You are on page 1of 5

1

Mushrooms Magic
 The    Emerging Mycelium Revolution 

 Daniel  Pieczarski
   

Mushrooms, also known as fungi, have been a perennial component of the human diet. 

Throughout history, mushrooms have been revered and worshipped by numerous civilizations 

throughout the world. For instance, the Chinese have been using mushrooms medicinally for over 

two thousand years (Ehler, 2009: 1); and many tribes in Mesoamerica have utilized the 

hallucinogenic properties of psilocybin containing mushrooms in shamanic rituals (Mckenna, 

1995: 6 ). Today, though still somewhat stigmatized, the preconceptions about mushrooms are 

being reassessed. Mushrooms are today considered more than just gourmet food items. The role 

mushrooms have played in the past, the tremendous discoveries being made in the present, and 

the anticipated functions that mushrooms will perform in the future give them a new and 

compelling cultural significance.

Wild mushrooms were among the first food items in the omnivorous diet of the Homo  

erectus. Some of the mushrooms consumed contained the psychoactive ingredient psilocybin, 

which may have been our first encounter with a hallucinogenic “entheogen.” Consumed in low 

doses, psilocybin enhances visual acuity, which provided early hunter­gatherers with considerable 

advantages. Psilocybin is also an aphrodisiac, possibly contributing to the proliferation of the 
2

species. In higher doses, it has a profoundly spiritual effect, which may have aroused the desire to 

express abstract ideas through language and symbols. (Mckenna, 1995: 48­39). On the other 

hand, many mushrooms are also highly toxic. Mycetism, or mushroom poisoning, was no doubt 

the cause of countless deaths throughout history. The infamous “death cap” mushroom was 

responsible for the deaths of many prominent historical figures, including Pope Clement VII and 

Roman Emperor Claudius. (Wasson, 197: 101) Mycetism, along with the illegal status of 

psilocybin­containing mushrooms, likely formed the bias and cultural stigma that is often 

associated with fungi. However, “Renaissance Mycologist,” Paul Stamets hopes to dissolve this 

inherent “mycophobia,” by elucidating our profound relationship to fungi.

Many are unaware that humans are intimately related to fungi. Animals have a more 

common ancestry with fungi than with any other kingdom. Fungi and animals have been placed 

into a new super­kingdom called, “Opisthokonta” (Wright, 2005: 93). We share many overarching 

commonalities with fungi. They inhale oxygen and produce carbon dioxide just as we do and 

furthermore, the same pathogens that attack fungi also attack humans. It was recently discovered 

that mycelium, the interwoven network of single celled chains which the fruiting body or 

mushroom emerges from, may be the largest organism on the planet. In Oregon, a mat of 

mycelium covers twenty thousand cubic acres of forest floor. (Stamets, 2005: 9). These fungal 

masses are the grand molecular recyclers of the planet, decomposing organic matter to create 

ever­growing layers of fertile soil. They have the unique ability to break down complex carbon 
3

molecules, which provoked mycologist Paul Stamets to pioneer the fields of “mycoremediation,” 

and “mycorestoration,” methods of utilizing the cultivation of mushrooms to decontaminate toxic 

waste sites, and improve the earth’s ecology.

A few years ago, Stametswas involved in an experiment to determine the best method for 

decontaminating oil spills. Four piles of dirt were saturated in diesel.  One pile was left alone, one 

was treated with bacteria, another with enzymes, and the last pile was treated with Oyster  

Mushroom Mycelium.  Six weeks later, the first three piles showed no signs of improvement, 

however the pile treated with fungi was overgrown with hundreds of pounds of healthy oyster 

mushrooms. Eight weeks later, the level of contamination went from 10 thousand parts per 

million to 200 parts per million. Moreover, the pile was carpeted by a variety of plant life. 

(Stamets, 2005: 91­91). Stamets believes that the industrial potential of fungi has not come close 

to being fully realized. He declares that utilizing fungi for the restoration and remediation of 

ecosystems is now more necessary than ever and that fungi will spawn a whole new branch of 

environmental industries.

In conclusion, the relationship between Fungi and the evolution of human culture runs 

deep. Not only are mushrooms a highly nutritious part of the human diet, they are also the worlds 

most important organism. They are considered the ecological guardians of earth, and without 

them, all eco­systems would fail. Clear cutting, oil extraction, urban sprawl and commercial 
4

development are destroying habitats at an alarming rate. Fortunately, it seems that an 

environmentally conscientious culture is slowly emerging. There was a time when mushrooms 

were worshipped and revered by ancient civilizations. Perhaps fungi may once again regain their 

exalted status. If so, this would be humanity’s most important gift to itself. 

List of Works Cited

Ehler, James T. "Mushrooms ­ History and Folklore of Mushrooms." Food Reference Website: 

Everything about food: from Articles & History to Recipes and Trivia Quizzes. 29 Mar. 

2009 <http://www.foodreference.com/html/art­mush­history417.html>. 

Mckenna, Terence. Food of the Gods The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge A Radical 

History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution. New York: Bantam, 1993. 

Stamets, Paul. Mycelium running how mushrooms can help save the world. Berkeley, CA: Ten 

Speed P, 2005. 
5

Steenkamp, Emma T., Jane Wright, and Sandra L. Baldauf. "The Protistan Origins of Animals 

and Fungi." 23: 93­106. The 
   Protistan
    Origins of Animals and Fungi
   . 8 Sept. 2005. 

Molecular Biology and Evolution. 29 Mar. 2009 

<http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/23/1/93>. 

Wasson, Robert G. "The death of Claudius, or Mushrooms for Murderers." Botanical Museum 

Leaflets (1972): 101­28. World Cat. Harvard University. 30 Mar. 2009 

<http://www.worldcat.org/issn/0006­8098>.