Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

SURVEY SAYS
STATE PAGE 5
‘IRON MAN’ HAS
GREAT ACTION
WEEKEND PAGES 16-17
STATE SNOWPACK ONLY 17 PERCENT
OF NORMAL
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to Unreal events in
Real Estate. For buying or selling a home
in the Palo Alto Area,
Call John King at
650•354•1100
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A jury deliberated just two days before con-
victing a Burlingame man of fatally beating
his roommate with a mallet in a fit of anger.
That anger, the defense had claimed, was the
result of suppressed rage stemming from
childhood sexual abuse that came to a head
when the dead man demanded oral sex.
Lawrence Hoffman, 65, was found guilty
Thursday morning of mur-
dering Joseph Consentino,
70, in the first degree,
using a deadly weapon to
do so and causing great
bodily injury of a person
over age 60. With its ver-
dict, the jury sided with
prosecutor Al Serrato’s
version of events which is
that Hoffman “snapped”
on Dec. 5, 2011 after feeling Consentino
demeaned his family and struck him at least
nine times in the back of the head until he was
certain of death. Hoffman then covered the
body with three blankets and fled, confessing
to a friend in San Francisco and eventually
landing in Southern California where he sur-
rendered.
Hoffman faces 26 years to life when sen-
tenced July 12.
“Justice was served today,” Serrato said,
adding that the jury “concluded he had not
been honest.”
Defense attorney Geoff Carr said he would
have found a second-degree conviction more
reasonable.
“Clearly we dropped the ball in providing a
defense that would not have resulted in a first-
degree verdict,” Carr said.
He expects to seek a new trial.
Roommate convicted of murder
Jury rejects repressed memory of childhood sexual abuse defense
Lawrence
Hoffman
Driver to trial for
pedestrian death
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A driver whose out-of-control car sent a
concrete garbage can flying into a 67-year-
old San Mateo pedestrian who died after
the motorist allegedly checked on the
pinned man and fled was held to answer
yesterday on several charges.
SSF officials
OK Planned
Parenthood
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Green and pink signs showed the split nature of the opinions
of those at the South San Francisco Planning Commission last
night when a proposal to open a Planned Parenthood in down-
town was approved.
After more than two hours of comments, a majority of the
67 speakers opposed the plan but not necessarily for the same
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Developers of the debated Transit
Village mixed-use project around the
San Carlos train station plan to resubmit
designs for a scaled-down project but
prefer residents view the changes per-
sonally at public unveilings that might
start in late May.
“A picture is worth a thousand words
and we encourage people to come to the
meetings because a few small words
don’t begin to explain the overall
design,” said Jeff Byrd, senior managing
director of Legacy Partners. “We don’t
want people to read one word or sen-
tence and make a judgment.”
Byrd said Legacy planned to announce
the new design when it is officially sub-
mitted to the city in a few weeks but
word leaked out when Councilman Mark
Olbert blogged that the developer was
showing the revisions to councilmem-
bers who approved the environmental
impact report. Olbert voted against the
EIR and wrote that he was not contacted
although the company called him after
New Transit Village plans to be unveiled
Developers want public vetting of scaled-down project
Josue Lopez
See LOPEZ Page 20
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
The South San Francisco Planning Commission approved a
proposal to open a Planned Parenthood despite protests
from many who attended the meeting last night.
REUTERS
Golden State’s Stephen Curry celebrates after the Warriors defeated the Denver Nuggets during Game 6 of their NBA
Western Conference quarter-final playoff. SEE FULL STORY PAGE 11
WARRIORS HEAD TO SAN ANTONIO
See GUILTY, Page 20
See SSF, Page 8
See VILLAGE, Page 20
Friday • May 3, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 222
STOCKS GAIN ON
JOBLESS CLAIMS
BUSINESS PAGE 10
Judge says sorry, pays $100,000
In an unusual act of contrition, a state
court judge publicly apologized and
agreed to pay $100,000 to Silicon Valley
billionaire Tom Siebel the week of May
3, 2008 for wrongfully besmirching him
in a lawsuit she filed as an attorney more
than a decade prior.
"I write to express my sincere regret
for pursuing claims against you that
were determined to be without merit,"
San Mateo Superior Court
Judge Carol Mittlesteadt
wrote in an apology to
Siebel that was released
that week.
Mittlesteadt, who was appointed to
the bench in 1998, also acknowledged
her actions "may have caused substan-
tial expense and inconvenience, and
damage to (Siebel’s) reputation and
good name."
The apology was part of a settlement
that ended a 12-year legal battle.
The odyssey began after Siebel’s soft-
ware company fired its top sales repre-
sentative, Debra Christoffers.
Representing Christoffers, Mittlesteadt
filed a wrongful termination and sex dis-
crimination lawsuit that named Siebel as
well as his company. A court later ruled
that the charges against Siebel were
unfounded.
Shark kills San Mateo bartender
A San Mateo bartender with a win-
ning smile died the week of May 3,
2008 from a shark attack off the Pacific
Coast of Mexico.
Adrian Ruiz, 25, died
that week on the first day
of his 10-day surf trip.
He was likely catching
his first waves when a
shark bit a 15-inch gash in
his right leg. He bled to death as friends
and rescuers tried to rush him to the hos-
pital.
On-ramp to close
The week of May 3, 2008, it was
announced that access to Coyote Point
Recreation Area was to be limited for
two weeks and the nearby on-ramp was
to be closed for more than a year as
Caltrans works on the elevated road at
Airport Boulevard near the Peninsula
Avenue overpass.
The work was set to begin May 5,
2008 and continue until May 19, 2008.
The construction was part of a $150 mil-
lion contract to add 4.5 miles of auxil-
iary lanes between Millbrae and Third
avenues and construct a new Peninsula
Avenue overpass.
Trio stuck off Devil’s Slide
Rescuers were forced to close
Highway 1 at Devil’s Slide the week of
May 3, 2008 after an
Oregon couple and an
Oklahoma transient got
stuck on the beach below the
dangerous cliff.
Dozens of rescue crews converged on
the north end of Devil’s Slide after
receiving a 911 call shortly after 3 p.m.
on Monday of that week. The three-hour
effort to find the stranded travelers
resulted in a complete closure of the
highway while crews parked their vehi-
cles on the road.
From the archives highlights stories original-
ly printed five years ago this week. It appears
in the Friday edition of the Daily Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Sports announcer
Greg Gumbel is
67.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1973
Chicago’s 110-story Sears Tower (now
the Willis Tower) was topped out after
two years of construction, becoming the
world’s tallest building for the next 25
years.
“Nobody is bored when he is trying to make something
that is beautiful,or to discover something that is true.”
— William Inge (1913-1973)
Singer Frankie Valli
is 79.
Dancer Cheryl
Burke is 29.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Riders compete during the ‘Kings of the Off-road’ quad bike amateur regional race in a Siberian boggy district near the
village of Kozhany, Russia.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
North winds around 5 mph...Becoming
northwest in the afternoon.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
upper 40s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the lower to mid
60s. Light winds...Becoming southwest
around 5 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. South winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Highs around 60.
Sunday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Lows in the upper
40s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
SENSE AGENT GARLIC ZEALOT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When it came to the twins, she was interested
in the — SINGLE ONE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BEEOS
CONUE
REVDIR
FATCEF
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
-
Answer here:
In 1791, Poland adopted a national constitution.
In 1802, Washington, D.C., was incorporated as a city.
In 1913, Clorox had its beginnings as five entrepreneurs agreed
to set up a liquid bleach factory in Oakland Author-playwright
William Inge was born in Independence, Kan.
In 1916, Irish nationalist Padraic Pearse and two others were
executed by the British for their roles in the Easter Rising.
In 1933, Nellie T. Ross became the first female director of the
U.S. Mint.
In 1943, Pulitzer Prizes were awarded to Thornton Wilder for
his play “The Skin of Our Teeth” and Upton Sinclair for
“Dragon’s Teeth.”
In 1948, the Supreme Court ruled that covenants prohibiting
the sale of real estate to blacks or members of other racial
groups were legally unenforceable.
In 1952, the Kentucky Derby was televised nationally for the
first time on CBS; the winner was Hill Gail.
In 1960, the Harvey Schmidt-Tom Jones musical “The
Fantasticks” began a nearly 42-year run at New York’s Sullivan
Street Playhouse.
In 1971, the National Public Radio program “All Things
Considered” made its debut.
In 1979, Conservative Party leader Margaret Thatcher was
chosen to become Britain’s first female prime minister as the
Tories ousted the incumbent Labor government in parliamen-
tary elections.
In 1986, in NASA’s first post-Challenger launch, an unmanned
Delta rocket lost power in its main engine shortly after liftoff,
forcing safety officers to destroy it by remote control.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush told a news confer-
ence in Crawford, Texas, it was a matter of when — not if —
weapons of mass destruction would be found in Iraq.
Folk singer Pete Seeger is 94. Actress Ann B. Davis is 87.
Actor Alex Cord is 80. Pop singer Mary Hopkin is 63. Singer
Christopher Cross is 62. Country musician Cactus Moser
(Highway 101) is 56. Rock musician David Ball (Soft Cell) is 54.
Country singer Shane Minor is 45. Actor Bobby Cannavale is 43.
Music and film producer-actor Damon Dash is 42. Country musi-
cian John Hopkins (Zac Brown Band) is 42. Country-rock musi-
cian John Neff (Drive-By Truckers) is 42. Country singer Brad
Martin is 40. Actress Christina Hendricks (TV: “Mad Men”) is
38. Actor Dule Hill is 38. Country singer Eric Church is 36.
Official: Shiny dog
bowl sparks house fire
SANTA ROSA — A Northern
California couple might be able to
blame this one on the dog.
Authorities say sun refracted off the
dog’s shiny water bowl and ignited a fire
at Terry and Shay Weisbrich’s Santa
Rosa home on Wednesday afternoon.
The fire was quickly put out, but it left
a hole in the siding.
The Press Democrat of Santa Rosa
reports that a fire department engineer
helped discover the dog bowl’s role in
the fire.
Rene Torres returned the bowl to its
original position during his investigation
of the fire’s cause. He found it concen-
trated light right on the area of the home
that was charred.
In other news ...
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place; california Classic, No.
5, in second place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:46.72.
7 3 2
21 30 34 39 49 43
Mega number
April 30 Mega Millions
22 26 31 54 55 18
Powerball
May 1 Powerball
1 6 9 17 29
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 7 0 3
Daily Four
5 6 2
Daily three evening
9 14 16 18 19 24
Mega number
May 1 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
650-354-100
REDWOOD CITY
Suspicious person. Two women were solicit-
ing residents without permits at the intersec-
tion of Arlington Road and Somerset Street
before 3:16 p.m. Monday, April 29.
Suspicious package. An unattended backpack
was left in a room on Middlefield Road before
2:42 p.m. Monday, April 29.
Suspicious person. A man wearing a white
shirt and tan pants was seen walking up drive-
ways of residents’ homes on West Oakwood
Boulevard before 2:31 p.m. Monday, April 29.
Suspicious person. A man was tampering
with a bike lock in front of a Dress Barn on El
Camino Real before 1:22 p.m. Monday, April
29.
Suspicious person. Someone reported seeing
a man leaving cards for a tree service and
seemed to be trying the front door at the inter-
section of Inner Circle and James Avenue
before 10:39 a.m.
Police reports
Shell shock
Several vehicles were egged at the inter-
section of Valota Road and Madison
Avenue in Redwood City before 9:11 a.m.
Monday, April 29.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Former Foster City Mayor Russ Harter died
April 24 with his wife Betty at his side.
He was 84.
Harter served on the Foster City Council
from 1995 to 2003 and was the city’s mayor
twice.
“He really cared for Foster City. He devoted
his time to make Foster City the best it could
be,” said Rick Wykoff, who served alongside
Harter on the council.
Harter was a fiscal conservative, Wykoff
said, who helped mold what the city has
become today.
“When it came to spending taxpayer money,
he was fiscally responsible,” Wykoff said.
He will also be missed, many of his col-
leagues said.
“Russ set the bar for all those that followed
with his compassion and love for Foster City.
He took such pride in being a councilmember
and mayor. He will be missed,” Mayor Pam
Frisella wrote the Daily Journal in an email.
Harter’s passing was a sad day for the city,
Vice Mayor Charlie
Bronitsky said.
“Russ devoted much of
his time and energy
toward making Foster City
the great place to live,
work and play that it has
now become and our city
will miss him and his
wonderful spirit of com-
munity,” Bronitsky wrote
the Daily Journal in an email.
Harter was raised in upstate New York and
worked at the Remington Arms Factory before
attending Pratt Institute in New York City
where he earned a degree in mechanical engi-
neering and also met his wife Betty.
After graduating in 1951, Harter attempted
to join the Army but was rejected because he
was too short, his family told the Daily
Journal.
He then worked as an engineer at
Westinghouse Electric and got his master’s
degree in mechanical engineering at the
University of Pittsburgh.
He worked for Atlantic Research in Virginia
where he designed oxygen and air regenerat-
ing and scrubbing systems for nuclear sub-
marines and for the preservation of fresh fruit.
He and Betty had two children, Sheila and
David, before being transferred to San
Francisco to work for the U.S. Postal Service
in the construction division.
The family moved to Foster City in 1976.
He was also one of the key reasons why the
city ended up building a park for skateboard-
ers.
“For every child who participates in an
organized sport, there are three who skate-
board,” Harter said while serving on the coun-
cil before it approved the construction of a
skate park.
He is survived by his wife, two children and
two grandchildren, Steven and Michael.
There will be a celebration of Harter’s life
at the Foster City Recreation Center, 2 p.m.,
Saturday, May 11, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster
City.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Russ Harter, former Foster City mayor, dies
Russ Harter
4
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
Caltrain board reviews budget
Caltrain staff presented a preliminary
report to the Peninsula Corridor Joint
Powers Board yesterday indicating the
rail service’s Fiscal Year 2014 budget
will be balanced, but warning that FY
2015 faces a significant budget shortfall
that could result in service cuts and fare
increases.
Unprecedented revenue increases due
to historic ridership growth, savings
from prior budget years and one-time-
only stopgap funds will make it possible
for Caltrain to put forward a balanced
budget this year, reported Gigi
Harrington, deputy chief executive offi-
cer for finance.
But the agency’s financial future
remains uncertain beyond the next fiscal
year as the rail agency continues to grap-
ple with a lack of dedicated funding and
surging demand for its services.
As Caltrain has done in the past, the
proposed FY 2014 budget was balanced
using what is known as “one-time only”
stopgap money. Caltrain will need to
either identify a new funding source or
consider service reductions for FY 2015.
Caltrain’s total proposed operating
budget for FY 2014 is $120 million, an
increase of 7 percent over the previous
year’s budget. The increase is a response
to Caltrain’s ridership growth. With such
high demand, the complexity of operat-
ing the system and managing the con-
tract is growing, leading to an overall
increase in Caltrain’s operating budget.
Street improvements to begin
Redwood City will begin approxi-
mately 10 weeks of improvements on a
number of residential streets later this
month aimed at extending the life of the
roads.
The resurfacing will include two
applications, cape seal or slurry seal.
Cape seal will begin the week of May 20
and includes the application of asphalt
rubber chips followed by a slurry seal a
few weeks later. Motorists can drive on
the asphalt seal a few hours after appli-
cation.
In early June, other streets will receive
only the slurry seal which will close
smaller local streets for up to four hours
after application.
An overlay will also be applied to
Brewster Avenue between El Camino
Real and Stanley Street. The work
begins in July and is estimated to last
approximately four weeks.
Neighbors will be notified of specific
scheduling and “no parking” signs will
go up when appropriate to keep cars off
the streets during portions of the work.
Motorists should expect periodic lane
closures, detours, dust and parking
restrictions.
Overall work hours will be 7:30 a.m.
until 4 p.m. with streets normally
reopened to traffic by 5 p.m. unless cur-
ing takes longer.
A full list of the streets slated for work
can be found online at www.redwoodci-
ty.org.
Man killed in 280 crash was San
Francisco’s Greens Restaurant chef
The victim of a fatal crash on
Interstate 280 in Daly City on Tuesday
morning was a chef at San Francisco’s
Greens Restaurant, executive chef
Annie Somerville said Thursday.
JohnPaul Ueber, 32, of San
Francisco, worked under Somerville at
the prominent vegetarian restaurant
located at Fort Mason.
“He was a very integral part of
Greens,” Somerville said.
She said Ueber had worked there
since 2004 when he started as an extern
through the California Culinary
Academy where he studied. He had
made his way through the ranks,
advancing from lunch chef, to sous-
chef to head chef, Somerville said.
The crash happened at about 8:15
a.m. Tuesday on northbound I-280 near
state Highway 1 after Ueber lost con-
trol of his Honda SUV and struck the
center divide.
The SUV overturned and came to
rest in the far left lane. Ueber, who was
alone in the car, was pronounced dead
at the scene.
Somerville said Ueber had just
dropped off his fiancee at work and
was returning to the city.
Postal carriers enlist public
support to stamp out hunger
On Saturday, May 11, people from
across the country will partner with
their letter carriers to help “Stamp Out
Hunger.”
Now in its 21st year, the Stamp Out
Hunger food drive is the largest single-
day effort to combat hunger in America
and the largest single-day food drive
for food banks in the Bay Area. To par-
ticipate, residents are asked to place a
sturdy bag of non-perishable food
items like peanut butter, pasta, rice,
low-sugar cereal and canned foods
such as tuna, meat, stew, soup and veg-
etables by their mailboxes before their
mail is delivered Saturday, May 11.
Letter carriers will collect the food
items and deliver them to their local
food bank to then be distributed to the
community to help those at risk of
hunger.
Last year, the Bay Area Stamp Out
Hunger food drive collected more than
835,000 pounds of food for those in
need, with 270,000 pounds going to
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo Counties. In
2012, drive organizers across the coun-
try collected more than 70 million
pounds of total food donations for the
ninth consecutive year.
For more information about Second
Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and
San Mateo counties visit
www.SHFB.org. To learn more about
Stamp Out Hunger visit www.helpstam-
pouthunger.com/.
Lopez to leave Samaritan
House for First 5 position
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Kitty Lopez, current executive director at the nonprofit agency
Samaritan House will leave her post later this month to become
the executive director at First 5 San Mateo
County starting at the end of June.
Lopez has been with Samaritan House the
past 12 years. It is the lead service agency in
the county that assists low-income families
and individuals with food, clothing, shelter,
health care and counseling services.
Her new job with First 5 starts June 24.
The FIRST 5 Association of California
works to improve the lives of the state’s
youngest children and their families through
implementation of the California Children
and Families Act at the local and state levels. The act, also known
as Proposition 10, passed in 1998 and created a system of infor-
mation and services promoting early childhood development
from prenatal to age 5.
The goal of Proposition 10 is to enhance the health and early
growth experiences of children, enabling them to be more suc-
cessful in school and to give them a better opportunity to succeed
in life. It is fueled by a 50-cent-a-pack tax on cigarettes and $1 tax
on other tobacco products such as chewing tobacco and cigars.
In San Mateo County, First 5 is led by commissioners who are
appointed by the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors. The
First 5 San Mateo County Commission was established in March
1999. Since its inception, it has invested more than $68 million
in local programs and has served more than 26,000 children pre-
natal through age 5 and 14,000 parents and primary caregivers.
It has a staff of about 10 and had an allocation of more than
$6.7 million in the 2009-10 fiscal year.
“We’re excited for Kitty, and grateful for all of her contribu-
tions to Samaritan House. Under Kitty’s leadership, Samaritan
House has become more visible in the community, has greatly
increased its ability to meet the needs of the underserved in our
community and has formed important partnerships with many
other organizations in the county,” Samaritan House board
President Patty Hsui wrote in a statement. Samaritan House is
forming a transitional team to find a new leader.
“Although Kitty will be missed, the board sees this leadership
transition as an opportunity to build on the strong base that Kitty
has created,” Hsui wrote.
The agency will honor Lopez at its Main Event May 11 with
this year’s theme being “Feeding the Hungry in our Community.”
For information go to www.samaritanhousesanmateo.org.
Local briefs
Kitty Lopez
5
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
We are so confident that our Personalized Martial Arts Instruction will
immediately change your life, we are making you an offer you simply
can’t refuse- FREE 30 DAY TEST DRIVE!!
1100 Park Place, suite 50 • San Mateo, CA 94403
650.286.0105 • www.zultimate.com
By Tracie Cone
and Rich Pedroncelli
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ECHO SUMMIT — The man in
charge of surveying California’s
snowpack to measure the amount of
water that will flow into storage
reservoirs over the next few months
had bad news Thursday.
“I’m finding nothing. Seriously,
there is no snow on the course at all,”
said Frank Gehrke, chief surveyor for
the Department of Water Resources.
The survey showed the water con-
tent of what little snowpack does
remain at 17 percent of normal, an
ominous situation for a state that
depends on a steady stream of
snowmelt to replenish reservoirs
throughout the summer.
For nearly a century the state has
been taking snow measurements at
select areas across the Sierra Nevada
in an attempt to gauge how much
water will be available for farmers
and city dwellers. Having a course
bare of snow is not unheard of in
May — the last month it is measured
— but it’s another stark reminder that
water will be in short supply this
summer.
With the DWR projecting to sup-
ply just 35 percent of what 29 agen-
cies providing water to 25 million
Californians say they need, officials
still are not ready to call it a drought.
“We’re not using that word yet,”
said spokesman Ted Thomas.
After a wet fall California’s precip-
itation declined and every monthly
measurement in 2013 recorded a pro-
gressively diminishing snowpack.
Exactly how accurate those physical
and electronic measurements are is
the subject of a NASA mission that is
collecting data from the air to help
determine how much water will flow
out of the Sierra Nevada as snow
melts.
Since April the NASA team has
been working with the DWR to map
the snowpack from the air using lidar
technology, which emits 100,000
pulses of light a second to record the
surface elevation of snow throughout
the mountains. Scientists then com-
pare the elevations to measurements
of the mountains without snow to
determine the thickness.
The hope is to get a more accurate
picture of the amount of water the
state can rely upon.
“Think of your TV screen made of
millions of pixels. How good is your
picture when you have just a few of
those pixels turned on? You can get
an indication, but what we’re doing is
turning them all on,” said Tom
Painter, the principal scientist for the
airborne snow survey at NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory.
State snowpack 17 percent of normal
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The board
that oversees California’s high-
speed rail project voted Thursday
to give its largest private contrac-
tor another $96 million and two
more years to oversee architectur-
al and engineering work, but
warned that it will exercise rigor-
ous oversight.
Board members made it clear to
contractor Parsons Brinckerhoff that
the California High-Speed Rail
Authority has beefed up its senior
management and added staff, so the
firm should not expect its proposals
to be rubber-stamped, as many crit-
ics have charged.
The authority, which is overseeing
efforts to begin building the $68 bil-
lion bullet train, has been criticized
for relying too heavily on outside
contractors, including Parsons
Brinckerhoff.
High-speed rail contractor
gets additional $96 million
By Jonathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Technology cre-
ated an energy revolution over the
past decade — just not the one we
expected.
By now, cars were supposed to
be running on fuel made from
plant waste or algae — or powered
by hydrogen or cheap batteries
that burned nothing at all.
Electricity would be generated
with solar panels and wind tur-
bines. When the sun didn’t shine or
the wind didn’t blow, power would
flow out of batteries the size of
tractor-trailers.
Fossil fuels? They were going to
be expensive and scarce, relics of
an earlier, dirtier age.
But in the race to conquer energy
technology, Old Energy is win-
ning.
Oil companies big and small
have used technology to find a
bounty of oil and natural gas so
large that worries about running
out have melted away. New imag-
ing technologies let drillers find oil
and gas trapped miles underground
and undersea.
Oil drilling tech leaps, clean energy lags
Bill gives parents
control of networking sites
SACRAMENTO — The state
Senate passed a bill Thursday that
would allow parents to remove their
children’s personal information
from social networking sites, over
the objection of Facebook and other
tech companies that say it would be
impossible to implement.
Sen. Ellen Corbett, D-Hayward,
said her SB501 gives parents the
right to protect their children by
removing addresses, telephone num-
bers, Social Security numbers, and
bank or credit card account informa-
tion. The bill applies to children
under age 18.
Her bill passed 23-10 and moves
to the Assembly.
In an opposition letter signed by
Facebook Inc., Google Inc., Zynga
Inc., Tumblr and others, the compa-
nies described Corbett’s bill as
unnecessary.
Senate passes drug
sentencing reform bill
SACRAMENTO — The state
Senate has approved a bill that
would allow county prosecutors to
charge lower-level, non-violent drug
offenses as misdemeanors instead of
felonies.
SB649 by Democratic Sen. Mark
Leno of San Francisco passed on a
party-line 23-14 vote Thursday.
Leno says his bill will reduce incar-
ceration costs and give local govern-
ments the flexibility to send drug
offenders to treatment.
Around the state
“I’m finding nothing. Seriously,
there is no snow on the course at all.”
—Frank Gehrke, chief surveyor for the Department of Water Resources
6
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes • Multi-Family • Mixed-Use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance / Cash Out
Investors Welcome • Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT
• U.S. Rep. Jackie
Speier, D-San Mateo,
will hold a town hall
meeting in Half Moon
Bay Saturday, May 11
to give new constituents
of the 14th Congressional District the opportu-
nity to ask questions about any topic on their
minds, including the economy, health care and
veterans issues. Residents from El Granada, Half
Moon Bay, Montara, Moss Beach and San
Gregorio in particular are invited.
The meeting will be 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m. at the
Half Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas St.
STATE GOVERNMENT
• Assembly Bill 470 passed out of the
Assembly Education Committee with nearly
unanimous bipartisan support. The vote was 6-0.
AB 470, authored by Assemblyman Kevin
Mullin, D-South San Francisco, is intended to
protect “categorical” funding for the develop-
ment of school safety plans.
These plans are developed by education
experts in conjunction with law enforcement
officers and make sure that school staff and
administrators are adequately prepared to
address violence and disasters at public schools,
according to Mullin’s office.
REGIONAL GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo County Harbor District
Board of Harbor Commissioners adopted its
Preliminary Integrated Operating and
Capital Budget for Fiscal Year 2013-14 at its
May 1 meeting and shall hold a public hearing
for the purpose of fixing the final budget 7 p.m.
June 19 at the Municipal Services Building, 33
Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco. Written
comments are welcome, please address them to:
400 Oyster Point Blvd., Suite 300, South San
Francisco, CA 94080.
Copies of the proposed San Mateo County
Harbor District Budget are on file and avail-
able for inspection by the public at the
Administration office at 400 Oyster Point Blvd.,
Suite 300, South San Francisco, CA; the office
of the Harbormaster at Oyster Point
Marina/Park, 95 Harbormaster Road, South
San Francisco, CA; and the office of the
Harbormaster at Pillar Point Harbor, One
Johnson Pier, El Granada, CA, between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The city of Burlingame is moving forward
on a promotional video of its downtowns that
will be played at local hotels. At a December
2011 study session, the council expressed an
interest in such a video. In February, a request for
proposals was set to 10 local video firms and
Burlingame residents identified as having the
skills necessary to create such a video. Five com-
plete proposals with budgets were received.
After being vetted by a subcommittee, Electrify
Media Productions was selected, according to
an update that will be approved by the council
Monday.
The $11,500 production may need to be re-
edited to include focus after the Burlingame
Avenue upgrades are in place. Prior to getting
started, the boards of both the Downtown
Business Improvement District and the
Broadway Business Improvement District as
well as the managers of city hotels will meet
with Burlingame’s Economic Development
Specialist Leslie Parks and Michael Higashi,
principal of Electrify Media, to answer questions
and discuss ideas.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, May 6 at
City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
George Glushenok
George Glushenok (1941-2013) died
Wednesday morning, April 24, following a
long struggle with myelofibrosis.
He was born on Manhattan where his fam-
ily resided until they moved to Jackson, N.J.
Following graduation from Lakewood
High School in 1959, George attended
Rutgers University, where he earned a bach-
elor’s of arts degree.
He obtained his master’s degree in Russian
at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in
1968.
He taught Russian at Emory University in
Atlanta. After earning a master’s degree in
library science, he worked as a librarian at
Georgia Tech University in Atlanta. In 1976,
he and his life partner moved to Palo Alto
seeking new career opportunities, eventually
obtaining a reference position at the San
Francisco Public Library (Main). He also
served in responsible managerial positions in
various public libraries on the San Francisco
Peninsula, including the South San
Francisco, Sunnyvale and Redwood City
libraries.
George retired in 2006, but continued
working part time in the Menlo Park and San
Mateo libraries until shortly before his death.
George is survived by his younger sister
Lydia Davis and family, by his older sister
Alice Wybernac and family, and by his life
partner of 46 years, Robert Mayer.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200 words
or less with a photo one time on the date of
the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200
words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
Fresh off victory, NRA
holds convention in Houston
AUSTIN, Texas — The National Rifle
Association has spent much of the past year
under siege, ardently defending gun rights fol-
lowing mass shootings in Colorado and
Connecticut and fighting back against mount-
ing pressure for stricter laws in Washington
and state capitols across the country.
Now, after winning a major victory over
President Barack Obama with the defeat of a
gun control bill in the U.S. Senate, the power-
ful gun-rights lobby will gather in Houston
this weekend for its annual convention.
Organizers anticipate a rollicking, Texas-
sized party — one that celebrates the group’s
recent victory while stressing the fight against
gun control is far from over.
“If you are an NRA member, you deserve to
be proud,” Wayne LaPierre, the NRA’s brash,
no-compromises chief executive wrote to the
organization’s 5 million members last week,
telling them they “exemplify everything that’s
good and right about America.”
California to say how
it will cut prison crowding
SACRAMENTO — California is housing
thousands of inmates out of state and sentenc-
ing thousands more to county jails instead of
prison, but the draw-down in population is still
not enough for the federal courts.
Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration faces a
midnight Thursday deadline to detail how it
will reduce the inmate population even fur-
ther. California needs to shed another 9,300
state inmates to reach a court-ordered popula-
tion cap by the end of the year.
The governor could be cited with contempt
of court if judges believe he is trying to dodge
their long-standing order, which has been
upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.
Greatly reducing the state prison population
is seen as the most effective way to improve
medical and mental health care for inmates.
Current treatment has been ruled unconstitu-
tional.
News briefs
NATION 7
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama has his top domestic
ambition at the head of his agenda as
he travels to Mexico on Thursday.
To sell his immigration overhaul
back home, he needs a growing
economy in Mexico and a Mexican
president willing to help him secure
the border.
Obama was flying to Mexico City
Thursday to meet with President
Enrique Pena Nieto, eager to pro-
mote Mexico’s economic success
and the neighboring country’s place
as the second largest export market
for U.S. goods and services.
Just before departing, Obama said
the trip to Mexico, then on to Costa
Rica, will promote his priority to
grow the economy and create mid-
dle class jobs.
“I’m going to be working to deep-
en our economic and trade relation-
ships across Latin America — rela-
tionships that create jobs and growth
here at home, and offer our busi-
nesses growing markets where they
can sell more American-made goods
and services abroad,” Obama said.
Mexicans will be hanging on the
president’s words, but Obama also
has in mind an important audience
back in the United States.
Though the role played by Latino
voters in last year’s U.S. presidential
election gets much credit for the cur-
rent momentum for changing immi-
gration laws and providing a path to
citizenship for 11 million immi-
grants in the U.S. illegally, another
reason for the change in attitudes is
that stronger border protections and
the recession have been disincen-
tives to cross into the U.S. As a
result, illegal immigration has
declined.
“With Mexico, first and foremost,
they are critical to our ability to
secure the border,” said Ben Rhodes,
an Obama deputy national security
adviser.
Obama to pitchimmigrationplan in Mexico
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The suicide rate
among middle-aged Americans
climbed a startling 28 percent in a
decade, a period that included the
recession and the mortgage crisis,
the government reported Thursday.
The trend was most pronounced
among white men and women in that
age group. Their suicide rate jumped
40 percent between 1999 and 2010.
But the rates in younger and older
people held steady. And there was
little change among middle-aged
blacks, Hispanics and most other
racial and ethnic groups, the report
from the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention found.
Why did so many middle-aged
whites — that is, those who are 35 to
64 years old — take their own lives?
One theory suggests the recession
caused more emotional trauma in
whites, who tend not to have the
same kind of church support and
extended families that blacks and
Hispanics do.
Suicide rate up sharply
among the middle-aged
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama
administration is rethinking its
opposition to arming the rebels
who have been locked in a civil war
with the Syrian regime for more
than two years, Defense Secretary
Chuck Hagel said Thursday,
becoming the first top U.S. official
to publicly acknowledge the
reassessment.
During a Pentagon news confer-
ence with British Defense Secretary
Philip Hammond, Hagel said arm-
ing the rebels was one option that
the administra-
tion was consid-
ering in consul-
tation with its
allies. But he
said he personal-
ly had not decid-
ed whether it
would be a wise
or appropriate
move.
“Arming the rebels — that’s an
option,” he said. “You look at and
rethink all options. It doesn’t mean
you do or you will. ... It doesn’t
mean that the president has decided
on anything.”
Hagel: U.S. rethinking arming Syrian rebels
Benedict XVI returns
to Vatican for first time
VATICAN CITY — Emeritus
Pope Benedict XVI came home to
the Vatican on
Thursday for the
first time since
he resigned Feb.
28, beginning an
unprecedented
era for the
Catholic Church
of having a
retired pontiff
living alongside
a reigning one.
Pope Francis welcomed Benedict
outside his new retirement home —
a converted monastery on the edge
of the Vatican gardens — and the
two immediately went into the
adjoining chapel to pray together,
the Vatican said.
The Vatican said Benedict, 86,
was pleased to be back and that he
would — as he himself has said —
“dedicate himself to the service of
the church above all with prayer.”
North Korea sentences U.S.
man in possible bid for talks
SEOUL, South Korea — A
Korean American detained for six
months in North Korea has been
sentenced to 15 years of hard labor
for “hostile acts” against the state,
the North’s media said Thursday —
a move that could trigger a visit by a
high-profile American if history is
any guide.
Kenneth Bae, 44, a Washington
state man described by friends as a
devout Christian and a tour operator,
is at least the sixth American
detained in North Korea since 2009.
Around the world
Chuck Hagel
REUTERS
Barack Obama,left,and his Mexican counterpart Enrique Pena Nieto walk
together at the National Palace in Mexico City.
Emeritus Pope
Benedict XVI
LOCAL 8
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
L
ast week, state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-
San Mateo, sent a letter to Michael
Peevey, the president of the
California Public Utilities Commission,
urging him to attend a Senate budget sub-
committee meeting April 25 to justify his
continuing appointment to lead the utility
watchdog. Turns out Peevey could not
attend because he spent the day on a utility-
paid junket with utility officials at a resort in
Napa. An NBC Bay Area reporter cornered
the CPUC president at the Napa event in a
testy exchange before Peevey walked away.
***
The Foster City Chamber of Commerce
has hired Joanne Bohigian as its permanent
chief executive officer. She has led the
chamber as its interim CEO for about a
year. She formerly served the city on its
Environmental Sustainability Task Force
and helped release a 100-page report, the
Recommended Sustainability Action Plan,
that outlines goals on water and energy effi-
ciency for the city and its residents.
***
Millbrae is celebrating Streets Alive!
Parks Alive! Sunday, May 5. This year the
city is ramping up its efforts by proving
something for everyone. From 1:30 p.m. to
5 p.m., participants can take part in free
activities taking place downtown on
Broadway between Meadow Glen and
Taylor Boulevard. Bring a chair and relax
while enjoying music, kids 5 to 12 can bring
their bike and participate in a bike ride, and
there will be plenty of chances to take pho-
tos. Those who want to be more active can
take part in one of many demonstrations
including martial arts, fitness and tai chi or
simply watch talented musicians and
dancers.
***
Jake Janosky, a third grader at St.
Catherine of Siena School in Burlingame,
with the help of his mom, Lisa, baked good-
ies to raise whatever he could for the vic-
tim’s of the Boston Marathon. Janosky’s
dad is from Boston and some of the family
lives near where the bombings occurred.
Janosky held his bake sale in the deli
department of the Mollie Stone’s in
Burlingame Sunday, April 28 and raised
$500 which was donated to the One Boston
Fund.
***
Interested in learning about bookbinding?
The San Mateo County History Museum,
located at 2200 Broadway in Redwood City,
will present a “Hands-On History” work-
shop on bookbinding from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, May 11. Local artist Lois White
will host the introductory class. Using
images of historic landmarks in San Mateo
County, participants will make a miniature
book to take home.
Beginners are welcome and materials will
be provided. The workshop fee is $15.
Please RSVP by May 4 to the Museum’s
Education Department at 299-0104, ext.
231 or education@historysmc.org. Space is
limited.
***
The Blind Judo Foundation, which
Coach Willy Cahill from San Bruno’s
Cahill’s Judo Academy is the CEO and co-
founder, is now able to accept vehicles of all
types whether working or not as donations.
Proceeds from the cars will help the non-
profit in its work to empower the blind and
visually impaired through the sport of judo.
For more information about the organization
visit www.blindjudofoundation.org.
***
Fair entries due Wednesday, May 8. This
year’s San Mateo County Fair runs June 8
through June 16. Fair contests have been a
popular tradition since the fair opened in
1926. This year, there is a contest for every-
one from fine arts, creative home arts, horti-
culture and flowers, gardening, agriculture,
literary arts, technology and industrial arts,
DIY science, youth exhibits, youth live-
stock, sustainable living and home brewing.
Prizes depend upon the category and con-
test, but can range from publication of your
work in the fair’s literary magazine, to rib-
bons, cash and even educational scholar-
ships. Fair contest entry forms are available
at www.sanmateocountyfair.com.
***
San Carlos’ Hot Harvest Nights is now
on again! The nighttime farmers’ market on
the 700 block of Laurel Street began May 3
and includes food, music and produce
spread among 50 to 60 booths set up in the
closed-down street. A whole lineup of music
is planned but as a tease, May 9 will feature
the Bonedrivers followed by Kitchen Help
May 16. The event runs 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
***
The Burlingame Lions Club is soliciting
nominations for the 2013 Citizen of the
Year Award. Candidates must be residents
of Burlingame and have, through, volunteer
time and effort, made a significant contribu-
tion in support of the Burlingame communi-
ty. Recommendations for a nominee should
be in written form and be submitted no later
than Friday, May 24 to: Ken Ingram (presi-
dent), Burlingame Lions Club, P.O. Box
206, Burlingame, CA. 94011-0206 or
klimni@sbcglobal.net.
The Citizen of the Year Award is an
annual recognition of citizen involvement
within the community and of the individ-
ual’s contribution in making a positive dif-
ference within the community. It is impor-
tant to list those activities, service organiza-
tion memberships, civic group associations
and personal contributions to improving the
quality of life within the city of Burlingame,
without monetary gain.
The winner is honored at the annual Joint
Services Luncheon, held in June.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
reasons. Many cited religious reasons while
others pointed to disapproving of the organiza-
tion’s offering of abortions. Others stood up to
point out the discussion was not one of moral-
ity but rather of city regulations and staff said
the proposal met city requirements.
However, the opinions from the audience of
Planned Parenthood Mar Monte weren’t the
issue. Instead the application to allow Planned
Parenthood Mar Monte to open at 435 Grand
Ave. — an application which staff is recom-
mending be approved — was about land use.
Since it met land use requirements, the pro-
posed three-story clinic was approved in a 6-1
split vote with Commission Vice Chair Carlos
Martin dissenting. There is a 15-day appeal
period.
“It’s not a moral issue. It’s not a belief issue.
It’s a land use issue,” said Commission Chair
Rick Ochsenhirt adding that means concerns
about protests, traffic or who the applicant is
are not pertinent.
Martin, who had many questions about pos-
sible consumer fraud to the applicant,
described a personal vision for revitalizing
Grand Avenue before turning down the appli-
cation. He added that the clinic failed to meet
standards by not submitting proof of the origi-
nal use of the building, a caveat of the code.
Martin’s view was the minority for the com-
mission and staff disagreed.
Moving forward, Liz Figueroa, vice presi-
dent of Planned Parenthood Mar Monte for
public affairs, said it welcomes the opportuni-
ty to offer health care services in South San
Francisco. During a 13-minute presentation,
the team presenting the plan said it would
work with law enforcement and partner with
the community.
Figueroa’s plan wasn’t welcomed by all.
Abortion was a main point of contention for
those in attendance. As proposed, the facility is
considering offering medication abortion but
not surgical, in-clinic procedures.
Ross Foti, for example, is a 20-year pro-lifer
who is well-known for protesting abortions in
San Mateo. He said approval of Planned
Parenthood would bring division and tension
to downtown South San Francisco. Foti also
promised it would “bring hatred to the area
through the killing of innocent babies.” If
opened, Foti promised to bring protests that
include photos and video of abortions.
“Do you want this in your city? The pres-
ence of evil?” Foti asked.
On the other hand, resident John Ruiz didn’t
dispute that there are underserved people who
could use health services. However, he noted
the location is near schools and downtown.
Ruiz worried the graphic protests in San
Mateo — which Foti is known for — would
become a staple in downtown South San
Francisco. He requested it simply be located
elsewhere within the city. Ruiz suggested the
other side of Grand Avenue or in the Oyster
Point neighborhood where it wouldn’t take up
downtown parking or be exposed to as many
children.
Lifelong South City resident Janet Ingersoll
said education and health services are needed
for this community. Ingersoll said she believed
Planned Parenthood could offer people the
skills needed to care for themselves. She
described the services proposed to be offered
as critical to the community, particularly those
not lucky enough to have health care.
Opening a clinic downtown is an allowable
use for the area. If approved, the clinic would
be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays.
Interior improvements are proposed but the
building will not be expanded, according to the
staff report.
Patients would enter the site from a secured
foyer area on Grand Avenue. The building
would have a security system in place and the
organization hopes to work with law enforce-
ment early to build a relationship in case diffi-
cult situations arise, Lynn Salazar, director of
facilities for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte,
wrote in an April 22 letter to the Planning
Department.
Services that are planned to be offered on
the site include: primary annual exams, contra-
ception and family planning services, cancer
screenings, sexually transmitted infection
screening and treatment, HIV screening, male
services, adolescent services, mid-life servic-
es, pregnancy testing and options counseling
and education services. There is consideration
to provide pediatric care, prenatal care, med-
ication abortion and colonoscopy, Salazar
wrote.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
SSF
OPINION 9
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Planned Bay Area
Editor,
Regarding the story, “What is Plan
Bay Area?” in the May 1 edition of the
Daily Journal, add two million resi-
dents to the Bay Area, where do they
get these thoughts? Haven’t they driven
around the Bay Area lately? Our high-
ways and streets are packed.
We cannot and do not want to sustain
any more housing.
A good example of this bad thinking
is the area between Sunnybrae Avenue
and 25th Avenue on Delaware Street in
San Mateo. They are developing Kmart
shopping center, Denny’s on Concar
and Delaware, the shopping center
kitty-corner from Kmart, the old San
Mateo Bowling alley, the old police
station, the printing company next to
the police station and of course Bay
Meadows. All of these residential
developments have required limited
parking with the idea that these people
that live there will depend on trains and
buses for their transportation.
The city of San Mateo and the
Association of Bay Area Governments
believes that these families that live
near the rail corridor will not own cars
because the transportation in the area
will take you anywhere you want. I’m
awake, the citizens of the Bay Area are
awake, it’s time ABAG and the cities
that support it wake up. We cannot
afford these kinds of thoughts. Fix
what we have first.
Bob Nice
Redwood City
GOP horse manure
Editor,
Chuck McDougald’s past weekend
guest perspectives, especially his last
one, are all a load of horse manure (in
response to “GOP and immigrants” in
the April 27 edition of the Daily
Journal).
McDougald wants everyone to forget
that just six months ago, during the
presidential elections, the GOP didn’t
want any of the immigrants to vote.
McDougald wants everyone to forget
that the GOP accused immigrants of
voter fraud so they wouldn’t vote for
President Obama. McDougald wants
everyone to forget that the GOP
changed or reduced (or attempted to
change or reduce) the voting places,
times and days, for immigrants and
other low-income people. Apparently,
McDougald wants everyone to forget
that the GOP is completely two-faced.
McDougald wants everyone to forget
that the GOP truly believes in the “47
percent” comment spoken behind
closed doors but, like McDougald, says
another thing to the immigrants’ faces.
So, Mr. McDougald, good luck in
rebranding the GOP with selective
memory and lies.
Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Los Angeles Daily News
S
tarting next year, nearly 5 mil-
lion uninsured Californians will
suddenly have health coverage,
due to the implementation of the
Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.
Sounds great, right? But having
insurance doesn’t guarantee
Californians can actually get care —
not if there is a shortage of caregivers.
That’s exactly the situation the state
faces in 2014. Even now California
doesn’t have enough primary care
physicians. Forty-two of its 58 counties
fall short of the federal government’s
most basic standard.
The California Medical Association
wants to build more medical schools
and expand opportunities for young
doctors. That’s a smart plan. But that’s
not going to be much help to the mil-
lions who go looking for a doctor next
year and can’t find one. Training a doc-
tor takes a decade. That’s a long time
for a patient to sit in a waiting room.
The chairman of the state Senate
Health Committee, Sen. Ed Hernandez,
D-West Covina, has a good idea to help
bridge the gap.
A practicing optometrist, he wants to
expand the ability of nurse practitioners
and other professionals such as pharma-
cists and optometrists to help treat
patients with primary care. Their work
would be limited to what they’re
already qualified to do but often not
allowed to do. Changing the rules so
that these health care professionals can
provide direct service would make bet-
ter use of their skills and provide at
least some care for people who can’t
find a doctor.
Seventeen other states, including
Washington, Oregon and Colorado,
have expanded the scope of nurse prac-
titioners. Doctors predicted a surge in
medical errors, but studies have not
found this.
The Institutes of Medicine, the health
arm of the National Academy of
Sciences, has recommended for years
that nurses should play a larger role in
diagnosing and treating patients and in
helping to manage chronic diseases.
California already has about 17,000
nurse practitioners. They can be trained
more quickly than doctors and at con-
siderably less expense.
Hernandez’s legislation, a package of
three bills — SB 491, SB 492 and SB
493 — comes up for its first committee
hearing Monday in the senate’s
Business, Professions and Economic
Development committee. It’s going to
be a fight, because the CMA, which
represents the state’s doctors, is
opposed. The association will argue
that patient safety will be compro-
mised.
But nurse practitioners, pharmacists
and optometrists would not be going
beyond the bounds of their training.
The first bill, SB 491, would allow
nurse practitioners to establish inde-
pendent practices and deliver limited
care without a doctor’s oversight. It’s
not like nurse practitioners would be
doing surgery, Hernandez said; they
would be limited to primary care they
do now.
This could prove especially helpful in
rural areas, where primary care physi-
cians are scarce.
The other two bills would allow
optometrists to diagnose and treat dis-
eases that show up in the eyes, such as
diabetes and some cancers. They would
also be able to do minor eye surgeries,
if they’ve had the appropriate training.
Pharmacists would be able to vaccinate
children and, with additional training,
prescribe or adjust prescriptions within
the limitations of their expertise.
Hernandez notes that with their four
years of medical training, pharmacists
are currently the most overtrained and
underused health care professionals.
Another argument that will be used to
thwart this legislation is that it will set
up a two-tiered medical system.
Hernandez says we already have a two-
tiered health care system in which some
people can access care and others can’t.
Ideally we would have enough pri-
mary care doctors to serve all current
and potential patients and enough
money to afford it. That’s not realistic,
or even cost-efficient for the future.
California has to be innovative in its
use of medical professionals to serve
newly insured patients.
Instead of fighting Hernandez’s bills,
the doctors should work with him to
build in safeguards so that all
Californians can have reasonable access
to health care.
Right prescription for health care provider gap
CuriOdyssey awaits
T
ucked away at Coyote Point is a tinkerer’s
dream with a long history, a recent stretch of
stability and the signs of upcoming progress.
CuriOdyssey, formerly the Coyote Point Museum, is
popular with the sippy cup crowd simply because its fea-
tures are kid-sized and hands-on with the simple rule
that they are all rooted in science.
The expansive building on the top of the hill at the
county-owned Coyote Point Park has seen better days,
but then it’s also seen worse days. In 2006, it was nearly
closed by a lack of enthusiasm and a revolving door of
leadership. It was also near-
ly sold off to a nonprofit
that envisioned a global
warming museum of sorts.
But it was rescued by a
group of supporters who
ousted the old board and
reinfused the place with a
sense of promise. Rachel
Meyer, the current executive
director, has righted the
ship and created a sense of
stability while focusing on
its core mission on children
and science literacy.
It is for that reason that
Eric Maschwitz, director of exhibits, can be found fine-
tuning interactive exhibits in the lower levels of the
wooden building. In his workshop, Maschwitz was work-
ing on a new exhibit based on Newton’s laws of motion
using magnets on a recent weekday. Other exhibits use
scientific principals in an accessible way for kids.
Maybe the kids get some science education out of it, or
maybe they think it’s just fun. Either way, it’s something
that can build in their mind over time. There are only a
few exhibits on the main floor at a time, but they are
constantly exchanged for new ones with unique lessons
so they’re fresh for kids.
With the advent of the DIY and maker movements,
such exhibits incorporating real science are becoming
more popular and Maschwitz is able to fine-tune them
through mobile demos at libraries and places like
Powell’s Sweet Shop in Burlingame. Popular summer
camps also give children the opportunity to explore and
create on their own, said Meyer.
The museum combines its focus on science with ani-
mal exhibits outside which allow for real-life visits with
such creatures as eagles, road runners, vultures, great
blue herons, sea otters and foxes. That has long been a
staple of the museum.
Another staple, the environmental hall, is shut down. It
featured a sloped series of walkways that mimicked the
California environment. It outlined the eventual destruc-
tion of man, and was a bit avant-garde when installed
decades ago, but it was a little, “heavy-handed,” said
Meyer.
When the museum undergoes a renovation, the hall
will likely be transformed into two levels with more
windows to take advantage of the natural setting with
views of the San Francisco Bay, skyline and airport.
That renovation, however, is still in the planning stages.
And for those who may be impatient, consider where the
museum was a mere six years ago. It was no longer
renewing or taking memberships, it was losing hundreds
of thousands of dollars a year, had a history of five
directors in five years and considered closing down for-
ever. The building, once grand in 1981, had fallen into
disrepair.
Now, its leadership is building membership and dona-
tions while shifting the ratio of income from 70 percent
contributed and 30 earned to 60 percent contributed to
40 percent earned while seeing its attendance increase
77 percent since its lowest point of 2008. It has 3,000
members with a goal of 6,000 and is exploring partner-
ships with other environmental groups. But its adherence
to biology and science and its delivery method to chil-
dren is at its core. There is a movement in the classroom
toward science, technology, engineering and math and
the museum is the perfect location for partnerships in
that focus. But technology is only one component.
“[Children] are into technology early. Well, that’s fine.
But it’s a real miss if you’re not interacting with the nat-
ural and physical world,” said Meyer.
And the aptly named CuriOdyssey is the perfect spot
for that piece of the puzzle.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He
can be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmays.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Kathleen Magana
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,831.58 +0.89% 10-Yr Bond 1.631 -0.49%
Nasdaq3,340.62 +1.26% Oil (per barrel) 93.89
S&P 500 1,597.59 +0.94% Gold 1,465.50
650-365-1668
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market is
all about jobs this week.
Stocks rose Thursday after unemploy-
ment claims fell to a five-year low. A day
earlier it was just the opposite; the mar-
ket slumped after companies added just
119,000 jobs in April, the fewest in
seven months, according to payroll
processor ADP. And stocks could swing
again Friday when the government’s
closely watched monthly employment
report is released.
“Everyone is looking to the April jobs
numbers,” said Tyler Vernon, chief
investment officer at Biltmore Capital.
“People are more confident that it was an
anomaly last month and are looking for
some bigger numbers.”
Economists forecast that the employ-
ers added 160,000 jobs last month.
Stocks slumped April 5 when the gov-
ernment said 88,000 jobs were added,
less than half the number forecast.
Signs of increased hiring have sup-
ported this year’s surge in stocks and
pushed the market to record highs. The
run-up has started to falter in recent
weeks on concerns that the global econ-
omy is slowing. More jobs should boost
consumer spending, a key driver of U.S.
growth.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
130.63 points to 14,831.58 on Thursday,
an increase of 0.9 percent. The index lost
138 points a day earlier. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index climbed 14.89 points,
or 0.9 percent, to 1,597.59, also recover-
ing almost all of its losses from a day
earlier.
Applications for unemployment bene-
fits fell last week to 324,000, the fewest
since January 2008, the Labor depart-
ment reported before the market opened.
The outlook for global growth also got
a boost after the European Central bank
cuts its benchmark interest rate a quarter
of a percentage point to 0.5 percent.
The euro fell a penny against the dol-
lar to $1.3060. The price of gold rose
$21.40, or 1.5 percent, to $1,467.60 an
ounce. The price of crude oil rose $2.96,
or 3.3 percent, to $93.99 a barrel.
Higher profits from CBS, Facebook
and other companies also lifted stocks
Thursday.
Broadcaster CBS reported a 22 per-
cent jump in first-quarter earnings as big
events like the Super Bowl pushed
advertising revenue higher. Its stock rose
95 cents, or 2 percent, to $47.35.
Stocks gain after jobless claims fall
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Beazer Homes USA Inc., up $1.73 at $18.52
Thanks to more home closings and higher prices, the homebuilder
said that its loss narrowed during its fiscal second quarter.
Hillshire Brands Co., down 80 cents at $34.77
The maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs reported
quarterly sales that fell short of Wall Street expectations.
MGM Resorts International, up 75 cents at $14.55
The casino operator reported a surprise first-quarter profit on the
strength of room bookings and gambling tables in Las Vegas.
General Motors Co., up 98 cents at $31.16
The automaker said that its net income fell 14 percent in the first
quarter, but adjusted results topped the analysts’ forecast.
LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., down 23 cents at $8.33
The educational toy maker said its first-quarter loss narrowed,but its
full-year guidance was weaker than analysts expected.
Yelp Inc., up $6.92 at $32.22
The online business review company boosted its financial forecast
beyond Wall Street analysts’ expectations.
Nasdaq
Elizabeth Arden Inc., up $3.33 at $42.62
The beauty products maker posted a third-quarter loss, but profits
were in line with expectations and it topped revenue projections.
Lifetime Brands Inc., down $1.10 at $12.47
The appliance and housewares company posted a loss for its first
quarter, as revenue declined on weakness in the United Kingdom.
Big movers
By Christopher S. Rugaber
and Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Fewer
Americans are losing their jobs.
Employers are struggling to squeeze
more work from their staffs. The U.S.
is producing so much oil that imports
are plunging, narrowing the trade
deficit.
A string of data Thursday raised
hopes for stronger hiring and U.S.
growth in coming months. More jobs
would spur spending and help energize
the economy, which has yet to regain
full health nearly four years after the
Great Recession officially ended.
And an interest rate cut Thursday by
the European Central Bank, if it helps
bolster the European economy, could
also contribute to U.S. growth.
The U.S. economic reports came one
day before the government will report
how many jobs employers added in
April. Economists think the gain will
exceed the 88,000 jobs added in
March, the fewest in nine months.
The government said Thursday that
the number of Americans applying for
unemployment aid fell last week to a
seasonally adjusted 324,000 — the
fewest since January 2008.
Unemployment applications reflect the
pace of layoffs: A steady drop means
companies are shedding fewer workers.
Eventually, they’ll need to hire to meet
customer demand or to replace workers
who quit.
LinkedIn 1Q net, revenue
soar; outlook falls short
MOUNTAIN VIEW — LinkedIn
Corp. continued its uninterrupted streak
of beating analysts’ expectations with its
quarterly results on Thursday as earn-
ings and revenue soared, but its outlook
for the rest of the year disappointed Wall
Street and its stock plunged in extended
trading.
Shares of the online professional net-
working service fell $21.67, or 10.8 per-
cent, to $180 after hours. The stock had
closed above $200 for the first time after
hitting a record high of $202.91 earlier
in the day in anticipation of the results.
LinkedIn Corp. earned $22.6 million,
or 20 cents per share, in the first quarter.
That’s up from $5 million, or 4 cents per
share, in the same period a year earlier.
Taco Bell says new
value menu may come soon
NEW YORK — Taco Bell says its
new value menu may go national in
coming months.
The fast-food chain had already said
in January that it was testing a “$1
Cravings” menu that would replace its
“Why Pay More” menu, which has
tiered pricing.
In a call with reporters Thursday,
executives at the chain said they’re con-
fident they’ve hit on the right mix of
products for a national rollout this year.
But they declined to specify a date.
Economic reports hold out hope for hiring gains
Business briefs
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aragon head tennis coach Dave
Owdom knows proverbial moun-
tains don’t come any higher than
what his team is about to face.
“We’re one of the few teams that
isn’t afraid to play Menlo School,”
Owdom said. “We’re looking for-
ward to playing them. We know
they’re very talented. There aren’t
many teams that want to play them,
but that’s the hand that’s been dealt
and I know they have great ability.”
But the Dons go into Friday’s sec-
ond round matchup against the
Knights in the Central Coast Section
playoffs a confident bunch follow-
ing an 11-7 first-round win over
Sacred Heart Cathedral.
“We can just as tough mentality as
them,” Owdom said. “I know my
guys, and I’ll tell you, they’re going
to fight for every point.”
Aragon beat the Irish in the first
round without their No. 1 singles
player Devon Hughes, who sat out
because he was sick. But the rest of
the Dons stepped up big time. No. 1
doubles team Matt Fowler and
Landers Ngrichemat went 3-0 in
their matches. Owdom said Aragon
went into that matchup against SHC
feeling confident as well.
“We told them we’ve played
Sacred Heart Cathedral in the past,”
Dons ready for challenge
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
No one knows College of San
Mateo pitcher Michelle Pilster quite
like Jamie Navarro.
More than just teammates,
through years and years of collabo-
rating as battery mates and thus
winning a lot on the softball field,
there is a bond and a chemistry
completely unique to the now
Bulldog duo. It’s sisterly, playful
and, while there is nothing really
out there to prove it, it’s a safe bet
the two might even be able to finish
each other’s sentences.
So when CSM head coach Nicole
Borg confirmed on Wednesday that,
after four years at Capuchino High
School and another two at the
College of San Mateo, Navarro was
going to join Pilster at Lindenwood
University in St. Charles, Mo., the
two smiled — then Navarro leaned
over to nudge Pilster on the arm and
lovingly said, “lucky you.”
Actually, the lucky ones are the
Lions and its softball fans because,
in Pilster and Navarro, Lindenwood
is getting the newly crowned Coast
Conference North Division’s
Pitcher and Player of the Year
respectively.
And just in case the Lions were
curious, they’ll get a glance at what
the two can do in postseason play
when they lead the Bulldogs against
Feather River College in the first
round of the California Community
College Athletic Association soft-
ball championship tournament start-
ing Saturday at 2 p.m.
“I was pretty stoked when I got
it,” Pilster said of her award. “Me
and coach joke about it because
coach pitched here so I really want-
ed it so we don’t joke about it any-
more. I just can’t wait for Regionals
to start. I want to play games.”
Navarro, perhaps the more chill of
the two, accepted her award in a
slightly different way.
See CCS, Page 13 See CSM, Page 13
CSM’s dynamic duo leads the way
San Mateo County’s local sports leader Friday, May 3, 2013
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Stephen Curry had 22 points and
eight assists, Andrew Bogut broke out with the best per-
formance of his injury-saddled season and the Golden
State Warriors eliminated the Denver Nuggets with a
92-88 victory in Game 6 on Thursday.
Bogut had season-bests and career-playoff highs of
14 points and 21 rebounds, and rookie Draymond
Green added a career-high 16 points and 10 rebounds to
power Golden State into the second round for the first
time in six years.
The Warriors went ahead by 18 points early in the
fourth before holding off one final Nuggets flurry.
Andre Iguodala scored 24 points and Ty Lawson had
17 in another disappointed early exit for Denver, which
has lost in the first round nine of the past 10 seasons.
See NBA, Page 13
SPORTS 12
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
$12.00
Eat Lunch Downtown and
get your Hair Cut!
Open Everyday
SAIGON BARBER SHOP
35 South B Street / 1st Ave.
(Next to China Bee)
Downtown San Mateo 94401
(650)340-8848
Mention this ad- Daily Journal Special
MENS
HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Fortunately for O’Koyea
Dickson, his alma mater College of
San Mateo is appearing in the open-
ing round of the community college
playoffs this weekend.
Now a power-hitting prospect for
the Dodgers, Dickson will be mak-
ing his homecoming of sorts
tonight, as Dodgers High-A affiliate
Rancho Cucamonga begins a four-
game series at Municipal Stadium
with the San Jose Giants.
Dickson’s pass list for tonight’s
series opener is at 75 and counting,
consisting of family, friends, and
former teammates from Washington
High School of San Francisco. And
if he keeps doing what he did in
April, the San Francisco native is
due to put on quite a show.
Throughout April, Dickson
appeared in all 25 games for the
Quakes, hitting .305 with a .495
slugging percentage, tabbing three
home runs and 16 RBIs, while his
nine doubles ties him for third in the
California League along with San
Jose third baseman — and former
Menlo School standout — Ryan
Cavan.
“I’m definitely learning a lot
about myself each and every
game,” Dickson said. “I’m just
trying to get better every day and
just really learn the game of base-
ball, and continue to trust my abil-
ities that God has given me, and
just go out and have fun.”
A 12th round draft pick out of
Sonoma State in 2011, Dickson has
been promoted a level per year in
his three years as a pro. He made a
fast start in 2011 at Short-season
Ogden, hitting .333 with 13 home
runs. He made the leap to Low-A
Great Lakes last year, tabbing 105
hits in 106 games to hit .272 while
finishing among the league leaders
with 17 home runs.
“When you’ve been in profession-
al baseball for three years, and
you’ve advanced a level every year
you’ve played, obviously [the
organization likes what they see,”
Great Lakes manager Razor Shines
said. “You’re continuing to master
what you’re doing. So therefore you
continue to go up the ladder.
Hopefully those things will contin-
ue all the way up to L.A.”
During previous winters, Dickson
worked out with former CSM alum-
nus and current Red Sox outfielder
Daniel Nava at the Nava family’s
home in Redding. However, Nava
relocated to Surprise, Arizona this
offseason. So the two longtime
friends had to forego their winter
routine.
So, Shines intervened, welcoming
Dickson to work out in the warm
weather at his home in Austin,
Texas for two weeks in January. As
the hitting coach at Great Lakes last
season, Shines marveled at
Dickson’s refined compact
approach as a power hitter.
“After seeing him [last] spring, I
understood he was a kid who was
going to be able to swing the bat,”
Shines said. “And the organization
loved what he was capable of doing
with the bat. So when I found out he
was going to come to Great Lakes, I
was excited.”
It seems Dickson is intent on
developing solid friendships at
every stop along his baseball jour-
ney. Things could have gotten very
competitive when Dickson was
paired with fellow Dodgers first-
base prospect Angelo Songco this
season. But instead, the two have
become fast friends.
Drafted out of Loyola Marymount
in 2009, Songco is two calendar
years older than Dickson. But after
a prolific 2011 season at Rancho
Cucamonga in which the left-hand-
ed slugger hit 29 home runs, Songco
suffered a freak injury last spring.
Songco broke his leg and required
surgery to place a steel rod in his
calf. The injury cost him the first
half of the season, as well as a prob-
able promotion to Double-A.
Songco finished last year at
Rancho Cucamonga, and returned
there to start the current season. He
is currently splitting time with
Dickson at first base and designated
hitter, while the tandem bats consec-
utively in the heart of the Quakes’
order. They also room together on
the road.
“We both care about each other a
lot,” Dickson said. “It’s not about a
competition between me and him.
We’re just two people who really
have love for each other and just
became good friends. You definitely
have to cling to good people.”
Dickson and Songco played a
game each at first base during
Hanley Ramirez’s recent two-game
rehab stint with Rancho
Cucamonga. The All-Star shortstop,
who the Dodgers acquired from the
Marlins last season, broke the
thumb of his throwing hand while
diving for a ball at third base for the
Dominican Republic in the World
Baseball Classic championship
game.
“Balls that should be driven got
driven with authority,” Dickson
said. “Defensively, obviously com-
ing off the thumb injury, a couple
balls he threw over to me had a little
bit of sink to it. Obviously he’s try-
ing to get his motion back and that
feeling back in his thumb.”
Now Dickson is intent on getting
to where Ramirez is, with the big
club in Los Angeles. Although
Dickson reported to minor-league
training camp over the spring, he
was utilized in some games with the
major league squad.
“When you get a chance to be in
the same dugout as some of our top
players — pretty much our whole
organization — it was pretty excit-
ing,” Dickson said. “Hopefully I’ll
get a chance to get up there quick.”
Former CSM slugger in town to face SJ Giants
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If home runs were valued as much
as saves among the Baseball
Writers’ Association of America,
then maybe Babe Ruth wouldn’t be
in the Hall of Fame.
Well, former Cubs’ reliever Lee
Smith is the Babe Ruth of closers.
Once the all-time Major League
saves leader, Smith now ranks third
in career saves with 478, having
since been surpassed by Trevor
Hoffman (601) and Mariano Rivera
(619 and counting).
Hoffman and Rivera will likely
get the call to the Hall when they are
eligible. Hoffman will appear on the
ballot in 2016, while Rivera will be
eligible in 2018 if he indeed retires
after this season. Yet Smith, once the
all-time saves king, is not in the Hall
of Fame.
Yesterday –— just a day after for-
mer College of San Mateo star Scott
Feldman hurled the first complete
game of his career to lead the Cubs
to a 6-2 victory over San Diego —
reliever Carlos Marmol tied Smith’s
all-time Cubs record of career relief
appearances with 452.
This once again begs the question
— amid a historic year in which no
one was voted into the Hall of Fame
by the BBWAA — why hasn’t
Smith been enshrined in
Cooperstown?
According to Rich Bordi, a team-
mate of Smith’s in Chicago from
1983-84 and a former El Camino
Colt, Smith deserved to be a first-
ballot Hall of Famer.
“It’s just something the selection
committee is going to have to look at
a little closer,” Bordi said. “Because
the idea of the Hall of Fame is peo-
ple who dominate their era. And he
dominated his era. He held the
record for the most saves in the his-
tory of the game. I think that’s good
qualification right there in itself.
“I don’t know if it’s because back
in the day the true closers sometimes
Marmol ties
Lee Smith
for Cubs’
all-time
relief mark
See SAVE, Page 14
The Nuggets won 23 of their final 26 regu-
lar season games to earn the Western
Conference’s third seed, then lost four of six
to the hot-shooting Warriors.
Golden State only outshot the Nuggets 40.3
percent to 34.7 percent in the finale but domi-
nated the rebounding matchup again, 55-44.
The Warriors overcame 21 turnovers —
including 10 in the fourth — while the
Nuggets only had seven.
Golden State will open the second round at
San Antonio on Monday. The Spurs swept the
Lakers in four games.
Warriors coach Mark Jackson ratcheted up
the rhetoric after the Nuggets won a physical
Game 5, saying Denver sent “hit men” out to
take “cheap shots” at Curry.
The accusations earned Jackson a $25,000
fine from the NBA for an “attempt to influ-
ence the officiating,” though neither side ever
got out of control in the finale.
Except Curry’s shooting — again
On the ball or off the dribble, Curry con-
nected all over his home court in another daz-
zling second half. Curry swished all four of
his 3-pointers in the third quarter and brought
the announced sellout crowd of 19,596 roar-
ing each time.
He also dribbled behind his back and threw
his legs, crossing over Lawson and zipping a
pass through traffic to Bogut for a thunderous
dunk. With Denver starting to chase Curry
around the perimeter, the spacing started to
open up.
Curry added a one-handed pass off the drib-
ble to a cutting Carl Landry, who finished for
a three-point play over Wilson Chandler,
flexed his arms above his shoulder and belted
out a roar from the floor to give Golden State
a 64-53 lead.
Green made a corner 3 in front of Denver’s
bench, and Klay Thompson hustled for a
rebound and a quick put-back to put the
Warriors up 80-62 with 9:11 to play.
The Nuggets failed to score for nearly six
minutes during the stretch.
he said, “and we’re usually pretty even. I
thought our guys were a bit better than them.
You have to think of every set you play like
it’s a third set. You’re looking for points and
you can’t say, ‘well, I’ll get two out of three,’
you have to get every set you can get. My
guys got big points when they had to.”
Aragon’s PAL mates, Carlmont, picked up a
calm 13-5 win over Evergreen Valley. They’ll
travel to Stevenson for Round No. 2.
“We kept it close,” said Carlmont head
coach Amina Doar Harsley recalling last
year’s loss to the same school, “it wasn’t blow
out until the end. So, we’re feeling well about
how our players performed last year. I think
our players are more prepared than they were
last year but at the same time, we have a dif-
ferent lineup, they have a different lineup and
stranger things have happened.”
There were few surprises on Wednesday as
Carlmont jumped out to a 6-0 lead and never
looked back.
“We have a very strong team and they
played really well,” Doar Harsley said.
Another first round win was collected by
Crystal Springs Uplands School over
Monterey. Peninsula Athletic League champi-
on Menlo-Atherton saw its season come to an
end against St. Francis. Sacred Heart Prep fell
to Gunn of Palo Alto.
Serra, the No. 3 seed, will host Piedmont
Hills at the College of San Mateo in their first
steps towards a CCS title.
“Everybody is loose and ready to go,” said
Serra head coach Marcus Charles. “They’re
all siked up. Everyone is calm. We don’t know
anything about the opposing team and that’s
the way we like it. They know all they do is go
out there and play the ball. It’s all about the
ball and not the person in front of them.
They know it’s their time. They feel it’s
their time. And they’re going to take advan-
tage of it.”
“It feels good,” Navarro said. “I wasn’t real-
ly expecting anything. I don’t ever really
though. But like coach says, I don’t really
focus on it too much, I just want to make it to
Bakersfield (and the CCCAA Final Four).”
And that’s kind of been Navarro’s attitude
since leaving the Capuchino program two
years ago. Already a dominant player at the
high school level, Borg said she needed to get
creative with her recruiting approach when it
came to Navarro, who was “over it,” accord-
ing to Borg.
Navarro explains: “I guess you can’t say I
actually lost it,” she said about the will to
compete on the softball field. “But I mean, in
high school, I was playing soccer year-round,
volleyball, I did golf which is nice because
you could walk after you hit the ball. But now,
it’s nice to focus one sport and you put all
your effort in one sport.”
With that focused approach on softball,
Navarro has produced two dynamite offensive
seasons for CSM. This year, she hit .464 with
a .696 slugging percentage. She hit four home
runs, drove in 38 and had a total of 14 extra
base hits. Navarro also stole 11 bases and had
a .500 on-base percentage.
And behind the dish, Borg said there were
few in the state who could compare with
Navarro. Perhaps more importantly, Navarro
has a Pilster sense — and that produced a
state-leading 27 wins and 168 strikeouts go
along with a 1.03 earned run average.
“We talked about this a lot,” Borg said. “It
doesn’t matter that she’s Pitcher of the Year,
that she’s Player of the Year, I could care less
how many times I’m Coach of the Year. I said,
my ultimate goal, and I’ve said this since day
one, is to make it to the state tournament. And
in my seven years full time here, we have yet
to do that.”
And so, the Dynamic Duo goes forward
against Feather River on Saturday in search of
redemption. As juniors at Capuchino, they fell
short of Central Coast Section glory and
redeemed themselves with a CCS champi-
onship their senior year.
Now as college sophomores, they get a
chance to avenge a 2012 run that fell way
short of expectations.
“I know for me,” Borg said, “I have a bitter
taste in my mouth. I really really want to
make it there (Bakersfield). It’s not every day
you get a group of this caliber together. A
team that has gone 72-8 over two seasons?
You just don’t get that every year. We’re
working really hard. We have to attack
Feather River and hope we make it to the sec-
ond round.”
CSM has recent history against Feather
River — in a March double-header, they
mercy-ruled them twice. But, this is the play-
offs, and there is a heightened sense of pur-
pose and business in the Bulldog locker room.
“I don’t think we’re overconfident,” Borg
said. “Again, we talk about it all time, March
is March. It doesn’t matter what a team’s
record is, it doesn’t matter what your record
is, all that matters is what you do on game
day. And if you play to the best of your abili-
ty, you can beat anybody. We feel good about
what we’re doing but it’s not like we’re walk-
ing into Saturday, ‘oh yeah, this is going to be
a piece of cake.’ In my mind, there are no easy
teams.
“At the end of the day, you don’t get ranked
No. 1 just out of luck. So I think we have, on
paper and any you look at it, we have a better
team. It’s just a matter of coming out and exe-
cuting on game day and playing the way we
know how to play.”
First pitch of the three-game series is sched-
ule for 2 p.m. Saturday, May 4 at CSM.
Game 2, and Game 3 if necessary, are
scheduled for Sunday, May 5.
SPORTS 13
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
CCS
Continued from page 11
CSM
Continued from page 11
NBA
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — American adults rank
steroid use among adolescents as less of a
problem than alcohol, bullying, marijuana and
sexually transmitted diseases, according to a
study released Thursday that was co-commis-
sioned by baseball’s Hall of Fame.
Those polled also felt cocaine, obesity and
eating disorders are bigger concerns. While 97
percent of the respondents believe steroids
cause negative health effects, just 19 percent
think steroid use is a big problem among high
school students.
“The results of today’s study show that
steroids remain a mystery to the American
public,” Hall President Jeff Idelson said at a
news conference.
The survey of 1,002 adults was conducted
by The Gallup Organization from Oct. 9 to
Nov. 10 and commissioned by the Hall, the
Taylor Hooton Foundation and the
Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers
Society.
“We have an adult population that is virtual-
ly oblivious to the fact that the problem even
exists,” said Don Hooton, whose 17-year-old
son Taylor — a cousin of former big league
pitcher Burt Hooton — committed suicide in
July 2003. Doctors attributed Taylor’s behav-
ior to depression caused after he stopped using
performance-enhancing drugs.
While 63 percent thought steroids were a
problem among professional athletes, just 46
percent thought it was an issue among college
athletes and 17 percent among high school
athletes.
“The American people haven’t connected
the dots between steroid use and our children,”
said Neil Romano, chairman of the Hooton
Foundation and former director of the White
House office of drug abuse policy. “This is my
kid may not have made the baseball team
because of the other kid in school. It may
mean that my kid did not get the scholarship,
my child didn’t make the cheerleaders. Now
the American people will pay attention to this
because it’s personal and it hits home.”
Hooton estimated the average high school in
the U.S. has 25-45 students using steroids,
which he said translates to an average of one
per class.
“The bulk of the nation’s attention regarding
steroid use is solidly fixed on the professional
athlete,” Romano said. “While it’s understand-
able because of the celebrity involved, it’s
drawn our attention as a country away from
what is rapidly becoming a growing national
tragedy among our young people.”
Study: Adults
minimize steroid
use as problem
SPORTS 14
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Up 1-0, Sharks know Canucks will keep coming
pitched two, three, sometimes even four innings to get a save.
Lee, in his era as a closer, he just pitched one inning. And that
shouldn’t be held against him. That’s just the way the game
has evolved. Yeah, he should have been a first-ballot Hall of
Famer in my book.”
Bordi recalls Smith as being larger than life, both on the
mound and in stature. A 6-5 right-hander, Smith was one of
the hardest throwing pitchers of his era. And he produced the
results to make it count.
“Dominated his opponents,” Bordi said. “When he stepped
on the mound he engulfed it. Lee Smith is a big man. He’s the
only guy I’ve ever seen that can put a baseball in his hand, and
his thumb and his middle finger could touch.”
When that big bear claw unleashed a mid-90s heater, it
wreaked havoc on opposing hitters. Bordi recalls the benefit of
pitching late in the day at Chicago’s Wrigley Field.
Throughout most of the 1980s the venue hosted only day
games, as lights were not added until 1988, the year after
Smith was traded to Boston. And Smith’s wicked stuff, com-
bined with the consistent late-afternoon shadows at home
plate, were a lethal combination.
However, throughout Smith’s career, he was consistently a
better pitcher on the road. He was especially tough on the
Giants, notching 30 career saves against San Francisco, while
posting a career .234 opponents’ batting average at
Candlestick Park.
Continued from page 12
SAVE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VANCOUVER, British Columbia — After
a loss in Game 1, coach Alain Vigneault is
looking for more offense from the Canucks.
“I need more from the whole team,”
Vigneault said after a short practice Thursday.
“There’s no doubt there. All our players
understand we have to get better and we’re
going to get better.”
Vancouver’s only goal in Wednesday’s 3-1
series-opening loss came after Sharks winger
Raffi Torres inadvertently put the puck in San
Jose’s net.
Game 2 of the series is Friday night.
Vigneault is looking for his team to put
more pressure on Sharks goalie Antti Niemi.
Vancouver’s best chances came mainly from
outside in Game 1, and the coach wants his
players to move the puck up ice and crash the
net.
“Our players, in my mind, are battled tested,
they’re pressure tested,” Vigneault said. “At
the end of the day, it’s about making plays. We
need to make more plays. We need to make
more plays out of our end to get through that
neutral zone better.
“At this time of year, goals that are scored
five on five are usually on second, third and
fourth efforts — battles in front of the nets —
and we need to do a better job there.”
Vancouver goaltender Roberto Luongo,
who will start again as Cory Schneider con-
tinues to recover from an undisclosed injury
suffered late in the regular season, said the
Canucks also have to do a better job of getting
the puck out of their zone and forechecking.
“We need to be a bit more assertive on our
forecheck, break the puck out cleaner,
whether that exchanges with myself and the
D-men or D-men with forwards,” Luongo
said. “Communication is really key in situa-
tions like that. Just sharpen up in general.”
Henrik and Daniel Sedin also want to see
the Canucks improve their forecheck after
they remained winless in four matchups with
San Jose, including three in the regular sea-
son. After the Game 1 loss, the twins said the
Sharks were able to move the puck out of their
zone with ease.
In another potential shakeup, the Canucks
recalled forward Brendan Gaunce, the team’s
first-round pick, 26th overall, in the 2012
draft.
The Canucks played a dump-and-chase
game in Game 1 that might be adjusted in
Game 2.
Sharks captain Joe Thornton and coach
Todd McLellan said the Canucks came at
them with a heavy forecheck, notably in the
first period, but the visitors were able to
adjust. Strategy aside, the Sharks are expect-
ing the Canucks to display much more inten-
sity Friday.
“You’ve got to think they’re going to
come out (thinking) do-or-die next game,”
Thornton said. “I expect their best effort —
and I expect our best, too.”
The Canucks have struggled at home in the
playoffs though. The hosts will attempt to end
a five-game home playoff losing streak that
stretches back to the 2011 Stanley Cup finals.
But Vancouver’s recent home record shows
it could recover quickly at Rogers Arena. The
Canucks won eight of their last nine regular
season games at home.
Sharks defenseman Dan Boyle doesn’t
expect the Canucks to feel overly pressured at
home, because they’ll realize one loss does
not automatically end their Stanley Cup
hopes.
Vigneault wants his team’s leaders to stress
that point, too, while realizing the importance
of the games.
“They’re all must wins in the playoffs,”
Vigneault said. “Playoffs is a different animal.
The leadership group has to come in and make
sure everybody is on an even keel, whether we
win or lose and realize this is not a sprint.”
SPORTS 15
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Active Independent Senior Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
•Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
EXPIRES: May 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
No matter how you slice it...
Our pizza is the BEST!
Menlo Park
1001 El Camino Real
324-3486
San Carlos
560 El Camino Real
486-1487
Pizzza-2-Go
989 El Camino Real
328-1556
We Deliver!
Online ordering available
www. applewoodbistro. com
Lunch Special 11am-2pm
Personal Pizza, Salad & Soda
Burger, Fries & Soda
Your choice $9.00 +tax
H
A
P
P
Y

H
O
U
R

M
-F 4-7pm
Sa-Su
Noon-7pm
2011
B E ST OF
2011-2013
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 20 8 .714 —
New York 17 10 .630 2 1/2
Baltimore 17 12 .586 3 1/2
Tampa Bay 12 15 .444 7 1/2
Toronto 10 19 .345 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 15 10 .600 —
Detroit 16 11 .593 —
Minnesota 12 12 .500 2 1/2
Cleveland 12 13 .480 3
Chicago 12 15 .444 4
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 17 11 .607 —
Oakland 16 13 .552 1 1/2
Seattle 13 17 .433 5
Los Angeles 10 18 .357 7
Houston 8 21 .276 9 1/2
Thursday’sGames
Boston 3,Toronto 1
Chicago White Sox 3,Texas 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Optioned RHP Trevor
Bauer to Columbus (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS—Recalled RHP Luke Putkonen
from Toledo (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS—Optioned RHPs Brad Pea-
cock and Rhiner Cruz to Oklahoma City (PCL).
Recalled RHP Jordan Lyles and LHP Dallas Keuchel
from Oklahoma City.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned LHP Nick
Maronde to Arkansas (TL).
NEW YORK YANKEES—Optioned INF Corban
Joseph to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).Transferred C
Francisco Cervelli from the 15-day to the 60-day
DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS—Reassigned Tacoma (PCL)
manager Daren Brown to major league coach and
minor league catching coordinator John Stearns
to Tacoma manager.
TORONTOBLUEJAYS—Placed RHP Josh Johnson
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 29. Recalled
RHP Brad Lincoln from Buffalo (IL).
National League
ATLANTABRAVES—Sent CBrianMcCanntoGwin-
nett (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO CUBS—Sent RHP Matt Garza to Ten-
nessee (SL) for a rehab assignment.
TRANSACTIONS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 17 11 .607 —
Washington 15 14 .517 2 1/2
Philadelphia 13 16 .448 4 1/2
New York 11 15 .423 5
Miami 8 21 .276 9 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 17 11 .607 —
Pittsburgh 16 12 .571 1
Milwaukee 14 13 .519 2 1/2
Cincinnati 15 14 .517 2 1/2
Chicago 11 17 .393 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Colorado 17 11 .607 —
San Francisco 16 12 .571 1
Arizona 15 13 .536 2
Los Angeles 13 14 .481 3 1/2
San Diego 11 17 .393 6
———
Thursday’s Games
San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
@Spurs
TBA
NBA
playoffs
vs. Spurs
NHL
playoffs
vs. Canuks
@Spurs
TBA
@NewYork
10:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
5/5
vs.Phillies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/6
vs.Dodgers
5p.m.
ESPN
5/5
vs. Dodgers
7:15p.m.
NBC
5/3
vs.Phillies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/7
vs.Dodgers
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/4
@Indians
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/7
@Indians
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/6
@NewYork
10:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
@NewYork
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/3
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/11
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
5/6 5/8
@Canucks
7p.m.
NBC
5/3
vsCanucks
7p.m.
NBC
5/5
vsCanucks
7p.m.
NBC
5/7
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/25
@RSL
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/1
Fast action
in ‘Iron Man’
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the galaxy of big-screen superheros — a rather glum lot — Robert
Downey Jr.’s Iron Man is the snappy one.
He’s the sarcastic, motor-mouthed, preening, self-referential do-good-
er, as opposed to all those self-serious crusaders. No matter how much
of a scrap heap of metal-twisting mayhem the franchise piles on (and it’s
a lot), Downey’s sheer charm — his unsentimental, offhand yammering
— is the only real super power in Marvel’s “Iron Man” trilogy.
“Iron Man 3” follows not just “Iron Man 2” but the box-office busting
“The Avengers,” in which Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man, joined forces with
other superheros. These global blockbusters are more produced than
directed, but it’s nevertheless particularly fitting that Shane Black here
inherits the helm from John Favreau, the director of the previous two.
Black (the “Lethal Weapon” screenwriter) and Downey last teamed up
(before Downey’s career had been fully resurrected) in the wonderfully
zippy, deconstructed LA noir “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang.” “Iron Man 3”
begins exactly the same, with Stark in a halting voiceover that he restarts
and then gives up on, concluding: “Well, you know who I am.”
See MAN, Page 18
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — There’s some-
thing of the old married couple about
Gwyneth Paltrow and Robert Downey
Jr., though they’re married to other
people.
They’ve known each other for 20
years, through bad times (his) and
good (hers all along and now his, too).
They’re cozy and comfy sitting down
together for an interview, shifting eas-
ily between talking about their Marvel
Studios superhero sequel “Iron Man
3,” chatting up each other’s career and
family and trading small talk about
their little ailments as Downey rum-
mages through a case of nostrums he
travels with.
“I think I picked up a little bacteria
on the road,” Downey says of his trips
promoting the film worldwide ahead
of its U.S. debut this week. “No big
deal.”
“In what part of your body?”
Paltrow asks.
“Tum-tum,” Downey replies.
“I got really sick from the plane
from England,” Paltrow says. “Just ter-
rible stomach problems.”
“Travel’s tough when you’re not a
kid anymore,” Downey adds. “You’ve
got to take it really seriously.”
Both are taking everything seriously
now, from work to family to lifestyle.
Downey and Paltrow are in enviable
places among their fortysomething
Hollywood peers.
At 48, he’s the great reclamation
project of show business, rebounding
from a fitful early career overshad-
owed by drug abuse and prison to
become arguably the hottest leading
man on the planet. “Iron Man 3” just
opened to a whopping $195 million
overseas, surpassing last year’s inter-
national debut of Marvel’s “The
Avengers,” in which he also had the
leading role.
At 40, Paltrow’s diversified into a
super-hyphenate. While slowing down
on acting to raise her two children
with her husband, Coldplay singer
Chris Martin, Paltrow has just published
Downey, Paltrow forge ironclad friendship
See IRON, Page 18
18
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
to Our Mother’s Day Buffet
Treat Your Mom...
Feast on seafood selections like shrimp,
crab legs and sushi. Our Action Station
features roasted prime rib, crab cakes
with assorted sauces, Belgian waffles and
omelets. Chef’s entrées include pecan-
crusted salmon, Sonoma stuffed chicken
breast and wild mushroom ravioli.
Assorted desserts are the finishing touch.
Served on Sunday, May 12
Seatings from 10:30 AM–2:30PM
Call 650.340.8500 to reserve
Adults: $42.95 Seniors: $36.95
Children 6–12: $19.95
Children 5 & under free
(Prices exclude tax & 20% gratuity)
A welcome Mimosa for each guest!
600 Airport Boulevard, Burlingame ò www.hiltonsfo.com
Black’s film, more than any other “Iron
Man,” is stuffed with this self-aware, wink-
ing style. This includes loads of references to
“The Avengers,” an experience from which
Stark has developed panic attacks and sleep-
depriving nightmares. Though the stated
cause is the alien battle that concluded “The
Avengers,” one suspects it could be Scarlett
Johansson’s acting that haunts him.
He is pulled into a confrontation with a ter-
rorist named Mandarin (a bearded Ben
Kingsley), who, in hijacked broadcast trans-
missions, takes credit for public explosions
that, in a movie such as this, chafe awkward-
ly in the wake of the Boston Marathon bomb-
ings. When reporters mob Stark for his
response after an explosion puts his friend
and bodyguard (Favreau, looking happily
unburdened) in the hospital, Stark swears
vengeance and brazenly supplies his home
address for a fight.
You might think Superman would be the
favorite of journalists everywhere, but I sus-
pect it’s Iron Man. Ever since Stark declared
his identity at the conclusion of the first “Iron
Man,” he’s unique among his more secretive
brethren: He’s the superhero who comments.
When helicopter missiles collapse Stark’s
Malibu estate into the sea, his companion
Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow) is separated
from him, and his damaged computer opera-
tor Jarvis (voiced in formal British by Paul
Bettany in a manner not unlike the classic
butler Jeeves) rockets Stark to Tennessee.
With a damaged suit and grasping at leads
on the bombing, Stark has to rebuild himself,
which he does with the help of a mop-head-
ed, fatherless boy (an excellent Ty
Simpkins). Tennessee isn’t an accidental
landing spot, but a preprogrammed flight to a
location where Stark begins to learn what’s
behind the bombings.
Downey and Simpkins make a good team
playing a kind of mock-Spielbergian pair,
and it’s the best and most natural part of the
movie.
There are good bad guys. Guy Pearce plays
Aldrich Killian, an inventor turned military
contractor who Stark haphazardly jilted back
in his partying years. His connections to the
terrorism aren’t immediately clear, but his
rise comes from a kind of biological
enhancement that makes its users nearly
indestructible and, when really angry,
breathe fire.
The “Iron Man” films have always played
in the world of the military industrial com-
plex, one where the guys with the fancy
weapons control the world more than politi-
cians. Soldiers, and even terrorists, are mere-
ly pawns in a larger corporate battle.
But within “Iron Man 3” is a fight between
screwball irony and blockbuster bombast.
The script, by Black and Drew Pearce, con-
tains the best dialogue of the series. But the
wisecracking begins to feel suffocated under
the weight of a whole lot of action, more Iron
Man suit changes than Beyonce would even
dare, and the lumbering machinations of a
plot that closes in on a lengthy oil rig finale
as if pulled by magnetic force.
This is the first “Iron Man” in 3-D, and the
darkening effect is particularly disappointing
for what’s been a bright-hued franchise. The
action scenes, too, are cut too quickly so that
your eye often feels like it’s racing to catch
up. The heavy metal action could never sink
the irrepressible Downey, but it weighs down
the otherwise light joy of “Iron Man 3.”
“Iron Man 3,” a Walt Disney release, is
rated PG-13 for sequences of intense sci-fi
action and violence throughout, and brief
suggestive content. Running time: 130 min-
utes. Two and a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 16
MAN
her second cookbook, runs the lifestyles web-
site Goop.com and is a business partner with
fitness trainer Tracy Anderson. Paltrow also
managed to book-end her Academy Award for
“Shakespeare in Love” with an Emmy win for
her guest spots on “Glee.”
Paltrow has plenty of detractors, though.
Critics questioned her designation by People
magazine as the world’s most-beautiful
woman, which came days after Star magazine
named her the most-hated celebrity.
Downey and Paltrow are following “Iron
Man 3” with smaller dramas, Paltrow starring
opposite Antonio Banderas in the Pablo
Picasso tale “33 Dias,” Downey joining Robert
Duvall for the father-son story “The Judge.”
He also has plans for a third entry in his other
franchise, “Sherlock Holmes,” though the
future of “Iron Man,” Downey’s billionaire
genius Tony Stark and Paltrow’s Gal-Friday-
turned-girlfriend-and-CEO Pepper Potts are
uncertain.
“Iron Man 3” hints that Tony might hang up
his metal suits to focus on life with Pepper.
Downey won’t tip his hand on the prospects of
future solo entries or whether he’ll return for
the upcoming “The Avengers” sequel. After so
many years on the outs in Hollywood, though,
Downey’s gotten used to the blockbuster life.
“Kind of like Tony’s obsession with the suit,
this genre of movie, this and the ‘Sherlock’
stuff, it’s addictive,” Downey says. “Because
they’re big movies. Interesting people seem to
be drawn to them in recent years. You get real-
ly cool directors, people really running wild
with their imagination.”
Paltrow eagerly says she would come back
for more “Iron Man.” Especially now that she’s
getting into the thick of things.
In “Iron Man 3,” Pepper graduates from glo-
rified personal assistant to running Tony’s
empire, and Paltrow even gets to put on the Iron
Man suit and mix it up in the action scenes.
“I seriously question all my career choices up
to that point. It’s like, what have I been doing in
these highbrow frigging corset things? This is
so much more fun,” Paltrow says.
Paltrow and Downey became friends after
meeting at a film festival in the 1990s, though
like much of Hollywood, she had doubts about
the talented but manic actor who squandered
his early promise through his partying and
addictions.
He recalls that after they met, a mutual friend
told him Paltrow had called looking for insights
on Downey.
Downey: “She was like, ‘What is wrong with
him? Who is this guy?’ She called him up ask-
ing, like, if it was going to be essentially bad for
her reputation to be hanging out with me.”
Paltrow: “That is not true!”
Downey: “Not your reputation. What I mean
was, I was wild.”
Paltrow: “He was really wild, and I was very
naive. I immediately took a shine to him. ...
Then he went off the radar for a little while.”
Downey: “Sure, yeah. Just a decade or two.”
Paltrow: “I didn’t see him for a while.”
Downey: “Not surprising.”
Paltrow: “We lost touch and then ...”
Downey (laughing hysterically): “She was
out there banging out one hit after the next, and
I was locked in a bathroom somewhere. So be
it. Life is beautiful.”
Paltrow: “And now look.”
The once out-of-control Downey looks like a
man in complete control now. Backing him up
and keeping him honest, much as Pepper steers
Tony straight, is his wife and producing partner,
Susan Downey.
They have a year-old son, and considering
the mess he made of his personal life in his 20s
and 30s, Downey’s happiness on the home-
front seems an appropriate complement to his
career turnaround, which included an Oscar
nomination for 2008’s “Tropic Thunder” (he
also was nominated for 1992’s “Chaplin”).
Is his future nothing but bliss?
“I see perpetual vainglory,” Downey initially
jokes. Then, “I see transitioning into things that
are age and spirit appropriate, and I couldn’t
have imagined that I’d be here five years ago.
Ultimately, it comes down to relationships.
What keeps driving me to feel that there’s more
to explore in this universe is sitting right next to
me,” he said, glancing at Paltrow.
“And my significant other, my partner, is a
great, creative producer, and there are ways she
is starting to inch me toward that are probably
for my highest good.”
Continued from page 17
IRON
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
º 0reat food º Hicroorews
º full ßar º Sports TY
º fool º ßanquet facilities
º family friendly Ðining since 1995
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
LEE FRIEDLANDER: THE CRAY
PHOTOGRAPHS. Images by one of the
nation’s most influential photographers bear
witness to the origins of the supercomputer
industry in “Lee Friedlander: The Cray
Photographs,” at the Cantor Arts Center,
Stanford University. The series, rarely seen in
its entirety, includes 79 works by an artist
lauded for his straightforward documentation
of ordinary things. In 1986 Cray Research,
Inc., then the world’s top supercomputer pro-
ducer, invited American photographer Lee
Friedlander to visit its worksite in Chippewa
Falls, Wisc., and take photographs for a book
marking Cray’s 15th anniversary. The Cantor
exhibition features the vintage gelatin silver
prints in the resulting set and includes a range
of subjects shot in Friedlander’s characteristic
style: sober images of shop fronts and empty
streets, views of the landscape and underbrush
surrounding Chippewa Falls, and close-up
shots of workers installing the complex wiring
inside a massive supercomputer. The images
have great historical significance. In 1996
Cray’s company merged with Silicon
Graphics, Inc. of Mountain View; Silicon
Graphics helped spark the rise of Silicon
Valley and its radical transformation of global
tech culture. Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell,
Ph.D., the Burton and Deedee McMurtry
Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photographs
at the Cantor Arts Center, said: “The Cray
series is fascinating for its simultaneous
breadth and its focus. It captures the character
of the town and people of Chippewa Falls in
photographs that represent the types of
images Friedlander is known for — pictures
shot from a car window, the architectural stud-
ies, tree-filled landscapes and the close-up
pictures of people at work. Yet, it is entirely
focused on one place at one moment so there
is a sharp, narrative coherence to it.”
Lee Friedlander was born in Aberdeen,
Wash., in 1934 and studied at the Art Center
of Los Angeles in the early 1950s. In 1956 he
moved to New York, where he worked free-
lance and took jobs photographing jazz musi-
cians. During the 1960s, primarily using
Leica 35mm cameras and black and white
film, Friedlander started photographing the
American urban environment, developing a
visual language that included images of peo-
ple at work, landscapes framed by car win-
dows, shop fronts with odd juxtapositions of
signs and merchandise and deliberately awk-
ward self-portraits.
The Cantor Arts Center is open Wednesday
– Sunday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Thursday until 8
p.m. Admission is free. The Cantor is located
on the Stanford campus, off Palm Drive at
Museum Way. Parking is free after 4 p.m.
weekdays and all day on weekends. For more
information call 723-4177 or visit
museum.stanford.edu. Lee Friedlander: The
Cray Photographs runs through June 16.
***
BIRDS AND ART ON STANFORD UNI-
VERSITY CAMPUS. Science and Art
Nature Walk, the first of a projected series of
walking tours on campus, melds observations
of nature with information about the universi-
ty’s extensive outdoor sculpture collection.
For information about this podcast visit
birds.stanford.edu.
***
CLASSICAL MONSTERS AND
HEROES IN SAN JOSE. The San Jose
Museum of Art highlights contemporary
works that feature scenes from classical Greek
mythology. Swans, Swine and Sirens com-
prises 20 works on paper from SJMA’s per-
manent collection. Highlights include Circe
into Swine (1979) by Romare Bearden; draw-
ings from the series “Leda and the Swan” by
Reuben Nakian; and prints from Roberto
Matta’s portfolio “Hom’mere Il – l’Eautre,”
the surrealist artist’s illustrations for Homer’s
Odyssey. The watercolor Winged Victory of
Samothrace (1976) by Red Grooms, a recent
gift to the Museum from Barbara and Dixon
Farley, is on view to the public for the first
time in this exhibition. Also included is the
video game “Let’s Play! Ancient Greek
Punishment!” by Pippin Barr, in which play-
ers futilely attempt to avoid the fates of
Sisyphus, Tantalus, Prometheus and the
Danaids. 110 South Market St., San Jose.
Open Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. and until 8 p.m. the third Thursday of
each month. For more information call (408)
271-6840 or visit
www.SanJoseMuseumofArt.org. Swans,
Swine and Sirens is on view through Dec. 1.
***
CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS
IN SAN FRANCISCO THROUGH MAY
27. 7,000 soldiers in an underground city,
guarding an emperor through eternity. The
First Chinese Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259-
210 B.C.), envisioned a subterranean domain
that would parallel his worldly existence after
corporal death. First unearthed in 1974, the
underground burial complex is a discovery on
par with Egypt’s elaborate tombs. The Asian
Art Museum’s China’s
Terracotta Warriors: The First
Emperor’s Legacy includes
seven of these soldiers, along
with life-sized horses, large
scale chariots and hundreds of
other recovered items. 200
Larkin St., San Francisco. Tuesday through
Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended
evening hours every Thursday until 9 p.m.
(415) 581-3500 or visit www.asianart.org.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
Now Open!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
LEE FRIEDLANDER, COURTESY
OF FRAENKEL GALLERY, SAN FRANCISCO.
Cray at Chippewa Falls, Wisc., 1986. Gelatin
silver print.On display in Lee Friedlander:The
Cray Photographs, at the Cantor Art Center,
Stanford University, through June 16.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, MAY 3
Alzheimer’s support group. 10 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Magnolia Center, 601
Grand Ave., Third floor, South San
Francisco. Drop-in. Free. For more
information call (800) 654-9966.
San Mateo County HistoryMuseum
continues ‘Free First Fridays’
program. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Admission is free the
entire day. At 11 a.m., preschool
children will be invited to learn about
Japanese traditions. At 2 p.m., museum
docents will lead tours of the Museum
for adults. Free. For more information
call 299-0104.
Art & History: Treasures from the
Hoover Institution Library and
Archives. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Herbert
Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion, 550
Serra Mall, Stanford. The exhibition is
open Tuesday through Saturday from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Runs through
Dec. 20. Parking on campus is free on
Saturdays. For more information call
723-3563.
Light and Dark: Photography Now.
5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Art League of
Palo Alto, 227 Forest Ave., Palo Alto.
Opening reception for this exhibition
of original work by California-based
photographers. Exhibition runs until
May 20. For more information call 321-
3891.
Eric Van James Trio. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Sam’s Chowder House, 4210 N.
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay. Jazz,
blues and adult contemporary. For
more information and reservations call
712-0245.
First Fridays Free at The Shop at
Flywheel Press. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 309
Seventh Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information contact
theshop@flywheelpress.com.
Quilting and Bonsai Exhibit. 6:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. The Cultural Arts
Commission presents
HOME+QUILT=FAMILY, a Quilt and
Bonsai Exhibit art gallery program.
Enjoy artistic quilts and bonsai on
exhibit. Unique gifts available for
purchase. Free admission. For more
information 829-3800.
Knights Moves XV: ADanceConcert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater,
31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for
students and seniors, $12 for general
admission and free for children 6 years
old and under. For more information
call 558-2623.
Pop Fiction at the Club Fox Blues
Jam. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $13. For more
information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, MAY 4
Streets Alive! Parks Alive! In San
Mateo County. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Belmont, Burlingame, Cañada Road
between Edgewood Road and State
Route 92, Colma, Daly City, El Granada,
Foster City, Menlo Park, Millbrae, North
Fair Oaks, Pacifica, Redwood City, San
Bruno, San Mateo and South San
Francisco. Streets Alive! Parks Alive! is
a coordinated effort among cities in
San Mateo County to promote healthy
communities by providing safe,
accessible, public spaces for recreation.
Streets and parks throughout San
Mateo County are opened up for free
activities including sports, exercise
classes, dancing, strolling, cycling,
picnicking and play. For more
information go to
www.streetsalivesmc.org.
VintageVehicle and Family Festival.
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Museum of
American Heritage, 352 Homer Ave.,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
call 321-1004.
Open House at Peninsula
Volunteers Rosener House Adult
Day Services. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 500
Arbor Road, Menlo Park. Professional
activity staff will lead a variety of
activities — music, art, exercise,
cooking, brain games, therapies and
more. Social work staff, nursing staff
and therapists will be available to
answer questions. Free. For more
information call 322-0126.
Bike Rodeo. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Barrett
Community Center, 1870 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Learn bicycle skills, make
sure your helmet is fitted properly and
participate in a slalom course. Free.
For more information go to
belmont.gov.
Seaplane Adventure. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Hiller Aviation Museum, 601
Skyway Road, San Carlos. Float planes
and boat planes on display.
Presentations. Event included with
museum admission. For more
information call 654-0200.
Peninsula Volunteers Decorator
Show House 2013. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The Horse Park, 3674 Sand Hill Road,
Woodside. $35. The decorator show
will be open from May 4 to May 24,
Tuesdays through Sundays. For more
information contact
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
TenthAnnual Foster CityPolynesian
Festival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Leo Ryan
Park Ampitheatre, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Free.There will be colorful
and spectacular cultural
performances, arts and crafts, canoe
rides, food and more. For more
information call 286-3380.
A La Carte and Art. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Castro Street between Church Street
and Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View.
This two-day festival of art will include
live music, an arts and crafts show,
artisan specialty food, home and
garden exhibits, festive food and drink,
a farmers’ market, a classic car show
and amusement for kids. Free. For
more information call 964-3395.
Seton Medical Center Hosts
Community Health and Wellness
Fair. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1900 Sullivan
Ave., Daly City. Free. For more
information call 991-6814.
Six Award-Winning Peninsula
Artists Exhibit Paintings, Jewelry,
Textiles and Fine Art Photography.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 856 Partridge Ave.,
Menlo Park. Free. For more information
contact frances.freyberg@gmail.com.
Benefit Concert for the College of
San Mateo’s Child Development
Center. Noon. College of San Mateo,
Main Quad, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. Come enjoy the Reggae
sounds of the Bay Area band Native
Elements and the Afro-Cuban beat of
Zanzibar. $12 for adults. $10 for
students. Free for children under the
age of 13. To purchase tickets in
advance or for more information call
574-6279.
Peninsula Volunteers Rosener
House Adult Day Services. 1 p.m.
Peninsula Volunteers Rosener House
Adult Day Services, 500 Arbor Road,
Menlo Park. There will be social
workers, nurses and therapists on site.
Free. For more information go to
www.peninsulavolunteers.org/rosener
house.
College of San Mateo Hosts Asian
pacificAmericanFilmFestival. 1 p.m.
to 7 p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. A $5
donation is requested for each
program attended, but no one will be
turned away due to lack of funds. For
more information contact
anderson@smccd.edu.
Spring/Summer Fashion Show to
Support American Cancer Society.
2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Amelia’s Antics,
311 Broadway, Millbrae. All ticket
proceeds will benefit the American
Cancer Society. $5. For more
information go to
www.ameliasantics.com.
Peninsula Choruses Present ‘How
Can I Keep From Singing?’ 3 p.m.
Transfiguration Episcopal Church,
3900 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. $20 general admission and $10
admission for students. For more
information call 513-5522.
School of Rock San Mateo presents
aTributetoNewWave/Punk Rock. 4
p.m. 711 S. B St., San Mateo. School of
Rock San Mateo offers performance-
based music programs and camps for
kids ages 7 to 18. Students of the
School of Rock will perform. $8 at the
door. For more information call 347-
3474.
Cinco de Mayo Celebration: Dinner,
Dance and Auction. 6 p.m. to 11:30
p.m. Beresford Recreation Center, 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
There will be silent and live auctions,
a raffle, games, music, dancing and
more. Hosted by the 50th Anniversary
San Mateo-Toyonaka Baseball Team.
Proceeds will benefit the team. $25.
Prices vary for refreshments. For more
information and for tickets go to
http://smsistercity.blogspot.com.
The Sherlock Holmes Mystery Ball.
6:30 p.m. to midnight. San Mateo
Masonic Lodge, 100 N. Ellsworth Ave.,
San Mateo. Victorian evening dress
(1870-1895), dress uniform or modern
evening dress is admired but not
required. There will be a light buffet
and of course, a mystery. $15 in
advance, $20 at the door. For more
information call (510) 522-1731 or go
to www.peers.org/holmes.html.
Knights Moves XV: ADanceConcert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater,
31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for
students and seniors, $12 for general
admission and free for children 6 years
old and under. For more information
call 558-2623.
In My Life — A Musical Theatre
Tribute to the Beatles. 8 p.m.
Redwood City Fox Theatre, 2219
Broadway, Redwood City. An award-
winning musical biography of the
Beatles through the eyes of manager
Brian Epstein and features live music
from renowned tribute band, Abbey
Road. Tickets start at $25. For more
information call 369-7770 or go to
www.foxrwc.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
he reported the same information at the
City Council meeting.
Byrd said Legacy representatives have
been trying to meet with each coun-
cilmember and there was no intention of
omitting any based on their earlier votes.
Olbert said he has no way of verifying
that truth and has faith in his colleagues
that the individual meetings were on the
up and up but believes the city doesn’t
want to undercut its formal review
processes or send the wrong message.
“At the end of the day, particularly
when you are running into a lot of push-
back, every time you have a choice to be
more open or less open, when you
choose less open people always interpret
that as something nefarious going on,”
Olbert said.
Rather than focus on how the new plan
is being publicized, Byrd wants the com-
munity to know the revamp is a direct
result of outreach, meetings and direc-
tion from the hours spent before the
Planning Commission and City Council.
“We were obviously listening,” Byrd
said.
The new plan calls for “dramatically
smaller” fourth floors on the eight build-
ings in response to height and mass
being of significant importance to neigh-
boring residents in Greater East San
Carlos, Byrd said.
The original proposal called for con-
verting a 10.53-acre strip of land within
the existing Caltrain station into eight
four-story 407,298-square-foot build-
ings with 281 housing units among a
mix of 23,797 square feet of offices and
14,326 square feet of retail space. The
project would also include 667 parking
spaces and a new Transit Center on 4.29
acres.
Legacy has been meeting in private
mediation with the GESC, property
owner SamTrans and the city but Byrd
said the latest design is meant for public
vetting. He hopes the first meeting can
happen by the end of May although no
date is yet set.
He also said the latest design is far
from set in stone.
“It’s a work in progress,” he said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
VILLAGE
Josue Vicente Lopez, 26, has pleaded
not guilty to gross vehicular manslaugh-
ter, felony hit-and-run and misdemeanor
child endangerment connected to the
Nov. 24, 2012 death of Reynaldo
Aguiniga. A judge Thursday found suffi-
cient evidence to try Lopez on the
charges which can carry up to approxi-
mately seven years in prison.
The primary question is whether
Lopez was grossly negligent or simply
negligent, said his defense attorney
Geoff Carr.
Carr said he also disputes reports of
how fast his client was actually driving.
The bizarre accident happened in the
1700 block of South Delaware Street
after the driver of a green 1994
Chevrolet Camaro later identified as
Lopez lost control of the vehicle while
speeding out of the Kmart parking lot.
The car reportedly jumped the curb,
went onto the sidewalk and into a
cement garbage container that dislodged
and hit Aguiniga. Authorities say Lopez
allegedly checked on Aguiniga after the
crash but fled the scene in his car with
his 5-year-old child.
Carr said Lopez pulled the heavy trash
can off Aguiniga before fleeing to his
home a few blocks away but planned to
surrender once his wife returned.
“The reality is he’s an illegal alien
with a kid in the car. He panicked and he
left,” Carr said.
Responding police officers found
Aguiniga pinned between the can and
tree near a bus stop. Aguiniga later died
at the hospital.
San Mateo police tracked down Lopez
to his home using witness descriptions
of the suspect car and a partial license
plate number.
He remains in custody on $250,000
bail and returns to court May 16 to enter
a Superior Court plea.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
LOPEZ
The defense never denied that
Hoffman killed Consentino but sought a
lesser verdict of manslaughter, arguing
that he acted out of perceived self-
defense after the victim propositioned
him. The request for oral sex drew up
anger about being raped by his father as
a teenager and later abusing his own
younger brother, according to Carr and
his other defense attorney May Mar.
Hoffman never would have believed
himself capable of murder, Mar told
jurors during closing arguments Friday.
Hoffman moved into Consentino’s
Garden Drive apartment in 2011 to make
ends meet and help Consentino sell his
late wife’s belongings. Serrato said the
two immediately butted heads. Carr said
Hoffman planned to move out and was
in the process of borrowing money to do
so at the time he killed Consentino.
According to the defense, Consentino —
clad only in his boxers — brandished a
mallet meant to dismantle furniture and
demanded oral sex from a surprised
Hoffman who had a towel in his mouth
because of panic attack-induced gag-
ging. Hoffman allegedly “snapped”
because as a child he was sodomized by
his father while forced to bark like a dog,
then grabbed the mallet and struck
Consentino twice.
Hoffman’s father may have been phys-
ically abusive but his story about sexual
abuse evolved so much over time that the
only conclusion is that it was “totally
fabricated,” Serrato said.
Serrato also called the proposition
story “ludicrous” because of
Consentino’s age, physical ailments and
a bladder so full at his time of death it
was distended.
Instead, he believes an argument over
money preceded the attack.
Hoffman’s daughter, who testified but
did not attend the rest of the trial, is
“happy” with the verdict, Serrato said.
Hoffman remains in custody without
bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
GUILTY
COMICS/GAMES
5-3-13
thursday’s PuZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOus
sudOku
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
5
-
3
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 Freight weight
4 Eye rudely
8 Amusing
11 Indiana neighbor
12 Bargain
13 “Wheel of Fortune” buy
(2 wds.)
14 Desire
15 Dry spells
17 Friendly
19 Extinct birds
20 Singer Orbison
21 Call -- -- cab
22 Where Nairobi is
25 Make unhappy
28 Unfold, in verse
29 Some NCOs
31 Picket line crosser
33 Birds’ bills
35 Diplomacy
37 Cable network
38 Grouchy
40 Perch
42 Disallow
43 New Year in Hanoi
44 Carnival attractions
47 Merry
51 Face mask attachments
53 Largest continent
54 Coq au --
55 QED part
56 Cartoonist Kelly
57 Qt. parts
58 Repudiate
59 Skipper’s OK
dOwn
1 Bangkok native
2 Sty noise
3 Public offcial
4 In a weird way
5 “Pretty Woman” actor
6 -- -tzu
7 Avoided capture
8 Saudi king
9 Golden rule word
10 Loch -- monster
11 Barn bird
16 Prods
18 Jungle snakes
21 Not fem.
22 “-- -Tiki”
23 Sweeping story
24 Kan. neighbor
25 Linger
26 Yodeler’s answer
27 Slaps the cuffs on
30 Most of the U.K. (2 wds.)
32 Plant sci.
34 Sword
36 -- bien, monsieur!
39 Soaked up the sun
41 Canada’s capital
43 Snappish
44 Host’s request
45 -- -- for keeps
46 Puts on
47 Caramel-topped custard
48 Do as -- --!
49 Yucky
50 Snack
52 Prior to
diLBErt® CrOsswOrd PuZZLE
futurE shOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GEt fuZZy®
friday, May 3, 2013
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Unless you have
absolutely no choice, do not delegate a critical
assignment to a surrogate. If you must do so, keep a
constant check on the party in question.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- When pressed for
answers about work or fnancial questions, you can
be very resourceful. This gift can work wonders.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- For some reason,
you’re likely to be unusually receptive to new
concepts. This asset will prove to be quite valuable in
helping you recognize someone else’s ingenious idea.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t hesitate to make
a change to a current project if you feel it would
help. Even if you’re uneasy, you’ll quickly fnd your
comfort zone.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You may get an
opportunity to spend time with someone whom you
don’t know well. This person could very quickly turn
into a good friend.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- This is a good day to
begin to distance yourself from an endeavor that has
proved unproductive. You’ll fnd that once you get
out, associates will likely do the same.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- If you’re wondering
why a recent acquaintance is starting to warm up to
you, the answer is simple. You no longer are judging
this person as harshly as you once did.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- A whole new
way of adding to your resources might come about
through an unusual set of circumstances. You’ll have
to be on your toes to spot it.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You are about
to enter a new cycle where your athletic skills
could begin to peak. Take part in as many sporting
activities as you can.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Should you amaze
yourself in coming up with an ingenious concept for
making or saving money, believe it and use it. It’s
the real deal.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Everybody around
you might require assistance or a backup, but
not you. You’ll function best when operating
independently.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- If you’re not afraid
to experiment, you could be closer to a major
achievement than you think. With only a few minor
adjustments, you’ll have what you desire.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Friday • May 3, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
SONY COMPUTER Entertainment
America is responsible for producing and
marketing Sony’s signature PlayStation®
family of interactive computer entertain-
ment products in the U.S., Canada and
Latin America markets. We have an
opening in our San Mateo, CA office for:
Sr. Manager, Playstation Mobile
Pls mail resume to 2207 Bridgepointe
Pkwy, San Mateo, CA 94404, Attn: Annie
Mach. No calls or emails.
DB2/ 24081060.1
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, Avanti Pizza.
Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
GILEAD SCIENCES, Inc., a biopharma-
ceutical company, has openings in Fos-
ter City, CA for Sr. Statistical Program-
mer (SP12): identify potential issues in
statistical analysis plans and proposes
solutions. Position is currently based out
of headquarters (Foster City, CA), but
employee may be assigned at various
unanticipated work sites throughout the
United States on an as needed basis by
management; Research Scientist I, Ana-
lytical Development (RS02): conduct sci-
entific research for the development of
drug candidates or the research support
of marketed drugs; IT Architect I
(ARC01): accountable for monthly prog-
ress against agreed deadlines towards
business objectives for network server
and system; Sr. Clinical Data Associate
(CDA02): work collaboratively with Clini-
cal Programmers, CRA, Statistical Pro-
grammers, Biostatisticians and other
Clinical, DSPH, Regulatory and Project
Management staffs to meet project deliv-
erables and timelines for non-routine
clinical data acquisition, quality checking
and reporting; and Sr. Safety Specialist,
Drug Safety & Public Health (SS03): in-
terpret case-related information including
medical conditions, lab results and pro-
cedures, and compile complete narrative
summaries. If interested, please refer-
ence code and send resume to Gilead,
Attn: HR, #CM-0819, 333 Lakeside Dr.
Foster City, CA 94404Patrick G. Jacobs
President & CEO Innovation Advertising,
LLC 1900 So. Norfolk Street, Suite 217
San Mateo, CA 94403
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Design/develop software compo-
nents, scalable systems.
BrightEdge Technologies, Inc., 999
Baker Way, Ste 500, San Mateo,
CA 94404
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520634
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Gary O. M. Watterworth
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Gary O. M. Watterworth filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Gary Orlando Montalvo
Watterworth
Proposed name: Gary Orlando Watter-
worth
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 14,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/24/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/22/13
(Published, 05/03/13, 05/10/13,
05/17/13, 05/24/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255100
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Woodside Tree Service, 2) Hills-
borough Tree Service, 3) Portola Valley
Tree Service, 4) Redwood City Tree
Service, 5) Atherton Tree Service, 6)
Menlo Park Tree Service, 7) San Mateo
Tree Service, 8) Belmont Tree Service,
9) San Carlos Tree Service, 10) Burlin-
game Tree Service, 2995 Woodside Rd.,
Ste. 400, Woodside, CA 94062 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Golden State Tree Service, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mark Feathers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520806
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ademar Inacio de Almeida Filho
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ademar Inacio de Almeida Fil-
ho filed a petition with this court for a de-
cree changing name as follows:
Present name: Ademar Inacio de Almei-
da Filho
Proposed name: Ademar Inacio Almeida
Filho
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 14,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/24/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/22/13
(Published, 05/03/13, 05/10/13,
05/17/13, 05/24/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255037
The following person is doing business
as: Ethelbop5016 230 San Antonio Ave.,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ma-
ria Alma O. Poblete, and Pepito Joves,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/10/2012.
/s/ Maria Alma Poblete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255428
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: New World Beauty Salon, 410
A-E 1st Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Susana Flores, and Cesar Brandan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susana Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
23 Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Regular Meeting of the City of Half Moon Bay
Planning Commission
TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of
the City of Half Moon Bay will hold a public hearing at 7:00 PM
on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 , at their regular meeting place in
the Adcock Senior/Community Center at 535 Kelly Avenue to
consider the following application:
CITY FILE #: PDP-09-13
LOCATION: 1602 Miramontes Point Road
APNS: 066-093-110/120/130/180
APPLICANT: Anthony L. Lombardo
DESCRIPTION: Coastal Development Permit and Site &
Design Permit Amendment to Extend the
Temporary Use of a Parking Lot on a Site
Located in a Commercial General (C-G)
zoning district.
For More Information: The proposed agenda report will be
available after Thursday, May 9, 2013, on the City’s website,
www.hmbcity.com and in hard copy at City Hall, 501 Main
Street and the Half Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas Street dur-
ing regular business hours.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, May 3, 2013.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255339
The following person is doing business
as: 002Design 2038 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kurin Vi Tu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/05/2009.
/s/ Kurin Vi Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255115
The following person is doing business
as: NK International Trading Company
USA, 37 Cymbidium Cir., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jiun Zhou,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jiun Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255412
The following person is doing business
as: Kristen Turner, 851 Old County Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kristen
Turner, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kristen Turner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255434
The following person is doing business
as: JF Consulting, 1035 Woodland Dr.,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: BE
HATA YOGA, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jordan Funk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255385
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Coastside Legal Research, 2)
DMV For You, 8231 Pescadero Creek
Rd., LOMA MAR, CA 94021 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ria
Gomes, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Ria Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255469
The following person is doing business
as: 24/7 Mobile Notaries, 955 Fremont
St., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Laura
Hawkins, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Laura Hawkins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255246
The following person is doing business
as: Sylvia’s Styling Salon, 18 24th Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: MSJ 18 En-
terprise Corp, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Maria S. Jacobo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255189
The following person is doing business
as: Travelers Inn, 100 Hickey Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Travelers Inn, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/1995.
/s/ Pankaj Patel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255259
The following person is doing business
as: Jeminix Research, 923 Emerald Hill
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Julie Doostzadeh, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Julie Doostzadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255181
The following person is doing business
as: El Amanecer Envios, 1714 El Camino
Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Martha Gonzalez, 349 S. Mathilda Ave.,
Sunnyvale, CA 94086. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Martha Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255506
The following person is doing business
as: Bashamichi Steak & Seafood, Japa-
nese Bistro, 1390 El Camino Real MILL-
BRAE, CA 94030 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Mark Melnick, 795
Park Ave., Moss Beach, CA 94030. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/15/2013
/s/ Mark Melnick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255460
The following person is doing business
as: Rey Rey Limousine Service, 178
Crestwood Dr. Apt. 9, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Rey P. Evangelista, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Rey P. Evangelista /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255138
The following person is doing business
as: Synergy Health, 1965 Edinburgh St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kelly Clo-
hessy, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kelly Clohessy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255507
The following person is doing business
as: Original Fashion, 90 S. Spruce Ave.,
Ste. F, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Nghi Dang, 1904 Leaven-
worth St., San Francisco, CA 94133. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nghi Dang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255606
The following person is doing business
as: Sunshine Transportation, 310 Lark-
spur Dr., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Krisnil Prasad, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Krisnil Prasad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255547
The following person is doing business
as: Gloskin, 440 San Mateo Ave., Unit S-
5, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Johan-
na Pajota, 3550 Carter Dr., #44, South
San Francisco, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Johanna Pajota /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255707
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Piano, 1200 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Bay
Area Piano Masters, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Bozkurt Erkmen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255453
The following person is doing business
as: Borel Auto Service, 1626 S. El Cami-
no Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Borel Group, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marina Ka Man Ly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255588
The following person is doing business
as: Lynn Hill and Co, 330 Primrose Rd.,
Ste. 411, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lynn M. Hill, 13 Violet Ln., San Carlos
CA 94070. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Lynn M. Hill /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13, 05/24/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OFALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: April 29, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Alice’s of Woodside Corporation
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
17288 Skyline Blvd
WOODSIDE, CA 94062-5707
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Rating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 3, 2013
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Sherley Stein, aka Bud S. Stein
Case Number: 123284
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Sherley Stein, aka Bud
S. Stein. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by Russ Benito. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Russ Benito be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 28, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
R. Hollis Elliott
203 Public Notices
Law Offices of R. Hollis Elliott
841 Menlo Ave.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025
(650)321-8460
Dated: April 23, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 26, May 3, 10, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside
CLAIMED!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, SOLD!
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
296 Appliances
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
(650)375-8021
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
24
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Tricky stroke
6 Don’t deny
11 Fr. address
14 Belief of more
than a billion
15 It’s tossed
16 Jets coach Ryan
17 Watts of “The
Impossible”
18 Supporter #1
20 Hip-hop Dr.
21 Carp
23 Word with
power or panel
24 Supporter #2
27 In transit
28 Chosen groups
29 Fiber source
31 Portable digs
32 Traveling
Wilburys co-
founder Jeff
33 Nancy Drew’s
guy
34 Sherpa’s
sighting
37 Clichéd film
assistant
39 Volume
control?
42 Old-style shade
44 Minnesota’s St.
__ College
48 Wood protectors
50 Prison in 1971
news
52 “I __ stupid!”
53 Supporter #3
55 Like wall
phones
57 Come to __
58 Abbr. used for
brevity
59 Supporters 1, 2
and 3
61 Asian capital
63 Shakespearean
adverb
64 Aces
65 It may be
historical
66 Deg. for Tim
Whatley on
“Seinfeld”
67 Things found
around the
house
68 Nephew of
Donald
DOWN
1 Outlook
2 In most
instances
3 Red liqueur
4 “The Lord of the
Rings” Hobbit
5 Political fugitive
6 Chest
chambers
7 Hang on a line
8 Landlocked
European
country
9 Qualifying suffix
10 Consequently
11 Magic Eraser
spokesman
12 Mishmash
13 Put to vigorous
use
19 Bite
22 Hwys.
25 One who may
object: Abbr.
26 Egg foo __
30 Former Prizm
maker
32 One who can see
what you mean
35 Appraisal no.
36 Overflow
38 Scholarship-
offering federal
gp.
39 Inhaled, with
“down”
40 Had a big hit
41 Moves quickly
43 Leads
45 As good as
ever
46 Salon solvent
47 Where you
might be with
this puzzle’s
59-Across?
49 Embittered
50 N.L. city
51 Pledged, in a
way
54 Continues
56 Unrestrained
indulgence
60 Portfolio
letters
62 Lettered
Bklyn.
thoroughfare
By Norm Guggenbiller
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
05/03/13
05/03/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, SOLD!
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER - Leather, beige chair with
ottoman, excellent condition, $50.,
(954)940-0277 Foster City
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 ßOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $99.,
(650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
306 Housewares
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO (650)315-5902
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" chop saw (new) 100 tooth
carbine metal/wood blades $60 OBO
(650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO
(650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00
(650)591-0063
SKIL 18 VOLT CORDLESS DRILL with
two batteries, 1 hour charger, with hard
shell case and instruction booklet. Used
once. Perfect condition. $60., (650)591-
0063
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75., (650)375-8021
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , good working condition, $12. both,
(650)347-5104
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOUSE PHONE - AT&T, good condtion,
used, works well, speaker option, $30.,
(650)834-3527 or (650)589-4589
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KING SIZE BEDSPREAD - floral, beauti-
ful, like new, $30., (954)940-0277 Foster
City
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LUGGAGE - Carry-on with wheels,
brand new, Kensington, $30., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 SOLD!
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOP LIGHT FIXTURE - unused, flores-
cent, brand Mark Finelite, 48” x 9” x 3”,
white finish, two working bulbs, 14’ cord,
excellent condition, $47., (650)347-5104
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SOLID METAL STAND - 3 tiers, strong,
non skid support, 20” x 30” x 36” tall, has
potential for many uses, $17., (650)347-
5104
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
25 Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES CLOTHES - Tops & pants (20)
Size S-M, each under $10., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50., SOLD!
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MEN'S PEUGOT 10 speed bike; Good
Condition. $70.00 OBO call:
(650)342-8510
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
BELMONT
1628 El Verano Way
Cross street Chula Vista
SATURDAY 9am-4pm
SUNDAY 10am-Noon
Exercise equipment,
sporting goods,
clothes, miscellaneous
household goods, and
much more.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
SEEKING:
Granny Unit /
Guest House /
Studio
Harvard Masters Degree
Graduate
CEO of a Local Start-Up
Responsible, Healthy, Single,
Pet Free, Non-Smoker looking
for a Granny Unit / Guest Home
in San Mateo/Burlingame.
Ready to move in 01 July
2013.
Please e-mail or call me at:
oliverpmj@gmail.com
Phone: 408.234.1572.
Excellent References
available upon request.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
620 Automobiles
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
670 Auto Parts
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1800 new, (650)481-
5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry Cleaning Concrete
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
26
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC
SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES
HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Craig’s
Painting
Residential
Interior
Exterior
10 years
of Experience
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 553-9653
Lic# 857741
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
Clean Drains Plumbing
REASONABLE RATES TO
CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
LIVING TRUSTS
$ Promotional Fees $
Plus
Trust Attorney With
Masters In Tax Law For
Tax Trusts & Asset Trusts
Plus
Free Individual Consult
For A Customized Trust
Do Yourself A Big Favor
*****
Ira Harris: 650-342-3777
IHZ-LAW.com
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
27 Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a License
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Back $40/hr
Open 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND
OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
28
Friday • May 3, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
rolex oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.
oyster perpetual datejust 11

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful