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Welding services

Welding is the process of permanently joining two or more metal parts, by melting both materials. The molten materials quickly cool, and the two metals are permanently bonded. Spot welding and seam welding are two very popular methods used for sheet metal parts. Advantage Fabricated Metals' welding staff has decades of complex welding experience. Our skilled welding staff provides a full range of welding services. We can provide welding services ranging from structural and plate welding to light gauge tubular steels, stainless, and aluminum. We jig and fixture components to be welded to ensure parts are correctly aligned before being joined providing quality and repeatability. We provide: TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) MIG (Metal Inert Gas) Stick, and Oxy-Acetylene

services plus weld & cut services. Every welding job's requirements are different, but Advantage Fabricated Metals welders often: grind the welds polish the welds fill in voids descale the welds prepare the welded surfaces for painting, and prime the prepared surface

after the welding process is completed. We will complete your custom metal fabricating component welding project in our 100,000 square foot manufacturing facility. Advantage Fabricated Metals has the equipment to do the job right! We carry the latest equipment and have a welding staff with high levels of welding training that is backed by decades of industrial welding experience. Let Advantage Fabricated Metals handle all your custom metal fabricating and welding/cutting jobs. Whether your custom components will be used in conveyer lines, racking equipment, stainless and aluminum tables, platforms, mixing tanks, storage containers, tubular frames, truck frames, or whatever custom application, call us at 1815-323-1310 or fill out our contact form to get help with your industrial welding needs!

Stick or MSAW welding

Advantage Fabricated Metals performs a number of welding processes. The two most common welding processes we use include TIG, an acronym for Tungsten Inert Gas welding and MIG, an acronym for Metal Inert Gas welding. TIG is also referred to as GTAW (Gas T ungsten Arc Welding) and Heliarc. MIG also is referred to as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding). We also provide stick or MSAW welding. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is frequently referred to as "stick" or "covered electrode" welding. Stick welding is among the most widely used welding processes. The flux covering on the electrode melts during welding. This forms the gas and slag to shield the arc and molten weld pool. The slag must be chipped off the weld bead after welding. The flux also provides a method of adding scavengers, deoxidizers, and alloying elements to the weld metal. When an arc is struck between the metal rod (electrode) and the workpiece, both the rod and workpiece surface melt to form a weld pool. Simultaneous melting of the flux coating on the rod will form gas and slag which protects the weld pool from the surrounding atmosphere. The slag will solidify and cool and must be chipped off the weld bead once the weld run is complete (or before the next weld pass is deposited). The process allows only short lengths of weld to be produced before a new electrode needs to be inserted in the holder. Weld penetration is low and the quality of the weld deposit is highly dependent on the skill of the welder. Process characteristics of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW/Stick) SMAW welding: Uses a electrode rod that is quickly consumed, Uses equipment that is simple, inexpensive, and highly portable, Uses an electrode that provides and regulates its own flux, Provides all position flexibility, Is less sensitive to wind or drafts, Yields a weld with a variable quality and appearance based on operator skill,

During the SMAW welding process the arc is established, the flux coating on the rod disintegrates and then forms a gas that shields the weld from the atmosphere. The slag that is produced by the flux coating prevents the weld metal from oxidizing. Equipment required to perform the SMAW welding process includes a constant current power source that supplies the power to the consumable rod electrode. The SMAW welding process typically is capable of producing three types of welded joints. They are: Butt joint Lap joint, T-joint, and Fillet weld.

The illustration below shows these four common welded joints.

Flux-coated electrodes are available in many core wire diameters and lengths. Matching the electrode properties to the base materials as a general rule for choosing the type of electrode. Available electrodes types include aluminum bronze, bronze, mild steel, nickel, and stainless steel. Materials commonly welded using the SMAW process include mild steel, cast iron, and stainless steel. View an overview of our welding services and any of the metal forming processes offered by Advantage Fabricated Metals by clicking the links above. For more information about Advantage Fabricated Metals and the metal forming, metal fabricating, and welding services we provide, please fill out our contact form or call us at 1-815-323-1310.

MIG welding
Advantage Fabricated Metals performs a number of welding processes. The two most common welding processes we use include TIG, an acronym for Tungsten Inert Gas welding and MIG, an acronym for Metal Inert Gas welding. TIG is also referred to as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and Heliarc. MIG also is referred to as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding). We also provide oxy-acetylene welding. The "Metal" in Gas Metal Arc Welding refers to the wire that is used to start the arc. It is shielded by inert gas and the feeding wire also acts as the filler rod. MIG is fairly easy to learn and use as it is a semi-automatic welding process.

Characteristics of the MIG welding process MIG: Uses a consumable wire electrode during the welding process that is fed from a spool, Provides a uniform weld bead, Produces a slag-free weld bead, Uses a shielding gas, usually argon, argon - 1 to 5% oxygen, argon - 3 to 25% CO2 and a combination argon/helium gas, Is considered a semi-automatic welding process, Allows welding in all positions, Requires less operator skill than TIG welding, Allows long welds to be made without starts or stops, Needs little cleanup.

The illustration that follows provides a look at a typical MIG welding process showing an arc that is formed between the wire electrode and the workpiece. During the MIG welding process, the electrode melts within the arc and becomes deposited as filler material. The shielding gas that is used prevents atmospheric contamination from atmospheric contamination and protects the weld during solidification. The shielding gas also assists with stabilizing the arc which provides a smooth transfer of metal from the weld wire to the molten weld pool.

Versatility is the major benefit of the MIG welding process. It is capable of joining most types of metals and it can be performed in most positions, even though flat horizontal is most optimum. The most common welds are illustrated below. They include the: lap joint butt joint T-joint, and the edge joint

MIG is used to weld many materials, and different gases are used to form the arc depending on the materials to be welded together. An argon CO2 blend is normally used to weld mild steel, aluminum, titanium, and alloy metals. Helium is used to weld mild steel and titanium in high speed process and also copper and stainless steel. Carbon dioxide is most often used to weld carbon and low alloy steels. Magnesium and cast iron are other metals commonly welded used the MIG process. View an overview of our welding services and any of the metal forming processes offered by Advantage Fabricated Metals by clicking on the links above. For more information about Advantage Fabricated Metals and the metal forming, metal fabricating, and welding services we provide, please fill out our contact form or call us at 1-815-323-1310.

TIG welding
Advantage Fabricated Metals performs a number of welding processes. The two most common welding processes we use include TIG, an acronym for Tungsten Inert Gas welding and MIG, an acronym for Metal Inert Gas welding. TIG is also referred to as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and Heliarc. MIG also is referred to as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding). TIG welding is also called Heliarc welding. Heliarc was the trade name given to the process by Linde's when it was introduced decades ago. The arc is started with a tungsten electrode shielded by inert gas and filler rod is fed into the weld puddle separately. The gas shielding that is required to protect the molten metal from contamination and amperage are supplied during the TIG welding operation. TIG welding is a slower process than MIG, but it produces a more precise weld and can be used at lower amperages for thinner metal and can even be used on exotic metals. TIG welding is a commonly used high quality welding process. TIG welding has become a popular choice of welding processes when high quality, precision welding is required. The TIG welding process requires more time to learn than MIG. Characteristics of the TIG welding process TIG: Uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode during the welding process,

Uses a number of shielding gases including helium (He) and argon (Ar), Is easily applied to thin materials, Produces very high-quality, superior welds, Welds can be made with or without filler metal, Provides precise control of welding variables (i.e. heat), Welding yields low distortion, Leaves no slag or splatter.

In TIG welding, an arc is formed between a non-consumable tungsten electrode and the metal being welded. Gas is fed through the torch to shield the electrode and molten weld pool. If filler wire is used, it is added to the weld pool separately. The illustration that follow provide a schematic showing how the TIG welding process works.

The most common TIG welds are illustrated below. They include the: butt joint, lap joint, T-joint, and Fillet weld.

The following illustration shows these TIG-welded joints:

The TIG welding process utilizes a number of shielding gases including: argon

argon/helium, and helium

Argon is superior for welding metals. It operates at a higher arc voltage, makes the arc start more easily, and is commonly used to weld mild steel, aluminum and titanium. Helium is generally added to increase heat input (increase welding speed or weld penetration) and is used for high speed welding of mild steel and titanium. Helium offers a smaller heat affected zone and therefore, penetrates metals deeply. It also can increase the welding speed up to 40%. Helium is also commonly used to weld stainless steel and copper. The argon/helium combination gas is used for a hotter arc in welding aluminum and aluminum alloys. It is also used in automatic welding applications. Even though TIG is a commonly used welding process, there are a number of limitations. These include: TIG requires greater welder dexterity than MIG or stick welding, TIG yields lower deposition rates, TIG is more costly for welding thick metal sections.

View an overview of our welding services any of the metal forming processes offered by Advantage Fabricated Metals. For more information about Advantage Fabricated Metals and the metal fabricating and welding services we provide, please fill out our contact form or call us at 1310. 1-815-323-