent+security. Credit
and background
checks. Pets con-
sidered. Call Diane,
570-239-9633
LARKSVILLE
PACE STREET
Single family home
with five rooms, 2+
bedrooms & 1 bath.
Dining room, deck &
yard. Pets allowed.
$760/month + utili-
ties. Call
Barbara Mark
696-5414
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
LUZERNE/KINGSTON
3 bedroom, gas
heat, stove and
washer included.
New rugs, yard, no
pets. $750 plus utili-
ties and security
570-430-7901
MOUNTAIN TOP
Completely remod-
eled mobile home.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
attached laundry
room. New rugs, all
new energy efficient
windows, new gas
range.Tile floor in
kitchen, bath & laun-
dry room. Located 3
miles from 81. Pri-
vate setting on 2.5
acres of land. Rap
around porch 1 car
garage. No smoking
no pets. $850/
month + utilities &
security.
570-868-5527
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
MOUNTAINTOP
Private setting, 3
bedroom, 2 bath-
room home. Hard-
wood floors, area
rugs, large kitchen,
dishwasher, stove
and refrigerator .
Office and second
floor bonus areas.
Laundry hook up in
basement, sewer
and water included.
Minimum outside
maintenance. No
Smoking, No Pets.
$1,250/month and
security, Lease and
background
check required.
Available Immediately
570-678-5850
MOUNTAIN TOP
Recently remodeled
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths,
washer/dryer. Full
unfinished base-
ment with work-
shop. Gas heat. No
smoking. No pets.
Credit check &
security deposit
required. 1 year
lease. $1,150/
month. Call
Nicole Dominick
570-715-7757
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 5 room
2 bedroom, car-
peting, hookups,
yard, electric heat.
$525 + utilities.
No pets. 868-4444
953Houses for Rent
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful, meticu-
lous contemporary
1 bedroom. Gas
heat, air, fully
furnished, fireplace,
hardwood & tile
flooring, carpeting.
Carport & lovely
garden. Most
utilities included.
$975/month.
570-881-0320
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom single
family home in
quiet neighbor-
hood with great
neighbors. 1 ½
bath, gas heat, air
conditioning, hard-
wood floors and
carpeting. Drive-
way with 2 car
garage. Large
yard with privacy
fence, shed,
above-ground pool
and swing set.
$950. per month
plus security and
utilities. Please call
570-333-4700 or
570-592-3420
WYOMING
FULLY FURNISHED
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
super clean
Cape Cod home.
$850/month + utili-
ties, 1 year lease.
No pets/smokers.
570-212-0432
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
965 Roommate
Wanted
NANTICOKE
Utilities included.
2nd floor bedroom.
$400 per month
references and
security deposit.
570-574-7145
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Summer
Home. Starting June
to end of August.
College students
welcome in Sept.
Lake rights. Call for
details.
570-639-5041
PRIVATE COUNTRY
CAMPGROUND
Several sites avail-
able, and will be
accepting applica-
tions for member-
ship. Gated Premis-
es, adjoins public
gulf course, 35
acre natural lake for
fishing. Large shad-
ed sites, with water
and electric, show-
ers and flush toilets.
Nestled near
orchards and
produce farms in
the hills between
Dallas and Tunkhan-
nock. For informa-
tion and applica-
tions call:
Call (570)-371-9770
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
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