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Jacksonville Review Page 2 May 2013
740 E. C alifornia, Jac ks onville
$279,900
3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths
1870 S quare Feet • .35 Ac res
Private s etting. S late Floor.
Water feature. Overs ized 2 c ar
garage RV Parking. In- ground pool
3650 Ros s L n C entral Point
$479,000
4 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
3000 S quare Feet • 2.910 Ac res
Gated Drive
In- ground pool add Tennis C ourt,
Pond & privac y
352 Martone Pl. Jac ks onville
$989,500
3 Bedroom • 2F 2 H Baths
4601 S quare Feet • 5.12 Ac res
Hilltop views of Jac ks onville.
Gormet Kitc hen, breakfas t room,
Balc ony, 6 c ar garage, rec room.
8150 Old S tage Rd
C entral Point
$429,000
4 Bedrooms • 3 Baths
2690 S quare Feet • 2.49 Ac res
Gated drive, s hop, s torage
3 C ar Gar, lots of extras
6251 Ventura L n,
C entral Point
$279,000
3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
2192 S quare Feet • 2.32 Ac res
C ountry S etting, Amazing Views
Bring your hors es .
675 S . Oregon S t. Jac ks onville
$859,900
6 Bedroom • 4 Baths
4389 S quare Feet • .85 Ac res
Main home plus C arraige Hous e.
Outdoor kitc hen, hot tub & s ports
c ourt. C los e to Britt Fes tival.
760 L aurel L n, Jac ks onville
$529,000
4 Bedrooms • 3 Baths
3389 S quare Feet
Gary S haw C us tom Home
Near Woodland J'ville Hiking Trail
& Britt. Butlers Pantry, Gues t S uite
11847 Upper Applegate Rd
Applegate
$449,900
3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
2420 S quare Feet • 5.09 Ac res
Vaulted C eilings , Gas Fireplac e
Finis hed Garage & Works hop
"Finding YOU & your family & friends the right property at the right price."
#1 Real Estate
Broker in
Southern Oregon
for John L Scott
2010, 2011 & 2012
Doug Morse April 2013:Doug Morse April 4/22/13 11:43 AM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 3 May 2013
I
t’s hard to imagine
that pioneer-vintner
Peter Brit dreamed
Jacksonville would be
considered the “heart of
Southern Oregon wine
country” 150 after he
planted the frst grapes
here. In the early 1850’s,
Brit did just that and test-
planted fve acres around
his hillside home to 200
grape varietals, some sold
as table grapes, others
to produce wine. Forty
years later, more than 100 acres in Jacksonville had been
planted by more than a dozen growers. Had it not been
for Prohibition destroying the wine industry in 1916, it's
likely the region would have become world-famous for
its wines rather than its pears!
Today, modern-day Jacksonville rests in the middle of
150 vineyards and tasting rooms that stretch from Roxy
Ann peak in the East Medford hills to the Applegate
Valley Wine Trail to the west. There are dozens more
doting hillsides and slopes from Gold Hill to Ashland
with more to come.
To help celebrate what Brit started, a host of wine-
related headliner events await, including the Applegate
UnCorked Barrel Tour on May 19 and Roam the Rogue
on May 25. This month kicks-of high-season for our
wine industry, now an economic driver for Southern
Oregon that is changing the local landscape, both socially
and economically. On that note, please read about a new
winery consortium on page 7—JOWA—the Jacksonville
Oregon Wineries Association, formed to promote six in-
town tasting rooms.
Speaking of tasting rooms…the Review has moved
its ofce to 220 E. California Street—the former home
of the Umpqua Tasting Room, next door to the McCully
House. Shortly after the owners of the UTR purchased
the Gelateria building up the street and relocated the
tasting room, we moved in and got to work bringing
you all the news and happenings in Our Small Town
with Big Atmoshere!
by Whitman Parker, Publisher My View
Publishers:
Whitman & Jo Parker
Print Layout & Design:
Andrea Yancey
Mail: PO Box 1114
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Visit: 220 E. California Street
(next to McCully House)
541-899-9500 Ofce
541-601-1878 Cell
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
production@jacksonvillereview.com
Website & Kiosk: Jo Parker
jo@jacksonvillereview.com
Te Review is printed locally
by Valley Web Printing
Jacksonville Publishing LLC
JacksonvilleReview.com
Advertising available!
Contact us for rates
and options.
The way wine
counTry should be.
simple & auThenTic
SOUTHERN OREGON WINERY TOURS
541.476.wine
or
1.855.550.wine
winehopperTours.com
Tours deparT daily from
ashland, medford & Jacksonville

WE ARE A 100% OREGON COMPANY
rw_WH_Jacksonville_686x5.indd 1 2/19/13 2:31 PM

Spring Time at Daisy Creek
We’re open for patio tasting beginning
May 1. Wednesday through Sunday.
Noon to 5:00 pm.


| 541-899-8329
675 SHAFER LANE, JACKSONVILLE
970 Old Stage Road | Jville
541- 499- 0449
Just One Mile North of the
Jacksonville Post Ofce.
• Taste the award winning
wines, love the Alpacas!
• Live music Sundays
• Hours: Thurs - Mon 12pm
to 5pm. Closed Tues & Wed.
• Shop our country store:
alpaca fber, sweaters, hats,
gloves, scarves, jewelry,
hand spun yarns
and Alpaca Farm
Assorted Cheeses, Crackers,
Meats and Olives
Snack Plates
On Our Cover
Jacksonville
photographer David
“Billy Goat” Gibb
climbed to new career
heights to capture
this stunning cover
image taken at Serra
Vineyards in the
Applegate Valley.
The image was taken
in mid-April at Serra
Vineyards using a
Nikon d700 with a
70-200 mm f2.8 Nikkor
Lens with a shuter
speed 1/250th.
Jacksonville Review Page 4 May 2013

Experience
Red Lily Vineyards
Award-winning wines & beautifully
landscaped grounds along the scenic
Applegate River
May at Red Lily:
Sunday, May 5th - Cinco de Mayo party
Sunday, May 12th - Mother’s Day brunch
Sunday, May 19th - Spring UnCorked!
Call us for more information
11777 Hwy 238, Applegate, 12 miles
West of Jacksonville
(541) 846.6800
Photo by Jim Craven
Open Daily, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Jacksonville Garden Club Sale
is Mother's Day Weekend
This year, the Jacksonville Garden Club’s
28th-Annual Flower and Bake Sale is on
Friday, May 10, and Saturday, May 11, from
10:00am-2:00pm. Get set for Mother’s Day
with beautiful bouquets and arrangements
created from fresh-cut local fowers, or pick
out a unique poted plant.
Home-baked goodies,
cookies, brownies, pies,
scones, and cakes will also
be ofered for sale— an easy
way to have some delicious
treats for the weekend.
There are a few changes
this year: the sale will
be held on two days
instead of one, and the
location has been moved
to the area next to the
Post Ofce for both days.
Small plant starts will
not be sold, as they are
readily available in other locations, but
some interesting poted plants will be for
sale to help round-out your garden.
Money raised from Garden Club
activities provides scholarships at the
Oregon Stewardship and at Rogue
Community College. Jennifer Wheatley,
the Executive Director of the Rogue
Community College Foundation says,
“The recipients of the Jacksonville Garden
Scholarship will likely move on to careers
that not only increase the economic
vitality of our region, but also serve to
protect and maintain the natural beauty
of Southern Oregon in the years to come."
Carla Hutchins at the Oregon
Stewardship notes,
“Each year, the
Jacksonville Garden
Club partners with
Oregon Stewardship in
providing a scholarship
to a South Medford
High student who
plans to study science
or the environment.
Additionally, the funds
support our operating
expenses so that we can
continue mentoring
local high school
students. We appreciate
this very much as it directly helps our
small nonproft continue its work." The
Jacksonville Garden Club funds and
supports local beautifcation projects at
Peter Brit Gardens, Doc Grifn Park and
Jacksonville Post Ofce.
For more information about the Spring Sale
or Jacksonville Garden Club events, please
contact President Susan Casaleggio
at 541-899-2029.
Garden Club members Jeanena
Whitewilson and Petra Irwin
Goodbye grey
skies, hello sunshine!
Frau Kemmling
Schoolhaus
Brewhaus is hosting
the 3rd annual
celebration of Spring
on Sunday, May 5th
from 11:00am-5:00pm
at the Bigham Knoll
Campus. Come
help roll out new
Spring beers, enjoy
bratwurst, sauerkraut,
giant pretels and
good times!
“Maifest” is a German tradition which
involves the entire family. Jacksonville’s
early pioneers gathered friends, family,
food and music together in Maifest
celebrations. The Jacksonville Maifest
celebration was traditionally a fun-flled
event for Jacksonville school kids with
the highlight of dancing to “Oompah”
sounds played by the ofcial Jacksonville
Silver Coronet band around the Maypole.
New this year will be Polka lessons in
addition to the German Sauerkraut
Band playing the ever popular
Chicken Dance!
For the kids, the day will
include Maypole dancing, and
rides on the popular "Cow Train."
All entertainment is free. For more
information, please call 541-899-1000.
See ad on page 12.
German Restaurant to Host Family Fun
at Maifest on May 5th
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 5 May 2013
Spring Barrel of Fun for Applegate Winery Fans
O
n Sunday, May 19, join the Applegate Valley
vintners for their Spring UnCorked Barrel
Tour. This is another not-to-be-missed day of
fun for wine and food lovers, featuring wine and food
pairings at 17 Applegate Valley wineries. Tickets are only
$39 and include a commemorative wine glass, tastings
and food. Several wineries will also feature live music
and demonstrations related to winemaking! As always,
DD’s (Designated Drivers) atend for free and may
partake in all food oferings as well as complimentary
soft drinks and water along the way.
The growing list of wineries west of Jacksonville,
known collectively as AVOVA—Applegate Valley
Oregon Vintners Association—holds fall and spring
barrel tours, ofering a fun and relaxed chance to taste
wines directly from the barrel before they are botled and
purchased by the public. The wines are carefully chosen
by each winery, as are each of the delectable homemade
foods paired with the wines. The self-guided and self-
paced tour kicks-of at 11:00am and runs until 5:00pm.
This year, Serra Vineyards will be a popular tour
stop for those wishing to get a frst look at the newest
tasting room to open in the valley. Serra is located at
222 Missouri Flat Road, near other popular wineries
including Troon Vineyard, Schmidt Family Vineyards,
Rossella’s and Wooldridge Creek. Completed this
April, the 3500 square foot building was designed to
incorporate all aspects of the tasting experience. The
eco-friendly building ofers some of the most incredible
views of the Applegate Valley from inside the tasting
room and from a magnum-sized party deck. Serra
Vineyards was the former home of Applegate Red,
owned and farmed by legendary winemaker Frank
Ferreira who passed away in 2009. Today, Ferreira’s
original tasting room which resembles more of a snack-
shack, remains on the property in the shadow of the
new tasting room. Going forward, it will be used as an
ancillary tasting location and marketplace.
Today, Jacksonville residents Scot and Krissa
Fernandes own the 75-acre property which includes the
vineyard, winery and tasting room. Since purchasing the
vineyard, which Ferreira had planted to Syrah, Cabernet
Sauvignon, Cabernet-Franc and Merlot, Scot and Krissa
have planted 15 new acres to Tempranillo and Malbec.
The tasting room is managed by Liz Wan, who doubles
as Serra’s marketing director. Wan, who’s a major
marketing force behind the Southern Oregon wine region,
has worked on the World of Wine event in Jacksonville
and the Rogue Valley Wine and Food event and others.
Scot Fernandes notes, “The new facility was designed
and conceptualized by our family to reduce the potential
negative environmental impact of a winery building
on the landscape. We maximized efciency of "Green
Building" applications everywhere we could.”
The new facility includes an outdoor crush pad, an
indoor tank room and production area, barrel room,
kitchen, laboratory, tasting room and ofces—all
fabricated and manufactured with American steel, 89%
of which was recycled and repurposed steel. Scot adds,
“We also designed it with slope and position of the roof
to maximize the future installation of solar panels to take
advantage of the abundant Applegate Valley sunshine.”
In addition to Serra’s new digs, UnCorked guests
will most likely get a glimpse of the new Wine Hopper
van as it jets 15 guests from winery to winery during
the day. The shiny black touring van is a new Mercedes
Benz Sprinter Van, ofering its passengers unparalleled
comfort. Wine Hopper owner Brad Niva says the
company now ofers daily tours of the Applegate wine
region with pick-up/drop-of locations in Medford,
Ashland and Jacksonville. In Jacksonville, the Wine
Hopper will meet guests every day at the corner of
California and 3rd Streets at the Beekman Bank. After
hours, on certain days of the week, the van is also
available to rent for private tours to any of the region’s 127
vineyards and 40+ tasting rooms… for birthday parties,
anniversary celebrations and other special occasions.
Reach Wine Hopper at (541-476-WINE or winehoppertours.
com) and see their ad on page 3 of this issue.
Tickets for UnCorked are only $39 and are only sold
online at applegatewinetrail.com. After logging-on, you
may purchase tickets and select one of 7 wineries to start
your self-guided and self-paced tour. Cheers!
Photo: © David Gibb Photography & Design
The Academy of Wine
Mahi-mahi topped with southwest corn salsa with
caper beurre blanc with 2008 Chardonnay
Barrel Tasting 2010 Claret
Bridgeview Winery
Mini strawberry cheesecake bites paired with new
sweet “Blue Moon” Riesling
Cowhorn Vineyard
Mango and blue cheese crepes with 2012
Sauvignon Blanc
Barrel Tasting 2009 Syrah
Cricket Hill Winery
Vertical tasting featuring 2006 Merlot with food pairings.
Special Event with a Barrel Tasting of 2007 Merlot
demonstrating an educational view of vintage year
differences.
Devitt Winery
Chocolate chipotle cake pops paired with 2006
Cabernet Sauvignon
Barrel sample 2007 Merlot, Steelhead Run
Fiasco Winery & Grapevine Gourmet Featuring
Chef Jesse Sword cooking
Wild mushroom pancetta with asiago cheese
bruschetta with Fattoria Rosso wine
Barrel Tasting Zinfandel
Special event: We are serving dinner from 5:00pm-
7:30pm with live music from 3:00pm-6:30pm
John Michael Champagne Cellars
Gorgonzola polenta and herb- infused virgin olive oils
with fresh baguette with Paris Pinot
Barrel Tasting Claret
LongSword Vineyard
Decadent 3-Cheese Macaroni with 2007 Lorelli
Gewürztraminer
Barrel Tasting 2012 “Phrase” Pinot Noir
Plaisance Ranch
Presentation: “The Three Smells of Wine.”
French Onion Casserole & Osso Bucco paired with
2010 Syrah
Red Lily Vineyard
Manchego Cheese and Quince Crostini (by C Street
Bistro) with 2007 Tempranillo
Barrel Tasting 2011 Red Lily Tempranillo
Rosella’s Winery
Mini Beef Wellington's by Mena’s Catering with
vegetarian option cream of wild mushroom soup with
2011 Merlot
Barrel Tasting 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon

Schmidt Family Vineyards
Flatbread with goat cheese, arugula, and prosciutto
with 2010 Sauvignon Blanc
Barrel Tasting 2011 and 2012 Merlot
Serra Vineyards
Rocky Tonk St. Louis Cut Pork Rib with 2012 Rosa Marie
Barrel Tasting 2012 Serendipity
Soloro Vineyard
Frittata and Ham Cups with Olive Tapenade with 2011
Thunder Egg Cut (Marsanne/Roussanne) plus Cheesy
Corn Dish and other special treats
Barrel Tasting 2012 Viognier
Troon Vineyard
Duck comft cigars with caramelized fruit reduction
with 2010 Old Vine Meritage
Barrel Tasting 2012 Chardonnay
Valley View Vineyard
Feature wine 2006 Cabernet Sauvignon Anna Maria
Barrel Tasting 2011 Tempranillo
Wooldridge Creek
House-made focaccia with goat cheese and fgs with
2012 Viognier
Barrel Tasting 2010 Warrick Red Reserve
May 2013 UnCorked Barrel Tour – Food & Wine Pairings
Jacksonville Review Page 6 May 2013
News From Britt Hill by
Donna Briggs, Britt Executive Director
Britt Does More Than J ust Offer
Summer Concerts
I
n 2010, Rachel
Jones joined
the Brit team
as Director of Education & Community
Engagement. Having come to Brit from
Wolf Trap’s award-winning education
department, she has brought signifcant
skills and visionary leadership to her role.
We now ofer internships in marketing,
development, production, social media,
digital media, and event planning. Brit
Festivals provides professional development
opportunities for interns, including
guest speakers, tours of our performance
facilities, and feld trips to other local arts
organizations. Our program is designed to
bridge the gap between the student and the
working professional by giving interns the
tools to become valuable employees in the
work-force. We ofer paid internships during
the summer and unpaid internships in the
of season, all of which last 10-12 weeks.
At any given time, the program
serves up to nine interns a
season, and the program serves
the Brit Festivals administration
staf by providing help,
perspective and community
engagement. The program is
going on its third year, and has
shown rapid growth.
Since 1999, Brit’s education
department has been providing
Music in the Mornings (MIM).
MIM serves over 26,000 students at 95
elementary schools in Jackson, Josephine,
Klamath, Douglas and Siskiyou counties
on a daily basis. This program helps
children learn about composers, musical
styles and major musical works; they
learn to hear the power and beauty of
music for themselves. For fve minutes
every day, a selection of classical music
is played over the school's PA system
with an informative introduction read
beforehand. The introduction gives some
historical background on the composer
and the piece. The same work is heard
for fve days in a row, with a slightly
diferent introduction each day. This
reinforces both recognition of the piece and
the information surrounding it. Brit has
recently put together a working group to
address the program’s future. The working
group consists of education specialists
from Southern Oregon University, primary
school music educators, representatives
from partnering arts organizations and
Brit staf members. The working group
will focus on prioritizing ways to maximize
efective usage of the program and beter
incorporate the program into each school’s
curriculum. The overall objective of the
working group is to develop an updated
program for the 2014-2015 school year. We
will keep you posted on our work.
Brit’s summer camps have also expanded
under Rachel’s leadership. This year we will
be ofering the third annual Brit Rock Camp,
a new classically-focused improvisatory
workshop, Project: Beyond the Page with
Project Trio, and Brit’s Ukulele Getaway.
The Rock Camp (June 17-22) is open to
regional musicians between the ages of 13
and 18, and is designed to foster creative
expression, community and collaboration,
while providing an entry point to
the arts for middle and high school
students. Participants will gain hands-on,
professional instruction on vocals, electric
guitar, electric bass, drums and keyboards
from Raining Jane, a female rock band
from Los Angeles. Students
also atend Brit Festivals
concerts and have the
opportunity to participate
in special sessions with
touring artists performing at
Brit during camp week.
Ukulele Getaway (July 5-7)
participants of all ages (age
6 through adult) will join
a stellar faculty and fellow
uke-thusiasts for three days of
happy music that will feel like a vacation—
without even leaving the Rogue Valley! With
workshops for beginning, intermediate and
advanced players, participants will fnger-
pick, strum, sing (not required!), write, jam
and, most of all, make music. Instructors
will facilitate the exploration of Hawaiian,
bluegrass, country, rock, pop, jazz and
everything in-between.
Project: Beyond the Page will take place
during our Classical Festival (August 12-17)
and serves students playing any orchestral
or band instrument. The camp will place an
emphasis on composition, memorization,
performance and extended techniques.
Featuring the innovative chamber ensemble
PROJECT: Trio as resident faculty, this
unique summer learning experience will
focus on Modern Chamber Music, using the
faculty's F.I.R.E. Technique (Fundamentals
of Improvisation, Rhythm and Ensemble).
For information on these camps or any of
our education programs, please contact Rachel
Jones, Director of Education and Community
Engagement at rachel.jones@britfest.org or
visit our website at www.britfest.org.
Rachel Jones
JUN 8 A Taste of Summer
JUN 15 Cyndi Lauper: She’s So Unusual Tour / Hunter Valentine
JUN 24 Grace Potter & The Nocturnals / Special Guest TBA
JUN 25 An Evening with Steve Miller Band
JUN 28 John Prine / Carrie Rodriguez
JUN 29 Ziggy Marley / Special Guest TBA
JUN 30 The Music of ABBA: Arrival from Sweden
JUL 5 John Hiatt & The Combo / Mavis Staples
JUL 6 Michael Franti & Spearhead - Family Matinee
JUL 6 Michael Franti & Spearhead / Special Guest TBA
JUL 7 Rodrigo y Gabriela / Special Guest TBA
JUL 11 Kenny Loggins / Blue Sky Riders
JUL 16 An Evening with Pink Martini with singer Storm Large
JUL 17 Scotty McCreery / Special Guest TBA
JUL 18 Best of Britt Beneft / Michael Kaeshammer
JUL 19 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy / Special Guest TBA
JUL 21 Amy Grant / Brandon Heath
JUL 24 Jeff Bridges & The Abiders / Jessie Bridges
JUL 25 Billy Currington / Special Guest TBA
AUG 2 Mei-Ann Chen / Jon Kimura Parker / Britt Orchestra
AUG 3 Mei-Ann Chen / Ian Parker / Britt Orchestra
AUG 9 Teddy Abrams / Yuja Wang / Britt Orchestra
AUG 10 Teddy Abrams / Augustin Hadelich / Britt Orchestra
AUG 16 David Danzmayr / Lisa Smirnova / Britt Orchestra
AUG 17 David Danzmayr / Jennifer Koh / Britt Orchestra
AUG 18 Symphony Pops / Project Trio / Britt Orchestra
AUG 20 Rebelution / Matisyahu / Collie Buddz / 4th act TBD
AUG 21 Brandi Carlile / Special Guest TBA
AUG 23 Regeneration Tour 2013: The Human League,
Erasure’s Andy Bell and Howard Jones
AUG 27 Chris Isaak / Special Guest TBA
AUG 30 Tegan & Sara / Special Guest TBA
SEP 1 Martina McBride / Special Guest TBA
SEP 5 The Doobie Brothers / Special Guest TBA
SEP 8 Dennis Miller / Special Guest TBA
SEP 13 REO Speedwagon / Special Guest TBA
SEP 14 Jake Shimabukuro / Jeff Pevar
Robert Plant presents
The Sensational Space Shifters JUL 2
TICKETS ON SALE MAY 16
www.brittfest.org
541-773-6077 • 216 W. Main St., Medford
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Jacksonville
Sally April 2013:Sally April 4/16/13 3:15 PM Page 1
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 7 May 2013
HWY
238
Oregon St.
Caprice
Vineyards
1 mile
1 mile
DANCIN
Vineyards
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Daisy Creek
Vineyards
Quady
North
Umpqua Valley Wine
Tasting Room
3rd St.
South Stage
Cellars
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For the last ten years, Jacksonville
residents Mike and Gail Haley have
invited pilots from around the world to
participate in one of the most respected
and exciting paragliding competitions:
“The Rat Race.” This year’s 11th Annual
Rat Race has become one of the largest
international paragliding events in the
world, with 250 pilots already signed-
up for the June 22-29th event in the
Applegate Valley at Woodrat Mountain.
This year, a new “Super Clinic” will
be introduced to train up-and-coming
pilots to expand their knowledge and
skills each day after the competition
fights. Sport icons Kari Castle and Ken
Hudonjorgensen will head-up the cadre
of instructors
for these 50
pilots enrolled
in the clinic.
Kari and Ken
are world-class
instructors
with decades
of experience
training
paragliding
pilots.
Kari Castle is a 3-time hang gliding
World Champion, as well as a US
National hang gliding and paragliding
champion. She holds 2 current women’s
hang gliding world records and the
current world record open distance
tandem paraglider fight record holder of
228 km fown in Australia.
Ken Hudonjorgensen is the frst
paraglider pilot in the US to be awarded
the highest safe pilot award for 5,000
consecutive safe fights. He has since
accumulated over 13,000 safe fights.
Woodrat Mountain has been voted
one of the best 25 paragliding sites in
the world. The
public is invited
to watch the
event at Red
Lily Vineyards,
Valley View
Vineyards, and
Fiasco Winery.
All locations
will provide
daily live video/
internet tracking of the races overhead.
Fiasco Winery is owned and operated
by Dave and Pamela Palmer, who have
donated the property and designated it
as a permanent landing zone for pilots.
And, mark your calendars for Sunday,
June 23 for the 5th-Annual Hunter Family
Fundraising Dinner—open to the public
from 6:00pm-9:00pm, hosted by Fiasco
Winery at 8035 Hwy 238, just 8 miles west
of Jacksonville. Money raised will again
be donated to local charities (yet to be
announced) in the name of the Hunter
Family, who are long-time supporters of
the sport. See Fiasco ad on page 36.
Save the Date for the 2013 Rat Race
JOWA members l-r: Herb Quady-Quady North, Traute Moore-South Stage Cellars, Jeanne
& Jim Davidian-Caprice Vineyards, Russ & Margaret Lyon-Daisy Creek Vineyard, Cassia
Winkler-Umpqua Valley Wine Tasting Room, Dan & Cindy Marca-DANCIN Vineyards
The Jacksonville Oregon Wineries
Association (JOWA) is a collection of six
wineries, each ofering a unique wine
tasting experience located within one
mile of Jacksonville. The Association
was formed during the development of
a collective brochure being prepared by
Porscha Schiller of South Stage Cellars.
“We didn’t just want to have a piece
of paper with a list of participating
wineries,” said Dan Marca, the
Association’s President, “so we decided to
gather as a group and determine how we
could all work together to draw atention
to the Jacksonville wineries.” Having only
six members has its advantages and after
only one meeting, JOWA was born!
Founding JOWA members include
DANCIN Vineyards, Daisy Creek
Vineyard, Quady North, South Stage
Cellars, Umpqua Valley Wine Tasting
Room and Caprice Vineyards. JOWA’s
afairs will be managed by its President,
Dan Marca of DANCIN Vineyards, VP,
Jim Davidian of Caprice Vineyards and
Secretary/Treasurer Dawn Roelke of
Quady North.
The Association was formed as a
collaborative efort by each Member
Winery to showcase Jacksonville, where
wine tasting is complemented by a host
of varied amenities. Jacksonville is a
very unique southern Oregon experience
where you can visit up to six very distinct
wineries, enjoy shopping at wonderful
stores, dine at world-class eateries and
stay at upscale inns and B&B’s—all within
one mile of the downtown core!
The Member Wineries are planning their
frst event, a Father’s Day Weekend Open
House on June 15th and 16th where dads
will be treated to complimentary pairings!
They are also planning subsequent events
on Veteran’s Day and Mother’s Day.
Marca notes, “The main goal of JOWA is
to help visitors discover our unique wine
tasting area and to promote it to locals
in the valley. Ultimately, it’s all about
promoting the Southern Oregon experience
and providing people with enough variety
so they’ll spend more time exploring our
region. Jacksonville’s past may have been
paved with gold, but its future will grow
with wine.” See ad this page.
JOWA to Showcase
Jacksonville’s In-Town Wineries
Ken Hudonjorgensen
Kari Castle
Jacksonville Review Page 8 May 2013
A gift of time never meant so much.
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Providence Telestroke Network provides 24/7 connected care between local emergency physicians and stroke specialists
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as a stroke patient arrives in the Providence Medford emergency department.
When every second counts,
you can count on Providence.
Providence Medford Medical Center is a nationally
certifed Primary Stroke Center, recognized by
The Joint Commission for outstanding patient care.
David Pfrimmer
Principal Broker, Accredited Buyers Agent
Certified Residential Marketing Specialist
Cell: (541) 326-6262
pfrimmer@windermere.com
www.SouthernOregonHomes.org
Principal Broker
541.944.2700
Branscum@charter.net
Van Vleet Jacksonville • 505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530 • 541-899-2000
W
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Wade Branscum
Search for properties at: WADE.withWRE.com
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Wade-Dave-FEB 2013:Wade-Dave-JAN 2/21/13 9:37 AM Page 1
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 9 May 2013
The Unfettered Critic by
Paula Block Erdmann & Terry Erdmann
I
f we had to choose a favorite from
all of Broadway’s tuneful oferings,
My Fair Lady would likely lead
the pack. So how “loverly” for us
that the Oregon Shakespeare Festival
currently is presenting an exceptional
interpretation of Alan Jay Lerner and
Frederick Loewe’s 1956 classic!
You know the story. Eliza Doolitle,
good-hearted, “squashed cabbage leaf” of
a fower girl, encounters Henry Higgins,
distinguished, overbearing snob of a
linguistics professor. Higgins observes
that Eliza’s Cockney accent keeps her
eternally bound to the
lower rungs of society.
“Look at her, a pris’ner
of the guters,” he states,
“condemned by every
syllable she uters.”
When Higgins boasts
to his friend Colonel
Pickering that by
teaching the girl proper
English he could get her
a job as a shop assistant,
clever Eliza takes note.
The next morning she
shows up at Higgins’
doorstep ofering to
pay for speech lessons.
Recalling the professor’s
claim that he could “pass
her of as a duchess at an Embassy ball,”
Pickering proposes a wager, and Higgins
bites. As Eliza endures weeks of insults
(tempered by chocolates), she realizes that
she isn’t the ignorant gutersnipe Higgins
thinks she is—and therein lies the fun…
And the songs, almost all timeless
standards. Excelling as Eliza, lively actress
Rachael Warren makes us want to join
in as she sings “The Rain In Spain” and
“I Could Have Danced All Night.” We
actually feel for Higgins as actor Jonathan
Haugen quietly laments, “I’ve Grown
Accustomed To Her Face.” The leads
are so good that we willingly relinquish
memories of incandescent performers
like Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews (or
Audrey Hepburn) in the roles. Warren
lifts Eliza into a place all her own, while
Haugen smartly sings his way through
the tunes rather than “talk” the songs as
Harrison once did.
We’ve long thought that My Fair Lady
contains two unnecessary characters.
Freddie, the misguided chap who pines
for Eliza, isn’t an integral part of the main
story. He exists to demonstrate Eliza’s
acceptance into a more elevated level of
society. On the other end of the scale,
Alfred, Eliza’s ne’er-do-well father, shows
the depths she’s emerged from. They
have nice songs, though, and director
Amanda Dehnert found wonderfully
innovative ways to use them. As Freddie,
actor Ken Robinson nearly steals the
show with his hilarious performance of
the once-staid ballad, “The Street Where
You Live,” which infers that his romantic
atachment may literally be for the street—
cobblestones, gravel,
and all. And we applaud
OSF staple Anthony
Heald, as Alfred,
who demonstrates
astounding energy
during an extended
dance routine in “Get
Me To the Church On
Time.” As Heald and
an ensemble of dancers
stomp about the stage,
the number resembles
a play-within-the-
play, brimming with
excitement.
Dehnert’s best decision
may be in her staging.
Most of the cast—and the
musicians—remain on stage at all times, so
that wardrobe, location, and scene changes
happen via a fuid choreography that is
fully visible…yet largely unnoticeable. “Life
isn’t neat, and theatre isn’t clean,” Dehnert
asserts. “You should see where the lights
hang, see the clothes being put on and taken
of, see how people transform.”
My Fair Lady was based on George
Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion, frst
produced in l916. Shaw, in turn, based
his story on a verse from the Greek poet
Ovid’s Metamorphoses: “Pygmalion,
critical of faults which nature planted in
female hearts, lived unmarried. With skill,
he carved a statue out of ivory, and gave
it exquisite beauty. She was so beautiful,
he fell in love with his creation.”
Two thousand years later, in Ashland,
so will you.
Paula and Terry each have long impressive-
sounding resumes implying that they are
batle-scarred veterans of life within the
Hollywood studios. They’re now happily
relaxed into Jacksonville.
Sometimes life, and theatre,
is more than Fair
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Office: 541.488.1311
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©

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P
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Together we’re
making a difference.
To all our Blue Sky
SM
business partners and customers, we say thank you.
It is your support that helps keep the environment healthy, brings economic
benefits to the region and preserves resources for future generations.
You can join the Blue Sky business partners listed below, as well as
thousands of individuals and other businesses across the region and
make a difference.
To learn more or enroll visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll
free 1-800-769-3717.
City of Jacksonville
Cycle Analysis
Daisy Creek Vineyard
Devitt Winery and Vineyards
Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
Scheffel’s Toys Inc.
Spa Jacksonville
The Jacksonville Mercantile
Yale Creek Ranch
Jacksonville Review Page 10 May 2013
The Jacksonville Woodlands Association
has a new informational trail kiosk
located in the Peter Brit Gardens at the
Sarah Ziegler Trailhead. The Kiosk was
constructed by JWA Board Member Will
Naumann and was installed by Will, Gary
Sprague, John Isaak and Tony Hess.
New Jacksonville
Woodlands Trail Kiosk
at Peter Britt Gardens
Focus on Hanley Farm by
Kerri Hecox, Hanley Farm Volunteer
“Threads to New
Worlds—A Collection
of Fiber Arts,” a juried
art show featuring fber
art by 24 Oregon artists
opens Friday, May
3rd at Art Presence in
Jacksonville. Show hours
are 11:00am-5:00pm on
Fridays, Saturdays and
Sundays during May. An
opening public reception will be held on
Friday, May 10th with hors’doeurves and
drinks at the gallery from 5:00pm-7:00pm.
This show is part of a year-long
traveling exhibit sponsored by the
Weaving Guilds of Oregon, formed as a
state-wide organization in 1982, to share
information, resources, education and to
promote fber arts throughout Oregon.
Members of two local weaving guilds,
The Rogue Valley Handweavers’ Guild
and the Saturday Handweavers’ Guild
are stafng this show and
demonstrating various fber
arts including weaving,
spinning and bobbin lace.
Three local fber artists and
weaving guild members have
pieces in this show: Kathy
Fennel, a creative weaver will
showcase her unique woven
photographs that earned the
Juror’s Choice Award. Cindie
Kitchen won the Complex Weaver’s
award with a beautiful hand woven
scarf. Shirley McFarland is showing-
of her talents in this fber show with a
wonderful woven pillow embellished
with bobbin lace.
The 700+ members of the Weaving
Guilds of Oregon invite everyone to
experience this not-to-be-missed event at
Art Presence Center on the grounds of the
historic Jacksonville Courthouse during
the month of May.
Fiber Arts Show Opens in May
H
ow do
we teach
children
the value of eating
healthy foods? As a parent, this is a difcult
question—do we force green vegetables at
dinner as a mater of course, or do we fnd
creative ways to integrate healthy foods into
our daily routines? Making nutrition a fun
and interesting activity for children isn’t
easy, but that is what “Rogue Valley Farm
to School” aims to do: “Educate children
about our food system through hands-
on farm and garden programs, and by
increasing local foods in school meals.”
Historic Hanley Farm is excited to
announce its new partnership with Rogue
Valley Farm to School. Over the summer,
2, one-week-long camps—July 8-12 for
7-10 year olds and August 5-9 for 5-7 year
olds—will be hosted at Hanley with Rogue
Valley Farm to School, where children will
learn about planting and tending crops,
caring for farm animals, harvesting and
preparing food, as well as participate
in arts and crafts related to farming. In
the fall, Farm to School will be hosting
regular “Harvest Meal” feld trips to
Hanley, where children will participate in
harvesting and preparing their own farm-
fresh lunches. The opportunity to have
children learning the value of nutrition
and the excitement of harvesting and
preparing their own food is a wonderful
development for Hanley Farm and one we
are all looking forward to bringing to the
community. Registration for camps can be
done online at www.rvfarm2school.org.
In addition to the Farm to School
program, we are thrilled to be expanding
the Children’s Heritage Fair to three
days this year. On May 30-31, Hanley
Farm will be hosting school groups from
all over the Rogue Valley to learn about
local history, farming, and to participate
in games and crafts. So far there are over
700 children registered to atend during
the two days of school feld trips. On
Saturday, June 1st, the public is welcome
to atend the Fair, where children of all
ages can connect with history through
hands-on activities. The public day of the
Fair will run from 10:00am-4:00pm.
And of course, don’t forget the Heritage
Plant Sale happening at Hanley on
Mother’s Day weekend, May 11-12. The
sale will open at 10:00am and run to
3:00pm on Saturday, and on Sunday there
will be a Tea & Crepes luncheon especially
for mom, with freshly-baked sweets
from Coquete bakery, also beginning at
10:00am. Come by for all of your spring
plant needs, as well as an extra-special way
to say “thank you” to mom.
For listing of events at Hanley Farm and to
learn more about this Southern Oregon gem
please visit: hanleyfarm.org.
SOHS/HANLEY FARM 2013 EVENTS
Heritage Plant Sale—May 11 & 12
A Southern Oregon tradition! Fill
your gardens with heritage varieties
of fowering plants, trees and
vegetables, many propagated from
the historic gardens of Hanley Farm.
Children’s Heritage Fair—June 1
Explore local history from a kid’s point
of view. Enjoy hands-on activities and
crafts, heritage breed animals and
farm-fresh foods.
ORIGINS: A Discovery of Place
June 22, July 27, Aug 24 & Sept 28
Nourishment for the mind, body
and spirit: Experience Hanley Farm-
to-Table, all-natural, locally-grown
gourmet dining and history.
News From The Friends of
Jacksonville's Historic Cemetery
by Dirk J . Siedlecki, President - FOJ HC
May Brings Flowers AND Wonderful
Cemetery Activities!
History Saturday, Saturday, May 11—
On May 11, Cemetery Docents Robert
Hight and Vivienne Grant will talk
about “Jacksonville's Early Doctors and
Medical Practices of the Day.” All History
Saturday programs during the next few
months start promptly at 10:00am and
last 90 minutes. Please meet your docents
at the Sexton's Tool House at the top of
the Cemetery road. Parking is available
within the cemetery grounds. Dress
for the weather and wear comfortable
walking shoes as there is some walking
involved. No advance reservations are
required and the program is free with
donations appreciated that will be used
for this year’s fund raising project to
restore the Jacob Ish Block. This program
will be fun, interesting and informative—
be sure to mark your calendar!
Cemetery Clean-up Day, Saturday,
May 18—Help us clean-up the cemetery
grounds in preparation for the Memorial
Day holiday and summer visitors. Join
the Friends, Jacksonville Boosters, Odd
Fellows, and other community volunteers
in sprucing-up the cemetery. Bring
gloves, gas-powered lawn mowers, weed
eaters, rakes, brooms and pruning shears.
Cofee and morning refreshments will be
provided. Clean-up runs 8:00am-12:00noon.
Meet at the Sexton's Tool House.
Marker Cleaning—Please note there
will be no Marker Cleaning Workshop in
May due to the Clean-up Day. Join us on
June 15, and then on the third Saturday of
the month, July through September.
Annual Memorial Day Meet and
Greet, Sunday, May 26 and Monday,
May 27—Volunteers will be on-site
both days from 11:00am-3:00pm to
assist families and friends with locating
gravesites of loved ones. They will also
answer questions about the cemetery
and our organization. In honor of our
fallen heroes, fags will be placed on
their gravesites. As May is also National
Historic Preservation Month, we will be
featuring some of our more recent cemetery
restoration and preservation projects along
with plans for our biggest project to date,
the restoration of the Jacob Ish Block.
For additional details on events and other
cemetery activities, please visit our website at
www.friendsjvillecemetery.org.
Outstanding Spellers Receive Awards
Lions Club members were on-hand at Jacksonville Elementary to present these outstanding 4th,
5th and 6th-grade students with certifcates and medals for winning the annual spelling contest.
Back row l-r: Lou Mayerski, John Harris, Nick Nichols, Karl Edding, and Bill Hanlon.
Front row l-r: Madi Henderson, Carmalee Reid, Jude Pannell and Matson Fowler.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 11 May 2013
Up Close and Personal with Local
Photographer, Kathleen Hoevet
Fifth in a series of artist profles by Randall Grealish
S
ometimes, a chance encounter
captures ones atention and sets us
on a new and unexpected path.
Such was the case for Kathy Hoevet,
who got her start as a photographer only
a few years ago upon discovering the
online community and image hosting site
Flickr. After browsing the site, she was
thoroughly impressed
with the photos taken
by a diverse group
of talented artists.
Kathy was inspired
to get a camera and
set-out on a journey
to explore her
surroundings through
the cameras lens. With
encouragement from
her daughter to turn her hobby into a
business, Kathy sought-out Hannah West
who helped set up her frst showing at the
Good Bean Cofee Shop—and she hasn’t
looked back since.
Befriending a local photo club and other
photographers with the same camera,
she began to
ask questions
to gain beter
knowledge
in the art
of being a
photographer.
“Never shoot
in auto mode,”
was one of
the frst bits
of advice received. To this day, Kathy
adheres to manual setings, allowing her
full control (of the camera at least) to
create an image that refects her vision of
what lies before her. She did, however,
confess to a distrust of her own eyes’
ability to properly focus and therefore
tends to rely on auto focus. Other lessons
learned include the importance of
composition, leading lines, the efect of
light, value, space etc… much the same as
a painter learns the art of painting.
To gain a beter understanding
of Photoshop tools, Kathy atended
study courses lead by well-known
photographer, Sean Bagshaw. She credits
him for teaching her a favorite technique,
which is to take a dynamic range of
images and blend them together to create
a much stronger fnal shot.
While atending outdoor workshops
lead by Sean, David Cobb and Zach
Schneph, Kathy found herself chasing
the early morning light in the Palouse
and Olympic Mountains. These trips
taught her the importance of geting out
early and how quickly light changes a
scene. Shadows came and went so fast
that she was constantly picking up her
tripod and moving from spot to spot to
capture the light and the efect it had on
the scene before her lens. Kathy couldn’t
be happier with the great insight and
constructive criticism
that was bestowed
upon her. Now, she’s
eager to atend more
workshops with these
fne photographers,
some of whom are
now friends.
Kathy’s work is
on display at the
Black Oak Medical
Center, Rogue Regency Inn, People’s Bank
on Barnet and Art Presence Art Center
in Jacksonville. She also creates greeting
cards, with lots of wine and vineyard
themes, celebrating Southern Oregon wine
country. In J’ville, you’ll fnd them at Bella
Union and Farmhouse Treasures and at
Rogue Regency Inn in
Medford. (More locations
are coming soon!)
Kathy has recently
received requests to do
product shots, which
she has found to be an
enjoyable experience
and a good challenge.
However, the bulk of her
work will continue to be
landscape and outdoor-based, which she
fnds most peaceful and calming.
Kathy will be showing her beautiful
photographs in the Naversen Room of the
Jacksonville Library through July 17. Please
call the library at 541-899-1665 for hours.
For more on Kathy visit her website:
kathleenhoevetphotography.com.
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Jacksonville Review Page 12 May 2013

Sunday - May 5th · 11 am To 5 pm
C E L E BRAT I NG S PRI NG!
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
S
CHOOLHAUS REWHAUS
10 11 12 B
f
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r
m
an cuisin
e

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i
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525 Bigham Knoll ∙ Jacksonville, Oregon
PHONE: 541-899-1000 ∙ www.thebrewhaus.com
Chamber Chat
by The J acksonville Chamber of Commerce
The longest journey starts with the frst
step. One of the most pleasant things about
Jacksonville is simply taking a walk. My
wife, Cheryl, and I spend many afternoons
walking neighborhoods and trails around
town. Whether watching a bird or trying
to fgure out what kind of tree it is perched
in, we always come home relaxed and
happy that we live in a place where you
don't have to drive your car to get around.
One of our favorite routes is the "Rails
to Trails" bike and pedestrian path that
runs from "D" to Middle Street, alongside
a minor tributary of Jackson Creek. The
Rogue Valley Railroad ran this route from
the historic station by the post ofce into
Medford many years ago. The logs for
our historic home on California Street, the
Purcell Cabin, were brought over from
Bute Falls on this very rail line in the
1930's and were then hand-peeled on the
building site. Today, all that remains of the
old railway is a fat grade, some fruit trees
and a slow trickle of water – making for
my perfect recipe for a walk.
It was on one of these walks when I
remembered a serious efort to develop
the railway easement into a greenway.
I did a quick check of Chapter 7 of the
City’s Master Plan that revealed the
historic railway easement was “ideal for
linear recreation development.” I guess
this was a fancy way of saying, “it’s
perfect for walking and biking on.” I
also learned that fve years ago the City
had extended serious efort developing
a state grant proposal to extend the
greenway to Medford.
I also discovered that my curiosity was
well-timed since Oregon's Transportation
Growth Management (TGM) program is
doing their biannual round of grants for
just such projects. A couple of phone calls
and a pre-application later, we were on the
list! The Jacksonville City Council approved
developing a grant proposal with Jackson
County and Medford on April 2nd; if we
get a grant, we’ll take our frst steps towards
developing a Jacksonville pedestrian
corridor linking the two towns.
This would be a wonderful asset to
our community and a link that could
someday connect Jacksonville to the
Bear Creek Greenway and provide green
transportation alternatives to our residents.
I will keep you posted on our eforts as they
develop in next month's Jacksonville Review.
You can send Councilor Criss your
thoughts and feedback by email at
councilorgarcia@jacksonvilleor.us.
Rails to Trails Project Possible
N
owadays, small businesses need
all of the free help they can get
and today’s social media and
online search options can be that help.
Existing customers play an important
role in today’s business environment
with their ability to post comments,
ratings and reviews on a variety of
internet sites and social media platforms.
This feedback can help local businesses
in atracting new customers.
Today’s travelers, shoppers and diners
seek-out more information on where to stay,
shop and dine than ever before. Whether
on a mobile device or home computer, they
use TripAdvisor, YELP and Google Maps
to locate and get reviews on businesses and
services before deciding where to spend
their money. They also seek-out input
from friends and family through Facebook,
Pinterest, LinkedIn and Twiter.
Business and Community Websites—
Many websites allow comments to be
posted about the business as a whole or
on specifc products. Your input helps in
two ways: First, it validates the website
for Google search purposes by proving
that the business has customers and that
those customers are interacting with the
website. Second, it helps other users of the
website by encouraging them to support
the same businesses.
Blogs—Comment on a business’ blog
or any blog that discusses one of your
favorite businesses.
Facebook*—“Like” your favorite
businesses. Like, comment on and share
their posts so that your friends will see
them too. Check-in at the business when
you visit. Your recommendation carries a
lot of weight in a purchase decision with
your friends.
TripAdvisor* & YELP*—Rate and share
reviews of businesses you have used. If
you are new to this, take some time to read
the other reviews and get a feel for the
rating system. Don’t post these reviews
while at the business and using the free
WiFi as it will appear to be a fake review.
And don’t be surprised if businesses
respond to your reviews. TripAdvisor
encourages businesses to interact with
their customers through reviews.
*User accounts are required for these
tools. YELP reviews may be fltered out
until you are an established user. Savvy
users will know how to fnd them by
removing the flter.
Having signifcant numbers of and high
quality reviews helps businesses increase
their overall online presence. Google, the
top search engine, aggregates reviews
from the majority of review sites and
factors that into its search algorithm. So
a higher online presence gets a business
ranked higher in a Google search.
The Jacksonville Chamber of
Commerce thanks you for supporting
local businesses.
The Chamber invites you to join us at
our monthly general meetings, at Old
City Hall. Held the second Thursday of
each month at 8:30am, we ofer a relaxed
and informative time to get your morning
going and connect with the business
community. See you May 9th !
For information on the Jacksonville Chamber,
these events, or to join, please contact the visitors
center at 185 N Oregon Street, 541-899-8118 or
chamber@jacksonvilleoregon.org.
How Social Media Helps Build Business
More than just Great Coffee . . .
Come experience why Pony Espresso is Jacksonville’s
favorite coffeehouse! Keeping it local . . .
• Jacksonville’s only drive thru window! Call ahead for
quick pick-up.
• Wonderful and Plentiful deck seating
• Bike Friendly: Most bicycle parking in town.
• Coffee, Breakfast, and Lunch Catering for your party
or event
• Organic Salads, Scratch Soups, Panini, Wraps.
• Local Draft beer and Wine menu.
• Excellent selection of baked goods.
Like us on Facebook today for all the news, specials,
and updates.
The Complete Coffeehouse
Celebrating 18 Years!
545 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville www.ponyespressojville.com
Open everyday until 6pm
541-899-3757
by City Councilor, Criss Garcia
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 13 May 2013
From the Firehouse to
Your House
by Fire Chief, Devin Hull
Firewise Community Public Meeting
A Few Minutes with the Mayor
by Paul Becker
A Tale of Two County Courthouses
CITY OFFICE
Monday - Friday
8:30am - 4:00pm
(541) 899-1231
MUNICIPAL COURT CLERK
Monday - Friday: 9am - 4pm

PLANNING DEPARTMENT HOURS
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
& Friday 8:30am - 2pm
Wednesday:
Closed to Public
Direct #: 541-899-6873
JACKSONVILLE OFFICE HOURS
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, May 7, 6:00pm (OCH)
PLANNING COMMISSION: Wednesday, May 8, 6:00pm (OCH)
HARC HEARING OFFICER: Wednesday, May 15, 10:00am (OCH)
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, May 21, 6:00pm (OCH)
HARC: Wednesday, May 22, 6pm (OCH)
City Offces 541-899-1231
www.jacksonvilleor.us
LOCATION KEY: CH - Old City Hall (S. Oregon & Main) CC - Community
Center (160 E. Main Street) NVR - Naversen Room (J acksonville Library)
FH - Fire Hall(180 N. 3rd St. @ C) EOC - Emergency Ops Center at Police Station
JACKSONVILLE CITY SCHEDULE
Jacksonville Fire Department Community Class Schedule
May – When to Go - When to Stay
No Class June thru September Fire Season
October – Fire Prevention Open House
November – Home Safety for Winter
December – Avoiding Cold Weather Injuries
Classes are held at the fre station on the 3rd Thursday of the month at 6:30pm
(except during fre season). For more information, please call 541-899-7246.
R
ecently,
Jacksonville
Fire
and Jacksonville CERT conducted a
public meeting for the residents of the
Westmont/ Mary Ann/ Pair-A-Dice
neighborhood, the area selected as the
frst Firewise community in Jacksonville.
Firewise is a national program designed
to educate and support neighbors by
creating defensible space around their
homes. With some assistance through
Oregon Department of Forestry grant
funds and ODF labor teams, neighbors
will be clearing highly-fammable
vegetation, planting fre-resistant
shrubs, trimming branches, cleaning-out
guters, sweeping-up pine needles and
raking leaves.
Each Firewise community has a
board made up of neighbors who work
together to approve the community
assessment, formulate an action plan,
analyze investment and complete a
renewal form. One annual day of clean
up is also required.
Becoming a Firewise community is
an ongoing endeavor that strives to
maintain the neighborhood protection
through defensible space from year-
to-year. Most of the work required
to become a recognized Firewise
community is minimal, but when done
by each neighbor, the communal efect
is dramatic.
Jacksonville Fire and CERT plans to
continue working with and following
this neighborhood’s progress and then
have several more neighborhoods
become Firewise.
For more information about Firewise,
please call 541-414-3236 or email
JacksonvilleFirewise@gmail.com.
I
am writing
this from the
warm, almost
hot, April weather
in Palm Desert,
California… a place Sharon and I try to
get to once every year. There are three
diferent routes we use when driving:
straight down I-5 through Los Angeles
and then to Palm Desert, I-5 to Bakersfeld
and over the Tehachapi’s or through
Lassen Park and Reno and down US-395,
a longer route but by far the more scenic
and the one we chose on this trip.
Near the base of Mount Whitney,
on Highway 395, in the town of
Independence, California, is a
magnifcent building which has caught
my atention every time we’ve driven
this route. Built in the 1920’s, at more
than 28,000 square feet, it stands as an
impressive-looking structure befting
its use as the county courthouse. The
Inyo County Superior Court website
reads, “The region's only example of
monumental Neoclassical Revival public
architecture, the present courthouse
was placed on the National Register of
Historic Places in 1998 in recognition of
its ‘integrity of feeling and association.’"
Now, I’m not sure what “integrity of
feeling and association” really means
since such a description can be used
for virtually any purpose. But when
reading it, I asked myself, what has
that got to do with being historic? The
folks who wrote that should see a truly
historic courthouse… the one right here
in Jacksonville we all know. Built in
the 1880s, it stands as a monument to
superb engineering and construction
with a craftsmanship seldom seen in
modern buildings.
The Inyo County Courthouse is the fourth
building on the same site. The frst, a brick
structure, was leveled in an earthquake. The
second, a wooden structure, was burned
to the ground in a devastating city fre. The
third was outgrown.
Our courthouse has had its own
checkered history. In 1932, the citizens
voted to move the County Courthouse
to Medford, thus ending almost half a
century of county government located
in Jacksonville. Then, according to the
National Park Service, “in the 1930s, the
building was used as the ofce for a local
Boy Scout Troop and for meetings and
other public functions, such as dances.
During WW II, the Courthouse was used
for Civilian Air Defense meetings. In 1946,
the Jacksonville Courthouse became the
Jacksonville Museum and home of the
Southern Oregon Historical Society.” The
courthouse was perilously close to being
demolished when SOHS saved it.
Now, more than eighty years since
the county vacated the courthouse, once
again its fate remains to be determined.
I say, why not return the building back
to the original purpose for which it was
designed. Somehow it seems fting
that we go full circle by using it for our
own city government. We are in need of
more space. By using the frst foor for
city operations and the second foor as
an “events center,” we would be taking
advantage of the fact that we’d be using
a building we never could have hoped
to buy. With its history, and with its
prominence in the city landscape, it is
the perfect location for our City Hall.
What a legacy for grateful and proud
future generations! What beter way to
assure this magnifcent building’s future!
Once again, the courthouse would come
to life like the phoenix rising from the
ashes. Now that is something we could
all celebrate.
Swordplay and Swashbuckling at Old City Hall
We are pleased to announce that
SCARAMOUCHE will be the flm
screened at Old City Hall in May. Stewart
Granger stars in this Napoleonic epic with
Mel Ferrer as his villainous opponent.
Janet Leigh and Eleanor Parker supply
the love interest. SCARAMOUCHE is
probably the best flm of its type other
than THE SEA HAWK which we ran a
couple of years ago. It is a breathtaking
display of sword-fghting at its best,
excellent acting from all the main
characters, brilliant direction, superb
over-the-top script and dialogue, and
frst-class Technicolor photography. The
climactic eight minute dueling scene is
perhaps the best ever flmed and certainly
one of the longest. SCARAMOUCHE is a
flm not-to-be-missed.
It screens Friday night, May 17 at
7:00pm at Old City Hall.
Jewelry • Unique Gifts • Home Décor
‘Like’ us on facebook for specials and new products!
115 W California Street, Jacksonville • 541.899.5590
Find the gift you seek at WillowCreek!
Make Mom feel special
this Mother’s Day!
Sunday, May 12
Jacksonville Review Page 14 May 2013
Stay at Brookings
Portside Suites
Portside Suites
It’s time to go to
Brookings, Oregon!
Only a 2.5 hour drive to...
Natural Scenery
Outstanding Weather
Beachcombing
Fishing
Golf
THIS MONTH
IN BROOKINGS:
SECOND SATURDAY
ART WALK
MAY 11
MEMORIAL DAY
WEEKEND - MAY 24-26
ANNUAL AZALEA
FESTIVAL
&
PARTY AT THE PORT
CHINOOK SALMON
FISHING SEASON OPEN
www.brookings.or.us
16219 Lower Harbor Road
Brookings-Harbor, OR 97415
(541) 469-7100 Suites
www.brookingsportsidesuites.com
Afordable Park
Model Cottages
$89,000-$199,000
16219 Lower Harbor Road
Brookings, Oregon
(541) 661-3148
www.portsidecrest.com
Thinking of buying your
own piece of the coast?
When it’s time to go to the beach...
M
other’s D
ay
B
runch
Pioneer Village invites you to join us for a
Please RSVP to
541-899-6825
by May 11, 2013
T
805 N. 5th St., Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-6825 • www.PioneerVillageOregon.com
Sunday • May 12, 2013
11:30 am-1:30 pm
Celebrate
Mother’s Day
with a brunch
and a fower
at Pioneer
Village!
Bring your Mother
(65 years and older)
and this coupon for
brunch and a fower.
Service of Former County Sheriff August
Singler Formally Recognized by U.S.
Congress and Oregon House
On April 15, 2013, the Oregon State
Legislature marked the 100-year anniversary
of the tragic death of former Jackson
County Sherif, August D. Singler with
the introduction of House Resolution 4.
The following was excerpted from remarks
made in Washington,
DC, Salem and Jackson
County, Oregon during
the month of April when
proclamations were read
into the United States
Congressional, Oregon
State Legislature and
Jackson County Board of
Commissioners records
formally recognizing
the sacrifce made by
August Singler. Singler’s
relatives, including his
granddaughter Diana
Walker of Talent and
great-granddaughter
Chris Walker, Jackson
County Clerk and other
grandchildren were in
atendance in Salem to
mark the occasion.
Mr. Speaker, I rise to express gratitude
to August D. Singler, former Sherif
of Jackson County, Oregon. Sherif
August David Singler was the 1st law
enforcement ofcer and only Sherif killed
in the line of duty in Jackson County
Oregon, April 23, 1913. He lived with
his family in Jacksonville Oregon in the
“Wilson House,” located directly behind
the old Jackson County Courthouse/Jail
when Jacksonville was the county seat.
A very special individual who during
his short tenure in law enforcement gave
his life in service for the citizens of his
County and the State of Oregon. His
place in history is recognized because of
his selfess burning desire and bulldog
atitude toward citizen rights, protection
of all families and respect for rule of law.
August was born on May 28, 1876 in
Millersburg, Plymouth County, Indiana
and was one of thirteen children of John
and Susan Singler. At a later date, the
Singler family moved to South Bend
Indiana where August met his future
wife, Rose Probst. They eventually
married November 15, 1898 and made
their home in South Bend, Indiana where
their frst child was born. August watched
the midwife during the birth of their frst
child and proceeded by himself, to deliver
the remainder of their eight children. As
the family and quest to support them
grew, August decided to head west.
Being the adventurous soul he was, he
hitchhiked to Southern Oregon twice
before sending a wire for his wife and
three children to come to Oregon by train.
Shortly after arriving, their fourth child
was born.
Singler performed various small
jobs including selling Singer sewing
machines and patented medicines
for the “Electric Medical Company.”
August was considered a “Jack of all
trades,” who would go to great lengths
to feed and clothe his family. In late
1906, August purchased a small piece
of land in Medford, Oregon on Lozier
Lane. Although he knew very litle about
building houses, he proceeded to erect a
two- story home for his family.
August was involved in many civic
organizations including the Moose Lodge,
Redmen, Woodsman of the World,
Knights of Columbus and was a charter
member of the Elks Lodge. Because of his
extensive involvement, he was known as
a community-spirited man who gave of
himself and his time.
In 1909, August was appointed
Constable of the Medford District and
served four years in this position. Upon
his appointment, Singler’s reputation as
keeper of the peace surfaced quickly. His
exploits were known from Sacramento,
California to Portland, Oregon. Singler
tracked criminals by horseback, railroad-
handcar, card and buck board, always
seeming to capture the ofenders. He
was called a “Super Sleuth,” nervy,
imaginative, tough and yet a gentle
soul. The citizenry jokingly called him
“Sherlock Holmes.”
Throughout the years
people have heard about
Lawmen of the West, yet
none surpassed Singler
in daring, innovation
and determination.
Ironically, most of his
achievements were
accomplished during his
tenure as Constable of
the Medford District in
Jackson County, Oregon.
Singler was responsible
for introducing the art of
fnger printing to Jackson
County and was the frst
lawman to use blood
hounds in this area.
In 1912, he decided
to run for Sherif of
Jackson County to
support the needs of his growing family.
His campaign slogan read, “Party I
am Working For” and featured Singler
with his wife Rose and eight children.
An interesting sideline to the campaign
came when Singler’s friends sent a
campaign card east to Colonel Theodore
Roosevelt. Friends were prompted to
send the campaign card as Roosevelt
had advocated for large families at this
time. Colonel Roosevelt acknowledged
receipt of the card with best wishes for
Singler’s success. Singler was successful
in the Primary election—beating the odds
running against Emmit Beesen, a local
pioneer family descendent and being
Catholic. In the General election, Singler
defeated a popular incumbent, Sherif
Wilber Jones.
Singler’s term as Sherif began in
January 1913, which was relatively
routine until April 22, 1913 when he
was advised of the return of a 19-year-
old desperado named Lester Jones. His
promising career as Sherif was cut short
that day as the result of the shootout with
the fugitive Jones while the Sherif was
atempting to serve him with an arrest
warrant. In a classic scene out of the
old West, Sherif Singler walked slowly
toward the two room cabin in the hills
southeast of Jacksonville. The young
desperado suddenly open fred—one
bullet ploughed through the Sherif’s
lungs and another through his right hand.
As Singler fell to the ground, he opened
fre, emptying his weapon. Each of the
six bullets hit fugitive Jones who died
instantly. Sherif Singler passed the next
morning on April 23, 1913, leaving behind
his beloved wife Rose and their eight
children, all under the age of thirteen. He
was the frst law enforcement ofcer to
die in the line of duty in Jackson County
Oregon and the only one elected Sherif.
On April 25, 1913, with businesses in
Medford closed and fags lowered to half
mast, the last tribute was paid to Sherif
August D. Singler. The funeral procession
was twelve blocks long, with church
crowds so large that only half could
be seated as hundreds stood along the
funeral procession with bowed heads. It
was said to be the largest outpouring of
its kind in Jackson County history.
It should be recognized that Sherif
Singler deserves a place in history. His
pride, concern and leadership are still
refected in those who understand what
it takes to preserve the peace. He was a
gentleman in every way and held a fair
about himself that demanded respect.
May his name not be forgoten, let him be
placed among other recognized lawmen
of the past…this day April 23, 2013,
represents 100 years since his tragic and
untimely death.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 15 May 2013
City Snapshot
Dan Mollahan
541.890.8714
danmollahan@johnlscott.com
www.DanMollahan.com • www.ToniAnderberg.com
Toni Anderberg
541.944.8496
tonianderberg@johnlscott.com
871 Medford Center, Medford Oregon 97504
635 N. Oregon St.
Jacksonville
8 BR • 6F 2H BA • 3.19
Acres • 8684 SF
Historic Home, Restaurant,
Catering Kitchen
The property is ideal
for a two family set-up,
bed and breakfast,
commercial restaurant,
catering business, event
center, or destination
tourism.
4069 Livingston Rd. Jacksonville
3 BR • 3 BA • 5.2 Acres • 3738 SF
Barn, In-ground Pool, RV Garage
$1,990,000
$799,000
3781 Old Military Rd. Central Point
3 BR • 3 BA • 6.4 Acres • 2436 SF
3.4 Irrigated Acres, Barn &Tack Room
$340,000
3575 Livingston Rd.
Central Point
$890,000
4247 Tami Ln.
Central Point
$525,000
337 Laurelwood Dr.
Jacksonville
$620,000
1537 Satallite Dr.
Medford
$650,000
P
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N
D
IN
G
P
E
N
D
IN
G
P
E
N
D
IN
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P
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N
D
IN
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For Sale: Historic Nunan House
Toni April 2013:Toni April 4/19/13 1:55 PM Page 1
With the memory of April 15th
fresh in your mind, it’s a good time
to start your 2013 tax planning. Many
individuals make charitable contributions
to local arts, heritage, and humanities
organizations. How would you like to
increase your support for these important
organizations—at no cost to you? You
can—through the Oregon Cultural Trust!
The Oregon Cultural Trust (OCT), a
program unique to Oregon, was created
by the State Legislature to promote our
cultural resources. In 2001, the Legislature
authorized a 100% tax credit for
residents donating to the OCT. The OCT
returns these donated monies to local
communities in the form of grants from
the Trust and its local afliates such as the
Jackson County Cultural Coalition.
Since the tax credit’s inception, Jackson
County organizations have received
almost $500,000 in grants for programs
ranging from art and music enrichment
activities, to health and ftness training,
to preserving and sharing local history, to
encouraging beginning readers to develop
a lifelong love of learning. Jacksonville has
seen funding for Brit Festivals, the Brit
Gardens restoration, the historic Catholic
Rectory’s new roof, and repairs to the
historic Beekman House. Grants have also
gone to the Shakespeare Festival, the Film
Festival, the Youth Symphony, the Rogue
Valley Symphony and Chorale, Ballet
Folklorico, SOHS, SMART, the YMCA,
Kids Unlimited, CASA of Jackson County
and more—65 organizations in all.
These funds provide employment,
augment scarce resources, generate
additional revenue for the economy, and
help create income that allows recipient
organizations to survive and thrive.
Economists also argue that such support
for arts and culture adds to our capacity for
long-term growth, contributes to a desirable
quality of life, and creates valuable
social bonds. In short, Jackson County,
Jacksonville, and its cultural organizations
beneft from the Cultural Trust tax credit,
and you and every other resident beneft
from our region’s cultural assets.
Here’s how the OCT tax credit works.
If you give as litle as ten dollars ($10) to
one or more of the registered 1300+ 501(c)
(3) cultural organizations and donate a
matching amount to the OCT, you can
deduct your Cultural Trust donation from
the amount you owe the State in taxes up
to a maximum of $500 per individual—
whether or not you itemize! In other
words, your OCT donation costs you
nothing! Moreover, it may come back to
the community in the form of a grant.
BUT—and it’s a BIG BUT—the OCT
tax credit is scheduled to expire at the
end of 2013. You can take advantage
of it during 2013, but we could all lose
its future beneft. The Legislature is
currently deciding on whether or not to
renew this legislation.
You can insure that we continue to
beneft from this tax credit and that this
funding source continues to be available
to our cultural organizations. Just make
a phone call, send an e-mail, or write a
leter to our legislators saying “please
renew the Cultural Trust Tax Credit.” To
make it even easier, here’s the contact
information:
Senator Alan Bates, 503-986-1703, Sen.
AlanBates@state.or.us, 900 Court St NE,
S-205, Salem, OR, 97301
Senator Herman Baertschiger, 503-986-
1702, Sen.HermanBaertschiger@state.or.us,
900 Court St NE, S-403, Salem, OR, 97301
Representative Peter Buckley, 503-986-
1405, Rep.PeterBuckley@state.or.us, 900
Court St NE, H-272, Salem, OR, 97301
Representative Dennis Richardson,
503-986-1404, Rep.DennisRichardson@
state.or.us, 900 Court St NE, H-373, Salem,
OR, 97301
Representative Sal Esquival, 503-986-
1406, Rep.SalEsquivel@state.or.us, 900
Court St NE, H-483, Salem, OR, 97301
The Oregon Cultural Trust has had an
impact on so many lives. Our legislators
pay atention to their electorate. If they
hear you—their voters—asking them to
renew the Cultural Trust legislation, then
they will be more inclined to do so, and
we will all beneft!
The Cultural Trust—One of Oregon’s
Best Kept Secrets!
Neil Simon’s Neil Simon’s
MAY 15TH - JUNE 9TH, 2013
Starring David Gabriel, Sarah Gore,
Steven Dominquez, and Jack Seybold
Directed by Paul R. Jones
Beneft: May 15 for Community Health Center, 8pm, all seats $22
Preview: May 16, 8pm $10 • Opens: May 17, 8pm
Pay What You Can: May 22, 8pm
General Admission Tickets: $24 • Student/Seniors $22 (except Sundays)
Reserved Seating Fee $2 per ticket • Box Offce Transaction Fee $4 per transaction
www.CamelotTheatre.org
Reservations Recommended
Thursday–Saturday, 8pm
Sunday Matinees, 2pm Talent Ave. & Main St. in Talent
541-535-5250
MENTION THIS AD IN THE J’VILLE REVIEW
AND GET A $5 DISCOUNT ON A TICKET!
Good thru 6/1/13. Limit one discount per caller.
POLICE BLOTTER
Jacksonville Police Department
A consolidated report based on type of calls & number of incidences
March 21, 2013 to April 13, 2013
Alarm - 3
Animal Complaint - 3
Assist - Medical - 6
Assist - Other Law Enforcement
Agencies - 17
Assist Public - 10
City Ordinance - 5
Civil - 6
Drugs - 1
DWS - 2
DUII - 1
Elude - 1
Larceny/Theft - 2
Motor Vehicle Crash - 1
Property Found - 7
Property Lost - 1
Suspicious - 12
Trafc/Roads All - 3
Trespass - 1
Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicle - 5
Call Type - Total Calls
City Council, April 2—Civil West
Engineering reported on the status of
the city’s water system. Of note, their
report suggests replacing a 250,000 gallon
storage tank above the Brit grounds built
in 1911. Although currently sufcient,
existing infrastructure upgrades and
additions over the next 15-20 years are
estimated at $5.5 million. See the full
report at www.jacksonvilleor.us.
Council approved a recommendation
by the Transient Lodging Tax Commitee
for 6 “bed tax” grants for: Jacksonville
Celebrates the Arts ($1200), Jacksonville
Boosters Club to replace lighting fxtures
on the Brit grounds ($4000), Chamber of
Commerce Victorian Christmas ($6000),
Jacksonville Forest Park trail maps
($800), Brit Festivals Taste of Summer
event ($4500), and Jacksonville Oregon
Business Association (JOBA) summer
marketing campaign ($2025).
City Council, April 16—Council
approved an emergency request to move
a power pole deemed a hazard at the
Applebaker Barn at 275 N. 3rd Street.
Council approved a new 20-year
franchise agreement with PacifcCorp
(from 3.5% to 6%) that will lead to higher
electric service bills while enriching city
cofers by $100,000/year. (Councilor
Hayes voted against the motion.) Council
then unanimously renewed its franchise
agreement with Century Link and a fee
hike from 5% to 6%, resulting in $8,000
more income to the city.
Susan Nuetman from PARC Resources
was on-hand to discuss plans to gather
community input over the next 4-5 months
on uses for the courthouse complex.
Council approved a request by
Councilor Garcia to apply for a $75,000
state transportation grant that, if received,
would be used toward the Rails to Trails
project, a hiking/biking pathway linking
Jacksonville to Medford via existing rail
line easements. Councilors Winterburn
and Hayes voted against the request.
Jacksonville Review Page 16 May 2013
175 E. California Street • Historic Jacksonville
Champagne Brunch
7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Dinner Served
4 p.m.-9 p.m.
Sunday, May 12, 2013
Mother’s Day
at Jacksonville Inn
W
e make it special because
M
oms are special!
Call for reservations: 541-899-1900 or 800-321-9344
It’s more than entertainment.
It’s life. Don’t miss it.
SM
Craterian
Performances
is a 501(c)(3)
non-proft
organization.
BOX OFFICE: 16 S. Bartlett, Medford
541-779-3000 • www.craterian.org
Watch for the
announcement of
our 2013-2014
season in late
May and become a
Craterian Performances
member now at
www.craterian.org
for priority ticket
sale opportunities
this summer!
BRILLIANT
TRACES
by Cindy Lou Johnson
Thu.–Sat, May 30-June 1, 7:30pm
All tickets: $12
NexT STAge
RePeRToRy CoMPANy
Thursday, June 13, 7:30pm
Thriller
“THE” MICHAEL
JACKSON TRIBUTE
THE ULTIMATE
TICKeTS: $42, $45, $48
sponsored by
August 9-10 & 15-17, 2013
Auditions to be announced soon – check
www.craterian.org for more information.
Teen Musical
Theater
of Oregon
The
Stage
Musical
Based on
the
Film
THIS
SUMMER
AT TMTO!
TICKeTS: Adults $22, youth $12
“...carrying on the magic,
music and energy Jackson
brought to the world.”
“...characters, story and dialogue so
fantastic they could exist only within
the enchanted realm of the stage.”
Less Stuff = Less Stress
2 Weeks in a Carry-on Bag
by Anne McAlpin
I
n the March Review, I ofered tips on
how technology is improving the
way we travel. Based on a recent trip
to Turkey and Greece during which I took
only a 20” carry-on bag, here’s part 2 of
how I kept my bag under 18 pounds. (You
can fnd part 1 on the Review website at
www.jacksonvillereview.com.)
The resounding response I received
from part 1 was, “Did you ever change
your clothes?” Well,
yes I did. And the
tech theme follows
through from carrying
lighter luggage to
light-weight travel-
friendly clothing and
only packing clothing
and items that have
multiple uses.
This trip was
challenging to pack
for because we were
traveling the last
week of September
into October—one
week in a Villa on
Rhodes, and the
second week sailing
the Turkish Coast on a 98’ sailboat. (Yes,
it was truly the trip of a lifetime!) The
weather was projected to be 85 degrees
(and it was) but I wondered what to pack
for our time on the sailboat, which in
Turkish is “Gulet.” Thankfully, my sailing
friend, Jim had reminded me that, “Hot
days turn into cold
nights, especially
on the water,” and
he recommended
packing a long sleeve
“performance fabric
top” to layer under
a windbreaker. This
turned-out to be the
best tip of the trip!
New Performance
Fabrics = Packing
Lighter—The
defnition of
“performance fabrics” is fabrics that
breathe well, wick moisture away from
your skin and dry quickly—all of which
make travel more comfortable, especially
in humid climates. Most performance
fabrics are either nylon or polyester and
some name brands include, Coolmax®,
Capilene® and Supplex®.
I packed a few of these tops which
came in handy in the hot, Mediterranean
weather. An added beneft is they didn’t
add much weight to my bag and quick-
drying meant they were easy to wash…
so I packed less. Since all-natural fabrics
are more comfortable (such as coton
and silk), but take a long time to dry, I
prefer to travel with middle-of-the-road
coton/poly blend fabrics which ofer both
comfort and performance.
Also, layering clothing items helped
keep my bag light. There’s no need to
pack three sweaters when one zip-up top
was easy to put over a Coolmax® shirt
base layer and then layer a windbreaker
on top of both. As it got hoter, I peeled-
of the layers, and then added clothes
back on as it got cooler. I was really glad
I also packed a long sleeve shirt with
sun-protection (“UPF”) against both
UVA and UVB rays for long days on deck
and sight-seeing. My wide-
brimmed hat was a winner,
too. I also packed a couple pair
of Capri’s, shorts and a skirt—
all under 18 pounds!
Travel Shoes—Everyone
knows shoes can be the
heaviest items in your bag.
I was able to travel with just
three pair of shoes: New
Balance runners (perfect for
hiking through ruins), Teva
Sandals (new design allowed
me to wear sightseeing on
Rhodes, on the sailboat, on
the beach and even to dinner!)
and a lighter pair of Sketcher
runners. I also took fip-fops
which were perfect for cold
marble foors, on deck and poolside.
Zip Clean Washing Machine (…or
Laundry on the Go)—The answer to
packing light: pack for a week and do
laundry. We knew in advance that our
Villa had a washing machine but no
dryer (similar to most European set-ups),
so we packed
accordingly. On
the sailboat we
were able to wash
our clothes in the
sink & hang to
dry topside. My
laundry secret is
to turn a gallon-
sized Ziploc bag
into a mini-
washing machine
by flling it with
water and travel
soap (shampoo in a pinch), toss in socks/
underwear, agitate and repeat with clean
water for the rinse cycle.
3 items that helped keep my bag under
18 pounds:
Large coton scarf: I pack a large scarf
for every trip: to cover my shoulders in
cathedrals and mosques, to stay warm
dining outside in the evening, and as a
blanket on the plane.
Silk long-underwear top: In addition
to my tech tops, I took one silk long-
sleeved top which was perfect for the
night we slept on-deck under the stars
as well as in the airport in the freezing
air conditioning. Natural fabrics are
generally warmer than synthetic and it
fts in a quart size Ziploc bag—now that’s
packing light!
Less Stuf - Cont'd. on Pg. 27
edenvalewines.com
Spring Days
at Voorhies
Mansion
Join us at the Voorhies
Mansion Tasting Room.
House Tours with
Reservations.
Monday - SaTuRday
11-6, Sunday 12-5
2310 VooRHieS Road
MedfoRd, oRegon
541-512-2955 x2
www.slaglecreek.com
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 17 May 2013 Page 17
115 Hangman Way,
Jacksonville
Stunning contemporary home with
vaulted ceilings, wonderful windows,
cozy gas fireplace, hardwood floors in
living room, kitchen and dining area.
Romantic master suite. Oversized 2 car
garage, patios, easy care landscaping.
$289,000
320 Coachman, Jacksonville
Amazing Stage Coach Hills home
with spectacular views overlooking
vineyards and Mt. McLouglin.
Magnificent master suite, formal
dining room, family room, media
room, 3365 sqft of living space plus
an indoor gunite pool with its
own 1100 sq.ft pool room.
$310,000
555 Coachman Drive,
Jacksonville
Incredible Coachman Hills home
with views. 4 bedrooms plus an office
and 31/2 baths, formal entry, formal
dining room, gas fireplace, 2 master
suites, one master on the main level.
Hardwood, slate, granite, custom
cabinetry. Level .94 acre lot.
$749,000
Upper Applegate Road
5 acres
Close to Applegate Lake.
Includes fractional interest in
recreational lot on the river.
Wonderful Views!
$149,900
3275 Old Military
Jacksonville Area
A natural wooded setting w/ plenty of
sunshine. Well-built custom home,
easy tri-level floor plan on 1.9 acres
north of Jacksonville. 3 BR, 2.5 BA,
large lower area w/ office & add’l living
space, darkroom, larger 2 car garage,
large patio & detached studio
$279,900
245 Deer Trail,
Jacksonville
Built in 2000 with approx. 2542 sq.ft.
plus a bonus room, this beautiful
home has room for everyone.
Oak, travertine and granite in
the kitchen and great room, a
breakfast nook, fireplace, formal
dining room, and family room.
$429,000
435 S. Fifth Street,
Jacksonville
Privacy and views from this 1790 sq.ft.
retreat. Nestled in the trees with
vaulted ceilings, a dining room, an is-
land kitchen, a new roof and 3 decks
and good off street parking.
$249,000
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
610 Hueners Lane,
Unit A & B,
Jacksonville
Rare Jacksonville Duplex.
2 BR 1 BA units each
w/garage & a nice fenced
yard. Laundry hook ups in
the garages. Close to every-
thing & always rented.
$254,900
570 N. Oregon,
Jacksonville
Make your own history on
this beautiful .34 acre home
site. Lovely setting with
mature trees. Gas, water,
and sewer to the property.
$152,500
Livingston Road
2.69 acres
Just outside Jacksonville.
Rare opportunity to own a
level, view lot with this
address.
Jacksonville Elementary
$249,900
1100 and 1104 S.
Third St.,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.06 acre in city
limits. Includes 2 separate
tax lots with utilities.
Get both lots for...
$159,900
Placer Hill Drive
5 acres -
Jacksonville
Nestled above Jacksonville
in Vista Wood Ranch.
Underground utilities,
paved road, fabulous
mountain and city views.
$299,000
335 West Oak St - Lot
Jacksonville
Lovely setting.
Near Britt.
$95,000
W
Van Vleet, Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
3390 Ross Lane,
Old Stage Road Area
Incredible vintage home built in 1925
on 5.3 acres overlooking the Rogue
Valley. Just outside Jacksonville with
3.3 irrigated acres. Formal DR, 4 BR
& office. Beautiful wood floors. Lawns,
oak trees, gardens, pastures, stable,
chicken coop & other outbuildings.
$429,000
Kathy H April 2013.qxd:Kathy H April 2013 4/18/13 8:33 PM Page 1
Find the
Perfect Gift
Cookware, Gadgets and
Gifts You Can’t Find
Anywhere Else.
Open Everyday: 10:00am-5:00pm
Escape to Extraordinary
Life slows a pace or two in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. 17 small wineries with big wines can be found
all along the meandering roads and rivers. Come meet
our grape growers, step into their vineyards and share
a glass of wine. Enjoy the scenic drive on Highway
238 just 8 miles west of Jacksonville.
“Wine Country the way it should be.”
– Sunset Magazine
Plan your trip online at:
www.applegatewinetrail.com
Spring wines
are here!
M
a
y
1
9
t
h


There’s no better time to tour the
Trail in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. Meander through scenic
mountain roads, meet the
winemakers, sample a range
of new releases and varietals.
“Wine Country the way
it should be”- Sunset Magazine
The Spring W
ine Event
you don’t w
ant to m
iss!

8 miles
9 miles
Only 8 miles from
Jacksonville
Spring wines
are here!
M
a
y
1
9
t
h


There’s no better time to tour the
Trail in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. Meander through scenic
mountain roads, meet the
winemakers, sample a range
of new releases and varietals.
“Wine Country the way
it should be”- Sunset Magazine
The Spring W
ine Event
you don’t w
ant to m
iss!

Tasting Room
4554 South Stage Road
(one mile east of downtown Jacksonville)
www.dancinvineyards.com
541-245-1133
Tasting Room
Spring Hours
Thursday
through Sunday
and Memorial Day
12 to 7

Corporate and Group Rates
541-899-2050 | 830 5th St Bistro • Wine Bar
www.dejavubistrowinebar.com
Déjà Vu
Tour 14 Local Wineries with our
Exclusive Wine Package
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
The McCully House Inn
240 E. California St. | 541.899.2050
A Part of Country House Inns Jacksonville | www.countryhouseinnsjacksonville.com
Home of:
Jacksonville Review Page 20 May 2013
{Saturday, May 4, 10:00am-4:00pm, Sunday, May 5,
Noon-3:30pm: FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARy
BOOK SALE, Jacksonville Library.
{Sunday, May 5, 11:00am-5:00pm: FRAU
KEMMLING SCHOOLHAUS BREWHAUS
"MAIFEST," Bigham Knoll Campus.
See article on page 4.
{Thursday, May 9, 8:30am: CHAMBER
MONTHLy GENERAL MEETING, second
Thursday each month, Old City Hall.
See 'Chamber Chat' on page 12.
{Friday, May 10 & Saturday, May 11, 10:00am-
2:00pm: JACKSONvILLE GARDEN CLUB
SALE, next to the Post Ofce. See article on page 4.
{Saturday, May 11 & Sunday, May 12, 10:00-
3:00pm: HANLEy FARM HERITAGE
PLanT SaLe & mOTHer'S day
LunCHeOn. See article on page 10.
{Saturday, May 11, 10:00am: CEMETERy
HISTORy SATURDAy, Jacksonville Historic
Cemetery. See article on page 10.
{Saturday, May 11, 10:00am-3:00pm: KIDS DAy
aT CraTer rOCK muSeum. Second
Saturday of the month. Call 541-664-6081 for info.
{Thursday, May 16, 6:30-8:30pm: J'viLLe fire
DEPT COMMUNITy CLASSES, "When to
Go -When to Stay." See schedule on page 13.
{Friday, May 17, 7:00pm: MOvIE NIGHT AT OLD
CITy HALL, Scaramouche. See article on page 13.
{Saturday, May 18, 8:00am-Noon: CEMETERy
CLEAN-UP DAy, Jacksonville Historic
Cemetery. See article on page 10.
{Sunday, May 19, 11:00am-5:00pm: UNCORKED
BARREL TOUR, applegate Wineries.
See article on page 5.
{Thursday, May 23, 7:30pm: JACKSONvILLE
eLemenTary'S SPrinG muSiCaL,
disney's Beauty & the Beast Jr, Brit grounds.
See article on page 26.
{Saturday, May 25, 11:00am-5:00pm: ROAM THE
ROGUE SPRING PASSPORT TOUR, Upper
rogue valley vinters. See ad on page 10.
{Sunday, May 26 & Monday, May 27, 11:00am-
3:00pm: MEMORIAL DAy MEET & GREET,
Jacksonville Historic Cemetery. See article on page 10.
EVENTS CALENDAR { MAY 2013
MAY
DAVID PINSKY
IT BEATS WORKIN’
DAN TILLER
L.E.F.T.
GREG FREDRICK & FRIENDS
BRIAN SWANN BAND
TIM MITCHELL
ROBBIE DACOSTA TRIO
DAVID PINSKY
THE RHYTHM KINGS
THIS MONTH AT
THE BELLA
2
3 & 4
9
10 & 11
16
17 & 18
23
24 & 25
30
31 & 6-1
170 WEST CALIFORNIA STREET, JACKSONVILLE • 899-1770
J a c k s o n v i l l e A r t E v e n t s
Ma y 2 0 1 3
May 3 - 27: Art Presence Art Center “Threads to
New Worlds - A Collection of Fiber Arts”
This month The Weaver’s Guild of Oregon
presents a juried show of 30 textile art works
by 24 Oregon artists, including 3 award-
winning fiber artists from the Rogue Valley.
There will be weaving, spinning and bobbin
lace demonstrations by members of the
Rogue Valley Handweavers’ Guild and the
Saturday Handweavers’ Guild.
You are invited to an opening reception on
Friday, May 10 from 5-7pm.
Art Presence now curates the art exhibits
at the Medford & Jacksonville Libraries!
Jacksonville Library:

Naverson Room, through May 17:
Watercolor paintings by Art Presence
Founder Anne Brooke.
• Naverson Room, May 18 - July 17:
Paintings by Art Presence board
member Katharine Gracey.

Front Entrance, May 20 - July 1:
Display of military memorabilia in
honor of vets & active service people.
Medford Library: See copper art by Art
Presence member Randall Grealish now through July 17.
Art Presence Art Center is open every Fri - Sun
from 11am - 5pm. This show will also be open for viewing
on Memorial Day. We are located at 206 N. Fifth St.
art-presence.org
May 1 - 31: Judy Elliott’s Dragonfly Designs West
GoodBean Coffee Company
This month Art Presence member Judy
Elliott returns for a featured exhibition of
handsewn kimonos and Happi (hip-length)
coats, exquisite hand-painted silk scarves,
fans and wall hangings, and hand-painted
paper umbrellas - Perfect gifts for Mother’s
Day! We anticipate a gorgeous show with a
very special atmosphere your mom will
love! yourkimono.com
May 8 - June 12: Guest Artist Dan Elster
South Stage Cellars
Dan is known for capturing amazing imagery
of wildlife birds and other wildlife through
the art of photography. Join resident artist
Cheryl D. Garcia and Dan at a reception May
18th from 1-3pm.  elsterphotography.com
May 19th: Cheryl D. Garcia
“UnCorked” at Red Lily Vineyards
This popular artist continues to create
amazing sculptural metal art ~ her latest
works will be on display at Red Lily for the
'UnCorked' wine tour.  Purchase tickets at
applegatewinetrail.com, or just come and
enjoy art in the beautiful Applegate Valley. 
Art Around the Valley
May 21, 6:30-8pm: “Why Art Matters”
Join an informal alliance of southern Oregon arts leaders,
including members of Jacksonville's Art Presence Art
Center, for the first in a series of discussions about the
many reasons why visual art matters to our communities,
hosted this month by Rogue Gallery and Art Center. Learn
why the arts are vital to our quality of life, education, and
economy and join the conversation at this FREE public
gathering! roguegallery.org 541-772-8118
www.soartists.com ~ soar@soartists.com
Art Event Calendar provided by
Hannah West Design, LLC ~ 541.899.2012
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featured: Ultimate Roman ShadeS
pedicures
541-899-5611 for men
190 E. California Street - Jacksonville www.daisycreeknailspa.net
DaisyCreek
Nail Spa and Waxing Boutique
women
&
facial technician, Catherine Bileau
-Gift certificates -
541 941 0694
541 621 8785
facials
manicures
IonCleanse Foot Detox technician, Kathy Gee
New additional staff...
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 21 May 2013
Thank You.
2013
Jacksonville/Medford
L
ast summer, GoodBean owner
Mary Kell and art curator Hannah
West of Art Presence fell in love
with the hand-painted silk creations
by Judy Elliot. This month, Judy’s
“Dragonfy Designs West” collection,
featuring a hand-sewn kimono and a
spectacular hand-painted black and red
hibiscus wall hanging will be on display
along with other work.
Since last summer, Judy
has made plans to get
married, moved into a
new home, started a new
career and painted a lot
of silk. You’ll be treated
to an array of stunning
pieces that will make very
special gifts for Mother’s
Day. Along with hand-
sewn coton kimonos and Happi coats,
hand-painted silk scarves, handheld fans
and wall hangings, expect to see hand-
painted paper Japanese-style umbrellas!
Judy says, “Growing up in Hawaii,
I absorbed the tastes and cultures of
the Islands. My father, a photographer,
blessed me with an artistic eye for exotic
colors and shapes. Early on, I developed
an interest in Japanese fashion and design,
particularly the Kimono and Happi
(pronounced “Hoppi”) Coat, which I often
wore as a child while dancing.”
Judy adds, “Silk comes from the silk
worm and is spun into threads to weave
into various items. While visiting a silk
carpet manufacturing facility in Turkey, I
learned more about how the threads are
formed and used…it
is actually very strong
and durable. Silk is a
unique item to paint on
and requires trial and
error before beginning
the process. I enjoy
working with silk,
experimenting with
new ways to use it.”
Hannah West notes,
“We anticipate a colorful show with
graceful designs that will create a lovely
ambience in the GoodBean for everyone
to enjoy this month. And, we look
forward to seeing you and your Mom
on Mother’s Day 2013, and hope you
consider one of Judy’s gorgeous pieces for
a gift she will never forget!”
Hand-painted Silk on Display
in May at GoodBean
Christian Hamilton, Principal Broker
541-621-0679
chamilton@windermere.com
www.jvilleagent.com
THIS MONTH’S FEATURED PROPERTY
590 Powderhorn Drive
Jacksonville
Talk to Christian Today!
505 N Fifth St, J acksonville, OR97530
Beautifully designed open foor plan, 4 bedroom 3 bath home with
stunning views of the valley, Mt. McLoughlin & city lights from both
the home and large outdoor deck. $925,000
Incredible Estate Home in
exclusive Coachman Hills
590 Powderhorn Drive, Jacksonville
"A Taste of Strawberries" will once
again be a part of Jacksonville's "Taste of
Summer" when Jacksonville Presbyterian
church holds their annual old-fashioned
Strawberry Festival on June 8 from
11:30am to 2:30pm at the Historic Church
on California Street. Suggested donation
for the generous strawberry shortcake is $3
with all the proceeds going to the Historic
Church Preservation Fund.
An added atraction on the lawn will be
the "River of Life Band" featuring good old
gospel songs.
Strawberry Festival at Historic Church in June
541-702-2258
100 E. California Street • Jacksonville
Dine-in or Take-out
Now open in Ashland & Grants Pass
130 N. 5th, Jacksonville • 541-899-2977
Open Tuesday - Saturday, 7am - 2pm
Sunday, 7am-1pm • Breakfast Only
Yum!
a whole lotta’
Jacksonville Review Page 22 May 2013
...behind the BLUEDOOR
541.899.3242 • 155 north 3rd street • jacksonville
HURRY IN!
NEW shipments are in...and
great new GARDEN PIECES
MADE IN OREGON!
Get your garden READY...
SPRING IS HERE!
OBELISKS...TRELLISES...
STAKES...Oh my!
We have MORE New Garden Art IN!
My Neighbor's Garden
by Kay Faught
more
online
3223 Taylor Road • Central Point • 541.840.6453
Upcoming Saturday
Classes are great for
kids and the gardeners
who care for them!
Need garden advice?
Use our design and
consult service!
SHOOTING STAR
NURSERY
wholesale • retail • design & consultation
Join Our
Saturday
Classes
• Mother’s Day Kids Class, make
a pot for mom complete with
flowers
• How to create a beautiful potted
arrangement
• Fun New Perennials
• Creating a miniature garden
Please register at
www.roguevalleynursery.com/class
Saturday Mornings
at Shooting Star Nursery
Shooting Star Nursery is ofering a
wide array of Saturday morning classes
on caring for your plants and trees.
Unless otherwise noted, all classes begin
at 10:00am and will be held at the nursery.
For parents, there are some age-appropriate
classes and there will be a sandbox, treasure
hunt, and some kid-friendly activities and
refreshments available.
May 4th and 5th, Master Gardener
Spring Fair at the Expo Center—come see
us at the fair! We will have many unusual
plants, edibles, and poted arrangements
that you may not have seen at the nursery.
May 4th and 5th- Master Gardener Spring
May 11th, Mothers Day Kids class—
Bring the kids and have them decorate
a pot for Mom! Then they can pick out
a plant to make it even more special.
Registration fee-$5, includes 4” plant.
May 18th, How to create a beautiful
poted arrangement—Tired or ripping out
annuals every year? Let us show you how
to make an all season interest container
using shrubs, perennials, and grasses. It’s
easy, beautiful, and a great way to reuse,
recycle, and reduce! Registration fee-$10,
you will also receive a 10% of gift certifcate
towards supplies, or bring your own.
May 25th, Fun new perennials—Come
get a tour and frst look at some of the
exciting new perennials we have. We will
show you how best to use them and get
the most out of them. Many meet our
standards of long blooming, drought
tolerant, deer resistant, or easy care. No
registration fee.
June 1st, Create a miniature garden—
location-Blue Door Garden Store in
Jacksonville. Come learn how to create
the new trend in container gardening-
Miniature Gardens. We will show you
how to make your own personalized and
creative mini worlds in a pot, complete
with live plants. Registration fee-$10, you
will also receive a 10% of gift certifcate
towards supplies.
For the entire schedule of classes for May
and June, please see our website at www.
roguevalleynursery.com. See ad this page.
“My Neighbors
Garden” is
actually one of my
neighbors! Ron
and Julie Kantor
are newbies to
Jacksonville, transplanting here after two
long years of building and waiting for the
timing to move from their Napa home.
Right of the
bat, the Kantors
had to deal with
their Wells Fargo
home's hillside
grade issues.
After working
through re-design
and retaining
wall issues, they
are now tucked
into their home
and working full tilt on design of their
back garden…or more specifcally,
their “mission style, hint of Asian,
retreat.” Entering their home, your eye is
immediately drawn to the large windows
framing the structures, natural elements,
and forms evolving in the garden. On
the same level, the view is a continuous
sweep from home to
outdoor. I absolutely
fell in love with the
environment they
are creating, and it
made me want to rip
out my garden and
start over! (A not-so-
happy thought for
my husband!)
Ron and Julie's
excitement is evident
as they talk about the garden! Both are
fnding therapy and joy in designing and
fnding out what they have in common
with the selection of plants, pots, and
decor. Ron had a very clear idea of what
he wanted, but it changed due
to water diversion issues and
deer. Neither like the “fence
look” so with the help of a
landscaper, they put “wants”
down on paper, and integrated
them into dealing with those
issues. The water problem
drove them to what is now
the focus of the garden…a
gorgeous dry creek bed
running the entire width of
the back. Flanked on the sides
by mounded planting beds,
(a feature repeated throughout) garden
art, specimen trees, and large boulders
are already creating a look of their own!
A beautiful contrast lies just beyond the
creek bed where the back half of their
property is left natural. It continues in
a mesmerizing pastoral scene under
small oaks, creating a
canopy over gentle grasses.
Afternoon sunlight warms
the grass tips and tree bark, providing a
landscaping feature money cannot buy,
while deer graze in the shadows.
The garden boulders tie into the texture
of the rock retaining wall, creating a
strong 3-way partnership with the creek
bed. In the center
of the garden, a
meandering stone
patio surrounds
a 3-foot pillar
stone fountain that
trickles onto rocks.
Rock slab benches
placed perfectly
along the walking
area unify the
entire garden.
Julie's greatest joy has been discovering
all the plants available that she can play
with! Suggested plants were not used, as
Julie and Ron take pleasure in fnding the
perfect, unusual specimen tree or shrub
for each spot. Each plant has its own story
and was selected based on what they love,
and fts the look they want. Instead of
a “plan,” they are
creating from the
heart and are taking
“one plant at a time.”
Rustic terracota
pots hold bamboo.
Another perfectly
placed, earthy glazed
pot holds a curly
“Walking stick.”
From tiny islands of
sea thrift, to Japanese
maple, a creamy white dogwood in a back
bed, shade tucked hellebores, and several
individual evergreens like a Hudson
Spruce, it is becoming part of who they are.
Both mentioned they feel like “parents”
each day, looking at each
plant and seeing what it is
doing, and how it has grown,
or for Julie, fnding a new
bird sharing what they have
planted! She and Ron both
love to just “be” in the garden
and enjoy the time they have
to enjoy it. Each step in the
process is being savored! In
no time they will be enjoying
evenings with a glass of wine,
as they listen to their fountain
bubble, watch the birds, and
see how “their children” have grown!
Kay is the owner of Blue Door Garden
Store, located at 155 N Third St. Specializing
in paraphernalia for the home gardener; she
carries garden gifts, decor, and a wide variety
of pots, tools, gloves, and organic product.
See ad this page.
View Lots For Sale
Only 5 Lots Left!
1/2 mile to downtown Jacksonville
Prices Starting at $130,000
.40 to .61 Acre Lots
City Services
For more information please visit...
Take California St S. Oregon Applegate Granite Ridge
Jeanne Freel • 541-821-2938 • Ste. 200, 691 Murphy Rd. Medford, OR
www.Old Stage Real Estate.com
GRANITE RIDGE
Freel November 2012:Freel November 2/21/13 8:43 AM Page 1
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 23 May 2013
artisanlandscapesinc.com
Love Your Landscape by Adam Haynes
Time to Celebrate Spring Colors
Adam Haynes is the owner of Artisan Landscapes, Inc.
Contact him at 541-292-3285, adam@artisanlandscapesinc.
com, or visit his website at www.artisanlandscapesinc.com.
See ad this page.
The Weed Wrangler by Bob Budesa
Bob Budesa moved to Jacksonville 20 years ago, retired
from BLM after 38 years where he oversaw the noxious weed
program with Medford District BLM (850,000 acres) for 20
years, worked in Wild Horse Program in 1970’s and was a
member of JWA for 2 years.
Where style
meets elegance.
JacksonvilleCompany.com
Jacksonville Company
155 W. California Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillecompany.com
S
pring ofcially arrived
on March 20 and with it
the chance to spend more
time outdoors amidst new growth
with a reinvigoration of color and
texture in the landscape. Some
would say that spring is the best season of all, and I’d
have a hard time arguing with
them. It’s always exciting working
alongside Mother Nature in
bringing to life new outdoor areas
in our town and region.
When we think of spring, it’s
important to remember that the
things we do for the interior of our
homes carries over into outdoor
spaces. You probably know what
I’m talking about—spring cleaning!
Most of us would agree that our
homes beneft from a good spring cleaning and this is
equally true for landscaping. The frst, most obvious
thing to do is clearing out dead plant material, which is
really important. Most properties can be cleared of old
growth and unwanted plant material in as litle time as a
weekend. But there are a number of other steps needed
to “clean up” a landscape, including tearing out outdated
designs, and incorporating an irrigation system. Adding
or seasonally updating an irrigation system can improve
the strength of the spring growth in any outdoor area.
With a clean, fresh and newly-irrigated lawn, new
plantings can be just the solution for a springtime
update. Some of the most traditional blooms we associate
with spring weather are those that grow from bulbs,
so these would naturally have to be planted in the fall.
Sometimes I like to take look at a landscape in the spring
and note the color that should be added with bulbs
the coming fall. I would advise that you make sure to
record your plans for bulb planting, so that when fall
comes around, you’ll have some specifc steps to take. In
a diferent vein, planting a vegetable
garden in the spring can bring much
more immediate results. Often, a
dedicated planting bed for vegetables
can transform an outdoor area from
one that is beautiful to one that’s
benefcial and provides nutritional
foodstufs at the same time!
This is a great time of year to take
note of how spring colors bursting
from your yard can be incorporated
into outdoor areas. If you have
outdoor furniture that is starting to fade, an update
can be achieved by adding a few new throw pillows,
or simply replacing the outdoor cushions with one’s
complimenting your garden plantings. Annual blooms
can be added to planters and garden beds for a minimal
cost with a maximum return in color impact. I invite
you to join me in celebrating the season by embracing
the beauty, hope and new life that a litle atention to
colorful details can bring to your outdoor living area.
P
uncturevine is a tap-
rooted annual, with
small, 5-petaled yellow
fowers, and small, hairy opposite
leaves. Its tendrils can reach 10’ in length! It produces
thorny seeds, which when mature will split into smaller
segments. The thorns dry to iron hardness, and can be
transported in tires, feet, shoes, etc.
Learn to recognize this plant early—This plant starts
producing seeds almost immediately after germination!
Recognizing it and killing it before seed production is
crucial in gaining control. The mid-vein on the seedling
leaves is a clear indicator that you’re dealing with the right
villain, and this size is just the right time to get ahead of the
seed production curve.
Use the right tool at the right time—At seedling stage,
this plant can be easily controlled by cuting the taproot,
spraying, burning, even pouring boiling water on it! Once it
starts producing seeds, those methods no longer apply. The
only method for true control in seed-production stage is to
sever the taproot, and bag the plant. Complete removal is the
only way to control the plant once seeds are produced, and
I’ve seen plants as small as silver dollars producing seed!
If the plants you’re dealing with have produced seed,
for Pete’s sake, don’t drive there!—If and when it’s safe,
get the propane burner out and scorch the area. Even
if you don’t kill the seeds, you’ll burn of the spines,
thereby removing it’s method of transportation.
Try this site—htp://oregon.gov/ODA/PLANT/WEEDS/
index.shtml. It’s important to utilize all the tools at our
disposal. If you’re a more tactile person, a book I’ve
found quite useful (great pictures) is Weeds of the West.
The city and county have
many priorities, so don’t be
mistaken into thinking that
road frontage that abuts
your property will be taken
care of by someone else!
Remember, your property
will sufer from lack of
weed control along roads
adjacent to your property, and your property will lose
value, so take charge! The city and county appreciate
your help. Also remember, if you use herbicides, read
and follow the label explicitly.
Questions—please contacte me at 541-326-2549 or
bob_budesa@yahoo.com.
Keep a sharp eye out!
{541}8998000
245westmainstreet
jacksonville,or
(oneblocktobritt)
elanguestsuites.com
purepanache!
élanguestsuites&gallery
5th Street FlowerS
555 N. 5th Street • Jacksonville
541-899-9208
www.5thstflowers.com
(next to Pony Espresso)
Mon-Fri 10am-5:30pm
Saturday 10am-2pm
Mother’s Day is Sunday, May 12th
Jacksonville Review Page 24 May 2013
Speaking of Antiquing
with J . Mark Madge, Sterling Creek Antiques
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
HomeCare
by Graham Farran, Expert Properties
S
outhern Oregon seems to
be built on an ant hill and
we always receive questions
about how to get rid of the litle
intruders. We Googled, “How to get rid of Ants” and
found lots of advice and ideas which we recapped below.
Since there are too many ideas for us to test, we have
bolded comments on methods we at Expert Properties
have tested and found successful.
Adhesive Tape —Create a “moat” around the object by
surrounding it with adhesive tape placed sticky side up.
Boric Acid—Give ants the heave-ho by sprinkling
boric acid along any cracks or crevices where you’ve
spoted the intruders. Note: boric acid can be toxic if
ingested by young children or pets. This is one solution
we have tried and it worked.
Chalk—Keep ants at bay by drawing a line around home
entry points. Ants will be repelled by the calcium carbonate
in chalk, which is actually made up of ground-up and
compressed shells of marine animals. Scater powdered
chalk around garden plants to repel ants and slugs.
Cloves and Bay Leaves—Sprinkle ground cloves and/
or crushed bay leaves—ants hate them and will run
screaming… listen hard, they have tiny mouths!
Colony-Find the Source—If you fnd the colony, you
have it made and can kill the eggs and the queen. We
followed a line of ants to a wood pile, lifted up some logs
to fnd thousands of eggs and noticed a mad shufe as
the worker ants tried to carry the eggs to safety…they
were stopped by a can of RAID.
Flour—Sprinkle a line of four along the backs of
pantry shelves or wherever ants are entering the house.
Repelled by the four, ants won’t cross over the line.
Lemons—Squirt lemon juice on door thresholds and
windowsills and holes or cracks where the ants are
geting in. And, scater small slices of lemon peel around
the outdoor entrance.
Mint—Ants don’t like mint so pour dry mint or extract
on their path—they won’t cross the area. Keep repeating
and they will usually go away.
Oranges—In a blender, make a smooth puree with orange
peels in 1 cup warm water and slowly pour the solution over
and into anthills to send the litle pests packing.
Pepper—Ants are always looking for sugar so give
them pepper instead. Cayenne pepper sprinkled along
the backs of your countertops or on your baseboards will
say, “No sugar ahead!”
Raid—Do advance work and take everything out from
under your kitchen sink and wash it all with a cleaning
solution. Then using "Raid" Ant killer, spray around
where the pipes come out of the foor or wall. Spray
along the foor line, including near your refrigerator
and around your window. We have used this at Expert
Properties and it has worked well.
Salt—Intercept them by sprinkling salt across the door
frame or directly on their paths and you will discourage
them from crossing this barrier.
Talcum Powder—Scater talcum powder liberally
around the house foundation and other points of entry
such as doors and windows. Other efective organic
repellents include cream of tartar, borax, powdered
sulfur, and oil of cloves. You can also try planting mint
around the house foundations.
Terro—You simply set Terro traps out on your kitchen
sink or whereever you have ants and in theory the ants
not only get poisoned but take the poison back to the
nest. This worked well for us.
vinegar—Pour equal parts water and white vinegar into
a spray botle and spray it on anthills and around areas
where you see the insects—they hate the smell of vinegar
In case the above mentioned home remedies don’t
work, seek professional help and hire an exterminator.
If you have any additional comments or ideas on how to
get rid of ants, please give us your input on our blog at htp://
expertprops.com/blog/. Expert Properties specializes in real estate
management, sales and furnished rentals. See ad on back page.
How to Get Rid of Ants
T
here are many answers that come from asking
the above question. Many collectors may
know the diference, but for a lot of us, it can
be confusing. Since purchasing an item when you are
unaware of its true place in history may cost you, a
review of the various designations is in order.
Collectible: In general, items of signifcance, beauty,
value or interest that are not “Antique” (100 years older
or more) fall into the realm of collectibles. However, not
all collectibles are limited editions and many of them
have been around for decades.
Examples include popular turn-
of-the-last-century posters, Art
Deco and Art Nouveau items,
carnival and Depression-era
glass. Most people today refer
to collectible items as those that
have been manufactured between
1960 and 1979. In addition,
there exists the “contemporary
collectibles,” featuring items like
plates, fgurines, bells, graphics,
steins, Beanie Babies and dolls
from the 1980’s and up. So when you compare antiques
to collectibles, remember the saying, “Antiques stand the
test of time.” Their value remains stable. Collectibles,
however, are priced more on a whim and their long-term
value is highly speculative. Use caution when investing
in collectibles as opposed to antiques.
vintage: Vintage refers to objects actually from a
certain time period. Some people defne vintage as
having a specifc date range, but in most cases, objects are
considered vintage depending on the date of manufacture.
In other words, an item described as “vintage” should
speak of the era in which it was produced and be
representational and recognizable as belonging to the era
in which it was made. “Vintage” would not be used on an
object that is less than 20 years old.
Retro: The word “retro” means “relating, or being
the styles and fashion of the past; fashionably nostalgic
or old-fashioned.” Retro furniture may not actually be
old but it references styles of the recent past. Most retro
items would fall within the 1970-1989 timeframe.
Mid-Century: Mid-Century is defned roughly as
the time period 1935-1965. During this time, there were
many architectural and interior designers who took Art
Deco, the prevailing style of the
day, and advanced the design
elements with a sleeker, more
horizontal-line. Architects such
as Quincy Jones, Albert Frey
and Richard Neutra created an
exterior style that we recognize
as Mid-Century. Furniture
designers such as Heywood
Wakefeld, the Eameses, Arne
Jacobsen and Isamu Noguchi
created the same for interior
designs. With the returning
servicemen from World-War II who were exposed
to new design elements in the European and Asian
markets, there became a great demand for the “new”
Danish Modern, Chinese-Modern and Italian designs
that defne Mid-Century.
These are general guidelines to help defne the
diferent terms you will encounter while “Antiquing”
or shopping at a fea market. There is a lot of fun and
joy in collecting and buying your treasures so it’s
important for an item to “speak” to you whether it is a
collectible, vintage, retro or mid-century. You should feel
a connection to it and appreciate its beauty.
See Sterling Creek Antiques ad on next page.
Collectible, Vintage, Retro, Mid-Century...What is it?
214 E. California Street (next to Las Palmas)
(541) 899-1972
Over 1200 Quilts!
Fabrics, Tapestries, Gifts & more!
Kansas Baltimore Sampler by Jacksonville Museum Quilters
•Quilt Finishing
•Custom Designs
•Special Requests
•Hand or machine quilting
Full line of Jim Shore
& Heartwood Creek Statues
Largest US website with
American-made Quilts!
CountryQuilts.com
or QuiltsR4U.com
email: countryquilts@msn.com
Enter as Strangers, Leave as Friends
Britt Concerts Under the Stars
541-899-0255
245 N. 5th Street
www.magnolia-inn.com
Book your room
reservations
early!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 25 May 2013
TRANSFORMATION
Before the Transformation
Featured Designer: Ava Living, Homelife
Magazine, Cover Stories: “FabulousKitchen
Remodel” and ”A Family Manor”
CHERYL VON TRESS
DESIGN GROUP
Google us
and like us on
Facebook!
Let us transform your space!
Full-Service Design or Hourly
Consulting: 541-951-9462
• Your Friendly, Professional
Pharmacy Staff
• Buy Local - Support Local
• Short Wait Time
• We Specialize in Custom
Compounding
• We offer Delivery to Your Home
• Unique Gifts - Large Selection
2355 West Main St, Medford
(541) 772-2330
www.WestMainPharmacy.com
The
Crown Jewel
Jewelry Art Decor Gifts
www.thecrownjewel.net
  
165 E. California St.
Jacksonville
541-899-9060
Inspiring Gifts,
For Moms
and
Grads.
Mention this ad and get a FREE tote bag with purchase.
Custom Designs Expert Repair Cash for Gold
. .
*While supplies last.
Estate Jewelry
Native American Jewelry
Gifts for Mom
Ofer expires 05/31/2013 Hurry, valid for frst 50 new members
Limit one per household. No cash value. Access card fee, other fees and some restrictions may apply. Valid only for local residents on frst visit at participating clubs. ©2012 Snap Fitness, Inc.
Jacksonville
650 G Street
(541) 702-0700
Across from Gary West Meats on G Street
snapftness.com/jacksonvilleor
—or—
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At Ark Built, we pride ourselves in providing high performance, energy effcient
building and renovation services with a common sense approach. DESIGN•BUILD
C ONS T R UC T I ON S E R V I C E S
541.951.3617 ARKBUILTENERGY.COM
Ark Built is proud to have been the exclusive
builder for the new Red Lilly Vineyards winery
(pictured) and the 200th house built for
Extreme Makeover: Home Edition in 2011
CUSTOM HOMES • HOME RENOVATIONS
COMMERCIAL BUILDING • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES
150 S. Oregon, Jacksonville, Oregon 97530 541-702-2224
P
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Jacksonville Review Page 26 May 2013
( 541) 899- 9999
725 N. 5th St., Jacksonville
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Author and Illustrator Kurt Cyrus to
visit Jacksonville Elementary!
The 3rd Annual Jacksonville
Elementary School’s Writers’ Festival
will be held on Thursday, May 2 from
6:00-8:00pm in the school gymnasium.
Author and Illustrator, Kurt Cyrus, will
be the event’s keynote speaker. Mr. Cyrus
is the author and illustrator of numerous
children’s books, including The Voyage of
Turtle Rex, Tadpole Rex, and Hotel Deep.
He has also illustrated a number of books
such as Hibernation Station and Mammoths
on the Move. The Writers’ Festival is a
school-wide event, featuring the work of
every student at Jacksonville Elementary.
During the festival, students meet in small
groups with local authors, journalists,
educators and other writing enthusiasts
who serve as mentors and facilitate a
discussion of each student’s writing. We
invite the community and local authors
to join us for his keynote address. Thank
you for supporting and celebrating our
young authors!
Tennis racket and Baseball mit drive
We are asking the community to
donate any new or used tennis rackets
or baseball gloves for our students to
use in conjunction with our Playground
Equipment Rotation Project. Please feel
free to drop of the equipment at the
front desk of the school. If you are able
to support the project in any way, or
you need to arrange for us to pick up the
equipment, please leave a message for
Sandy Metwally at the school (541-842-
3790). Thank you!
Jacksonville elementary's 2013 Brit
Musical!
The 25th Spring musical is coming!
Our 4th-6th grade students will perform
disney’s Beauty and the Beast Jr. on the
Brit stage in Jacksonville on Thursday,
May 23, at 7:30pm. Please join us for an
evening of fun, talent and inspiration.
Tickets will be for sale at the box ofce on
the evening of the play. Don't miss this
wonderful community event!
Father/Daughter Dance
Our frst annual Father/Daughter Dance
is scheduled to be held in May (date/time
TBD). The girls will dance the evening
away with their special loved one (father or
grandfather or uncle, etc...). We are looking
forward to this fun event!
The fog rolled in and the rain began
when we moved to Jacksonville in
November, 1995. I loved our new home
and community, but I remember looking
out at the rain in January wondering
how long? When spring came, my
concern disappeared! I had no memory
of living anywhere with this astonishing
abundance of beauty. Walking in the
woods was an introduction to wildfowers
I had never seen; birds
I’d never glimpsed or
heard. Now, 17 years
later, winter is past
and spring is here!
Patches of sunlight
coax a few early
bloomers like previews
of coming atractions.
Teasing notes of
songbirds stop us in
our tracks for a one-
sided game of hide and
see. Today, the curtain has come up on
the main atraction: fowers exuberantly
blooming and birdsongs heard on the
Woodland Trails.
Along the trail there is a forgoten litle
handful of elegant Fawn Lilies with one
dandelion included, a child’s intuitive
knowledge of complimentary color. They
lie on the ground wilted and crumpled.
Perhaps they were innocently picked
and ofered to a parent and received
a scolding, spoiling the wonder, and
therefore discarded. Or perhaps it was
carelessly taken and thrown away. I hope
neither scenario happened. I remember
long ago when I was fve, picking so
many dandelions that I had to carry them
in my blouse. I was on a path next to a
stream trickling through a feld to my
grandma’s house. It seemed I held all the
brilliance that nature could ofer in those
soft, yellow heads and I ofered them to
grandma. First she gently taught me that
fowers are to be freely shared, but when
found in the woods, we leave them to live
their lives in their natural home. Then she
taught me that the Dandelion can be used
as food and drink and she placed one
fower under my chin to show me how
it could detect whether or not a person
liked buter—an amazing fower!
Today Shooting Stars abound;
their stems each form a French curve
ending in the perky red violet fower
with a dark purple accent. They make
luxurious splashes of color all through
the woodlands. Hound’s Tongue waits
patiently for those other wild fowers to
make its grand entrance, now it is out
mingling among them creating a stunning
display. It parades a palete of color that
plays across the blue family from sky
blue to ultramarine and fnally fading to
lavender before it is spent. The leaves of
the plant suggest its name as they wrap
up around as if licking the thick stalk.
With the woodlands bursting with
beautiful color and fragrance, the birds
have joined in for a late morning songfest
adding another
sensory dimension to
this morning’s walk.
Hearing a woodpecker,
I look high and low to
fnd it and discover an
Acorn Woodpecker,
possibly on its way
home from Arizona
and just stopping by for
a litle nourishment. I
know where to look for
my favorite Woodland
friend: the shy Rufus Sided Towhee.
It is black with burnt orange sides and
white breast—and even has stripes and
spots—it just doesn’t get much beter! Its
song is “Towhee,” frst and second verses
and chorus alike. I hear it on the ground
in the dry leaves under the bushes. I still
have a small book from childhood simply
called “Birds.” It is one of the Golden
Library of Knowledge books. I loved
it and it shows; the book is well-worn
and thumbed-through. On page 51 is
an illustration of the Towhee explaining
that it is sometimes mistaken for a robin
and feeds on the ground. The pages that
aroused new curiosity in me as a child are
now a litle brown, but it opened a door
of fascination that has accompanied me
through life.
When I was growing up my
favorite white fowers were Lilacs. No
manufactured scent can come close to
the natural perfume when I bury my
nose into a cluster of lilacs. They helped
awaken in me the wonder of the earth’s
natural treasures. But nothing in my
childhood prepared me for the radiant
purity and simplicity of the Trillium.
Today, after crossing two bridges on
the Woodland trail, we come to a low
area near to Jackson Creek. It has been
expertly staged to focus on the Trillium.
Oh Glorious Day! Each plant has three
wide green leaves surrounding three
white petals with a crown of brilliant
yellow in the center. The petals point to
the heavens and my eyes follow them up
as I whisper a grateful, “Thank You.”
Blooms and Birds on Our Woodland Trails
by Sue Bennett
Rufus Sided Towhee
Debbie Rubaum - The Art & Science of Beauty
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Horsefeather Farms Ranchette
13291 Hwy 238, Applegate, OR
Call for information and reservations: 541-941-0000
Spring cleaning done!
We’re all spruced up!
Mention this ad for 10% off your meal
at the cafe. (One per person, please!)
Weekend or nightly, rustic bunkhouse-style country home
away from home sleeps up to fve. One bedroom with
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Store • Cafe • Gas • ATM
Espresso • Deli • Beer & Wine
Open 7days a week!
Cafe open 6am-3pm
Applegate Store & Cafe
Come on over!
Bring the kids!
Pet friendly!
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 27 May 2013
Family Views
by Michelle Hensman
Expect the Unexpected
²
 RUCH COUNTRY STORE
²
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Located at the "Gateway to the Applegate Valley," our unique country
store has everything to make your day of wine tasting or picnicking the
best. We carry a wide variety of organic and specialty foods along with
conventional items. Our Deli is one-of-a-kind with fresh healthy salads
to sandwiches made your way. Everything is made in our from-scratch
kitchen. We also carry a large selection of LOCAL wines. Stop by and see us!
7350 Hwy 238, Jacksonville • 541-899-8571
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Discover our GROCERY STORE and incredible
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Kiwanis Honors March
Student of the Month
PJ Flores and Kiwanis' Dave Wilson
In April, the Kiwanis Club of
Jacksonville was pleased to honor
PJ Flores as Student of the Month
for March. PJ is a junior at South
Medford High School, and is the
son of Jamie and Tomas Flores of
Medford.
He is currently taking English 3,
Geometry, American History, and
Biology, but his favorite is Ceramics,
and he has been developing skills
working in that class.
His goals include working to get
higher grades so he can go to college.
After college, he wants to work in the
construction industry and become a
construction supervisor.
He says his older sister has infuenced
him the most, pushing him hard to get
his grades up and has always helped him
when needed.
With the type of young people that the
Kiwanis honors each month, the future of
our country is in good hands!
For further information, contact Dave Wilson
at 541-899-1934, e-mail: elkhntr@charter.net.
F
rom the
moment
we become
parents we realize
our lives are no
longer our own; so much more is at
stake. We take the tiny, helpless infant
into our arms and commit our lives to
the new demanding stranger. Without
hesitation we vow to love and protect
them. We promise to share all our worldly
knowledge and experience with them and
expect nothing in return.
We are commited to being successful
and research what professionals consider
to be the best baby proofng products,
safest car seats, strollers and high chairs.
We consciously select toys that will
stimulate curiosity, excitement and
learning. Our bathrooms become small
drug stores flled with pain relievers,
diaper creams, bandages covered with
cartoon characters, stool softeners,
toothache gel…we want to be prepared
for anything.
Well worn copies of What to Expect
When You’re Expecting and the First Year
sit side-by-side on the book shelf; an even
more tatered copy of The Discipline Book
is at the bedside riddled with dog ears,
underlined passages and sticky notes.
Meanwhile, The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem
sits splayed open on the cofee table. We
are proactive, methodical and diligent
parents. However, nothing could have
prepared you for _______ (fll in your
own blank).
As parents our dreams are flled
with images of eternal happiness and
unlimited opportunities for our children.
Every waking moment is focused on
helping them to achieve that happiness
by teaching them about all the wonderful
things the world has to ofer. Through it
all, our mission is to make sure they feel
safe and loved. So what happens when
we fall from grace?
A parenting fact is that going from
feeling omnipotent to incompetent
is inevitable because, in reality,
disappointment, injustice and pain are
all unpredictable. It’s natural to want to
protect our children from harsh reality,
but it’s impossible. We cannot be with
them every moment, everyday to ward
of evil doers. There comes a time when
we must trust that our children will be
cared for by others, trust our adolescent’s
judgment and trust that we are making
the best decision for our children, even
when the options are lousy. And like it
or not others will not care for them as we
would, they will have errors in judgment
and disappoint us on more than one
occasion, and parents, even after doing all
that homework, we will make plenty of
wrong decisions along the way.
Everyone makes mistakes and
sometimes bad things happen to good
people. How we deal with challenging
situations and the emotions they evoke
and how we navigate ourselves and our
children through such adversity is what
makes the diference. It can ultimately
defne who we are and who they will
become. When they make mistakes or
bad things happen to them use it as an
opportunity to teach them how to draw
strength from the experience, learn from
it and eventually ofer/accept forgiveness.
Keep in mind it’s easier for most people
to extend forgiveness than it is to receive
it; which can be detrimental to their
subconscious for years. And clarify the
diference between a victim mentality and
an empowered survivor.
Our actions are the only thing we
can control and we need to make sure
children learn this through conversations
that help them to understand cause
and efect. Children don’t come with
instruction manuals and none of us are
equipped with a What to Expect During
Your Life Expectancy guide. All we can
do is our best and believe that the bad
experiences we endure have a greater
purpose and embrace the notion: that
which does not kill us only makes us
stronger characters!
microfber travel towel: I used this
every day since both the villa and
sailboat only provided 1-2 towels for
each of us. Because of the quick drying
microfber fabric and its XL size, I was
able to use this for an extra towel for the
beach/bath and pool as well as a sarong/
cover-up for my swimsuit, and it packed
down to the size of a paperback book.
Hopefully these tips have inspired you
to try some of these packing light ideas
on a future trip. Save valuable travel
dollars (not to mention your back) and
have less stress while you’re at it. Less
stuf = less stress. A good moto for life.
Local Jacksonville Travel Expert Anne
McAlpin has packed and unpacked over
25,000 times. Her 2013 edition of Pack It
Up Travel Smart, Pack Light includes a new
1-hour DVD on how to pack an 18-pound
carry-on bag for a 2 week
trip and lots of other
valuable travel tips.
www.packitup.com
Less Stuf - Cont'd. from Pg. 16
star
of the
morning
WALDORF BASED PRESCHOOL
Jacksonville Review Page 28 May 2013
Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
541-899-2020
950 N 5th Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillevisionclinic.com
•CompleteVisionCareandPersonalService
•Hundredsofframestochoosefrom
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Jacksonville Vision Clinic
See the diference...
Just across from
the Chevron
station in
Jacksonville!
SightSeeing by J ulie D. Danielson, O.D.
Are Your Arms Too Short?
Julie Danielson, an optometric physician, is available by
appointment at 541-899-2020. See ad this page.
Osteoporosis: It’s More Common than You Think
by By Haidee Roxanne Zamora, MD, Endocrinology, Asante Physician Partners
Rex F. Miller DMD PC
541-899-1924
570 Blackstone Alley • Jacksonville
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I
f you are over the age of 40,
you have probably noticed
a decrease in your ability to
see things up close. This natural
aging process, during which the
eye’s crystalline lens loses its ability
to focus on near objects, is called presbyopia. In early
stages, you may discover that if you just hold things a
litle further away, you are able to focus well enough.
But eventually, as your arms seem too short to reach that
focus, you will need another solution.
While presbyopia cannot be prevented or reversed,
there are now several options available to treat it,
depending on your lifestyle. You may choose reading
glasses, whether prescription or over-the-counter, to
relieve eyestrain while performing near tasks like reading
or using a computer. Over-the-counter type readers will
not correct astigmatism or compensate for a diference
between the right eye and the left eye. In addition, the
inexpensive lens materials used in these readers may
have lesser quality optics which could lead to eyestrain or
headaches. Prescription readers will provide the clearest,
most comfortable vision for near activities.
If you fnd the constant search for reading glasses to
be inconvenient, you may want to consider bifocals.
These lenses allow you to see clearly for far when you
look straight ahead and clearly up close when you gaze
downward. Bifocals may be used even if you do not
need a distance prescription. If you don’t like the look
of bifocal lenses, progressive lenses can give you all the
benefts of a bifocal without the visible line.
Another option for treating presbyopia is contact
lenses. Monovision is the use of a distance contact lens in
the dominant eye and a near contact lens in the other eye.
Alternatively, you may be a candidate for bifocal contact
lenses, which correct distance and near in both eyes.
While laser vision correction will not allow your eyes to
change focus from distance to near like they did when you
were younger, you may opt for monovision correction
similar to the contact lenses above. Other surgical
corrections include a recent advance in cataract surgery in
which the natural lens of the eye is replaced by a fexible
implant. This implant can change position in the eye and
allow you to focus on both distance and near objects.
Presbyopia can be very frustrating, especially if
you have never needed vision correction before. Your
optometrist can evaluate your daily visual demands and
help you to fnd the best solution to meet your needs.
O
steoporosis is a skeletal
disorder that results in
decreased bone strength
and increases the risk of fractures. It
is estimated that 200 million people
have osteoporosis worldwide, with
10 million Americans having the
disease—8 million women and 2
million men. It is projected that by
2020 there will be almost 14 million
Americans with osteoporosis.
Surprisingly, osteoporosis is much more common
than other diseases which usually catch the public’s
atention, and it does not get recognized early enough,
even if the consequences of certain fractures can lead to
death. There are approximately 1.5 million osteoporotic
fractures per year in the United States. This includes
700,000 spine fractures, 300,000 hip fractures, 250,000
wrist fractures and 300,000 other fractures.
Osteoporosis may occur not just in women but also
in men. Aside from family history and menopause in
women, there are several conditions and medications
that may predispose a person to lose bone. The most
common are chronic steroid use, anticonvulsants,
depot progesterone, methotrexate, hyperthyroidism,
hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D defciency, celiac
disease, infammatory bowel disease, alcohol abuse, low
testosterone levels in men, and low estrogen levels in
premenopausal women.
The screening test for osteoporosis is through a DXA
scan/bone mineral density, which is a painless test
similar to geting an X-ray. It is covered by Medicare
and most commercial health plans. Screening is
recommended for:
• All women age 65 and older and men age 70 and
older, regardless of risk factors
• Younger post-menopausal women and men aged 50-
70 and older with risk factors
• Adults with a fragility fracture (fracture occurring
spontaneously, or following minor trauma such as
fall from a standing height)
• Individuals receiving steroids over 3 months or more
• Individuals with a history of primary
hyperparathyroidism
The main goal for treating osteoporosis is to prevent
fractures. This is achieved by modifying risk factors,
addressing secondary causes of osteoporosis and
medications that increase the risk of developing
the disease. There are several medications that are
FDA-approved for the treatment and prevention of
osteoporosis.
• Bisphosphonates (Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, Reclast)
• Denosumab (Prolia)
• Teriparitide (Forteo)
• Calcitonin
• Raloxifene
• Estrogen
In addition to the abovementioned pharmacologic
treatments, calcium and vitamin D supplementation
should also be part of the regimen.
Lately, there has been some controversy about the
use of bisphosphonates because of the noted incidence
of atypical hip fractures and osteonecrosis of the jaw.
As with any treatment, the risks and benefts have to be
weighed and information from research studies has to
be analyzed in the appropriate context. I would advise
discussing questions or concerns regarding the diferent
treatment strategies with your doctor to determine which
is best for you.
Osteoporosis is common and can occur in both
men and women. But the consequences of untreated
osteoporosis----increased risk of fractures---can be
lessened by early detection and timely treatment. If you
or someone you know has risk factors for osteoporosis or
is at a certain age where the risk of osteoporosis is high,
please talk to your doctor about screening.
Dr. Zamora is an endocrinologist with Asante Physician
Partners. She may be reached at 541-479-6777. See ad on page 11.
Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), Acute
Myelogenous Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
are just a few diseases that can be treated by a bone
marrow transplant. Imagine fnding-out that your
husband, wife or child didn’t have long to live without
a bone marrow transplant. Recently, this happened to
a close friend of mine at which time I was shocked to
learn there are 10 million-plus people in the National
Marrow Donor Program Registry and yet many patients
die before they fnd a match. Our friend was fortunate
to have found a match and we are praying the outcome
will result in the long-term remission of his disease.
What can you do to ensure more are able to fnd a
lifesaving match? It's simple, convenient and free. If
you are between 18 & 44, I invite you to come to the
Bigham Knoll Campus in Jacksonville on Tuesday,
May 14th between 10:00am-2:00pm and join the
“Be the Match Registry.” After flling-out a short
registration form and a basic medical questionnaire,
all that’s left is a simple swab from of the cells of your
cheek. It's that easy and by taking 10-20 minutes out of
your day, you could end-up being the life-saving match
that someone's loved one has been waiting for.
Once matched, Be the Match Foundation covers all
costs associated with harvesting marrow from donors.
Although partially funded by the government, much
of their ability to fnd new donors is made possible
through fundraising initiatives. Each completed donor
swab test kit costs the foundation approximately $100.
Our goal at this drive at Bigham Knoll is to register
as many new potential donors as we can to help save
lives, and also raise some money to donate to the Be
the Match Foundation. If you are a corporation or
individual that would like to sponsor this drive in any
way, please contact Cristie Fairbanks at 541-899-2099 or
thefairbanksfamily@yahoo.com. I look forward to seeing
you at the drive on Tuesday, May 14th!
Bigham Knoll Campus is located at 525 Bigham Knoll in
Jacksonville. From the corner of 5th Street and “F” Street (at
Rays Food Market) head east until the street ends at the campus.
Information on marrow donation process taken directly
from the Be The Match website: www.bethematch.org.
Community Bone Marrow Registry Drive
Tuesday, May 14th at Bigham Knoll!
by Cristie Fairbanks
Financial Consultants:
Sharon Richey (541) 779-7759 • Melanie Madden (541) 621-8219
Dennis Ramsden (541) 973-4187
*Lyn F. Boening CFP®
Financial Advisor
* Investment Advisory Services
Estate Planning
Mutual Funds, Stocks and Bonds
Life, Health & Long Term Care Insurance
Please call for a no obligation consultation:
(541) 899-9164
820 North 5th Street • Jacksonville • OR 97530
Securities and Investment advisory services ofered through Financial Network Investment Corporation. Member SIPC.
Pioneer Financial Planning, LLC and Financial Network Investment Corporation are not afliated.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 29 May 2013
Joyfull Living
by Louise Lavergne
Emotional Spring Cleaning
May is for Moms!
Dr. Jason Williams
Chiropractic Physician
580 Blackstone Alley
Jacksonville, Oregon
(541) 899-2760
Mother’s Day is almost here! Show
your mom or wife how much you love
her and appreciate everything that she
does for the family. This year, skip the
fowers and instead pamper her with
the gift of balance. Our Mother’s Day
chiropractic treatments are the perfect
gift for your mother, wife, sister, or
friend or yourself.
Sorry Dads! Moms Only – your day is
coming up soon!
$10 OFF
any product
or service
Just clip this ad and
bring it into the
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May 5-13th, 2013.
Introducing
Natalia Nazartchouk, PhD, FNP-BC
Ruch Family Medicine
7208 Hwy. 238, Jacksonville, OR 97530
Ph: (541) 899-6976
Fax: (541) 899-6981
Natalia Nazartchouk has joined Dr. Andrew Watson
at Ruch Family Medicine and is currently accepting
new patients. She is a Board Certifed Family Nurse
Practitioner and, additionally, has been certifed as an
Advanced Diabetes Management Practitioner by the American Diabetes Association. Natalia received
her Master of Science degree from University of Massachusetts in 2002 and, for the last 11 years, has
engaged in advanced medical practice, both in ambulatory and hospital care environments.
Key specialties of her medical experience include family primary care, cardiology, advanced
diabetes management, geriatrics, and women’s health. As a Family Nurse Practitioner, Natalia
places strong emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention.
Natalia’s Philosophy of Care: “Compassion and understanding need to be integrated with clinical
aspects of healthcare. I want to build long-term professional relationships with my patients based on
trust, comfort, and understanding, and I enjoy taking care of multiple generations within a family. I am
a strong advocate for preventative medicine and strive to equip my patients with knowledge and tools,
which will help to promote their personal wellbeing.”
R
ecently,
I helped
a client
identify old
emotional issues
that kept sabotaging his opportunities for
success. “I thought I let that go!” he told
me in frustration.
What does “leting go” mean? When
a project or an aspiration doesn’t play
out the way we want, it’s normal to feel
disappointment, sadness, anger and
even depression. Painful emotions can
make us want to shut down. This is a
very common
survival refex.
By ignoring
our feelings,
we deny their
importance. Just
like cleaning
out the closet
by shoving
everything in
and slamming
the door shut.
Sooner or later
you have to
deal with it.
Unresolved issues are likely to keep
creating similar challenges. If we take
time to truly “feel” our feelings and take
responsibility for our part in creating the
situation or challenge, we can come to a
place of acceptance and surrender and
truly let go. Leting go makes you feel
free, lighter and ultimately peaceful, just
like after spring-cleaning when you can
open the closet and feel good.
If we keep blaming something or
someone else, we stay stuck. As we take
responsibility for our feelings and our
part in the situation, the healing begins.
It is equally important to acknowledge
factors beyond our control. We can then
begin the surrender process and self-
forgiveness. Taking time to discover and
embrace the lessons will help you make
beter choices in future situations and
also help in leting go. If you cannot see
the lesson immediately, give yourself
time. Facing ourselves
honestly and staying
open to feelings
when we are in
pain takes great
strength and
bravery. It is in
this challenging
process that we
acquire emotional/
spiritual muscles. “It takes great learning to
understand that all things, events, encounters
and circumstances are helpful." ~ A Course in
Miracles.
Here’s a simple Yoga Meditation for a
peaceful mind, to help you process and
“Let Go:”
Sit in a chair, or cross-legged on the
foor with a straight spine (leaning
against a wall can help). Slow down your
breathing and close your eyes.
Man Suhaavee Mudra Kriya: the mudra
(hand gesture), which pleases the mind:
• Create a triangle with the tips of
the middle fngers together and the
tips of the thumbs together with the
pinkie and ring fngers curled into the
palm.
• Bend the index fngers so that they
touch each other at the middle joint.
Stretch thumbs toward you, middle
fngers point away.
• Bend your elbows, hands level with
your heart, about 4 inches from your
chest, forearms are parallel to the
ground.
• Inhale, gently hold your breath, and
mentally repeat 21 times: I am or I
am Peace.
• Exhale and mentally repeat the same
phrase 11 to 21 times. Within three
minutes, your mind will become
tranquil.
• To end, focus on your heart,
breathing in Peace, breathing out
Peace, as you relax your hands.
• Think about something you feel
grateful for. Dwelling in that
gratitude, begin to feel compassion
in your heart and embrace yourself,
your feelings and the individuals
around the situation bothering you,
without geting into “the story.”
Just feel compassion. Allow your
emotional waters to gently wash over
you just like spring showers and take
responsibility for your feelings.
You can start practicing for one minute
and gradually build up to three minutes.
Remember that only limiting thoughts
can limit your life. Feel the joy as you
truly begin to let go! Breathe in Gratitude-
Live in Joy.
© Louise Lavergne 2001-2013
Louise is a creator of JoyFull Yoga; She’s a
JoyFull living coach, International Motivational
speaker & owns JoyFull Yoga LLC in
Jacksonville. She ofers group & private sessions.
She has been practicing and teaching yoga and
meditation for over 25 years. www.joyfull-
living.com or 541-899-0707. See ad this page.
Glassware,
Jewelry, Fine
Antiques, etc.
130 N. 4th St.,
Jacksonville
Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Jacksonville Review Page 30 May 2013
Controlling Your Blood Pressure and Reducing
Your Risk of Stroke is Just a Check Away
M
ay is the month to raise
awareness on multiple health
issues. It is High Blood Pressure
Education Month and Stroke Awareness
Month. Both are leading causes of death
in the United States and both can lead
to serious medical complications. As a
nationally certifed primary stroke center
and part of the largest telestroke network
in Oregon, Providence Medford Medical
Center is helping raise awareness of the
connection between good blood pressure
and good health.
“I need to get your blood pressure…” is a
common phrase at the start of any medical
checkup. But what does it really mean?
Blood pressure is a measure of the force
of blood moving through your arteries
as it is carried from your heart to the
rest of your body. It is measured with
two numbers, for example 120/80. The
top number, systolic pressure, measures
the force of blood in your arteries when
your heart contracts or beats. The botom
number, diastolic pressure, measures the
force of blood in your arteries while your
heart is relaxed and is flling with blood
between beats. High blood pressure is
140/90 or greater.
According to the American Heart
Association, one in three adults in the
U.S. sufer from long-term high blood
pressure—called primary or “essential”
hypertension—and 90 to 95 percent of
adult cases have no identifable cause.
Hypertension can be infuenced by many
sources, including stress and certain
medications such as antidepressants, birth
control pills and over-the-counter pain
relievers. High sodium diets, high cafeine
intake, pregnancy, and a sudden increase
in exercise intensity can also contribute.
Left unchecked, hypertension can lead to
heart disease and stroke. In fact, people with
untreated high blood pressure are four times
more likely to have a stroke. Hypertension
can also increase the risk of damage to your
eyes, blood vessels and kidneys.
Known as a “silent killer,” hypertension
has no symptoms but there are many
known risks. Everyone should get his or
her blood pressure checked on a regular
basis. If you can put a checkmark next
to any of the following conditions, you
may be at an increased risk for high blood
pressure:
• Overweight or obese
• Smoker
• Litle or no exercise
• Too much salt in your diet
• African American or Hispanic/
Latino/a
• Drinking too much alcohol
• High stress
• Family history of hypertension
Age, ethnicity, family history, and
gender can also affect a person’s risk
for having a stroke. The more risk
factors that you have the greater your
chance of developing hypertension or
suffering a stroke.
The good news is that hypertension can
be reduced and controlled through diet,
exercise, and sometimes with the addition
of medications to control hypertension.
Most anyone may start a low intensity
exercise routine of walking 30-60 minutes
each day but it is recommended to check
with your physician frst if you have a
history of cardiovascular disease or if you
plan to start a moderate to high intensity
exercise program.
Eat a healthy diet that is rich in whole
grains, fruits and vegetables and includes
low-fat, low-cholesterol foods. Be a
smart shopper by avoiding junk food
and decreasing the amount of processed
foods that you buy. Reduced cafeine
intake can also help lower your blood
pressure. Some people are more sensitive
to cafeine than others. Check your blood
pressure before and within 30 minutes of
drinking a cup of cofee. If it increases by
more than fve points after drinking one
cup, you may have cafeine sensitivity
that spikes your blood pressure. You may
need to moderate your cafeine intake.
Start monitoring your blood pressure
at home and have regular check-ups with
your health care provider. Right now,
National High Blood Pressure Education
Month is the perfect time to learn more
about your own blood pressure and how
controlling it protects your heart and
helps prevent heart atacks and strokes.
For more information contact Josephine
Jacavone, RN, MS, CNS, CCRN, the
coordinator of Providence Southern
Oregon’s Stroke/STEMI Programs at
Josephine.jacavone@providence.org or check this
website: htp://oregon.providence.org/patients/
healthconditionscare/high-blood-pressure.
Vascular Screenings: Get smart about
your hypertension and stroke risks
May 4, 8:00am-4:00pm
Providence Professional Plaza
1111 Crater Lake Ave., Medford
The following three screenings are
available for $40 per test or all
three for $100:
• Carotid artery disease
screening—is a stroke in your
future?
• Abdominal aortic aneurysm
screening—is an aneurysm
already forming?
• Peripheral artery disease (PAD)
screening—is the blood fow in
your legs blocked?
Call 541-732-5543 to schedule your
appointment or to fnd out when
the next screening is scheduled.
Understanding Cholesterol: Simple
steps to a healthier heart
Presenter:
Cardiologist, J ames Cook, MD
May 23 6-7:30pm
Medford Library
205 S. Central Ave.
To register call 541-732-6237
by Kelly Carper Polden, Marketing and Public Affairs,
Providence Southern Oregon
• Central Point • Jacksonville area
• Medford • White City @ VA-SORCC
Nan King: 541-779-6691 ext. 309
freshaccess@accesshelps.org
ACCESS Food Share Gardens feed the hungry.
Help your community. Volunteer at a garden.
March - October • 6 sites
www.accesshelps.org • www.facebook.com/accesshelps
• Gold Hill
Curt Shuler:
541-855-2576
curt_shuler@yahoo.com
• Rogue River
Jill Ruehlen: 541-582-8156
ruehlen75@live.com
Gogi’s Restaurant
541-899-8699 • 235 W Main Street • Jacksonville
Open for Dinner Wednesday - Sunday 5-9pm & Sunday Brunch 10am-1pm
COMING SOON: Gogi’s Lite Bites Patio Menu
& Return of Britt-nic Baskets…!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 31 May 2013
Soul Matters by Kate Ingram, M.A.
La Bohème
Clothing & Gift Boutique
175 W.California St.
541-899-1010
Mon-Sat
10:30-5:30
Sun 11-4
Happy Mother’s Day
Sunday, May 12
Pampering with a
purpose
Breakfast in bed and bouquets of
fowers are a nice touch on mother’s
day, but good health is priceless.
Encourage your mothers, daughters,
wives and sisters to get screened.
In honor of Mother’s Day,
the Leila J. Eisenstein Breast Center
at Providence has a special offer.
Let Mother’s Day be
your annual reminder.
Leila J. Eisenstein Breast Center
Schedule your mammogram
or bone density screening May
through June and enjoy a 16 oz.
Free Beverage
at The Human Bean
Compliments of
Providence.
If fnancial concerns are preventing you from
getting a screening we may be able to help.
Call to see if you pre-qualify for assistance.
www.providence.org/medford
Schedule an
appointment
by calling
541-732-6100
Middle Age is for the Birds
Expecting a new baby? Pregnancy is an exciting time
and acupuncture can make it even more enjoyable.
Acupuncture is a safe and highly efective treatment for
expecting mothers.
How can acupuncture
be used in pregnancy?
The number one, most
efective acupuncture
treatment is turning
a breech baby. With
approximately two
ofce visits and some
treatment at home, the uterus can be stimulated to
turn the baby. Statistically, acupuncture is successful
in turning a breech baby in approximately 85+% of
the cases. Mothers that are afraid of needles can be
treated with heat and moxa (a warming herb). The
ideal time to treat is the 33rd week of pregnancy or
after. In conventional medicine, a breech presentation
requires a caesarian section which is much more painful
and expensive. The average cost of a caesarian section
delivery is well over $2,000. The cost of a couple of
acupuncture treatments is less than $200.
Pregnancy is a time of many changes and these
changes require a lot of energy. Acupuncture is highly
efective in increasing a mother’s energy both before and
after birth. The acupuncture Law of Mother/Child states
that if the mother is not energetic, healthy, balanced,
and happy, the baby and family sufer. It is difcult to
feel energetic after pregnancy, birth, and post-partum
feedings! Acupuncture can restore energy and balance.
Other commonly used acupuncture treatments during
pregnancy include decreasing morning sickness, relieving
constipation, increasing sleep, and inducing labor.
Acupuncturists have been treating mothers for thousands of
years. One of my favorite acupuncture points (Kidney 9) is
often called the “beautiful baby point.”
Denise Vore has a bachelor’s and
master’s degree in biology. She
graduated from a four-year acupuncture
school in Colorado and has practiced for
over 10 years. Denise is certifed by the
Oregon Medical Board and currently
practices out of the Jacksonville
Chiropractic Clinic. She can be reached
at 541-261-8854.
Acupuncture and Pregnancy
By Denise Vore, MS LAc
O
ne of the more
interesting phenomena
of middle age is the
recognition of just how very
stupid you have been up to this
halfway point. Let's be honest:
in your teens you're simply an ass; in your twenties
you think yourself invincible; in your thirties you still
entertain the idea that it will be "like this" for decades
to come. Then, fnally, in your forties, you began to get
a glimpse over the hill that you didn't realize you were
climbing, and a dawning awareness begins to arise.
Until 45 or so, most of us feel like we really have our stuf
together; we think we're brilliant and special and, unlike
those other sad people, we are never going to have fappy
upper arms or wear stupid-looking pajamas or talk about
our tendonitis. We’re not going to eat dinner at 5 and be in
bed by 8:30. Not us.
My late 40s has been a wonderful and humbling
experience. I now know, for example, why my parents
wanted to sit down at 5 o'clock and have a drink. I
understand this in a way I never did before because I am
there. Judgment is being supplanted by empathy. The
parenting business an obvious one for discovering one's
youthful arrogance, but other more subtle situations
illuminate my former hubris.
For example, I used to think that a fondness for
birds and bird watching was sort of sad, something
lonely people did in lieu of having real pets and real
relationships. Lately, however, I sit on my front porch in
the predawn darkness in my pathetic pajamas, wrapped
in a blanket with my mug of tea, and I listen to the dawn
songs of mourning doves, robins, wild turkeys and
owls, and I realize now how very important they are.
The birds remind me of the perfection of being. Unlike
humans, they don't try. They are not out to impress,
not encumbered by fear and judgment and doubt: they
just are themselves. I listen to their songs, smiling and
silently apologizing for my former arrogance.
It's good to wake up but it's a real blow to the ego. The
psychologist Carl Jung said that every defeat for the ego is a
victory for the Self; as ego shrinks, our real self—the part of
us that is divine and eternal—grows. This is a good thing,
but the process is no picnic. To get to that higher Self, the
ego has to take a few in the keester. You have to get rid of
all the junk you've piled
up in order to feel safe
and smart. You have to
be humbled, and age is
nothing if not humbling.
Ironically, it is this ego
defeat that opens us to our
real power. Not having
to appear smart, you can
become wise. Being able
to say, "I don't know," is incredibly liberating; it opens you
up to the fullness of life's potential, removing the limitations
we unwitingly place on ourselves in our youth. I don't know
and I don't have to know. I can be interested. I can be open. I
can wonder. I can see what unfolds. I don't know it all, and I
never did, and I never will. Bliss.
I just turned 49, thank you, and the view from here is
prety amazing. I have tendonitis and I wear old sweats and
my day is just not right without a few minutes on the porch
with my bird friends. I'm less preoccupied about what I
have, and more concerned with what I am sharing. I get it
now. It’s only, and always, about singing your song.
KATE INGRAM is a writer, psychologist and soul coach.
To fnd your song, please go to www.katherineingram.com and
follow her @kateingram425.
HOMES ON THE APPLEGATE RIVER
• 20 acres w/irrig near Grants Pass $599k
• 6 acres w/irrig near Applegate $599k
• 6.62 acres w/irrig and custom home$725k
•Great Vineyard/winery site on 68 south facing irrigated acres
near town of Applegate $999k
541 541
Jacksonville Review Page 32 May 2013
the best care
for your best friend
To us, our patients are like family. With
over 25 years of experience, we’ve
seen families through generations of best
friends. We believe in a total wellness
approach to veterinary care which helps our
patients live long, healthy lives. A blend of
compassionate care and the use of the latest
medical technology, all at an affordable
price, makes Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
the best choice for your pet’s care.
937 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville
541.899.1081 | www.jvillevet.com
• Preventitve Care
• Surgery
• Obedience
Training
• Boarding
• Spay/Neuter
• House Calls
• Emergency
Services
• And many more!
Ask about our online Pet Portal!
Paws for Thought by Dr. Tami Rogers
Dr. Rogers can be reached at the Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
at 541-899-1081 or jvhospital@qwestofce.net. See ad this page.
Heads-up J ackson County Dog Owners!
The Laundry Center
Try our
BuLK
LAuNDry
SErVICE!
(clothes, towels, etc.)
• Self-service - or we do laundry for you!
• We do comforters, sleeping bags, and
other large items
• Drop-off/Pick-up for Weldon’s Dry Cleaning
• Children’splayarea
• CableTV&kid’smovies
2408 W. Main Street, Medford
(541) 842-2932
Hours: 7am-10pm
Close to Jacksonville,
next to Albertson’s Center!
$1.10/PouND - CHEAP!
(best price in the valley!)
High quality
toys from
around the
world for the
young and
young at
heart.
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Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-4
180 W. California St. • Jacksonville, Oregon
541-899-7421
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Mon-Sat 10-5 • Sun 12-4
180 W. California Street • Jacksonville, Oregon
541-899-7421 • www.schefels.com
S
ome recent changes have
been made in Jackson
County in regards to the
licensing requirements of dogs
and our role as veterinarians. I wanted to make sure
that our clients are aware of this change so there are no
surprises at your next veterinary visit. Though we at
Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital may disagree with this
change, like other veterinarians in the County, we will
now be required to report.
Efective May 20, 2013 veterinarians working in
Jackson County will be required to report all canine
rabies vaccinations to Jackson County Animal Services.
The goal of this program is to increase the number of
licensed dogs in the County, which is currently estimated
to be only around 40%. We will have 60 days to report
when a vaccine has been administered. At this point,
the County will check their licensing database to see if
your pet has been licensed. Clients without a current
license will then be sent a notice explaining licensing
requirements in the County, the benefts of licensing, and
the need to obtain the required license to avoid a citation.
Benefts of licensing your dog include: it acts as a
life-saving form of identifcation, it helps get your pet
returned to you safely and quickly, it is a record that
your pet is vaccinated against rabies, and it provides
revenue to fund local animal services. Fees and penalties
to “bail out” an unlicensed dog start at approximately
$180! In comparison, a three year license for a spayed or
neutered dog in Jackson County is only $49.00.
As a way to reward responsible dog owners, the
County has recently developed a “Free Ride Home”
program. As many of you know, dogs are great at
fnding an open gate or door and heading out to explore
the world! If your licensed dog is found by an Animal
Control Ofcer, the ofcer will atempt to return your
dog free of charge. Or, if your dog ends up at the Shelter,
the frst night’s stay is free of charge.
While the recent changes may cause a few headaches,
I think overall that the program is well intended. Again,
I wanted to make sure that our clients, and other local
pet owners, are kept up to date so as not to be surprised
when they next visit. If you have further questions you
can certainly call the Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
and we will do our best to answer them or you can call
Jackson County Animal Services directly.
In late March, Grant and dr. Susan Konecny
transferred ownership of their successful mobile
veterinary clinic, Home Pet vet, to dr. Julie Tavares.
The Konecny’s, who’ve lived in Jacksonville for ten years
explained, “It has been
almost fve years to the day
since Home Pet Vet began
operating our small animal
mobile service. We have
grown considerably since
then, caring for over 1000
pets and 400 clients!”
Dr. Konecny has been
struggling with tendon
problems in both of her
hands and elbows, a
serious condition which
has been aggravated over
the years by repetitive use.
As a result, she said, “I am
being forced to consider
surgery at this time due
to chronic discomfort and
pain. In addition to these physical concerns, my husband
Grant and I have aging parents with whom we feel the
need to spend signifcantly more time.”
Fortunately, Susan and Julie met while working
together on a veterinary board they both serve on. “Julie
is someone Grant and I felt was the ideal candidate to
take over the Home Pet Vet mobile service,” Susan said.
Dr. Tavares has been a veterinarian in the Rogue Valley
since she graduated from the University of Wisconsin
School of Veterinary Medicine in 2006. She grew up in
Pennsylvania and lived in many places before setling in
Southern Oregon with her husband, Duward. Since doing
so, the couple have had two children, Carmen, 4 and Vera,
2. Tavares notes, “During my years here, I have worked in
Grants Pass and Medford as a small animal veterinarian.
In 2009 I began holding monthly clinics for pets of
people experiencing
homelessness in Grants
Pass. Eventually, my
volunteer work led to the
start of Homeless Oregon
Pet Project, a nonproft
that provides basic
veterinary care to the pets
of the homeless in Grants
Pass and Medford.”
Prior to vet school,
Tavares earned a B.S. in
Environmental Science
from the University of
Delaware and did a two-
year stint with the Peace
Corps in Guatemala,
working with indigenous
Mayan families. “I had
a wonderful experience and learned much about the
Mayan culture and myself…and also met Duward who
was a volunteer from the next town over.”
Dr. Konecny knows she will miss all of her clients and
their pets dearly but knows she’s leaving HPV in great
hands. “Julie has excellent medical skills, knowledge,
standards and compassion that will serve you and your
pets very well. Grant and I hope you will welcome her as
you welcomed us these past fve years!”
Please contact Dr. Julie at 541-761-6163 and see her ad on
facing page.
Home Pet Vet Has New Owner
From l-r, Dr. Susan Konecny, Dr. Julie Tavares
and assistant, Susan Hicks
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 33 May 2013
’ '

www. Ho me P e t Ve t . n e t

Dr. Julie Tavares
541-761-6163
It’s what’s inside
that counts...
All our foods contain
NO corn, wheat, soy or
by-products.
(541) 857-5000
In Winco Shopping Center, just behind Jack In The Box
roguevalleypet.com
• Locally owned
• Featuring made in
Oregon & USA
• Raw diets
®
Wizard of Dogs 2013 Dogs for the Deaf
Dog Walk
by Vaughn Maurice, General Manager,
Dogs for the Deaf, Inc.
A
s spring slowly fades to
summer, every dog owner in
the Rogue Valley hears that tiny
whisper in their head, “I am longing to
get out of the house with my pooch and
mingle with others like
myself.” And, whether
you are one who blasts
“Who Let the Dogs Out”
or simply hums along to
Cat Stevens’ “I Love My
Dog,” you know that each
time you’re singing along
to those beloved dog
tunes, one thought enters
your mind: “When, oh
when, is Dog Walk?”
That’s right folks, it’s
time again for Dogs
for the Deaf’s much
anticipated Dog Walk! This year’s furry
fun- flled festivities are on Saturday,
June 1st from 9:00am to 2:00pm. Register
at DogsfortheDeaf.org by May 3rd and
receive a custom designed Dog Walk
t-shirt. Advanced registration is only $30
and day of the event registration is $50—
so register now and save.
What’s diferent this year? Well, a
number of things! We’ve added a poker
run and we are in historic Jacksonville.
You and your furry friend will enjoy a
Saturday full of gambling while strolling
around town. Like most poker runs, each
’paw’ticipant will make 7 puppy poker
stops from one pup-friendly shop to the
next. The hound holding the best hand
at the fnal stop wins the competition.
One might ask, “Well, what DOES the
best hand win, exactly?” How about
$1,000 in cold hard cash donated by our
friends at Rogue
Valley Pet?! We’ve
also added some
other PAWsome
prizes including:
Shakespeare
Festival tickets,
Jazz Festival
tickets, a weekend
getaway, and much
more. But the
really cool part of
this ‘Puppies Gone
Poker” game is
that EVERYONE
is a winner because all the proceeds go
towards helping Dogs for the Deaf.
Join us and add YOUR support to our
mission of saving the lives of orphaned
dogs, training them and placing them to
assist people. AND, have a litle fun in the
process. So, come meet Grand Marshal
Ryan Lane from ABC Family’s hit show
“Switched at Birth,” enjoy a free lunch
as you check out our kids zone, canine
agility demonstrations, local community
information booths, and a Wizard of Oz
doggie costume contest. Something for
everyone, except the family cat, can be
found at our 22nd annual Dog Walk.
See map below.
Jacksonville Review Page 34 May 2013
I am Community Action.
I am so privileged to partner with ACCESS to
advocate for vulnerable seniors in our community.
I lead a team of remarkable employees committed
to sharing their time, talent and resources to
making a difference.”
I help seniors in need.
As a Community Action Agency (CAA), ACCESS fghts
America’s War on Poverty by helping people help
themselves in achieving self-suffciency.
ACCESS helps children, families, individuals, seniors,
and others throughout Jackson County with food,
housing, energy assistance, weatherization, and
outreach to seniors and people with disabilities.
Gloria Schell
U.S. Bank Region President, So. Oregon/No. California
You can help, too.
• Donate • Volunteer
• Become a partner
Do something today.
accesshelps.org • 541.779.6691
Anita’s Alteration Center
541-772-8535 or 541-899-7536
259 E. Barnett Road, Unit B, Medford (In the Win-co Center)
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s
for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
Anita’s specialties include but are not limited to:
•Alterations
•Pressing, hemming, repairs
•Custom sewing projects
•Special-occasion and wedding gown design
•Prom dresses
•Bridal party ensembles
•There are NO hard to ft fgures!
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
Trail Talk
by Tony Hess and Bob Budesa
T
here are a few new items we’d
like to bring to your atention.
First of all, there is a new bridge
in Forest Park. You don’t have to wade
across Jackson Creek to get to the Old
Miners Trail from the Rail Trail!
The next item(s) are trail signs. Kevin
Kuhn is a Boy Scout in hot pursuit of
his Eagle Scout badge, and as such, has
built and installed signs throughout most
of the Woodland trails to keep people
from geting lost. He had quite a crew of
helpers who dug holes, buried posts, and
afxed signs at most of the intersections.
We’re certainly grateful to Kevin and his
crew for their hard work and dedication.
This nice weather is certainly making
it difcult to stay indoors, isn’t it? It’s
great seeing so many people out enjoying
the trails with friends and their dogs!
Speaking of dogs, it’s equally nice to see
so many of them on leashes! Hopefully
before long, we can count on everyone’s
favorite friend being controlled.
Ever wondered about the diference
between the trails in the Woodlands
and the trails in the Forest Park? The
Woodlands trails are, by now, very
comfortable for most to navigate, with
easy hiking on mostly moderate slopes (a
few exceptions!). They vary in elevation
from 1,590 feet to 2,190 feet. The Forest
Park trails start at 1,950 feet elevation
at the kiosk and Rail Trail, and climb to
3,300 feet elevation on the Jackson Ridge
Trail. For those who’ve not hiked there
yet, you’re in for a pleasant surprise. The
Forest Park hiking experience can either
be a stroll up the almost fat Rail Trail, or
hike alongside a stream up the Canyon
Falls Trail, and come to the Canyon Vista
trail head. Canyon Vista is a fat trail for
1.5 miles with awesome views from an
elevation of 2,600 feet, and the views go
all the way down the canyons and of to
the east beyond Medford. With relatively
fewer hikers, the Forest Park hikers can be
alone with their thoughts and nature.
Don’t miss an opportunity to visit
the Forest park trails. They’re a totally
diferent experience for the adventurer
who seeks the quiet solitude and beauty
of our city parks trails.
The Applegate Trails Association
(ATA) invites you on a fower-flled hike
on the Applegate Ridge Trail (ART) and
the boundary of the proposed Wellington
Wild Lands. With cooperative weather,
we are guaranteed breathtaking views
into the Applegate Valley, Thompson
Creek and beyond to the distant Red
Butes. Look the other direction to view
Mt. Isabelle, Mt. McLoughlin and Forest
Creek from a whole new vantage point.
Much of the trail runs along the ridge
top on the edge of a vast open meadow
sprinkled with oak, buck brush, mountain
mahogany and the occasional big fr tree.
In the spring, waves of grass are overlaid
with bursts of blooming wildfowers
including California poppy, mountain
tarweed and the uncommon showy thistle.
At 3 miles total (out and back) along with
400 feet of elevation change, this hike is
rated moderate. For a few, an optional
longer and more difcult loop hike will be
ofered involving a steep trail of the end
of the ridge (rated moderate to difcult).
Hikers should wear appropriate
layered clothing for the weather and
sturdy footwear. Remember to bring
your camera and water. Please leave your
pets at home. We meet Saturday, May 18,
9:00am at the Bunny Meadows Staging
Area (intersection of Forest Creek and
Longanecker Road).
RSVP is requested. Contact the hike
leader, David Calahan at 541-899-1226 or
david@applegatetrails.org.
Directions to Bunny Meadows Staging
Area: From Jacksonville, travel 4.9 miles
southwest on Hwy 238 (towards Ruch) and
turn right on Forest Creek Rd. From Ruch,
travel 2.8 miles northeast on Hwy 238
(towards Jacksonville) and turn left on Forest
Creek Rd. The staging area is 7/10 mile down
Forest Creek Road.
For more information about our
organization and our hikes, check out our
website calendar at www.applegatetrails.org .
Donations to our non-proft organization are
gratefully appreciated.
ATA Hiking Amongst Flowers
Next Medford Food Project
Jacksonville Pickup Day:
Saturday, June 8
th
Please contact Jerrine Rowley at 541-702-2223
or Faye Haynes at 541-324-1298 if you have any
questions or wish to become involved with
the Food Project in Jacksonville!
(Always the 2nd Saturday of even-numbered months.)
Brokerage, investment and fnancial advisory services are made available through Ameriprise
Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. Some products and services may not be
available in all jurisdictions or to all clients.
© 2013 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.
We are pleased to announce that
Natalie Cole
Has joined Ameriprise Financial
Our Advisors. Your Dreams. More within reach
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Natalie Cole
Financial Advisor
830 Ohare Pkwy
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541-973-2891
natalie.cole@ampf.com
www.ameripriseadvisors.com/
natalie.cole
535 Rossanley Dr Medford OR 541-734-3743 M-F 8-5:30
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180 N Oregon Street • Jacksonville, OR
Reservations: airbnb.com or 541-414-7787
P
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 35 May 2013
Little Applegate Country Care
Our Adult Foster Home
offers a warm, family
setting on a beautiful
homestead—with a
view!
Country Lifestyle for those who can’t do it alone due to age or
disability. Inquiries welcome: 541-899-6827
or LittleApplegateCC@gmail.com
Visit our expanded
British Shoppe!
3939 W. Main Street
(Just East of Jacksonville)
541-773-8031
www.whitescountryfarm.com
• Beer • Wine • Spirits
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Free consultation!
541-899-2055
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The Cleaning Crew
You Can Count On Us!
Licensed Bonded Insured
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• Homes • Offces
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• Rental Move In & Move Out
541-601-6236
Natural Products Used
www.TheCleaningCrewOnLine.com
The Paw Spa & Boutique
541-899-6811
Dog and Cat Grooming
175 East C Street, Jacksonville
thepawspaandboutique@aol.com
Open Tues-Fri 8:30am-4:00pm
Please call for an appointment
Tarina Hinds
Owner/Grooming
10+ years experience with all
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Ellee Celler, Broker
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541-301-7893
“ Business is Booming! ”
BUYING or SELLING
Give us a call today!
Ellee Celler & Max
Max and I will make
it happen for you!
Want to see your AD in the next issue of
the REVIEW?
Please RESERVE your ad space by
May 15
th
for the JUNE 2013 issue!
For advertising information, please visit our website:
J acksonvilleReview.com/advertise
or contact Whit Parker at 541-899-9500 or
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
• Tim Balfour
• Mayor Paul Becker
• Sue Bennett
• Donna Briggs
• Bob Budesa
• David Calahan
• Susan Casaleggio
• Sara King Cole
• Dr. J ulie Danielson
• Linda Davis
• Paula & Terry
Erdmann
• Cristie Fairbanks
• Graham Farran
• Kay Faught
• Criss Garcia
• Randall Grealish
• Adam Haynes
• Dr. Kerri Hecox
• Michelle Hensman
• Tony Hess
• Chief Devin Hull
• Kate Ingram
• Carolyn Kingsnorth
• Amy Kranenburg
• Louise Lavergne
• Mark Madge
• Dan Marca
• Vaughn Maurice
• Anne McAlpin
• Dave Palmer
• Kelly Polden
• Dr. Tami Rogers
• Dirk Siedlecki
• Kathy Tiller
• Denise Vore
• Hannah West
• Dave Wilson
• Dr. Haidee Zamora


• David Gibb
• J eanena
Whitewilson
THANK YOU
to our Contributors!
Photographers
Have an idea or suggestion for the Review?
For print: Whit at 541-899-9500 or whitman@jacksonvillereview.com.
For website or kiosk: J o at 541-227-8011 or jo@jacksonvillereview.com
Each year in April, Kiwanis Clubs
throughout the Pacifc Northwest District
take on a community improvement
project called “Kiwanis One Day.” On
April 6th, the Jacksonville Kiwanis Club
cleaned-up the property at 440 Highway
238, next to the City Maintenance Center,
where a house had burned down several
years ago and had been left an eyesore.
The Club contacted the out-of-area
owner and obtained writen permission
to haul the debris to the recycling center.
Four Kiwanis members and a recent
Student of the Month and his father joined
forces and the work went fairly smoothly.
This was the fourth community project
the local Club has been involved in,
following the moto of helping one child
and one community at a time. Other
projects have included painting a house
across from the Post Ofce, painting the
eaves of the restroom building next to the
library, and cooperating with the Boosters
Club last year to refurbish the structures
at Doc Grifn Park.
For further information, contact Dave Wilson
at 541- 899-1934, e-mail: elkhntr@charter.net.
Jacksonville Kiwanis Club "One Day" Project
Property before clean-up
Property after clean-up
With spring fnally well along, there are
lots of reasons to get out and enjoy some
of your local trails, or beter yet, come out
and participate in
one of the upcoming
events sponsored by
the Siskiyou Upland
Trails Association
(SUTA).
On May 5th, join
a hike led by Janeen
Sathre from Wolf
Gap down to the
Sterling Mine Ditch Trail, ending at the
Bear Gulch Trailhead (SUTA will help
with a car shutle). The Wolf Gap access
trail ofers stunning views of the Siskiyou
Crest. The hiking route also wanders
through a diverse landscape.
Southern Oregon Runners and SUTA
are sponsoring the 2nd ‘Run the Ditch’
run on May 25th. This year’s run has both
5 and 10 mile routes, with both starting
and ending at the Tunnel Ridge Trailhead.
Based on the nearly 100 runners in last
year’s race, we anticipate a large turnout.
Visit www.sorunners.org for the route and
registration details. After the run, stop by
Buncom Days at Southern Oregon’s only
remaining ghost town!
SUTA will have a table at
the event, and there will
be a variety of activities
and entertainment.
It’s always an eclectic
gathering and great way
to learn more about this
bit of our local history.
June 1st is National
Trails Day and SUTA is coordinating with
BLM to construct a bypass trail in the
Armstrong Gulch drainage to create an
access route around a privately-owned
section of the SMDT. Coming out to help
on NDT is your opportunity to participate
in keeping this great community resource
open to all. In addition to some light
trail construction, there will be food and
festivities ofered by SUTA, BLM, and
other sponsors.
For details and directions for this and other
events, visit www.sutaoregon.org.
SUTA Updates and Coming Events
2013 marks the second year the Run
the Ditch Trail Run will take place in
the Litle Applegate. The event will take
place on May 25, 2013, at 9:00am with a
fve-mile and ten-mile race. Participants
will experience incredible views along
the Litle Applegate River and the historic
Sterling Mine Ditch Trail, dug by Chinese
gold mine workers in 1877. There will be
ribbon awards for the top three fnishers
in the age groups, as well as cash awards
for the three top male and female fnishers
in the ten-mile event. Plus, lots of prize
drawings for the early registration folks
will take place. The run is being co-
sponsored by Southern Oregon Runners,
Siskiyou Upland Trails Association
(SUTA) and BLM. For more details and/or
to register online, visit www.sorunners.org.
For more information, please call contact
race directors, Seth Weintraub at 541-899-7659
or Steve Goldman at 541-899-3232.
Run the Ditch Race is May 25
Jacksonville Review Page 36 May 2013
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10% off all Wursts
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coupon good for entire party
* excluding Maifest - May 5th
We served 5,260 Wursts in 2012.
The count continues.
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