You are on page 1of 3

v5n31 > august 3-9, 2006

END DAYS, THE RAPTURE,


THE DEATH OF SCIENCE
AND THE RISE OF
CHRISTIAN NATIONALISM
BUFFALO NATIVE
MICHELLE GOLDBERG
TALKS ABOUT HER FIRST
BOOK, KINGDOM COMING
INTERVIEW BY KATHERINE O’DAY > PAGE 12

SALVATION
NATION
NEWS
CASINO
NEWS
STATE SENATE
MUSIC
ATTENTION
CHRONICLES #16 RACE ALL BANDS!
IS THE BUFFALO HOW THE FEW KICKING OFF BOOM:
CREEK CASINO CHOOSE CANDIDATES AV’S ONLINE BATTLE OF
ILLEGAL? FOR THE MANY ORIGINAL MUSIC
BY BRUCE JACKSON > PAGE 10 BY PETER KOCH > PAGE 11 > PAGE 33
august 3 - august 9, 2006 | | 1
THE
most
������������������������������
������������������������������ �������� ESSAY
�����������
�����������

radical
�������������������
����� ����� �������� ����� ���
����� ����� ����� ��� ���� ������
�������� ��� ������ ����� ������
����������������
���������������������
����� ���������� ��� ����� ����� �����
������������������������������������� How
�����������������������������������

IDEA
�������������������������� ����� ������� ��������� ������� ���
������ ������� ����� ����� ���� �������
�������� �� �������� ����� ������� ���
������ justified
����� ������������� ������� ��������
����� ���� ���� ������� ����� ������ ����������������������������������������������������
��� ���� ���� ������ ��� ������� ���������
����� ������ ����������� ����� ����������������������� is our
���� ��� �� ���� �������� ������
������� �������� �������� ��� �����
��������������������������
nuclear
��������������������������
��� �������� ����������� ������ ����
���� ����������� ��������� ������
������������������������ past?
�����������������������������������������
������������������� ���������������������������������������������
������������������� ���� �� ���� �����
��� ������ ������� ����������� ��� ���������������������� ������ ���� ���� ������
> BY����� ��� ������
PETER KOCH�������
������������������������������������������ �������������������������������������������
��������������������������

S
��������������������������� ������� ������������� ����� ����� ���������
����������������������� ��� �������� ��� ���������� ����������������
toryteller and folk singer Utah Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no materi-
������������������������
��������������������� ����������������� ������� ��������� �����Phillips ���� ������� has said that “the long al assistance in our war against Japan. The
��� ���
�������� ���� ���������� memory
������ is the
����� most radical idea in Japanese were already defeated and ready
�������
�������������� ������������������������������������������������������������ America.” His words ring especial-
����� ����� ������ ���� �� �������� ly true now, as the United States to surrender because of the effective sea
������� ��� ���� �������� ������ ��� ������ �������� �
����������������������������������������
attempts to set nuclear policy for the rest blockade and the successful bombing with
������ ���� ���������� ���� ������ ����� ������� ����������������� ����������������������������������������������
of the world without adequately reflecting conventional weapons.” In late May, Her-
���������������������������������
��������� ������������������� ��� ��������� ����
on its�����������
own nuclear �����������
past. bert Hoover called on Truman and told
������������������ ��������������������������������������������
Few Americans will mark the historical sig- him, “I am convinced that if you, as Presi-
�������� ��������������
���� ���� ������� ������� �������� nificance of August 6 and 9 as they pass this dent, will make a shortwave radio broadcast
������ ������������������� week. Half a world away, however, Japanese to the people of Japan—tell them they can
����������������������������������� ■ ��������������������������
������������������� hibakusha will not forget the dates. Hibaku- have their Emperor if they surrender, that
■ ���������������������
sha translates literally to “explosion-affect- it will not mean unconditional surrender
���������������������� ■ �����������������������������
ed people,” and refers to those who wit-
������������������������������ nessed or were injured by the 1945 nuclear except for militarists—you’ll get a peace
����� ������������������ ■ �������� bombings of Japan by the US. They mark in Japan, you’ll have both wars over.” The
���������������������
������������������������������� the dates by adding the names of hibaku- list of those in opposition to atomic bomb-
��������������
������������������������������
��������
�������� ■ �������� sha whose ���������������
deaths have been recorded in ing goes on: Dwight Eisenhower, General
the previous year to the cenotaphs at Hiro- Douglas MacArthur, Assistant Secretary of
�������������������������������������� �������������������� shima and Nagasaki.
�������������������� War John McCloy, Under Secretary of State
������������ Sixty-one years ago this Sunday (August Joseph Grew, Under Secretary of the Navy
6), Col. Paul Tibbets took the controls of Ralph Bard and Albert Einstein, who’s of-
����������������������������������������������
a modified B-29 Superfortress—named for

����������������������������
�������� his mother, Enola Gay—and lifted off into ten linked to the beginning of the Manhat-
������������������������������������
������������������� the starry sky over Tinian, a speck of an is- tan Project that created the bombs.
land in the Northern Marianas. Six hours The points made by Leahy and Hoover are

���������� �������� ����������� �


�����������������������
����� ����
later, at 8:16am, the Enola Gay’s bombar-
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
dier released “Little Boy,” a 9,000-pound important. As the war in Europe drew to
atomic ������������
��������������������������������������������������������������������������
bomb, over the Japanese port city a close, the Allies waged an increasingly

� � �������������������������������������������� ��� ��� ����


�������������������������������������������������������������� explosive
���������
�������������������������
of Hiroshima, unleashing what can only effective war in the Pacific. In mid 1944,
be described ������
��������������������������
as hell������
on earth. Little Boy’s the United States took the Marianas from
power was equivalent
���������
tons of dynamite and ��� to a15,000
�� �produced light
Japan, bringing the home islands within
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
����������������������������������������������� ������ ���� ��������
many �����������������������������������
times brighter than ���the sun. The range of American B-29 bombers. Begin-
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
ning in November, Japanese cities became
��������� explosion
killed�����
and
�������
����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
140,000
its immediate
people.��������� after-effects
Victims’ skin�������

hung ���
���������������������������������������������������������
the subject of nearly constant conventional
���������
��������������������������
in �����
tethers from�������������
their bodies �������
and
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������the ��������
explo- bombing raids. General Curtis LeMay, the
������������������������������� sion melted the eyes of some who looked commander of the bombing raids, claimed
������������������������������������
■ ��������������������������������� on it. The ensuing firestorm generated
■ ���������������������������� its in June of 1945 that the war would have to
■ ����������������������������������
������������������� own weather�����������������������
systems, stirring up cyclones
���������������� and causing a sticky black rain to fall over end by September or October, because by
the city. In short, it was the ■most awesome, then all of Japan’s industrial targets would
terrible ��������������������������
■ ����������������������������� �����������������������
force ever wielded by humans be completely destroyed.
�������against�����������������������������������������
��humans, ����� and the first time nuclear
��������������������������������������������� At the same time, a naval blockade, begun
weapons were ever employed in combat.
���� � �
������ ���� �����
���� ������ ����� ��� ������ in September of 1944, was choking Japan’s
�������
Three days later (August 9), we did it again remaining industry by blocking entirely its
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������������
in Nagasaki, that time killing approximate-
ly 74,000 ������� �������������
Japanese civilians�����
with����� ability to import oil and other vital materi-
���������
the larger
�������������������������������������������� “Fat Man” ��� ��������bomb.���That was the
���������� ���������������� als necessary to produce war materials.
last time a���������������� �����
����������������������������������������������� nuclear weapon was ever employed
������� ��������� ����� ���� ������� ��� ��� against In July of 1945, Germany surrendered,
������������������ ����������������������������
� humans.
�������� ���� ���������� ������ ����� ������� ���freeing
� up the� Allies to� focus all�����
of their
������ When���������������������������������������������
this chapter in our history is visited, forces and resources on Japan. The world
the justification most often given for us-
�������������������� ing the����������������������������������������

atomic bombs against Japan is the knew that Japan was defeated, and so did
�������� ����������������������� need ����������������������������������������������
avoid ���
to bring a quick end to the war, to Japan. American intelligence experts
��������� invasion
a full-scale ���� ����������� �����������
of the Japanese cracked the Japanese diplomatic code as
������������������ ������������������ home��������������������������������������������
islands. This is what we were taught far back as 1940, allowing the military to
���������������������������� ������������������ in school and few of us ever questioned it. intercept messages between Tokyo and the
������������������������������������ ��������������������������� The truth is, however, that there is no Japanese embassy in Moscow. In spring of
■ ��������������������������
consensus on the necessity of the atomic 1945, it was clear that Japan was looking to
■ ���������������������
���������������������������������� ����������������������������� bombs. In fact, many military personnel the then-neutral Soviet Union to mediate
������������������������������������ ■ �����������������������������
���������������������������������� and administration officials adamantly op- a peace between Japan and the Allies. One
������������������� posed using the atom bombs at the time.
���������������������������������� ������������������������������ Admiral ■ William�������� Chief of Staff to example is a July 12 message that reads,
Leahy, ���������������������
�������������������������������� President Truman, said, “It is my opinion “…it is His Majesty’s heart’s desire to see
that the ■ use �������� ���������������
of this barbarous weapon at the swift termination of the war.”
������������������������������������������������������������������
�������������������������������������
����������������������� ��������� ��������� ���������
���������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
������������
8 | | august 3 - august 9, 2006 ����������������������������������������������

������������������������������������
��������
On July 26, 1945, an ultimatum from the GRAYCLIFF CONSERVANCY’S
Allies was broadcast in Japanese in San
Francisco. It was relayed to the Japanese
��������������
��������������� L ARKIN
government the next morning. That mes-

���������������������
�����������
PREMIUM
���������������������
sage, the Potsdam Proclamation, called
EXPOSITION
for the “unconditional surrender of all the
Japanese armed forces.” It ignored Japan’s
central surrender concern, though: the
���������
100TH ANNIVERSARY OF
retention of the emperor’s position. The ���������������
�������������� FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S
LARKIN ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
Japanese considered their emperor to be ��� ���� �������� ������� ������ ���� ���
a god, and the heart of Japanese culture.
Japan’s Prime Minister Suzuki publicly an-
������������
������������ Exhibits • Lectures • Tour
����� Collections
������� ���������
of Antique ������� ���
nounced in June, “Should the Emperor ������������������������������� �������������������������������������
Premiums & Products
system be abolished, the Japanese people ���������������������������������������������� ����� ���� �������
Discover Buffalo’s�����������
Heritage ����� ���
������������������������������������������������������
would lose all reason for existence. ‘Un- �������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������
SAT. AUG 5TH • 12 to 5
conditional surrender,’ therefore, means
L ARKIN AT EXCHANGE
death to the hundred million: it leaves us
no choice but to go on fighting to the last
������������������
����������������������������������������� ��������������������������
726 Exchange St. Buffalo
man.”
�����������������������
������������������������������� ������ ���� ���� ������������ ����� ����������
������������������������������� INFO: 9 47 - 9217
���������������������������������������������
Several people in Truman’s administra- ��������������������������������� http://graycliff.bfn.org
���������������������������������� ������ ���� ���� ������ ����� ��� ������ �������
tion were aware of this concern, including ��������� ������ �������� ������ ����� ���������
John McCloy, who suggested that America ������� ������������� ����� ����� ��������� ���
not use the term “unconditional surren-
��������������������������������������������
der.” He suggested Japan be allowed to
��������� ����� ���� ������� ��� ��� �������� ����
exist as a nation with its chosen form of
government, including retention of the ���������� ������ ����� ������� ������ ����� �������
��� ��� ����������� ������� ��� ���� ��� ������

��������������
emperor, though only on the basis of a
constitutional monarchy.
His suggestions were ignored, though, and
��������������� ������������ ���� ������������ ���� ���� ������
������������������������������������������������

��������������������� ����������� ����������� ����� ����� �� �������

����������
the Potsdam Proclamation brought no sig-
�������������������������
nificant response from the Japanese. Plans
were made for a large-scale invasion, to
take place November 1. At the same time, ��������������� ■ ��������������������������

�������������
the decision was made to drop the atomic ■ ���������������������
bombs. ������������ ■ �����������������������������
When it is said that the dropping of the
bombs indeed ended the war, two impor- ������������������������������� ■ �����������������������������■
���������������������������������������������������
tant developments are ignored. First, the ������������������������������������������������������ �����������������������
Soviet Union declared war on Japan on ��������������������������
August 8, two days after the atomic bomb
was dropped on Hiroshima. Second, even ������������������
�����������������������������������������
7:30 SHOW
SOLD OUT!
������������
on August 13, four days after Nagasaki
�����������������������
������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������
was obliterated, the Japanese Cabinet still

SECOND
�������������������������������
couldn’t get the unanimous vote it needed ���������������������������������
to surrender. On August 14, however, Em- ���������������������������������� ������������������������������������

peror Hirohito stepped in, saying, “It is


my desire that you, my Ministers of State, SHOW�����
ADD������
ED! ���� ����� ���
accede to my wishes and forthwith accept
the Allied reply.” Accordingly, the Cabinet 10:3����������
����� ���� ������������ ���
0PM ���� ��� ����� ���
voted unanimously to surrender that day. �������������������������
These factors are usually ignored in the ��������� �� ���� ������ ����
justification for dropping the atomic ��������������������
bombs. America unleashed the most ter-
rible weapon ever developed on civilian
populations—the two cities were chosen
not because of their military value, but be-
cause their post-bombing campaign pris- ������� �� �����
tine condition would allow a true gauging
of the bomb’s effectiveness—without fully ����� � � �����
exploring diplomatic means to ending the
war with Japan.
The first explosion of an atomic bomb
occurred on July 16, 1945 at Alamogordo
Test Range in New Mexico. Upon witness-
ing the blinding flash and towering mush-
room cloud, Los Alamos scientific director
Dr. Robert Oppenheimer said he was re-
minded of lines from the Hindu scripture,
the Bhagavad Gita: “I am become death,
destroyer of worlds.”
Whether Oppenheimer was predicting the
arms race that would bring our nation to
the brink of world-ending nuclear war or
simply musing about his terrible inven-
tion, we should mark his words. If the long
memory is, indeed, the most radical idea
in America, then let’s be radical and, like
the Japanese hibakusha, never forget the
events of August 6 and 9.
To respond to this article, send e-mail to
editorial@artvoice.com.
��������� ���������
����������������������������������������������

august 3 - august 9, 2006 | | 9