You are on page 1of 5

Pendery 1

Max Pendery Prof. Vetter 28 February, 2013 Project 2 First Draft

A very creative and captivating title As we have learned through reading responses to academic articles written by genre theorists, genre is a product of the social constructs of a community. Like many authors suggest in every genre, basketball coaches alike, discourse community and the way they perceive writing is almost its own language made up of localized vocabulary. Therefore, within basketball coaching genres it is established that the purpose and goals of certain texts are to provide the clearest methodology of the sport useful to the extent of improving your team and preparing them for challenges that lie ahead. In this essay I will outline several genres within this discourse community and analyze their context and meaning, and hopefully their transitional influence into the physical play of the game. I will then compare and underline patterns between genres as to add to the perspective of the genres themselves. First, I will outline the ever-growing genre of player and team scouting reports. This genre appears in the realm of basketball coaching. Usually, an assistant coach will scout another team by going to one of their games and bring the report filled out back to the team for analysis and preparation. This genre interacts with other genres such as a practice schedule because it gives coaches the info needed to determine what needs to be practiced and coached upon, and what doesnt. This genre provides skills knowledge and abilities information on a

Pendery 2

future opposing team. Not only the strengths weaknesses and tendencies of the team, but of its players strengths weaknesses and tendencies as well. When people use this genre, they are interacting with the strategy of basketball and how to plan, organize, and execute goals and principles in a fashion that will counter the opposing team and players. They are interacting through quantifiable statistics and interpreted basketball strategies the same way a student studies for a test or an employee researches for a report. Basketball coaches and basketball players use this genre for strategy and to achieve success. At some levels, people use these to gain more knowledge in betting. Others could use scouting reports for specific players to understand their talent and potential for playing at a higher level. Sideline broadcasters could use scouting reports as a study tool to gain better knowledge about teams and players in order to do their job better. The writers of this genre can be several different people. There are individual scouts and scouting agencies who conduct reports for sale, however, basketball coaches and assistant coaches are the ones who usually complete them for the in-house knowledge. It would be like a marketing department of a company paying an independent marketing company for their expertise in a marketing endeavor. There are often separate writers for team scouting and individual player scouting of a certain team, but the simpler scouting reports can easily be done alone. The writers of this genre must have an extreme knowledge of the game, player stereotypes, and be hyperobservant to properly complete a scouting report. Additionally, the more the experience of the writer, the better, because basketball is a comparative game where you need to relate players to individuals observed in the past in order to compare transitional ability. These coaches will attempt to write the genre usually in a binder or on a clipboard at a game or infront of a film

Pendery 3

screen. In this situation, a coach writes the scouting report and then it is read and analyzed by other coaches and the players. Because the audience is usually at the same, or close to the same, localized knowledge level as the writer there is no specialist vs nonspecialist dynamic. Therefore, the sports jargon and basketball lingo used in scouting reports is almost its own language in itself and the knowledge needed to understand and apply this way of thinking is found in general basketball comprehension. The readers of this genre usually analyze this in a conference or meeting room among other specialists to brainstorm ideas for strategy and planning. Like many of the authors in genre theory state, genre is built by revised versions of ideas and documents in the past which also draw from several other related genres. Basketball scouting reports are no different. Over time, it has been shown that preparation for opponents through scouting and adjusting strategy based on weaknesses and strengths of the other team is what the definition of coaching has become. Coaching is represented by a manager who sets their team up for the most success through growth of skill, use of that skill, and collective effort or teamwork. This all contributes to the basis of knowing your opponent and not simply relying on your own style of play to best another team. Another, possibly more vital, genre a basketball coach would be concerned with would be a practice outline. As we all know sports conduct practices, however different in structure intensity or style. The effort exerted behind the scenes and in the offseason when no one is watching is what makes a successful sports player and/or team. So arguably the most crucial part of sports is practice and its characteristics. Therefore the importance of a well-structured basketball practice outline is essential to performance. The coaches of a basketball team get together and discuss practice schedules for hours before deciding on the correct outline.

Pendery 4

Several genres contribute to a practice outline such as scouting reports and injury memos. Like a scouting report, practice outlines are a necessary planning measure for conducting a practice. This genre addresses weaknesses in a teams abilities, cohesiveness, and strategies while adding to a teams strengths. When coaches use this genre, they are interacting with the growth of a team. As a coach, the two main goals your staff has are to 1) Get the best out of your players and help them reach their full potential, and 2) get better as a team throughout the year and into future seasons. In this genre only coaches use it to write, reflect, change and grow upon, however, the players are the ones who interact with the genre. The majority of the time, a head coach will lead their staff in a discussion of necessary drills and activities and have a brainstorm of what why and how they will be scheduled and accomplished throughout a practice. The writers of this genre need a high level of task identity and task significance. These qualities are essential for the productive nature of practices. The greater the ability of a coaching staff to recognize problems and areas for concern, the more the practice outline will reflect that, and the greater the transition into appropriate drills and time blocks. The readers of the practice outline texts are the coaches themselves; therefore, there is not much miscommunication with what is written. This genre is written during coaches meetings and takes much more time to develop than the time they will take to conduct the actual practice. It is written in an open forum style of brainstorming and collectively decided upon. In rare scenarios (where the coach doesnt think his assistants will be of help or has an alone style of coaching) the coach could write the practice outline himself. This usually only occurs with smaller staffs and in the offseason or preseason. Many of the world renowned coaches in history have declared that preparation is the key to success.

Pendery 5

As we have learned through reading responses to academic articles written by genre theorists, genre is a product of the social constructs of a community. Like many authors suggest in every genre, basketball coaches alike, discourse community and the way they perceive writing is almost its own language made up of localized vocabulary. Therefore, within basketball coaching genres it is established that the purpose and goals of certain texts are to provide the clearest methodology of the sport useful to the extent of improving your team and preparing them for challenges that lie ahead.