Feasibility Study for a Workforce Development & Education Center as part of the Wallops Research Park

Submitted by: Robert C. Peterson, Ph.D. Larry D. Jones, Ph.D. February 13, 2008

Table of Contents
Executive Summary …………………………………………………………………… iii I. Introduction ……………………………………………………………………….…. 1 II. Analysis of Surveyed Skill Sets …………………………..………………………… 2 Area Businesses ……………………………………………………………………… 2 Wallops Research Park……………………………………………………………….. 2 III. Wallops Research Park Mission ………………………………………………….. 3 IV. Goals for the Workforce Development and Education Center …………………. 3 V. Workforce Development and Education Center Concept ………………..……… 4 VI. Recommended Training and Certification Programs ………………………...… 5 VII. Recommended Physical Space Requirements ………………………………..… 6 VIII. Recommended Equipment ……………………………………………………… 7 IX. Capital Budget …………………………………………………………………….. 8 X. Initial Annual Operating Budget …………………………………………….……. 8 XI. Potential Demand for Office, Conference, and Lab Space ………………………9 XII. Recommended Structure for Board of Directors ……………………………….10 XIII. Steps to Follow to Make Center a Realty ……………………………………....13 Phase I (2008) ……………………………………………………………………..... 17 Phase II (2008-2009) ……………………………………………………………….. 18 Phase III (2009-2010) ………………………………………………………………. 19 Phase IV (2010) …………………………………………………………………….. 20 Phase V (2010-2012) ……………………………………………………………….. 20 Phase VI (2012-2017) ………………………………………………………………. 20 XIV. Advantages ……………………………………………………………………… 20 XV. Concerns and Cautions ………………………………………………………….. 21 XVI. Feasibility of Project ……………………………………………………………..22 XVI. Appendix…………………………………………………………………….……23 Workforce Data Accomack County………………………………………………..... 23 Unemployed Workforce Data Accomack County ………………………………….. 24 Education and Training Data Accomack County.……………………..……………. 28

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page i

University of Maryland-Eastern Shore Master and Doctoral degree programs in Aerospace Engineering……………………..…………………………………….. 29 Old Dominion University Master and Doctoral degree programs in Engineering….. 39 Old Dominion University Master and Doctoral degree programs in Business Administration…………………………………………………………. 54 Two Year Technical and Career Programs offered through Eastern Shore Community College, Wor-Wic Community College and Delaware Technical and Community College…………………………………………………………. 58 Old Dominion University Distance Learning programs at New River Community College and Wytheville Community College…………………………………… 95 National Institute of Aeronautics……………………………………………………100 Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center……………………………………….102 Memorandum of Understanding: Facility Utilization Cost. Southwest Virginia…..108 Higher Education Center

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page ii

while upgrading the skills of the region’s workforce pool will make it more attractive for new industries to move into the area. math. For the educational institutions the Center would provide prestige access to NASA. Much of the success of a Workforce Development and Education Center will be dependent upon the establishment of the Research Park and the growth and development of Automated Vehicle Systems and their use of the restricted flight space around the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. there is a need for existing engineers and scientists to have access to graduate education in technology management. The near-site location to NASA Wallops is a major advantage for all constituents. writing. • • • • • • • • Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page iii . It is important the Center has some early success stories to provide momentum for future growth of programs and services. the Workforce Development and Education Center would provide a hub for economic development efforts and raising level of workforce that will improve the quality of life for citizens and attract new business and industry. a Workforce Development and Education Center would provide improved access to higher education and training for the region. and to attain additional certifications and degrees via area community colleges and universities. developing new skills. Virginia. The Center will provide ongoing opportunities for improving existing skills. and computer skills and motivation to upgrade their work related skills and education levels. Below is a summary of the major findings: • For the region. Also. rather than only Accomack County. and enhanced opportunities for program development and research. There is a need for workers with current skill sets in a wide variety of technical areas. There is high concern whether many of the residents they have the necessary reading. The current educational attainment level of unemployed residents in Accomack County is low. collaboration with other entities. Raising the level of education and training within the workforce is critical to the region’s overall economic development. the Center would provide improved work life opportunities for technical staff. the US Navy and other organizations located nearby. The Center must have a regional focus and be a resource for the Eastern Shore corridor. Upgrading employee skills in existing industries will make them more competitive in the marketplace. facilitate IPA assignments. It is anticipated that it will take several phases over a period of ten years for the Center to reach its full potential. For NASA. joint research projects. with 77% only having a high school education or less. pathways to NASA jobs for students. This study analyses the feasibility of building the Workforce Development and Education Center adjacent to the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Accomack County.Executive Summary As part of a proposed Wallops Research Park.

Overall. the creation of a Workforce Development and Education Center is a laudable project with great potential and needed benefits for the region. The recommended initial annual operating budget is $385. The most important feature of the physical structure of the Center will be its flexibility to adapt to needs as they are identified and change over time.000 sq. Part of that space should have a high ceiling and large hanger door to allow larger equipment to be moved in and out of the facility. The Center would be approximately 20. ft. while not without major challenges. The Center would be established as a state agency by the Virginia Commonwealth legislature and have a Board of Directors with wide representation of its major constituents.000.• • • • • • • • A manager of the Center would need to be identified early and brought onboard prior to construction to champion its mission and develop the linkages to the region that will be necessary to ensure early successes. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page iv . with ample flexible and open space. The Center would have broadband wireless access to the Internet throughout the facility and be equipped with state-of-the-art computing and two-way audio / video systems. The anticipated capital cost is $8 million to build and equip the Center.

Development for NASA. The region ranks near the bottom of the Commonwealth in educational attainment. The potential for incubator space being made available to small. and Workforce Development and Education Center on properties owned by Accomack County. Marine Science Consortium. The Center would also provide other workers. Accomack and Northampton counties consistently rank in the bottom quarter of the Commonwealth of Virginia in terms of per capita and household income. Business Incubator.and MARS-related tenants may take several years to develop. and Accomack County have proposed the building of a Wallops Research Park. there is currently limited demand for this type of facility other than for space.Introduction The NASA Wallops Flight Facility. however. The creation of these three entities on the eastern shores of Virginia would provide a unique opportunity to bring together economic development with workforce training to provide improved access to higher education. Workforce development is critical to economic development of the region.and aviation-related businesses linked to NASA and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS). The Wallops Research Park would be quite unique for the region and would face little competition in the area. However. particularly those who are unemployed or underemployed. developing companies on a temporary basis would also be unique to the area and would provide facilities and some other resources for emerging businesses to complement the Research Park. many residents perceive education and training to be of little value due to the lack of high-paying job opportunities requiring advanced education. with the necessary skills to potentially attract new industries to the area. There are few jobs in the area not related to either agriculture or tourism. Unfortunately. The Workforce Development and Education Center would provide the mechanism to upgrade the current skills of existing workers in the region. shortages of and needs for skilled workers to fill high level technical jobs and workers to fill information and systems technology positions. One aviation outfitting company (BaySys) has indicated an immediate interest in opening a facility in the park. There are. The region’s industrial economy is underdeveloped. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 1 . as well. The details of the business incubator and the projected demand for this type of facility are being addressed separately by Bay Area Economics. A more highly skilled and trained workforce would attract additional higher technology business and the end result would bring higher paying and quality jobs for area residents in the eastern shore areas of Virginia and Maryland. Employers are hesitant to invest in expansion or relocation to areas like the eastern shore counties of Virginia or Maryland because of the lack of a highly-trained workforce.

Data from the Virginia Employment Commission suggest the fastest growing demand for workers will be in the medical and health services and in information technology and network systems related occupations. writing. 2007. while 14% of county residents have a college degree versus 30% statewide. MARS. would be the home for science and technology industry businesses. engineering or aerospace industries. Only 9 percent indicated they were interested in changing careers. even seek out the necessary training and education needed to develop the skills necessary for the jobs at the Research Park companies? Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 2 . electrical technicians and engineers will certainly be needed. Unfortunately. many of whom have typically shunned education much of their lives. there are not sufficient numbers of people who currently have these skills. Another issue is one of culture. Will the residents. Medical and health science technical skills provide another opportunity to meet local training needs. Surveys conducted of unemployed people seeking jobs asked about their interest in the aviation. computers) to be successful in completing this training. Analysis of Surveyed Skill Sets Numerous surveys and interviews were conducted through the Virginia Employment Commission office and Eastern Shore Community College in August. These businesses will require employees with specialized training and skills. roughly only 68% of the adults aged 25 and over have a high school degree versus 82% statewide. as it develops. should the Wallops Research Park. and other aerospace-related enterprises develop a stronger presence.” and 27 percent reported no interest at all.II. math. Additionally. even if other companies are not attracted to the facility.” 12 percent said “maybe if training programs were available.” 16 percent said simply “maybe. in Accomack County. We would not call this a rousing interest among people needing employment willing to be trained to develop new skills. County residents will need to further their education and/or training before they could perform the jobs required by the Research Park companies. Wallops Research Park The Research Park. Area Businesses Interviews were also conducted of major employers in Accomack County to identify their personnel and training needs over the next several years. 33 percent said “maybe if the pay and position fit their needs. According to the US Census Bureau. Computer training at all levels is a major need for employers and workers. NASA and MARS both have on-going engineer and technician needs of their own. A key question is will the residents seek out the training and/or education that is needed and do they have the basic skills (reading.

but also the business incubator piece. it is difficult to keep the best and brightest who grew up in the area to stay and get the skills needed to attract new employers to the area. and outreach. lacking in medical care.Because of the demographics and geography of the area (rural. We see the Research Park as the engine to drive not only the workforce development piece. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 3 . professional development. Complement the role and mission of the Research Park by assisting in attracting science and technology industry businesses to come to area. Develop necessary skills in the area workforce to make it attractive for new employers to come to the region. underdeveloped. it is important the Center work closely with the Wallops Research Park. and Create high tech jobs to retain the Shore’s best and brightest and attract others with our quality of life. Leverage existing federal facility investment and employment opportunities to spark Wallops Area as a regional research and technology area. IV. Wallops Research Park Mission The mission for the Wallops Flight Facility is listed as: Wallops Flight Facility will be a national resource to enable low-cost aerospace-based science and technology research while promoting regional economic development. The Wallops Research Park economic development goals are: • • • • Develop comprehensive planning that enables growth in all sectors. Goals for the Workforce Development and Education Center As an integral part of the Wallops Research Park. Supplement educational and work force development opportunities on the Shore in the scientific and technical fields for increased collaboration. etc). Raise the skill levels of existing area workers to make it attractive for new businesses to come to region. III. the goals for the Workforce Development and Education Center should be: • • • • • Utilize area resources to develop a regional education and training center for the purpose of developing new or enhancing current skills needed for local companies. Create high tech jobs to retain the area’s best and brightest young people. For the Workforce Development and Education Center to be a viable entity.

Worcester and Wicomico counties in Maryland. Maryland lacks a sufficient critical mass to be cost effective in providing education offerings without using distance learning technologies. the business incubators. The full concept of the research park and education center will easily take 5-10 years to develop. Virginia and southern Worcester County. Career counseling and assessment for adults is seen as an important component for the Center. V. and the employees of their sub-contractors. it should expand on these programs. the US Navy. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 4 . Workforce Development and Education Center Concept The Wallops Research Park. the Marine Science Consortium. have opportunities for them to continue to develop their skills. and doctoral degree programs using distance learning whenever possible. Wor-Wic Community College (Maryland) and Delaware Technical and Community College. The Center should utilize graduate and undergraduate programs offered through Old Dominion University and the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore and the technical programs offered through Eastern Shore Community College (Virginia). and continue their formal education to acquire additional degrees. Note: The financial viability of individual education and training programs must be considered in order to get area educational institutions to participate in providing educational offerings at the Workforce Development and Education Center. bachelor. Stakeholders must be patient during the early developmental stages. Unfortunately. the geographical area of northern Accomack County. master. develop new skills. they cannot be expected to be a long-term participant.• Once new workers are on site. the focus of the Workforce Development and Education Center should be on developing programs that would benefit the employees of NASA Wallops. It should begin by utilizing educational and training programs already being provided by area community colleges and universities. If the participating educational institutions cannot at least operate at a break-even level. It is also important to note that the development of new businesses related to either the Research Center or to the business incubators. Initially. We see the Center offering selected associate. is what is going to drive the Workforce Development and Education Center. and the Workforce Development and Education Center all MUST be a regional center serving Accomack and Northampton counties in Virginia. It is important that the Center starts small. As the Center develops. and the southern part of Delaware.

North Carolina State University. Recommended Training and Certification Programs A number of technical training and certification programs are needed for the region and would be offered at the Center. the Marine Science Consortium. avionics/ airway sciences. a similar program could be developed initially involving Old Dominion University. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 5 . Currently participating in the NIA Graduate Program are six research universities: Georgia Tech.D. In conjunction with the Wallops Research Park. the University of Virginia. fiber optics. and ultimately receive a degree from that institution. We also envision the Education Center developing a program similar to what the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) has developed with NASA Langley. This program is a unique graduate program to educate the next generation of scientists and engineers in technologies of the future. These programs should include electronics.D. but the opportunity for graduate students. Students in this program have the opportunity to participate in leading-edge research programs and take unique graduate courses that are not available at any single university. engineering mechanics. NOAA. Graduate degrees (M.S.S. to work with NASA scientists and researchers on state of the art projects. Other universities could be added in the future. or Ph. six universities have pooled their resources to offer an innovative program of courses designed and delivered from different universities. and the University of Maryland. NIA students may take up to 50% of their courses from the other participating universities. Currently. doctoral and master levels. the US Navy. Classes offered at NIA. We see the real strength of the NIA program being the collaborative efforts of the participating institutions of higher education to not only offer unique courses of study that are not available at any single university. While students enroll in a M. the University of Maryland. Students are provided the opportunity to be taught by professors from a variety of universities while at the same time are able to work side by side with NASA Langley researchers on tomorrow's most pressing problems.Programs should be selected that would enhance recruitment of new workers as well as help to retain current employees at NASA Wallops. and any of the sub-contractors located in the region. and Ph. North Carolina A&T State University. mechanical engineering. materials science and engineering.) currently are available in aerospace engineering. electrical engineering. VI. the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech. both on-site and via distance learning. include required core courses as well as state-of-the-art electives in new and emerging technologies. ocean engineering and systems engineering. electronic communications and other related technician programs to serve the area’s aerospace and engineering employers. engineering physics. program at one of the member universities.

wide x 25 ft. masonry. There is also a need for construction/contractor programs where a person would receive training in carpentry. portions of those areas could be designated as incubator space for developing companies whenever needed. open space. home and convalescent care personnel. VII. a large lecture hall. We also envision the Center developing programs with sub-contractors of NASA Flight Facility and the Research Park that would facilitate assignment of Wallops personnel to work on projects as a need arises utilizing the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA). tiling. Medical and health science technical skills programs for emergency medical technicians. space with an open 40 ft. hvac. research balloons. Recommended Physical Space Requirements The primary design criterion for a building to support workforce development and education as part of the Wallops Research Park will be the maximization of flexible. and other large Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 6 . A large (60 ft. This would provide the foundation to build on these successes as well as providing momentum for the additional growth of other programs. To add credibility to the program. ceiling be the hub of the building. normal classrooms. planes. as needed. truck driver training should be considered. all training space should utilize movable floor-to-ceiling walls to allow for changes in configuration that meet demands over time. That training space should include small hands-on labs. dental and physician assistants. nursing. it is important to have a few successful “home runs” early on in the project. Cubicles for individual distance students should be easily accessible near the front of the building. We feel it is important to identify a champion or several champions early in the process to secure support from the various stakeholders involved. and psychological and substance abuse clinicians should be considered as the Center’s programs develop. Therefore. plumbing. x 80 ft. networking systems. Computer training at all levels including Microsoft Windows and Office certification courses. Since much of the training that will take place in this facility revolves around the aviation industry. and other related construction skills to proved needed skill sets for area employers. Because of the flexibility of the training space. It is therefore suggested that an 80 ft. there should be a small reception area and a galley kitchen. electrical. In addition. there needs to be a large open space that allows for large equipment to be moved in and out as needed.With the soon to be open Wal*Mart distribution center in southern Maryland. and information security should become a part of the educational and training offerings early on at the Center. flooring. high) hanger door at the back of the building will provide access to this space and allow the facility to accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles. The offices and conference space should also utilize movable walls. etc.

A sketch of the floor plan of is shown below: VIII. and other lab equipment should be on wheeled workspaces so they may be moved from space to space as needed. most of the desks. chairs. Two-way audio and video for conferencing and instruction can be provided with portable Polycom™ systems. tabletop simulation units. etc. Consequently. welding apparatus. Also. tables. along the outside walls there would be space for testing equipment. Likewise. To the extent possible testing equipment. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 7 . Portability will be the key to maximizing the use of equipment and taking advantage of the flexible space the building offers. Recommended Equipment The entire building must have secure broadband wireless access to the Internet. all or most computing should be via notebook computers that may be moved from space to space on carts. etc. should be stackable on portable carts to accommodate easy setup. engineering simulation stations.equipment up to a size that can be moved in via regular park roads since this facility will not have runaway access.

galley kitchen. ft. ft. ft. training.5 million.IX.000 • • • • Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 8 . tables.400 sq. services – Work with Board to secure funding $ 50K . wireless & telecommunications access – Cost of Polycom systems and Blackboard software fees Total estimated annual operating cost: $ 385. smart boards – Portable projection systems – Stackable chairs. of reception. The building cost is based upon a facility currently under construction at Eastern Shores Community College that is similar in size and scope with a construction cost of $ 6. • $ 7 million for building – 19.Manager of Workforce Development and Education Center – Supervisor of staff and facility – Marketer of the facility – Broker for education.receptionist / assistant – Provides concierge services $ 30K – maintenance / janitorial services $ 200K for overhead to include – Cost of utilities. and conference room space • Approximately 7. desks. etc. of open space with 40’ ceiling and 25’ high x 60’ wide hanger door • 3. office.000 sq. Initial Annual Operating Budget Below is an estimate of the initial annual costs once the building is completed (amounts for personnel include salary plus benefits computed at 25% of salary): • $ 75K . – Mobile workbenches – Office & conference room furniture – Galley kitchen equipment Total estimated cost to build and equip facility: $ 8 million • X. Capital Budget Below is an estimate of costs to build and equip the building.200 sq. facility including: • 6. ft.200 sq. of flexible training space $ 1 million for equipment including: – Hardware for building-wide wireless network – Notebook computers on delivery carts – Portable two-way audio / video equipment (Polycom) – White boards.technical support person $ 30K .

Below are lists of potential uses of the facilities in both the near and longer terms: • Near term uses – Near-site (outside security gate) NASA conferencing – Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT) training / certification / associate degree program – Electronic and IT technician training – Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) training – Masters Degree in Engineering Management / Organizational Development – Customized networking & security training – Equipment-specific training – Technical career-awareness programs for kindergarten through college students Longer term uses – UAV and balloon research and testing – Aircraft prototyping & simulation – Collaborative partnerships and research efforts among educational institutions. and Lab Space There is a great potential for use of the space in the Workforce Development and Education Center. none had a large enough area that would seat over 150 people. NASA.000 potential gross annual incomes from facility rentals for conferences. Potential Demand for Office. Each talked about $100. contractors working with NASA. Conference. both in the near term (within a year of opening the facility) and longer term. In looking at local hotel facilities. Potential users of the facilities include NASA. These • Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 9 . XI. private industries in the Eastern Shore region. It is further suggested that this staff person report to the President of Eastern Shore Community College. at least during this program development phase. private sector. That person should begin to develop partnerships and programs so the facility will be well utilized immediately upon opening. there was none available in their respective areas. The Crossroads Institute and the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center each provide conference facilities where prior to their establishment. That may mean that some programs are started in temporary facilities prior to construction.000-$250. other governmental agencies. higher education institutions. etc.Note: It will be important to hire or appoint the Manager of the Workforce Development and Education Center in advance of the actual construction of the facility. primary and secondary schools. business meetings. and governmental entities in northern Virginia and southern Maryland.

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 10 . in the legislature right now. Both are relatively new in the legislature (the senator was just elected this year and the person in the House has only served a few years) so they have not yet built a power base. The Center also receives between $500-$700. This is something that has already been done by the legislature and there are other similar types of facilities in operation in Virginia. we looked at three potential formats the Workforce Development and Education Center be governed. One philosophy of a Board is to make it as inclusive of all stakeholders as possible. Recommended Structure for Board of Directors One area we struggled with is the makeup of the Board of Directors. the person representing the area in the state senate does not serve on the Senate Finance Committee nor does the person representing the area in the House of Representative serve on the House Appropriations Committee. over time this could ensure funding over a long period of time. conferences held at the Center. One would be similar to how the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center was established.would involve Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) project assignments. The difficulty with this is the size of the Board can become quite unwieldy at times.000 in rental income from the participating institutions of higher education. Another view is to have a smaller Board to deal with the general issues and policies that affect the operation of the Center and have an Advisory Board which would provide advice and guidance to the Governing Board.6 million for the current fiscal year. Unfortunately. – Co-ops / internships / informal interaction – Development of Six Sigma Center of Excellence – Promotion ongoing regional economic development efforts – Digital repository for technical materials XII. and from the Virginia Extension Service which is located in the Center. It was created by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia with an initial appropriation for planning. After reviewing several governance structures for similar type of facilities in Virginia and Texas. If the Workforce Development and Education Center could be established by the Virginia legislature. Funding to construct a building was eventually received and the Commonwealth of Virginia legislature supports the Higher Education Center with an appropriation of $1. Funding from the General Assembly continued while a coalition of support was built within the Virginia legislature and partnerships were developed with area institutions of higher learning to provide the necessary courses of education programs and courses of instruction. This gives the people affected by the Center an opportunity to participate in the governance of the Center.

(website: www. was established to provide for and to assure the continuation of the philanthropic spirit. Virginia – Worcester County. and to provide challenging opportunities and act as a catalyst for the betterment of the community. Inc. who made aviation history by launching the nation's first commuter airline service in 1962.richardhensonfoundation. Grant amounts have ranged from $500 for smaller-scale projects to $1 million or more for "bricks and mortar" campaigns. to enrich the quality of life primarily. Henson Foundation.. we see the Workforce Development and Education Center with a Board of Directors having a linkage to the NASA Research Park Service District.Using this model. Virginia – Worcester County. Henson. at least initially. Virginia – Northamptom County. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 11 . The Board of Directors must have wide representation of its major constituents and. and ideals of Richard A. should include a member from each as follows (this is assuming the Center is created by the legislature in the Commonwealth of Virginia): • • • • • • NASA Wallops Marine Science Consortium Maryland Institute for Science & Technology Virginia Department of Housing & Community Development Richard A.appointed by the Governor – 2 state senators from Commonwealth of Virginia – 3 state representatives from Commonwealth of Virginia • • • • * The Richard A. in the Greater Salisbury area. Virginia – Northamptom County. Maryland County Government (one each): – Accomack County. The Foundation provides grants to qualified nonprofit organizations and other qualified institutions for charitable activities which address the Foundation's priority issues. objectives. Henson Foundation * Higher Education Institutions (one each): – Eastern Shore Community College – Old Dominion University – University of Maryland Eastern Shore – Wor-Wic Community College Major Technology Employers (one each): – BaySys Technologies – Lockheed Martin – Northrop Grumman Corporation County Public Schools (one each): – Accomack County. Maryland State Government. Maryland – Wicomico County. Typical grants are difficult to describe. Maryland – Wicomico County. but not exclusively.org).

as well as the local representative in the State Senate. It also does not place the entire financial burden on one state. and Old Dominion University. In this model. We recognize the difficulty. a rural entrepreneurial and educational initiative in Galax. the Maryland Institute for Science and Technology. local and federal government agencies. though. the Crossroads Rural Entrepreneurial Institute houses three important elements: 1) the Southwest Regional Enterprise Center . and would benefit businesses and residents of both states. Eastern Shore Community College. This would be a working Board and would probably meet on a monthly basis. We envision this as a state agency being supported by the Virginia legislature. the major technology employers (such as BaySys. and the local representative in the State House of Representatives. Virginia. of forming and operating an inter-state agency. as well as state. the Board of Directors should elect the following officers: • • • Chairperson Vice Chairperson (to become Chairperson the following year) Treasurer Thereafter. Accomack County.A second governance structure we considered was to develop the Center as a dual state agency co-sponsored by the Commonwealth of Virginia and the state of Maryland. The Manager of the Workforce Development and Education Center will function as the Recording Secretary and provide staff support for the Board of Directors.a mixed-use business incubator facility including business assistance and consulting services.org: “Through a unique partnership composed of educational institutions and economic developers. the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore. A third governance structure and the one we recommend is to keep the Board small and not as unwieldy as the first two structures mentioned. the Board of Directors would be expanded to include two state senators and three state representatives from Maryland appointed by the Governor. the US Navy. We also suggest setting up an Advisory Board consisting of representatives from the Accomack County School Board. Wor-Wic Community College. but want to mention this as a possibility. and the Richard Henson Foundation. we suggest the Board consist of one representative from NASA. This information is from their website at www. This structure is similar to two other entrepreneurial and educational initiatives established recently. Initially. 2) a technology-enhanced educational center . the Board of Directors will elect a Vice Chairperson and Treasurer on an annual basis. the Marine Science Consortium. this might make sense. Since the Workforce Development and Education Center would involve educational institutions from both Virginia and Maryland.crossroadsva. Northrop Grumman.including high-demand technical Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 12 . The Advisory Board would meet quarterly with the Governing Board and advise the Board on any and all matters the Board might feel it needs guidance or assistance. If that were to happen. Lockheed Martin). • one established at The Crossroads Institute.

the constituent higher education institutions and technology employers grow in number. Steps to Follow to Make Center a Reality As mentioned earlier. the Board may wish to review who the current stakeholders are at that time and may wish to review the structure.” Every two years. Fowlkes began working on the concept of a higher education center in southwest Virginia in 1991. she was able to build the coalition of support necessary within the Virginia legislature. Our partner universities and colleges currently offer over 60 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in addition to many certificate programs. Virginia. Dr. with one elected representative from each group as members of the Workforce Development and Education Center Board of Directors. 1998. Rachel Fowlkes. an ideal location. Peterson had a rather lengthy discussion with Dr.swcenter.• curricula and occupational programs for high school and college students. at some point in time. approximately 700 students are enrolled in a variety of courses involving ten public and private higher education institutions. For the next four years. workforce and corporate training as well as a convention center/exhibition hall. Stakeholders must be patient in the beginning and not try to do too many things at once and allow the Center to be developed in a phased in process. GED. founder and current Executive Director of the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center located in Abingdon. In 1996. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 13 . She developed the partnerships necessary with area institutions of higher learning to provide the necessary courses of education programs and courses of instruction. 3) a continuing education center for workforce skills including literacy. Construction was completed and the newly built Center building was opened in January. 2007. The Center was created in 1992 by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia with an initial appropriation of $50. The southwest Virginia area is somewhat similar to the eastern shore area of Virginia in that it is rural and economically depressed. with renewed funding for planning each year. Dr. the timetable for making the Workforce Development and Education Center a reality will need to span up to 10 years. and possibly even more.edu.000 for planning. From their website at www. XIII. Virginia. “the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center (SVHEC) provides a state-of-the-art facility. If. it may be wise to consider an advisory board structure for those two groups. Fowlkes was able to obtain funding through the Virginia legislature for the building of the Center and construction began on the Center. and an outstanding staff to support its mission of education and regional economic development. Dr. She also worked with these higher education institutions in planning the design of a building to house the Center. in the Fall Semester. Nearly ten years later. transfer programs and a university center.” one established at the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center in Abington.

Prior to 2001. and Radford University) offering courses at the Center. Fowlkes identified four keys to what she felt contributed to the success of the SWVHEC program: • Hiring of a point person early on who is familiar with higher education and state funding of education. Virginia Intermont University.500 for the current fiscal year. She emphasized area state legislators need to be involved on the governing board. separate from the providing institutions. 2) furniture manufacturing. This aids in being able to receive moneys from the state legislature. It is up to each University to recruit enough students to make these lease payment financially viable. University of Virginia at Wise. Oliver McBride. and 3) textiles. Virginia. the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center charged a lease fee of $50. and who is willing to stick with developing the program in the early stages. There is a private institution.For the fiscal year 2007-2008. Old Dominion University. Peterson also spoke with Dr. long distance telephone calls. copier. Ownership of the building and equipment within the building needs to be an independent organization. Dr. the governing boards consists of 4 state house delegates appointed by the Speaker of the House and 2 state senate delegates appointed by the President of the Senate [the Lieutenant Governor]. There cannot be a lead institution. and Strong support of the Governing Board. Educational provider institutions must all be on equal grounds as far as access to the facility and must be willing to collaborate together early on. the SWVHEC is now starting to look into instituting a research and development phase concentrating on energy production utilizing coal and nuclear energy. which offers some classes at the Center and is being charged a lease fee of $24. etc. Virginia Technical Institute and State University. At SWVHEC.666 to each of the state institutions (University of Virginia. each participating institution is charged for direct costs for items like postage. We see this aspect occurring in the initial phases of the Workforce Development and Education Center through the Wallops Research Park. who has a passion for this type of program. the Executive Director of the Crossroads Institute located in Galax. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 14 . In addition. This covers office space for each institution and usage of classrooms within the Center. even when things may appear to be very difficult. Dr. the geographic area surrounding Galax had three primary industries: 1) agriculture (much of it tobacco). • • • After being opened for ten years.

000 square feet. The facility consists of 4 regular classrooms. The Institute was incorporated in the Commonwealth of Virginia.including highdemand technical curricula and occupational programs for high school and college Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 15 . 2 electronic classrooms. the Crossroads Rural Entrepreneurial Institute houses three important elements: 1) the Southwest Regional Enterprise Center . Over the next 2-3 years.000 grant came from the Virginia Tobacco Fund $700.c. local and federal government agencies. There were 3 areas of focus for the Institute: • • • Business incubator Lifelong learning Technical and entrepreneurial studies To make the Institute a reality. A computer lab with 60 computers is available for public access. It applied for and received 501. and the employment futures of many of the residents were threatened. and physics courses taught at the facility and 2 classrooms for the LPN program. To address those needs. chemistry.3 status as a not-for-profit organization. was formed. the Institute purchased and renovated an old Lowe’s Home Improvement Center building which contained approximately 80. Through a unique partnership composed of educational institutions and economic developers. an umbrella organization called the Crossroads Rural Entrepreneurial Institute. the following funds were secured for the Institute: • • • • $2 million initial funding grant came from the US Economic Development Administration $800. That person’s salary was paid by the community college. a business incubator. The building finally opened to the public in 2005. as well as state. The initial concept of the Crossroads Institute was developed in 2001 as a result of the following identified needs related to providing residents with skills that would ensure their employability: • • • a career/technical education center at the local school system.a mixed-use business incubator facility including business assistance and consulting services.The region began experiencing a significant decline in each of these industrial areas.2 million loan from the Federal Rural Development Authority Using those funds. 2) a technology-enhanced educational center . Virginia $2. There is also space that is utilized by a call center that takes up a sizable portion of the building. and space for Wytheville Community College to offer classes to residents of Carroll and Grayson counties. 1 wet lab used for biology. a staff member from Wytheville Community College served in the initial stages as Executive Director and worked to secure funding.000 grant came from Community Development Block Grant funding through the City of Galax. Inc.

long distance telephone calls. Currently. etc. two representatives from the area community college (including its President). HVAC. which is something the area has never had. two county commissioners from each of the three counties served by the Institute. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 16 . approximately 250-300 FTE students are attending classes held by the community college and adult education. a representative from the Center for Technology & Entrepreneurial Studies.000. comes from the balance of some of the grant funding received earlier. copier. the superintendents of the two local school system. The charges for classroom space can vary from semester depending on the number of classes offered and the sizes of classrooms used.000. The balance. 2006. and the Executive Director of the Institute. etc. and entrepreneurial studies courses. It is used quite frequently. electrical. plumbing. It is very much a regional center as it also houses Virginia’s Director of Entrepreneurial Development and the Virginia Small Business Development Corporation for the region.25 per square foot for office space assigned. The Institute is governed by a 14 member Board consisting of a representative from the City of Galax. At the Institute member institutions offering classes at the site are charged a lease fee of $6. The call center employs slightly more than 100 people total. technical. GED. the local public school system and Wytheville Community College who use the space for the lifelong learning. Businesses which participate in the incubator space are charged $10 per square foot per annum for the space each occupies. These classes make up approximately 60% of the rental income for the facility. and consists of the majority of the income for the rest of the facility. Approximately 50 people are involved in construction trades training (carpentry. transfer programs and a university center. Each institution is charged for direct costs for items like postage.students. about $50. One of the tenants in the incubator is a catering business that provides lunches at a small cafe in the facility and caters meals for conferences held in the facility. Since December. The facility’s current annual budget is approximately $600.. workforce and corporate training as well as a convention center/exhibition hall. with at least one event being held at least one-half to two-thirds of the days the facility is open. There are 9 tenants in the business incubator. a representative from the Southwest Regional Enterprise Center. 3) a continuing education center for workforce skills including literacy. About $550. Additionally each institution is charged a pro-rata fee based upon the percentage of classroom space each occupies for classes which are offered.. The facility also serves as a conference center. a regional call center has leased some space which provides some additional rental income.000 comes from leases with the persons using the incubator space. down from 14 a few months ago.) and are involved through TRADAC funding.

spoke with pride as he described the Institute having grown out of grass roots into a self supporting and self sufficient organization.Dr. The combined populations of the two areas are both around 50. McBride was asked if he was familiar with the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center and he said he was.3 entity dependent upon grant funding. There were many similarities in the Crossroads Institute region being served and the Accomack County region. They are taking courses in political science. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 17 .c. one is a Virginia resident who pays the instate tuition rate of $304 per credit hour and one is a Maryland resident and pays the out of state tuition rate.000. McBride. economics. one a state agency and one a 501. He identified the following four areas as key to the success of the Institute: • It was a regional effort • They have always had a “can do” spirit • Everyone felt any and all ideas and opportunities were possible • Through drive and determination they could always make things happen. education and business. The Institute’s philosophy has always been to create as many doors to come into its facility as possible. Dr. Both students are enrolled in the master’s degree program in Engineering Management. The types of educational programs being offered or proposed being offered at the northern Accomack County site are quite similar. Of the 2 graduate students. history. Phase I (2008) Old Dominion University's TELETECHNET Distance Learning currently has a site through an arrangement with the Navy at Wallops Island. ODU has been offering courses at the Cropper Center located in the Navy Welfare and Recreation Building just off-site from the NASA Wallops facility. English. Both the Crossroads Institute and the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center are regional centers. Both are highly rural and economically depressed. The classes being beamed are part of ODU’s state wide network and are available to all community colleges within the Commonwealth of Virginia. This semester there are 8 undergraduate and 2 graduate students taking courses which are beamed to a satellite receiver and then transmitted into one of two rooms where students come to take classes. his comment was the SWVHEC had more money and a better looking building. the Executive Director of the Institute. mathematics. When asked to compare the differences in the two operations. No other fees are charge to the students other than tuition. The “can do” spirit and attitudes are prevalent at both locations. The 8 undergraduate students are all Virginia residents and each pays $206 per credit hour.

That 14 would include students at the Workforce Development and Education Center site and at the Melfa site. Typically. business incubator. Virginia campus. The students at the Workforce Development and Education Center would be charged the same tuition and fees as students at the Melfa campus. Phase II (2008-2012) Funding will need to be secured (possibly through the Virginia DHCD) to pay for a Center director/manager to be hired to begin the ground work to make the Center a reality.) of the Center director/ manager for the first 1-4 years. and business administration. etc. travel. and local contractors to begin offering the master and/or doctorate program in Engineering Management through Old Dominion University. that person would oversee the initial construction and programming for the Center’s activities. it takes about a minimum of 14 students enrolled in a course for it to make. Graduate course offerings would be expanded to other graduate programs to include aerospace. Once the Center director/manager is hired. The aviation technology and Aircraft Maintenance Technician Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 18 . and Delaware Technical and Community College to the pointof-presence location near NASA Wallops and then connect from there to the temporary site in an existing facility at NASA Wallops. Funds should include moneys for operating costs (telephone. A search for and hiring of the Center director/manager should be conducted early on. ESCC would rely on enrollments to cover the cost of the courses offered. University of Maryland-Eastern Shore. ODU is losing money with the arrangement at Wallops and it would take a total of about 30 students for the University to break even. Set up a broadband connection from Wor-Wic Community College. and workforce development and education center. all which would be offered through distance learning. We recommend Eastern Shore Community College coordinate efforts early on to recruit students from companies and organizations already located at the NASA Flight Facility.ODU pays rent to Eastern Shore Community College for the space it is using. under the governing board’s direction and authority. According to Nancy Collins. This is a very important hire. Cheryl Thompson-Stacey has indicated ESCC would offer at the Workforce Development and Education Center duplicate classes already offered at the Melfa. Additional funding would be needed to begin the engineering and architectural drawings for the building to house the Research Park. ESCC would receive subsidies from the Commonwealth of Virginia based on the FTE generated. It does not pay rent for the Cropper Center space. electrical engineering. The governing board should conduct a thorough search to make sure the right person with the right background is identified. Dr. There would not be any extra subsidies charged to the students. ODU’s on-site person at Eastern Shore Community College. office supplies and equipment. the US Navy.

a kitchen could be added to the Center and be used to provide lunches and to do catering for conferences held at the Center. we see the Workforce Development and Education Center expanding its program offerings to include electronic and IT technician training. electronic and IT technician. Through the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore.(AMT) programs through Delaware Technical and Community College and University of Maryland-Eastern Shore would be started in conjunction with internship opportunities at BaySys and other employers. as was done at the Crossroads Institute. customized networking systems and information security. and workforce development and education center. and staff hired for operation of the Research Park. nursing dental and physician assistants. Perhaps later. and medical and health sciences training at all levels including emergency medical technician. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 19 . equipment purchased. home and convalescent care. equipment. Following the short term successes from earlier programs. Through either Eastern Shore Community College or WorWic Community College. Phase III (2010-2012) Funds would be raised for the construction of the building. business incubator. Microsoft Windows and Office certification. Unmanned Aerial Systems education and training should also be started. Work would begin on completing the engineering and architectural drawings for the building. Phase IV (2012-13) Building would be constructed. and psychological and substance abuse clinicians should be offered. we saw culinary arts students taking the traditional liberal arts courses via distance learning (probably through ESCC). Short term certificate programs would begin to be offered in the following areas: • Travel and tourism • Customer service • Banking and finance • Truck driver training • Culinary arts Initially. Facility would be opened. and operating costs. and then driving to the Wor-Wic Community College Campus (less than an hour away from where the Workforce Development and Education Center would be located) for the Culinary Arts courses.

and doctoral levels. master. and possibly Pennsylvania to have access to the building. plumbing. we see numerous opportunities for the development of seamless educational pathways for technical careers at the certificate. Maryland. XIV. flooring and other related construction skills to provide needed skill sets for area employers • Other related technician programs to serve the area’s aerospace and engineering employers Phase VI (2012-2017) As companies and organizations begin full utilization of the Research Park and the business incubators. Delaware. All expressed a keen desire to be a part of the facility.Phase V (2013-2017) At this point the Center should begin offering training and certification programs in: • Computer training at all levels • Avionics/airway sciences • Fiber optics and electronic communications • Construction/contractor programs to include carpentry. People would not have to go through the security gate making access to the building far easier. baccalaureate. the President and Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs of Wor-Wic Community College. and possibly the Marine Science Consortium. and the Chair of the Department of Engineering & Aviation Sciences at the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore. the US Navy. All of these people expressed and high degree of interest and support for the Workforce Development and Education Center. masonry. NOAA. associate. the facility would serve as a conference center for the Flight Facility. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 20 . the Research Park. hvac. tiling. Additionally. Advantages The Wallops Flight Facility offers a large area of restricted air space which would be used for a number of research and development applications unique to the aerospace industry. We met with the President of Eastern Shore Community College. Having the facility serve as a regional workforce development and education center will allow existing educational resources in Virginia. The location of the proposed facility near to but off-site of the existing Wallops Flight Facility provides a more convenient access to outside groups who may be involved in the use of the facility. electrical.

” 12 percent said “maybe if training programs were available. We caution against using what we call the “Field of Dreams” approach—a philosophy that would use a “build it and they will come” approach. the financial viability of individual education and training programs must be considered in order to get area educational institutions to participate in providing educational offerings at the Workforce Development and Education Center. XV. Concerns and Cautions The pace and scale of the growth for the Workforce Development and Education Center is very difficult to predict. engineering or aerospace industries. 33 percent said “maybe if the pay and position fit their needs.” and 27 percent reported no interest at all. the success of the Center is highly in question. That is why it is very important in the beginning to have someone on-site early on to be the “champion” of the Center and to be the “shepherd” in securing funding and guiding the progress of the Center from concept to finished product. and the critical development of automated vehicle systems all coming together to make this a very exciting operation. These three areas are all inter-related. though. The Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center has over 700. leaving little or no extra dollars available for the Center. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 21 . but these moneys fall far short of the total amounts needed. We would not call this a rousing interest among people needing employment willing to be trained to develop new skills. as was noted earlier in this report. If the participating educational institutions cannot at least operate at a break-even level. The Commonwealth of Virginia has some moneys which could be used for the startup of this project. Federal.” 16 percent said simply “maybe. and without all of the components starting at the same time and being successful. The growth of the Workforce Development and Education Center will be highly affected by the development of the Wallops Research Park and the success of the business incubators. The big questions are “Who are ‘they’?” and “Will ‘they’ come?” Surveys conducted of unemployed people seeking jobs asked about their interest in the aviation. It will take the combinations of the Research Park growing and developing. We believe in 3-5 years the number of 250 students would be conceivable. Only 9 percent indicated they were interested in changing careers. they cannot be expected to be a long-term participant. and county budgets are already set through much of 2008. The Crossroads Institute has about 250-300 students currently participating in programs. business incubators producing viable companies who hire employees. Again. so much is dependent on the development of the Research Park and the business incubators and the development of automated vehicle systems. state.However.

Do you first establish training for area worker so they can acquire the skills necessary to attract employers to the area or do you need to attract employers with jobs needing specific skills to entice the area workers to upgrade their skills for those jobs? Based on the educational demographics of the current population. all parties involved must realize this is not a “slam dunk” program and will require the coordinated effort and support of all. and Pennsylvania. A great deal of creativity will be needed in how to fund this venture using moneys from these five sources. and the states of Maryland. especially since some state entities may have to spend money in a facility not located in their respective states. All of the resources (educational institutions. This is quite a unique project as it involves cooperative efforts among the federal government. Feasibility of Project The major underlying question related to this entire project is “Is this concept feasible?” Our answer to this question is yes. The concept is a laudable one and the potential outcomes and benefits from establishing the Research Park. You also would be having Maryland and Delaware educational institutions offering education and training programs in Virginia. may have a definite impact on the ability to carry out this project. the business incubators. shared a long term vision of this project developing into creating a “Silicon Valley” for aerospace and marine research and development for the region. the Commonwealth of Virginia. and the workforce development and education center are certainly needed and would greatly aid the region. it may be difficult to get workers to acquire skills for jobs for which they might not be immediately employed. However. Being a regional center provides some challenges as you would be utilizing educational institutions in two states and the situation of charging tuition for in-state and out-of-state students becomes an issue. Delaware. It would be beneficial if agreements can be made among the various states so students participating in these regional education programs can be charged in-state tuition. and local businesses) in the area with whom we spoke or who answered surveys were excited about participating in the project. That coupled with anticipated “tight” budgets at the federal and state levels.There is also a concern to what we are calling the “chicken or the egg” situation. government entities. Most. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 22 . XVI. if not all.

Manufacturing employs 17 percent of the workforce. only 25 percent of residents in the Accomack County. or other professional occupations. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 23 . respectively.XVIII. while retail trade and leisure/ hospitality industries employ 11 and 10 percent of the county residents. as compared with more than 38 percent statewide. business. As demonstrated by Table I below. Virginia area are employed in management. financial. Appendix Workforce Data Collected (data on pages 19 – 24 provided by Bay Area Economics) Residents in the eastern shore regions of Virginia and Maryland are more likely to be “blue collar” workers than their counterparts in other areas of Virginia and Maryland.

many people who had full-time jobs who had their own part-time business on the side or who worked a second job. Many residents are limited to part-time jobs. compared to 3.6 percent nationally. There is extensive underemployment of persons in the area with the majority of residents working in sales. we found during our visit. Additionally.Unemployed Workforce Slightly more that 4 percent of county residents were unemployed in 2006. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 24 .0 percent statewide and 4. services and lowskilled production and material moving jobs.

58.Unemployed workers in Accomack County are somewhat younger than those throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia.6% of the county’s unemployed are between the ages of 25-44. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 25 . One-quarter of the county’s unemployed workforce have less than a high school diploma. In fact.

None comes from information industries and only 5% were from professional or technical service industries.In looking at unemployed residents by industry. 17% of the county’s unemployed residents were the manufacturing sector. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 26 . and nearly 10% from construction. 10% from the health care and social assistance sector.

office and administrative support occupations. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 27 .When looking at unemployed residents by occupation. sales. and transportation and material moving occupations. construction. education. many of the persons had worked in the building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations.

Education and Training Eleven percent of the county residents have less than a 9th grade education and nearly 19% have a 9th to 12th grade education. Additionally. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 28 . but this is roughly one-half the statewide rate. almost 15% have a Bachelor’s degree or higher education. but no diploma. which is much higher than the statewide rate.

For admission as a regular graduate student. if their native language is not English.S. This remedial plan will include the undergraduate course work required to prepare the student for graduate work in the shortest possible time. Those applicants with an aggregate score above 1800 will automatically be considered for possible financial support. Structural Dynamics. and who shows evidence of improvement may be admitted as a provisional student.) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. structural mechanics and controls. the undergraduate program must have included the subject matter prerequisite for graduate study in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics.00 or higher.University of Maryland-Eastern Shore Masters and Doctoral Programs in Aerospace Engineering Graduate Programs Aerospace Engineering involves the solution of complex multidisciplinary problems associated with aerospace vehicles and systems. or those with engineering degrees other than aerospace. spacecraft systems.D) Experimental Methods offers a solid foundation in advanced topics in the areas of aerodynamics. and many other problems in addition to the traditional areas of aeronautics and astronautics. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from ODU.The following degree programs in Aerospace Engineering are offered: • • • Master of Engineering (M. as summarized below. .00 (4. For those applicants with nonengineering degrees. high-speed ground vehicles. a remedial study plan may be designed for an applicant by the GPD upon the applicant's request. must submit scores Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 29 . and analytical) from their Graduate Record Examination (GRE). In other cases.) Master of Science (M.1 Admission To qualify for admission. Students focus in two of four specialty areas offered (Applied Automatic Control. International students. 2. such as civil structural engineering. or with exceptional academic achievements.S. Aerodynamics and Design of Experiments) leading to emphasis areas such as . the applicant must have earned an undergraduate degree from an accredited university in aerospace engineering. mechanical or engineering mechanics. or a related field. quantitative. All students must submit scores (verbal.E. The GPD may waive the GRE requirement for applicants holding B. development and testing.75 overall GPA. wind tunnel testing and aircraft systems test and evaluation This program is meant to prepare students to be immediately productive in the real world environment of research. An applicant with an overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 3. as described in the University Catalog. engineering mechanics.75 in the major.00 and a grade point average in the major of at least 3. coupled with hands-on experience with state of the art test and measurement equipment. An applicant with at least a 2. Degree Requirements . noise or flow control. an applicant must first meet the general University admission requirements.00 scale) may be admitted as a regular student. mechanical engineering. Provisional students are automatically transferred to regular status after the completion of 12 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 3. physics or mathematics. More informationabout the Aerospace Engineering program is available.Master's Degrees 3.

Form AE #3 indicating the planned program of study for the Master's degree should be submitted to the GPD before the end of the student's first semester in the Department. robotics. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 30 . The writing examination must be repeated until passed. Experimental Methods students have a different set of requirements. Master's students in the Aerospace Engineering Department must satisfy this requirement prior to the completion of 15 hours of course work by passing a writing examination prepared and administered through the Writing Center. fellowships.2. 3.from their Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). AE 606 (Applied Signal Processing) and AE 691 (Experimental Research Project). wind tunnel testing. The program of study listed is a tentative list of desired course work needed to meet degree requirements. A minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree is required. and the GPD. The MEXM program requires students to combine two of these specialty areas as part of the degree requirements. or by an additional selection. structural mechanics. as soon as possible. The entire program will be planned by the student under the guidance of the Faculty Advisor and the GPD.0).00) average and a minimum of 6 semester hours of thesis credit. the student's Faculty Advisor and the GPD. Aerospace Engineering students will now choose an emphasis area. All Master's degree students in aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics are required to take MATH 691 (Engineering Analysis I) and AE 601 (Theoretical Continuum Mechanics) as part of their core course requirements. 3. The remainder of the program will be selected primarily from the chosen emphasis area. chosen from the three currently offered: aerodynamics. either aerodynamics. structural dynamics and applied automatic controls. engineering mechanics or experimental methods. flight controls. research needs and student interest. The Master of Engineering degree requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work (with at least a B (3. etc. The GPD can serve as the student's advisor during the early portion of their program.3 Writing Proficiency It is the policy of the University that all graduate students demonstrate writing proficiency. These selections will complete the core course requirements. a student must meet the following requirements: 3. students must complete one course with heavy emphasis on computational methods. In this program.2 Requirements To qualify as a candidate for a Master of Science or Master of Engineering degree in aerospace engineering. structural mechanics. and dynamics and controls (see Section 7. Combinations lead to emphasis in areas such as spacecraft control. Engineering Mechanics students are required to take a minimum of one course in each of the three emphasis areas of aerodynamics.2 Course Work The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work beyond the bachelor's degree with at least a B (3. and aircraft design and aeroelasticity. however. according to the study plan developed by the student. 3. or dynamics and controls. and take the designated core course for that emphasis area (see Section 7. This will complete their core course requirements. Students should consult the Writing Exit Examination Guidelines available from the Writing Center.1 General All students will plan and execute their programs under the guidance of a Faculty Advisor. with the approval of the Faculty Advisor. students will gain a solid foundation in advanced topics in the areas of aerodynamics. Students having writing deficiencies may be required to participate in programs through the Writing Center to correct these deficiencies. Students must then take the required three courses in each of two specialty areas. structural mechanics and controls. Either by choice of these courses. the student should select a Faculty Advisor whose expertise coincides with their research and educational interests. A maximum of 6 semester hours may be derived from 500-level courses.2. An approved elective course completes the 30-hour program. International students must also submit a statement of adequate financial resources to cover their educational expenses.2. Students entering the Master of Engineering in Experimental Methods (MEXM) program are required to take AE 605 (Applied Engineering Analysis). This requirement is satisfied if the Department offers financial aid through teaching or research assistantships. noise control. This examination is administered several times each semester with the scheduled dates announced in each semester's schedule of classes pamphlet. coupled with hands-on experience with state-of-the-art test and measurement equipment. active flow control. Retesting is not required. Students with previous degrees from ODU will probably have already passed the Writing Exit Examination.00) average). the Director of the Experimental Methods Program. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required by the University. The entire program will be planned under the guidance of a faculty advisor. They must take an additional threehour course at the 600-level or above in mathematics or an approved equivalent in AE with heavy mathematical emphasis.0).

All students must submit scores (verbal. The 30 semester-hour requirement is thus met entirely by course work. or approved experts in the field of research. Students are only permitted two attempts at this examination. Master of Engineering students are required to pass a comprehensive. A one-page description of the proposed project should be submitted by the student with the Advisor's endorsement to the Director of the Experimental Methods Program for approval. a related branch of engineering or a closely related field. an applicant must first meet general University admission requirements. Projects should be planned such that the majority of the work can be completed in one semester.6 Project in Experimental Methods The project for the MEXM program (AE 691) is defined jointly by the student and their Advisor. A letter grade is assigned to the project by the student's Advisor. An applicant with an overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 3. In other cases. Before the end of the student's second semester in the Department. a remedial study plan may be designed by the GPD upon the applicant's request. As early as possible. For admission as a regular student.2. Form AE #3 should be submitted to the GPD. The Project Advisory Committee for students in the MEXM program is defined using Graduate Form 20 and consists of the Faculty Advisor and at least two other faculty members or approved experts in the field. Signatures of the Thesis Advisory Committee members indicate approval of the proposed work.1 Admission To qualify for admission.Doctoral Degrees 4.3. Graduate Form 23 should be submitted to the GPD with the appropriate signatures. At the beginning of the semester in which the student desires to take the Master's Comprehensive Examination. mechanical engineering. which are summarized below. Written reports of sufficient quality may form the basis of a submission to a technical conference or journal. The majority of committee members must always be full-time faculty members of the Department. a Thesis Advisory Committee should be formed (Graduate Form 20) consisting of the Faculty Advisor and at least two other faculty members.2. At the same time.25 and who shows evidence of improvement may be admitted as a provisional student. During their final semester. The GPD may waive the GRE requirement for applicants with Master's degrees in AE. EM or ME from ODU. For those applicants with degrees in fields other than aerospace engineering. All written reports will be archived by the Department.S. and analytical) from their Graduate Record Examination (GRE). mechanical engineering or engineering mechanics.00.2. an applicant with a GPA of a least 3. or for applicants with Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 31 .) degree in aerospace engineering and in engineering mechanics is a non-thesis degree. engineering mechanics. the applicant must have earned a Master's degree from an accredited institution in either aerospace engineering. Signature of the Faculty Advisor indicates approval of the proposed work. Students are transferred to regular status following completion of twelve semester hours of course work with a GPA of at least 3.00 scale at the Master's level may be admitted as a regular graduate student. 3. 3.50 on a 4. Students in this program identify a Master's Examination Committee and submit Graduate Form 22 to the GPD with the appropriate signatures. students should submit Form AE #5 listing their graduate courses which form the basis of the examination. The majority of committee members must always be full-time faculty members of the Department. The project will culminate in a written report in the format of a technical journal or conference paper and an oral presentation of the project and its findings. quantitative.4 Master's Thesis The Master of Science (M. However. previous course work should include the subject matter considered prerequisite for the doctoral program in either aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Before the end of the student's second semester in the Department. Graduate Form 20 should be completed and submitted to the GPD for approval.5 Master's Written Comprehensive Examination The Master of Engineering (M. Form AE #1 should be submitted to the GPD. Those applicants with an aggregate score above 1800 will be considered for possible financial support. written examination covering their program of study. Unsuccessful candidates are not eligible to transfer to the thesis option.) degree in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics is a research degree which requires a thesis. Graduate Form 20 should be completed and submitted to the GPD through the Director of the Experimental Methods Program for approval. The thesis constitutes six semester hours within the 30 semester-hour requirement. Master of Science students are required to pass an oral defense of their thesis at the conclusion of study.E. such as physics or mathematics. Degree Requirements .

structural mechanics or dynamics and controls). if appropriate. Doctoral students in the Department of Aerospace Engineering must satisfy this requirement prior to the advancement to Candidacy.2 Course Work As early as possible. 4. a student is paired with a Faculty Advisor when they are offered a graduate assistantship. intellectual commitment. 4. and aptitude are encouraged to pursue the degree. In this case.2. In most cases. Signatures of the Guidance Committee Members indicate approval of the planned program of study.1 General The applicant must have completed graduate-level course work that includes subject matter approximately equivalent to the Master's programs in Aerospace Engineering of Engineering Mechanics at Old Dominion University. Students with previous degrees from ODU will probably have already passed the Exit Writing Examination. This requirement is satisfied if the Department offers financial aid through teaching or research assistantships. a student must meet the following requirements: 4. Form AE #4 should be submitted to the GPD. D.exceptional academic achievements. Students must normally spend a minimum of one academic year as a full-time student in the program. International students must also submit a statement of adequate financial resources to cover their educational expenses.4 Preliminary Diagnostic Examination The purpose of the preliminary examination procedure is to provide an early screening for aspiring doctoral candidates so that: (i) those who have the necessary background. The program of study listed is a tentative list of desired course work needed to meet degree requirements. The student and the advisor are expected to work closely together and regularly update the guidance committee during the student's progression to doctoral candidacy. if their native language is not English. the Guidance Committee reviews the paper and provides recommendations regarding acceptance. must submit scores from their Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). However. The second option is to first-author a full-length paper in the format of a recognized technical journal.2. 4. At least three-fifths of the course work for the Doctoral degree should be 800-level courses. A minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate course work beyond the Master's degree must be included in the planned program. the student should select a Faculty Advisor whose expertise coincides with the student's educational and research interests.2. Engineering Mechanics students will be expected to select at least one course from each of the three main emphasis areas. During the first semester. each student must plan a complete program of course work designed to meet their academic and professional objectives. This requirement may also be satisfied while preparing the dissertation. The writing examination must be repeated until passed. Retesting is not required.) degree in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. chaired by the Advisor with at least two additional full-time faculty as members. Students having writing deficiencies may be required to participate in programs through the Writing Center to correct these deficiencies.g. This examination is administered several times each semester with the scheduled dates announced in each semester's schedule pamphlet. 4. fellowships. Exceptions may be approved for part-time students working in research laboratories in the Hampton Roads region. Aerospace Engineering students will be expected to concentrate in their chosen emphasis area (e. in one of three ways. Before the end of the student's first semester in the Department. Courses designated as part of the Master's core curricula will not normally be available for inclusion in the 24-hour course work requirement. the student is assigned a Guidance Committee. The first option is by passing a writing examination prepared and administered through the Writing Center. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required. The Aerospace Engineering Department requires that the student records of each doctoral student include documentation certifying that the student has participated in the Preliminary Diagnostic Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 32 .. aerodynamics. International students.2. Assisted by this Advisor. It is assumed that the student has a background in the core course topics and any deficiency will be discovered during the Preliminary Diagnostic Examination. research needs and student interest. guidance committee. A third option for students is to use their Research Skill report to meet this requirement. (ii) those who possess correctable deficiencies in their technical backgrounds can be informed and appropriate corrective actions taken. etc. preferably early in the first semester. and (iii) those who lack the necessary background and aptitude for doctoral-level study in the program will not be allowed to continue. and student.3 Writing Proficiency It is the policy of the University that all students demonstrate writing proficiency.2 Requirements To qualify as a candidate for a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. Students should consult the Writing Exit Examination Guidelines available from the Writing Center. The selection of course work is primarily the decision of the advisor. and 500-level courses are also not included.

4. which is distinct from the dissertation topic but fundamental to doctoral and postdoctoral research. All Ph. the Guidance Committee function is completed. this examination will still be administered as described in Section 6. The student is deficient in some indicated areas and must remove the deficiencies by a recommended procedure (this procedure may include re-examination in some areas and/or additional course work). This Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 33 . 4. such as French.2.D. or students may elect to be tested rather than take the courses. The Candidacy Qualifying Examination consists of two parts. and the Guidance Committee recommends remedial course work beyond the usual plan of study in cases of major weaknesses. The student is fully qualified to continue study within the Ph.D. and who have met the Research Skill and the Writing Proficiency requirements.5 Foreign Language / Research Skill Requirement Ph. Details of the foreign language requirements are described in the University Catalog.2.50. If students opt to take additional courses. 4.7). Evidence needed to support the indicated recommendation is obtained from the results of the Ph.D. A copy of the report will be filed with the student's Departmental records. iii. A Dissertation Committee should be composed of people who have significant knowledge related to the candidate's dissertation research. It is used primarily as a diagnostic examination. Students taking this examination should submit Form AE #5 early in the semester they plan to take the examination. part-oral Preliminary Diagnostic Examination during their first semester in the Ph.8 Dissertation Ph. program.2. Students may elect to take the core courses and hence be exempt from being tested in that area. Part-time students must take the exam before completing 9 credit hours. based on the submission of a 1-page proposal prepared and submitted by the student with the Advisor's endorsement. This form certifies that the student has participated in the Ph. Papers must be submitted to the Guidance Committee for approval. The student may also meet the Writing Proficiency requirement with this report. Students taking this examination should submit Form AE #5 early in the semester they plan to take the examination.Examination procedure. Students should seek advice from their Advisor or the GPD as to the tentative course offering schedule (see Appendix A) since these core courses are prerequisites for many courses. can be approved by the Guidance Committee and the GPD. The student is not qualified to continue in the degree program. candidates are expected to work with their Advisor to form their Dissertation Committee. This is a new committee formed to supervise the dissertation research. As soon as the student passes the Candidacy Qualifying Examination (both written and oral parts). Graduate Form 10 is used to report the results to the GPD and the Office of the Registrar. program. the student is admitted to candidacy. a written examination and an oral examination. The Preliminary Diagnostic Examination covers the Master's core curricula as well as the student's chosen emphasis area(s).D. and other students with exceptional academic records may submit a written request to seek exemption from the Preliminary Diagnostic Examination. ii. are eligible to take the Candidacy Qualifying Examination. Students who complete their Master's degree at ODU with a GPA above 3.6 Candidacy Qualifying Examination Students who have completed their plan of study or who are taking their last course(s). The findings of the approved research skill must be written as a report in the full-length-paper format of a recognized technical journal. or they are not allowed to continue in the program.D. Diagnostic Examination Procedure and is to indicate one of the following: i. a Dissertation Committee is formed (use Graduate Form 16). An alternative research skill. All full-time students are required to take a part-written. Students who do not complete the Preliminary Diagnostic Examination within their first year cannot be financially supported by the Department without Department Chair approval. Generally the chairman of the Guidance Committee continues to serve as the chairman of the Dissertation Committee. Preliminary Diagnostic Examination. D.7 Dissertation Committee and Dissertation Proposal After successfully passing the Candidacy Qualifying Examination. After the Dissertation Committee accepts the dissertation proposal. Graduate Form 10 is to be signed (approved) by the Committee and the Graduate Program Director. students are normally required to demonstrate reading knowledge of an approved foreign language which is not their native language (a language commonly used in scientific work. 4.5.2. German or Japanese).D. Students use Graduate Form 15 to request permission to take this exam. Students are normally given two opportunities to pass each part of the Candidacy Qualifying Examination. students must satisfy the Master's core course requirements either by taking the courses (in addition to the required 8 courses) or by passing the questions on the Preliminary Diagnostic Examination. The format of the dissertation proposal is set by the Advisor (see Section 6. Students must reach a satisfactory level of performance within two attempts.

AE 497. Lecture 3 hours. Analysis. Evaluation of flight vehicle configurations and missions. Prerequisites: ME 332. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. The dissertation must constitute a significant original contribution to the field. Lecture 3 hours. AE 403/503 Flight Mechanics. 604) if these courses were not included previously on the student's graduate examinations (Preliminary Diagnostic Exam and/or Candidacy Qualifying Exam). Viscous flow topics including boundary layers. 340. Control System Design and Application. flight and maneuver envelopes. Aircraft concepts including performance prediction and optimization. thin airfoil theory. 312.2. Basic principles of design. who must be a full-time faculty of the Department. Lecture 3 hours. Impact of aviation and space programs on the global society and economy. turboprop. statically indeterminate beams. separation and solution of aircraft equations of motion.committee consists of the Advisor. Fluid Dynamics and Aerodynamics. Industry/government oversight. 3 credits. Variable 1-3 credit hours. separation. Analysis of aircraft and space vehicle structural components. rate of deformation tensor. Propulsion Systems. Lecture 3 hours. D.including turbojet. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. conservation principles. Once the student arrives and meets with the Advisor. 3 credits. Space programs. and ramjet engines. 3 credits. finite wing theory and airfoil design will be discussed. The dissertation defense consists of two parts: an open presentation to the general public and a closed examination conducted by the Dissertation Committee. Prerequisites: ME 303. laboratory sessions on data acquisition. computer-aided design and implementation of practical control systems. Furthermore. at least two other full-time faculty members of the College. development. ME 436. The majority of the committee must be full-time faculty members of the Department. History of flight and evolution. Aerospace Structures. aircraft dynamics. analog and digital controllers. 603. Basic concepts and terminology of flight. program of study. AE 495. natural modes. Variable 1-3 credit hours. system identification. Prerequisite: Permission of the Chair. Prerequisites: ME 436. Lecture 3 hours. stream function. lift and drag. turbofan. Prerequisites: ME 312 or 414. design of stability augmentation and autopilot systems. students should thoroughly understand those differences and how they will impact course work requirements and graduate examinations. shear center and shear flow. Introduction to chemical rockets. operation and performance of propulsion systems . torsion. Courses Offered/Descriptions AE 300T Aerospace Technology and Its Impact. and steady flight performance. Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions. Students seeking this change will be re-examined in the Master's core course requirements (AE 601. and at least one expert from outside the Department. Changing from the Aerospace Engineering degree program to the Engineering Mechanics degree program is more difficult than the reverse. and shear on typical aerospace structural components. and turbulent flow. Prerequisite: Permission of the Chair. 4. AE 406/506. Current domestic and international aerospace programs. singularities. introduction to state space and digital control. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. AE 601. stress and strain tensors. Usually changes in a degree program are done before taking the Preliminary Diagnostic Examination. vorticity and circulation laws. 602. external flows. the student may seek to change degree programs within the Department. dynamic stability. who must be approved as an adjunct faculty by the Department. Inviscid flow concepts including: Euler equations. sensors and actuators. Effects of bending. AE 417/517. Lecture 3 hours. AE 420/520. 3 credits. Introduction to composite structures. Additional topics: longitudinal static stability and trim. Indicial notations and tensor calculus. 3 credits. ion and plasma thrusters. Since the degree programs offered by the Department have different requirements. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In addition. Lecture 3 hours. Safety and risk management. Individual analytical computational and/or experimental study selected by student. velocity potential. they must indicate a degree program (Aerospace Engineering or Engineering Mechanics). constitutive Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 34 . Introduction to typical aerospace structures. Consideration will be given as to whether the research has resulted in refereed publications during the course of the research. 3 credits. AE 438/538.9 Changing Degree Programs When students apply for admission to the AE graduate program and the University. The committee is expected to work closely with the candidate during the course of the research. Case studies in historical and contemporary topics and issues. these core engineering mechanics courses are in addition to the required 8 courses for the Ph. Prerequisites: AE 406. 3 credits.

Lecture 3 hours. Principle of virtual work. Euler limit equations. Dynamic testing. Coordinate transformation matrices. Prerequisites: AE 406 or 602. Lecture 3 hours. body oriented coordinates. Linear Stress. convergence. AE 620. (cross-listed with ME 606) AE 604. Flow quality. Nonintrusive methods. AE 603. unsteady boundary layers. Comprehensive examination of aerodynamic test facilities for use in subsonic. and sensors and transducers. AE 606. conformal mapping. Applied Engineering Analysis. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Simple applications. basics of finite volume methods. Fundamentals of Turbulence. model equations of hyperbolic. including multi-hole pressure probes and hot-wire anemometers. Lecture 3 hours. panel techniques. including extraction of aerodynamic parameters from flight test data. explicit and implicit schemes. Aerospace Test Facilities. finite-difference solutions. Conservation laws. beams. vortex and circulation theorems. Prerequisites: AE 601. Conservation laws for viscous and inviscid flows. thin airfoil theory. Wall and support interferences. Prerequisite: AE 602. 3 credits. transonic. Lecture 2 hours. nonlifting bodies. Computational Fluid Dynamics I. supersonic and transonic flows. Laboratory 2 hours. stability analysis. and real-time control of electro-mechanical systems. fast Fourier transforms. slender bodies of revolution flows. MATH 691. buckling and vibration problems. curvilinear coordinates. Lagrange's Equations of Motion. applied automatic control and aerodynamics. finite difference methods. Elementary missile dynamics. supersonic. superposition of singularities. Approximate methods of solution. efficiency. Lecture 3 hours. consistency. AE 612. Review of flight test methods. Prerequisite: MATH 691. including cryogenic wind tunnels. 3 credits. Kolmogoroff scales. ordinary and partial differential equations. Advanced kinematics with moving reference frames. and velocity. introduction to unsteady flows. Corequisite: AE 612. statistical treatment of data. D'Alembert's principle. entropy production. Introduction to experimental measurements. AE 613. Applications to experimental modal analysis. 3 credits. 3 credits. AE 621. Lecture 3 hours. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 35 . Crocco's Theorem. wake and jet flows. Introduction to the statistical behavior of turbulence. AE 605. Applied Signal Processing. applications to bars. and hypersonic flow regimes. Applications of linear algebra. thermal and compressible boundary layers. Spectral analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Surface and stream flow visualization. Review of engine test facilities. Isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. and plates. Boundary Layer Theory. AE 611. Reynold's and Favre averaging. Introduction to turbulence modeling. transformations and finite-difference solutions. Governing equation for supersonic flows. 3 credits. Green's theorem.and three-dimensional potential flows with applications to airfoils and wings. 3 credits. AE 622. 3 credits. Supersonic Aerodynamics. 3 credits. (cross-listed with ME 607) AE 602. separations. Two. Concepts of energy and variational methods. Corequisite: MATH 691. first and second-order small disturbance theory. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics. Turbulence scales. Review of ground test facilities for space structures and other space systems. Experiment control. including Laser Doppler Velocimetry and other optical methods. Aspects of wind tunnel design and operation. Probe methods. Lecture 3 hours. Subsonic Flow. Mixing length theories. exact solutions to inviscid equations. conical flows. method of matched asymptotic expansions. Surface measurements. Two-point correlations. Analytical Dynamics of Aerospace Vehicles. Lecture 3 hours. experimental aerodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. AE 611. Classification of single PDE's. Lecture 3 hours. digital filters. digital signal processing methods. full potential equation. and complex variables to engineering problems in structural dynamics. Corequisite: MATH 691. Experimental Fluid Mechanics. airfoil flows. Prerequisite: AE 602 or 406. Euler equations of motion. variational principles of structural mechanics. lifting line and lifting surface theories. Analytical and numerical solutions of viscous flow problems. parabolic and elliptic type. Hamilton's principle. 3 Credits. Castigliano's Theorems. Techniques for static and dynamic measurement of pressure. wing flows. central and upwind schemes. Introduction to hydrodynamic stability and turbulence. formulations of fluid mechanics and solid mechanics problems. Prerequisite: AE 602. formulation of fluid mechanics and aerodynamics problems. temperature. weak solutions of quasi-linear hyperbolic equations. Introduction to random processes. calculus of variations. adaptive wall test sections and magnetic suspension. Lecture 3 hours. AE 610. Advanced concepts. classification of PDE's governing subsonic. 3 credits.formulations for elastic solids and viscous fluids. Gyroscopic systems and gyroscopic instrument theory. Prerequisite: AE 602. Boundary layer equations. Energy and Variational Methods in Structural Mechanics.

flight and maneuver envelopes for vehicles in atmospheric flight. Real-time computer programming methods for control of electromechanical systems. Applications to isotropic and laminated plates. 3 credits. Venant warping. AE 650. cutouts and constraints. Lecture 3 hours. membrane analogy. Structural vibrations under combined loading. Cooperative Education. laboratory 2 hours. solutions and postprocessing. disks. 3 credits. event driven scheduling. Lecture 1 hour. Corequisite AE 438/538. Modern Control Theory. Prerequisite: MATH 691. data structures for real-time control. and propulsion characteristics. 2 credits. free and forced responses. Introduction to composite materials AE 634. A study of the flight performance of aerospace vehicles. Student participation for credit based on academic relevance of the work experience. Bending. laser vibrometers. design-oriented project work. criteria. shear. Lecture 3 hours. Finite element methods. centrifugal compressors and turbines. use of selected software commonly used by practitioners in industry. Applied Real-Time Control. thick-walled cylinders and various stress raiser problems. Navier and Levy solution procedures. Aircraft loads estimation. and assembly. interaction of digital computers with controlled processes. AE 630. Lecture 3 hours. Analysis of tapered beams with application to fuselages and wings. Prerequisite: AE 634. strain-displacement. 3 credits. Theory of Shells. Structural Vibrations. combustion chambers. timing and time interrupts. Natural modes of discrete and continuous systems. Lecture 3 hours. 1-3 credits. Stress functions Prandtl stress function. 3 credits. Experimental techniques and methods for structural dynamics and vibrating systems. Prerequisites: MATH 691 and AE 601. Theory of Plates. Experimental Structural Dynamics. beams. accelerometers. control of multiple independent processes. AE 671. Lecture 3 hours. AE 660. State feedback control design. ME 414 or AE 611. 3 credits. 3 credits. Membrane theory of shells. Thermodynamic cycles of aerospace propulsion systems. Lecture 3 hours. impact hammers. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Synchronous programming. discretization. Mathematical concepts of finite element analysis. General three-dimensional elasticity problems. research labs and academia for grid generation. 3 credits. compatibility. and shells. (cross-listed with ME 609). Applications to rods. Applications to 1-D and 2-D problems of engineering. AE 651. Introduction to non-linear vibrations. Computational Fluids Dynamics Laboratory. Open-ended. Theory of Elasticity. Introduction to methods of design and trajectory optimization. signal analyzers. assessment and post processing. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 2 hours. transform and wave solutions. Overview of fluids equations. Special topics include transonic stages. Available for pass/fail grading only. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. AE 633. Formulation of state space equations governing dynamics and stability of linear systems. State observers and estimators. Introduction to nonlinear theory. and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Buckling and vibration of plates. Applications to isotropic and laminated shells. Range. Design and performance of air intakes. or ME 607. plane engineering boundary-value problems for beams. Prerequisite: MATH 691. Prerequisite: AE 417. closed form and approximate methods. observability. stability. Shells of revolution. Prerequisite: MATH 691 and AE 603. . algorithms. Instrumentation selection and utilization including electrodynamic shakers. Aircraft Propulsion Systems. St. uncertainty. Laboratory 4 hours. rotor/fluid interaction. continuity. Prerequisites: AE406 or 602. axial compressors. Variational approach based on weak-form solutions to partial differential equations. AE 667. and force transducers. Demonstration of correlation and theoretical vibration topics for lumped and distributed systems undergoing free and forced motion. signal filters. Finite Element Analysis I. 3 credits. AE 641. discretization. 3 credits. Fluid flow in turbo machinery. propelling nozzles. Differential geometry and curvilinear coordinates. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites ME 404 and MATH 691. Equations of equilibrium. Controllability. AE 632. variable geometry nozzles. Optimal control methods. AE 631.AE 623. Review of aerodynamic. axial turbines. operator interfaces. 3 credits. Torsion of thin-walled sections. (cross-listed with ME 636). 3 credits. thin-walled cross sections. and constitutive equations using Airy and complex potential stress functions. Review of basic elasticity. Aerospace Vehicle Performance. AE 640. asynchronous signal processing. Theory of modal analysis and approximate methods for undamped and damped systems. Flight Vehicle Structural Analysis. The course includes laboratory experience using micro-computers to control electro-mechanical systems. plates. Time and frequency domain data acquisition. Prerequisite: MATH 691. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 36 . Basic concepts of interpolation functions. Prerequisite ME 436 or equivalent. and torsion of open and closed. Classical and higher-order theories of plates. Design and performance of launch vehicles. grid generation.

Prerequisite: MATH 691. hodograph equation. Kinetics of chemical reactions in homogeneous and surface processes. Experimental Research Project. Aerothermodynamics. unsteady separation. Forward flight aerodynamics & performance. boundary layer control. An independent laboratory experience in the area of either aerodynamics. 1 credit. minimization methods. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. stability of parallel flows. Nonlinear oscillations and waves. Prerequisite: AE 613. AE 697. linear stability analysis. data reduction. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Blade motion & rotor control. Numerical simulations. and low density effects. use of computational and visualization techniques for solving linear and nonlinear algebraic systems. plates and shells. Research leading to the Master of Science thesis. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. 3 credits. AE 714/814. transonic breakdown of linearized theory. Rotor dynamics & stability. Introduction to Computational Mechanics. Prerequisite: AE 611. Orr-Sommerfeld equations. Introduction to Rotorcraft Performance and Dynamics. subsonic. membranes. Individual analytical and/or experimental study selected by the student. and supersonic flows. AE 715/815. thermal instability. AE 682. Results will be reported in a format and quality similar to a technical conference paper. Two-equations models (k-epsilon). 3 credits. 3 credits. viscous. 612. AE 698. 3 credits. Radiation. Prerequisite: MATH 691. Thermal environment of high performance vehicles. unsteady motion of nonlifting bodies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Hover aerodynamics performance. Review of the basic laws. transonic expansion procedures. scattering and absorption of sound. Lecture 3 hours. oscillating flow in a pipe. integration. Prerequisite: AE 611.AE 681. Regular tutorials on recent topics of interest in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Supervised and approved by the advisor. Credit hours: Variable 1-3. Transition. Prerequisite: AE 611. similarity rules. periodic boundary layer flows. performance metrics for algorithms. oscillating finite wings. Lecture 3 hours. applications to aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics. Large-Eddy simulation. AE 690. Prerequisites: AE 610. Laboratory 6 hours. eigensolvers. Lecture 3 hours. unsteady transonic flows. Lecture 3 hours. Theoretical Acoustics. structural dynamics or applied automatic control. Reynold's stress transport models. AE 683. AE 691. Dimensionless forms and limiting cases. Aerospace Engineering Seminar. AE 712/812. Turbulence Modeling. transonic slender bodies. finite difference methods. AE 713/813. 3 credits. Lecture 1 hour. Matrix and symbolic computing systems. oscillating airfoils in incompressible. unsteady boundary layer flow in two-dimensional and axisymmetric flows. hypersonic flow past slender bodies with sharp and blunt leading edges. Unsteady Flow. Waves on flexible strings. 711. unsteady compressible boundary layers. AE 710/810. Lecture 3 hours. three-dimensional wings. 3 credits. Acoustics in moving media. and consideration of nonequilibrium phenomena in hypersonic flows. inviscid and viscous instability. and Control. unsteady motion of finite wings. Introduction to the linear theory of acoustics. Transonic Flow. ODE systems. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Modifications to governing equations. Acoustic wave motion in fluids. Introduction to rotorcraft. Prerequisite: FORTRAN or C experience. 3 credits. transonic far fields. Thesis Research in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Multiple temperature and relaxation models. Lecture 3 hours. regression analysis. Hypersonic bluntbody flows. AE 695. 611. Real gas. Hypersonic Flow. bars. arbitrary airfoil motion. transonic small disturbance theory. Equilibrium turbulence models. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites: AE 612. Coupling of acoustical systems. Singular surfaces under the Euler limit. 3 credits. Elements of supersonic combustion. 3 credits. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. transition to turbulence. relaxation schemes. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 37 . Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours. Compressible and non-equilibrium turbulence effects. non-linear stability analysis. Basic concepts of hydrodynamic stability. Auto rotation. Flow Stability. 3 credits. centrifugal instability. General considerations of hypersonic flow and similarity principles. AE 711/811. Lecture 3 hours.

Multiple degree-of-freedom systems. linear conventional/contemporary and frequency/time-domain techniques for control and guidance functions. Techniques of experimental modal analysis will be investigated including the application of Fast Fourier Transform methods to the structural dynamic measurement and mathematical modeling process. Structures with single degree -of-freedom. 650. 3 credits. Finite element analysis and composite structures. Nonlinear Systems in Aerospace Engineering. Application of variational methods to structural mechanics. and dual Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 38 . Conservative and nonconservative non-linear systems. Advanced computational procedures. Prerequisites: AE 634. grid generation. Parametrically excited systems. Equations of motion development and solution including inertia/gravitational/aerodynamic/propulsive loads.and subharmonic resonances. effects of nonlinearities. Bending. Stress-strain relations for a lamina. central difference schemes. introduction to multidisciplinary analysis. Applications to plate bending. Attitude dynamics including torque free. and TVD schemes. Approximate and finite element methods of solution. Solution methods for two. Prerequisites: AE 604. Laboratory 2 hours. Stability of Structures. Robot Analysis and Control. autocorrelation and spectral density. AE 761/861. Prerequisite: AE 650. AE 743/843. Super. proper experimental procedure for collection of quality data. 3 credits. 2 credits. Prerequisite: AE 720/820. AE 734/834. upwind flux-vector. Lecture 3 hours. Classification of systems of PDE's. Lecture 3 hours. initial-value propagation.AE 720/820. Principles governing the dynamics and control of vehicles in atmospheric flight. Micro-mechanical behavior of a lamina. Lecture 3 hours. Introduction to non-linear control. boundary conditions. Prerequisites: AE 601. mathematical nature of Euler equations. methods of multiple scales and averaging. Lecture 3 hours. Space Flight Dynamics and Control. Mechanics of Composite Structures. and vibration. and development of mathematical models from experimental data. and nonlinear simulation. linear longitudinal and lateral-directional motions. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE 601. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: AE 601. Lecture 3 hours.and three-dimensional thermoelastic problems. 3 credits. gain scheduling. AE 733/833. Prerequisite: AE 634. plates. AE 730/830. conservative form of the Navier-Stokes equations. failure theories. Orbital mechanics including elements. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of robotic servo mechanisms including drive and actuator dynamics. 3 credits. Principles governing the dynamics and control of vehicles in space flight. and small oscillations criteria for instability of equilibrium are applied to continuous and discrete systems. Qualitative analysis. Formulation of thermoelasticity problems for elastic materials. AE 732/832. Introduction to non-linear problems. Prerequisite: AE 601. inviscid flow using a central and upwind algorithm. Stationary random processes. Nonlinear formulations and solution strategies for static and transient problems. Structural Vibrations II. ergodic processes and temporal statistics. Estimating service life. validation with nonlinear simulation. 3 credits. Corequisite: AE 602. Computational Fluid Dynamics Project. Lambert boundary-value problem. Computational Fluid Dynamics II. buckling. decoupled transnational and attitude motions. Prerequisite: AE 641. Develop CFD codes for algebraic grid generation. 631. Computational and finite element methods. Prerequisite: AE 403. Self-sustained oscillations. Energy. AE 741/841. Key stateof-the-art motion and force control techniques. AE 750/850. axisymmetric/unsymmetric vehicles. AE 740/840. AE 760/860. perturbations. AE 721/821. 650. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. flux-difference. adjustments/transfers. and nonlinear trim and simulation. Introduction to nonlinear continuum mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Constitutive relations of a laminate. 603. 3 credits. Finite element formulations based on alternate variational principles. measurement and excitation methods. Experimental Modal Analysis. Atmospheric Flight Dynamics and Control. gravity moment. and vibration of laminated plates. Prerequisite: AE 640. Thermal Stress Analysis. applications to aerospace vehicles. Application to beams. Equations of motion development and solution including inertial/gravitational/propulsive loads. 3 credits. 3 credits. General finite element development procedures including symbolic computations. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. continuous systems. 3 credits. and shells. adjacent equilibrium. Introduction to nonlinear vibrations of structures. Prerequisite: AE 620. Response of multi-degree-of-freedom and continuous systems. Finite Element Analysis II. strings and plates. viscous flow using an upwindbiased/central algorithm. Flight control system design and analysis incorporating flying quality requirements. 603 and 740/840. Lecture 3 hours. buckling. Laboratory 4 hours. Buckling of bars. Laboratory demonstrations and student experiments will be performed using state-of-the-art equipment. Lecture 2 hours. finite volume schemes. 3 credits. AE 731/831. Finite Element Analysis III.

spinners. AE 898. Lecture 3 hours. Aircraft concepts including performance prediction and optimization. Aeroelasticity. testing techniques. generalized method. acoustic analogy. computational and/or experimental study selected by the student. 3 credits. 3 credits. Formulation of fluids/dynamics interaction. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. introduction to numerical simulation.. 3 credits. compressible flows. constraints. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. Perturbation Methods in Aerospace Engineering. Flight Mechanics. applications in vibrations and wave motion. decomposition. Unsteady aerodynamics. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Initial and boundary conditions. vibrations of nearly circular membranes. AE 795/895. analysisoptimization coupling. AE 770/870. two scales method. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Aeroelastic models and testing. surface and shape parameterization. sequential versus simultaneous solutions. and nonlinear phase-plane design using thrusters. Supervised and approved by the advisor. Application of boundary-layer techniques in estimating convective heat transfer for external. Introduction to aeroelasticity. Equations of aeroacoustic wave propagation. Prerequisite AE 720/820 or 740/840. Overview of radiation heat transfer considerations. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Lecture 3 hours. AE 783/883. moving grids. AE 780/880. Methods of averaging. canonical variables. duct acoustics. Aerodynamic Design Optimization. scaling laws. formulation of fluid/structure interaction. Multidisciplinary Problems in Aerospace Engineering. discrete sensitivities. Credit hours: Variable 1-9. Prerequisite: AE 634. and design of stability augmentation and autopilot systems. control reversal. flight and maneuver envelopes. initial and boundary conditions. 2D incompressible flow. natural frequencies and modeshapes. formulations of fluid/dynamics/control interaction. dynamic response. effects of uniform and nonuniform flow. finite burns. derivative expansion. AE 781/881. development. control theory and variational sensitivities. frames of reference. Prerequisite AE 611. KB and KBM methods. Additional topics: longitudinal static stability and trim. and optimization. 3 credits. and steady flight performance. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. solvability conditions. sensors and actuators. Finite element formulation of heat conduction problems in aerospace structures. general fourth-order P. boundary conditions and time-series analysis. Lecture 3 hours. frame of reference. generalized interaction problems. separation and solution of aircraft equations of motion. methods of solution. Old Dominion University Batten College of Engineering Graduate Courses for Master and Doctorate Programs Course Prefixes Aerospace Engineering–AE Civil and Environmental Engineering — CEE Electrical and Computer Engineering — ECE Engineering — ENGN Engineering Management — ENMA Civil Engineering Technology — CET Electrical Engineering Technology — EET Mechanical Engineering Technology — MET Mechanical Engineering — ME Modeling and Simulation — MSIM Aerospace Engineering–AE 403/503. aircraft dynamics. AE 797/897. 3 credits. inverse methods. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian. Development of thermal analysis techniques for extracting heat flux estimates from tunnel data. 3 credits. Individual analytical. dynamic stability. Prerequisites: AE 406. 760/860. deforming grids. stochastic search methods. Lecture 3 hours. sensitivity analysis.Lecture 3 hours. Dissertation Research in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. natural modes. Aeroelastic phenomena. 3 credits.E. energy methods eigenvalue problems. AE 784/884. Static and dynamic loads. unconstrained minimization. Lecture 3 hours. flutter. Lecture 3 hours. linearization. AE 782/882. model design. methods of solution. Thermal Analysis of Aerospace Vehicles. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 39 . Flight control system design and analysis including impulsive velocities.D. Review of aerodynamic analysis. Dissertation research in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Prerequisites: AE 630. Aeroacoustics. 3 credits. 681. Method of multiple scales. Lambert targeting. 720/820. acoustic waves in ducts. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. divergence. 2-D subsonic and supersonic compressible flow. ME 436. linear design using momentum wheels. aerodynamics sources.

experimental aerodynamics. and real-time control. and complex variables to engineering problems in structural dynamics. applications to bars.and three-dimensional potential flows with applications to airfoils and wings. Inviscid flow concepts including: Euler equations. Indicial notations and tensor calculus. Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions. Two. Discussion of the optimization of high performance vehicle design for low drag and/or high down force and the facilities and techniques required. Introduction to chemical rockets. Lecture 3 hours. Lagrange’s Equations of Motion. Lecture 3 hours.406/506. Lecture 3 hours. correlation and regression analysis. Lecture 3 hours. (cross-listed with ME 407/507) 467/567. Prerequisites: ME 303. turboprop. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 332. Formulation of fluid problems. Simple applications. turbofan. conservation principles. Prerequisites: MATH 307 and PHYS 232N. Racecar Performance. 3 credits. Applications of linear algebra. Prerequisite: ME 312 or 414. one-factor experimental designs. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE 601. Signals and transforms for realtime systems. lift and drag. Review of basic fluid mechanics principles pertaining to the incompressible flow of air. and/or experimental study in an area selected by student. 417/517. Discussion of experimental and computational methods for evaluating vehicle aerodynamic performance. Supervised and approved by the advisor. ordinary and partial differential equations. ANOVA. 604. Laboratory testing via on-board instrumentation during skid pad and road course evaluation. Ground Vehicle Aerodynamics. Hamilton’s principle. tire selection and operating pressure on overall racecar performance and handling. fluid flow and thermal considerations in engine design and performance. Individual analytical. 3 credits. Applications to modal analysis. power and communications for spacecraft. rate of deformation tensor. variational principles of structural mechanics. Conservation laws for viscous and inviscid flows. Approximate methods of solution. Introduction to typical aerospace structures. High Performance Piston Engines. Basic principles of design. Boundary-layer approximations. fixed and random effects. torsion and shear on typical aerospace structural components. Overview of engine types and their operation. 603. Principle of virtual work. Lecture 2 hours. Analysis of aircraft and space vehicle structural components. 3 credits. Elementary missile dynamics. and turbulent flow. 3 credits. computational. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 420/520. separation. In addition. 601. Propulsion Systems. beams and plates. statically indeterminate beams. ideal and semi-empirical models of engine cycles. buckling and vibration problems. Introduction to applied statistics for engineers and experimenters. Linear stress. 606. Prerequisites: AE 407/507 and 457/557. 605. Lecture 3 hours. computer simulation to investigate various car setups. Introduction to spacecraft systems starting from mission design and space environment considerations and proceeding through propulsion. 350. shear center and shear flow. Self-similar solutions. production and performance (race car) automotive aerodynamics. Laboratory consists of various vehicle dynamics tests on model vehicles and full-size racecars. 602. and ramjet engines. 3 credits. 457/557. Application to aerospace testing. Lecture 3 hours. Corequisite: MATH 691. Aerospace Structures. 3 credits. control charts. Analytical and numerical solutions of viscous flow problems. Prerequisite: MATH 311. suspension system geometry adjustments. Lecture 2 hours. Lecture 3 hours. D’Alembert’s principle. Descriptive statistics for data analysis. altitude control. velocity potential. 472/572. Energy and Variational Methods in Structural Mechanics. Introduction to bluff body aerodynamics. thermal control. On-track performance of typical racecars (Legends and Baby Grand) to demonstrate and evaluate the interplay between vehicle aerodynamics. thin airfoil theory. Introduction to the aerodynamics of other surface vehicles such as sailboats and trains. Analytical Dynamics of AerospaceVehicles. external flows. singularities. 315 or MET 300. Introduction to hydrodynamic stability and turbulence. 340. Real-time Signals and Systems. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. engine design and operating parameters. 3 credits. Crosslisted with ME 607. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Advanced kinematics with moving reference frames. Analytical methods in vehicle dynamics. 3 credits. constitutive formulations for elastic solids and viscous fluids. Statistical Foundations for Experimenters. Euler equations of motion. Coordinate transformation matrices. Applied Engineering Analysis. laboratory 2 hours. applied automatic control and aerodynamics. combustion. Lecture and wind tunnel experiments. laboratory 3 hours. Laboratory evaluation of engine performance using flow and dynamometer systems. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites ME 312. Flight Vehicle Aerodynamics. as well as truck and bus aerodynamics. 1-3 credits. (cross-listed with MET 480) 495/595. Gyroscopic systems and gyroscopic instrument theory. 407/507. Cross-listed with ME 606. Introduction to Space Systems Engineering. A study of the fundamental principles and performance characteristics of spark ignition and diesel internal combustion engines. Motorsports Vehicle Dynamics. Lecture 3 hours. formulation of fluid mechanics and solid mechanics problems. Prerequisites: ME 205 and MATH 307. Lecture 2 hours. 312. Introduction to composite structures. Viscous flow topics including boundary layers. 497/597. strain and stress tensors. Lecture 3 hours. operation and performance of propulsion systems – including turbojet. frequency distributions and sampling. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Prerequisite: ME 303 or MET 330 or CEE 330. Concepts of energy and variational methods. 3 credits. 3 credits. laboratory 2 hours. 440/540. vorticity and circulation laws. spacecraft structural design. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 40 . Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. introduction to probability. 477/577. 3 credits. 3 credits. Castigliano’s Theorems. Effects of bending. multiple comparisons. 1-3 credits. Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals of one and two sample problems. Fluid Dynamics and Aerodynamics. ion and plasma thrusters. Basic mechanics governing vehicle dynamic performance. calculus of variations. Lecture 3 hours. finite wing theory and airfoil design will be discussed. stream function.

Prerequisite: MATH 691. Applications to isotropic shells. Applications to isotropic and orthotropic plates. Wall and support interferences. 634. Flight Vehicle Structural Analysis. Lecture 1 hour. Introduction to state-space. supersonic and hypersonic flow regimes. Prerequisite: AE 634. Data analysis for improving engine. Dynamic model development. Hydraulic electro-hydraulic and electric actuators. Applications to rods. plates and shells. wing flows. Governing equation for supersonic flow. Stress functions. 640. 3 credits. Air-Data systems. Lecture 3 hours. Aircraft loads estimation. full potential equation. 647. Lecture 3 hours. Performance Sensors and Analysis. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 41 . Classical and high-order theories of plates. Theory of modal analysis and approximate methods for undamped and damped systems. slender bodies of revolution flows. Inertial navigation systems and satellite navigation systems. and velocity. including extraction of aerodynamic parameters from flight test data. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Supersonic Aerodynamics. Racecar Structures and Materials Design.and second-order small disturbance theory. Prerequisite: ME 436. Modern design of experiments and use of advanced diagnostic methods. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 662. 3 credits. terminology and axis system. Natural modes of discrete and continuous systems. Analysis of tapered beams with application to fuselages and wings. Prerequisites: AE 406 or 602. Prerequisites: AE 406 or 602. Controllability. Aerospace Structures. 3 credits. 3 credits. impact hammers. Review of flight test methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics I. Aspects of wind tunnel design and operation. transonic. and post-processing. Review of engine test facilities. Experimental Aerodynamics. laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: ME 436. Lecture 3 hours. and driver performance. parabolic and elliptic type. Stiffness and crashworthiness influence on design. Crocco’s Theorem entropy production. Development of mathematical models from experimental data. continuity. State feedback control design. 660. Navier and Levy solution procedures. 3 credits. Computer-aided analysis and design of practical control systems.611. Lecture 3 hours. free and forced responses. analog control. A study of the flight performance of aerospace vehicles. Flight Control Actuators and Sensors. Review of basic elasticity. thin-walled cross sections. design-oriented project work. Prerequisite: AE 602. Experimental Structural Dynamics. Applications to 1-D and 2-D problems of engineering. and telemetry devices. Modern Control Theory. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Comprehensive examination of aerodynamic test facilities for use in subsonic. Experiment control. Prerequisites: MATH 691 and ME 404. 3 credits. Variational approach based on weak-form solutions to partial differential equations. Lecture 1. finite difference methods. logger units. 633. supersonic and transonic flows. Materials properties and selection criteria and process. Laboratory sessions on aliasing. 3 credits. 650. Control jets and momentum wheels. Prerequisite: AE 407/507. 622. Small-scale tests of models and full scale test of characteristic vehicles. first. and real-time control. system identification. statistical treatment of data. laboratory 2 hours. Lecture 3 hours. adaptive wall test sections and magnetic suspension. ECE 461 or equivalent. Design and performance of launch vehicles. classification of PDEs governing subsonic. chassis. wiring. Review of ground test facilities for space structures and other space systems. 637. connections. Surface measurements. laboratory 6 hours. ME 414 or AE 611. Relevance of tire performance to overall vehicle performance. Lecture 1 hour. Structural Vibrations I. Fabrication methods. laser vibrometers. discretization and assembly. shear. Classification of single PDE’s. and simulation. (cross-listed with CEE 716/816 and ME 635) 641. Dynamic testing. including multi-hole pressure probes and hot-wire anemometers. Euler limit equations. Prerequisite: AE 457/557. Lecture 3 hours. membrane analogy. efficiency. Techniques for static and dynamic measurement of pressure. consistency. AE 611 or ME 414. analysis. cutouts. Lecture 2 hours. observability. Prerequisite: AE 605 or MATH 691. Review of aerodynamic and propulsion characteristics. 3 credits. signal analyzers. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. flight and maneuver envelopes for vehicles in atmospheric flight. Finite element methods. Prerequisites: AE 403. weak solutions of quasi-linear hyperbolic equations. 621. Finite Element Analysis I. Applied Analog and Digital Control. Mathematical concepts of finite element analysis. central and upwind schemes. 638. laboratory 4 hours. Surface and stream flow visualization. Flow quality. 3 credits. signal filters. end constraints. Structural vibrations under combined loading. conical flows. accelerometers. 3 credits. Prandtl stress function. Empirical characterization of essential tire properties and discussion of tire construction. Accelerometers and rate gyros. Lecture 2 hours. Experimental techniques and methods for structural dynamics and modal analysis. 627. 3 credits. transform and wave solutions. Basic concepts of interpolation functions. and torsion of open and closed. digital signal processing and digital control. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. including Laser Doppler Velocimetry and other optical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 691. Differential geometry and curvilinear coordinates. Aerospace Test Facilities. Instrumentation utilization including electrodynamic shakers. Probe methods. stability analysis. 631. Range. Membrane theory of shells.5 hours. basics of finite volume methods. explicit and implicit schemes. airfoil flows. St. Cross-listed with ME 636. Advanced concepts. 438 and 604. convergence. 3 credits. 3 credits. Optimal control methods. Aerospace Vehicle Performance. 657. closed form and approximate methods. Aerodynamics for Motorsports. Introduction to non-linear vibrations. Lecture 3 hours. Overview of governing principles and operations of actuator and sensor hardware used in aircraft and spacecraft flight control systems. Prerequisite: ME 440/540. Open-ended. model equations of hyperbolic. Lecture 3 hours. Tires and Brakes Performance. Introduction to composite materials. Time and frequency domain data acquisition. Venant warping. Nonintrusive methods. temperature. Formulation of state space equations governing dynamics and stability of linear systems. beams. and force transducers. including cryogenic wind tunnels. Nonlinear hardware characteristics and the influence on closed-loop vehicle behavior. Bending. Wind tunnel operations and test methods for aerodynamic evaluation and development of race cars. 3 credits. Cornering properties and friction circle. Introduction to methods of design and trajectory optimization. 620. assessment. 3 credits. Principles of installing sensors. State observers and estimators. Synthesis and analyses of complex structures that are characteristic of contemporary racecar design practices. Shells of revolution. laboratory 4 hours.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Develop group leadership skills and learn how to recognize and effectively use group dynamics in motor sports management. finite difference solutions. A systematic introduction to the foundation of Virtual Environments. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. upwind flux-vector. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Results will be reported in a format and quality similar to a technical conference paper. viscous and low density effects. Emphasis on teamwork and communications skills. Work or other professional career. Provides experience of working as part of a team to design a racecar or significant component to specific performance requirements. random and mixed effects in factorials. introduction to response surface methods. Experimental Research Project. including human perception. Lecture 3 hours. flux difference and TVD schemes. 1-3 credits. Unsteady motion of finite wings. dynamic response. Two-equations models (k-epsilon). residuals and modal adequacy checking. Lecture 3 hours. and consideration of non-equilibrium phenomena in hypersonic flows. 669. transonic slender bodies. 3 credits. Thesis Research in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Brief introductory content regarding project management and use of computer based tools. transformations and finite-difference solutions. Equilibrium turbulence models. Cooperative Education in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Aeroelastic phenomena. 1 credit. three dimensional wings. hodograph equation. 1-3 credits. method of matched asymptotic expansions. Internship in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. 692. Real gas. 2^k factorial and fractional factorial designs. unsteady transonic flows. laboratory 2 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE 611. 695. 1-6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. chassis geometry. Lecture 3 hours. Project will include fabrication and demonstration of goals. Lecture 1 hour. General consideration of hypersonic flow and similarity principles. Laboratory exercises use designed experiments applied to aerospace testing. Goals. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE 620. Lecture 3 hours. 687. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Reynold’s stress transport models. 1-6 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Turbulence Modeling. Micro-electrical-mechanical Systems (MEMS) control. boundary conditions. overview of Virtual Environments application areas. 709/809. and 634. Static and dynamic loads. 3 credits. Unsteady motion of non-lifting bodies. conservative form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Considers the matching of race car engines. Mixing length theories. 3 credits. Prerequisites: AE 602 and 709/809. structural dynamics or applied automatic control. Compressible and non-equilibrium turbulence effects. 698. Prerequisite: AE 602. 690. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Work or other professional career-related experience of a limited duration and highly applicable to aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Introduction to hydrodynamic stability and turbulence. Prerequisite: departmental approval required. Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity. transonic far fields. 3 credits. relaxation schemes. Classification of systems of PDE’s. optimization. transonic small disturbance theory. Flow transition control. Review of relevant statistics. flutter. 3 credits. wake and jet flows. Design of Experiments. Practicum in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. 6 credits. including cost and schedule goals. 672. Computational Fluid Dynamics II. Supervised and approved by the advisor. Future challenges. 699. 3 credits. Introduction and definitions. 3 credits. transmission gearing. similarity rules. 3 credits.related experience of a limited duration and highly applicable to aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. displays. 711/811. Lecture 2 hours. Lecture 3 hours. Master’s Project. Prerequisites: AE 602. Large-Eddy simulation. separations. ANOVA. 1-3 credits. Randomized complete block designs. grid generation. mathematical nature of Euler equations. 697. finite volume schemes. Oscillating airfoils in incompressible. Boundary-Layer Theory. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. An independent laboratory experience in the area of either aerodynamics. Regular tutorials on recent topics of interest in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Drivetrain Design and Performance. 3 credits. 684. Numerical simulations. factorial designs. Introduction to operation and design of high performance vehicle transmission and differential systems. Boundary layer equations. 691. Aerodynamic Flow Control. thermal and compressible boundary layers. Virtual and Synthetic Environments and Applications. Co-requisite: AE 602. hypersonic flow past slender bodies with sharp and blunt leading edges. Flow separation control. Work or other professional career. Formal experiment design. Drag reduction control techniques. Prerequisite: AE 472/572. transonic expansion procedures. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 3 credits. a course project on engineering or science applications. Laboratory 6 hours. Subsonic and supersonic flows. and track characteristics for best performance. interaction techniques. 611. Thesis research in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics leading to the Master of Science degree. Hypersonic Aerodynamics. computational and/or experimental study in an area selected by the student. Lecture 3 hours. Hypersonic blunt-body flow. Oscillating finite wings. 3 credits. Transonic Aerodynamics. Team Summary Project. 712/812. unsteady boundary layers. 710/810. 668. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 2 hours. Prerequisite: AE 611. 713/813. Isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. divergence. Prerequisite: AE 477/577.related experience of a limited duration and highly applicable to aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Aerospace Engineering Seminar. Team Dynamics and Leadership. Lecture 3 hours. body oriented coordinates. laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: AE 602 and 720/820. 720/820. Individual analytical. Demonstrations and simulations are experiential methods for student participation. software and design principles. central difference schemes. multiple comparisons. Lecture 3 hours. 677. 714/814. Arbitrary airfoil motion. 3 credits. including wind tunnel testing and instrument calibration. laboratory 3 hours. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 42 . transonic breakdown of linearized theory. Passive and active control methodologies and techniques. control reversal. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Singular surfaces under the Euler limit.667. finite difference methods. Lecture 2 hours.

Kinematics. Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization. ergodic processes and temporal statistics. Unconstrained minimization. Maxwell’s equations. Methods of solution. generalized method. and wave domain models for structural dynamics and control. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 43 . Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: AE 601. Autonomous and Robotic System Analysis and Control. Lecture 3 hours. Equations of aero-acoustic wave propagation. Laboratory exercises include RSM applied to wind tunnel testing and optimization. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Hoo. introduction to numerical simulation. Constraints. 784/884. control of waves in structures. and nonlinear phase-plane design using thrusters. Method of multiple scales. Prerequisites: AE 403. Review of multivariable dynamic math models including state space. Theory and application of multivariable control design techniques including LQR/LQG/LTR. Fundamentals of structural dynamics. applications in vibration and wave motion. Integration of spatial-temporal signal processing techniques. Empirical model building. Lambert targeting. and robustness. Passive and active magnetic suspension. buckling and vibration. and nonlinear trim and simulation. Response of multi-degree-of-freedom and continuous systems. nonlinear panel flutter. 650. Application to problems of large bending deflection. 3 credits. Micro-mechanical behavior of a lamina. Equations of motion development and solution including inertial/ gravitational/aerodynamic/propulsive loads. linear longitudinal and lateral-directional motions. Flight control system design and analysis incorporating flying quality requirements. Estimating service life. Formulation of fluid/dynamics/control interaction problems. Prerequisite: AE 611. boundary conditions and time-series analysis. Solution methods for two.731/831. Lambert boundary-value problem. dynamics and control of complex nonlinear electro-mechanical systems. Perturbation Methods in Aerospace Engineering. Applications to plate bending. and digital signal processing. distributed strain actuators-sensors. computational methods. Stationary random processes: autocorrelation and spectral density. Prerequisite: AE 601. solvability conditions. Feedforward-Feedback control. 3 credits. Equations of motion development and solution including inertial/ gravitational/propulsive loads. Approximate and finite element methods of solution. decoupled translational and attitude motions. finite burns. thermal post-buckling. initial-value propagation. 3 credits. robust design. Multivariable design criteria including stability. vibrations of nearly circular membranes. active control of structurally radiated sound. two scales method. method of least squares. magnetic materials. 763/863. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Magnetic Suspension Technology. controller design and implementation. low frequency approximations. gravity moment. plates. An applied course in response surface methodology with aerospace applications. Principles governing the dynamics and control of vehicles in space flight. gain scheduling. linear design using momentum wheels. Formulation of fluids/dynamics interaction problems. electromagnet design. electrodynamic levitation. buckling and vibration of laminated plates. and nonlinear random response. Constitutive relations of a laminate. 740/840. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: AE 640. acoustic waves in ducts. Lecture 3 hours. Sensors. Principles governing the dynamics and control of vehicles in atmospheric flight. power supplies. Eigen Space Assignment and other advanced methods. Lecture 3 hours. restrictions on randomization. Topics in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Classical and finite element analysis methods for nonlinear aerospace structures of beams. 780/880. Review of electromagnetic suspension and levitation systems. Thermal Stress Analysis. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: AE 650. Optimization and coupling. Space Flight Dynamics and Control. Prerequisites: AE 604. Mechanics of Composite Structures. 750/850. Frames of reference. Lecture 3 hours. performance. 733/833. Rotatable. 744/844. KB and KBM methods. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. axisymmetric/ unsymmetric vehicles. Attitude dynamics including torque free. Lecture 3 hours.and three-dimensional thermo-elastic problems. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian. Prerequisite: AE 672. and matrix fractions. methods of averaging. Finite element formulations based on alternate variational principles. stresses. Relationships between physical. linear conventional/contemporary and frequency/time-domain techniques for control and guidance functions. 734/834. Finite Element Analysis II. particularly robotic manipulators. Methods of solution. and nonlinear simulation. Orbital mechanics including elements. 3 credits. canonical analysis. 785/885. Bending. Prerequisites: AE 631 and 634. 3 credits. Response Surface Methodology. Aeroacoustics. aerodynamic sources. 3 credits. and dual spinners. Stress-strain relations for a lamina. and shallow shells. 760/860. 3 credits. multiple response optimization. derivative expansion. 3 credits. Computational and finite element methods. Introduction to non-linear problems. perturbations. 650. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. validation with nonlinear simulation. Earnshaw’s theorem. general fourth-order PDE. Initial and boundary conditions. adjustments/transfers. Structures with single degree-of-freedom. Lecture 3 hours. Magnetostatic and magnetodynamic modeling. forces and moments. Formulation of thermo-elasticity problems for elastic materials. 795/895. Method of steepest ascent. 732/832. linearization. Application of variational methods to structural mechanics. control systems. modal. Initial and boundary conditions. 3 credits. Advanced Control Methodologies. Prerequisites: AE 634 and 650. theory and implementation of active and passive vibration isolation systems. Structural Vibrations II. and smart materials. cuboidal and small run designs. duct acoustics. 761/861. Sensitivity analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Conventional and adaptive control methods applied to vibrating structural systems. Design optimality and efficiency metrics. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: AE 634. failure theories. model adequacy checking. 772/872. Nonlinear Aerospace Structures. Modeling and characterization of transduction devices. Introduction to nonlinear vibrations of structures. 783/883. second order models. 3 credits. acoustic analogy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. canonical variables. effects of uniform and non-uniform flow. Prerequisite: AE 720/820 or 740/840. Atmospheric Flight Dynamics and Control. 3 credits. large amplitude free vibration. Flight control system design and analysis including impulsive velocities. transfer function. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. Active Control of Structures. Lecture 3 hours. General finite element development procedures including symbolic computations.

applications of lasers in engineering. 458/558. VLANs. 3 credits. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. mean and standard derivations. technology. Modeling and Simulation Design Projects. model development. Emphasis is on gaining an understanding of networking design principles that entails all aspects of the network development life cycle. optical emitters. DC and RF glow discharges. This course is an extension of ECE 355 into a semester long project. electrotherapy. memories and input/output subsystems. traffic flow measurement and management. Digital Signal Processing I. instruction cycles. computational and/or experimental study in an area selected by the student. integrated services. discrete Fourier transforms. simulation verification and validation. The theory and design of p-n junction devices. Lecture and design 3 hours. 3 credits. WAN design. Stability. science and medicine. ultrashort electrical pulses for intracellular manipulation and the application of plasmas to biological systems will be covered. electrotherapy in wound healing In addition. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. z-transform analysis. Plasma Processing at the Nanoscale. A one-semester course covering the electrical properties of cells and tissues as well as the use of electricity and magnetism in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Kinetic theory of gases. etching. or 232N. (cross listed with MSIM 405/505) 406/506. A sequence of projects requiring the programming and integration of a micro-controller based system is conducted. Pole placement through state variable feedback. Optimal regulator design. Analysis and design of computer subsystems including central processing units. 112N. Optical Communications. Prerequisites: ECE 202 and 304. virtual and cache memories. Micro-controllers. and performance specifications. I/O interfacing. 1-9 credits. optical communication systems. Root locus. analog-to digital conversion (ADC). Lecture 3 hours. all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. optical fibers and receivers. and the design of simulation experiments. internetworking principles and design. Communication Systems. Prerequisite: ECE 202. and the general-purpose instrument bus (GPIB). defibrillation. components used in optical communication systems. Cascade and feedback compensation. 3 credits. This includes the methods of amplitude. Network Engineering and Design. (offered spring) 451/551. Laser and Laser Applications in Engineering. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites: undergraduate course in probability and statistics. data gathering. computer arithmetic. Important concepts include datapaths. Co-requisites: ECE 304 and 488. non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. the physics and design of rf antennas. computer literacy. 481/581. Solid State Electronics. Introduction to integrated circuits and microelectronics. Application of lasers in various areas of engineering will be addressed. electroporation. Project assignments require a microcontroller evaluation board and accessories supplied by the student. Prerequisites: ECE 313. Prerequisites: ECE 341. An introduction to computer architectures. design of hybrid IP networks. sputtering. Typical topics to be covered include electrocardiograpghy. 3 credits. Independent Study in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. sampling of continuous-time signals. 443/543. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. and interrupt management. (offered fall) 446/546. Computer interfacing using a graphical programming language with applications involving digital-to-analog conversion (DAC). Important statistical concepts. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. Basic concepts of information transmission using electrical signals and systems are covered. Supervised and approved by the advisor. 999. laboratory 2 hours. Topics include time domain analysis. bipolar transistors. 3 credits. Team projects consisting of the design and implementation of a complete simulation study. analog pulse and digital modulation. 382 and MATH 312. 3 credits. digital input output (DIO). A hands-on approach to microprocessor and peripheral system programming. verification and validation. sensitivity. MATH 200 or higher. Each project will require the development of all of the main components of a simulation study including problem formulation. Prerequisite: ECE 355 or permission of the instructor. cardiac pacing. 446/546. Lecture and design 3 hours. Dissertation research in aerospace engineering or engineering mechanics leading to the doctoral degree. Electrical and Computer Engineering — ECE 405/505. Analysis and design of control systems via frequency and time domain techniques. Lecture 3 hours. 478/578. simulate and analyze self-defined projects. Prerequisite: ECE 323. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 111N or higher. Prerequisite: ECE 241. 461/561. 3 credits. and unipolar devices. and documentation. modulators. and the power spectrum. Lecture 3 hours. differentiated vs. digital filter Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 44 . solutions of difference equations. introduction to rf communication. After successfully passing the candidacy examination. Introduction to Discrete Event Simulation. Prerequisites: ECE 313. 3 credits. Analysis of sampled data involving the use of the probability density function. The design of modulation systems and analysis of their performance in the presence of noise are also considered. Lecture 2 hours. 3 credits. 323 and 332. 899. Prerequisites: MATH 212 and PHYS 102N. pipelining. Prerequisite: ECE 202 or permission of the instructor. diffusion. and plasma deposition. simulation construction. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. experimentation and analysis. photonic devices. gas phase collisions. 3 credits. 3 credits. correlations. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 405/505. Electromagnetic waves. 474/574. The science and design of partially ionized plasma and plasma processing devices. A DES tool will be used to create. Aerospace Engineering 999. serial ports. Bode and Nyquist techniques. An introduction to the fundamentals of discrete event simulation(DES). Individual analytical. Instrumentation. Introduction to Bio-electrics. Dissertation Research in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. (Cross-listed with ENGN 454/554) 455/555. 472/572. 473/573. Topics include discrete event simulation methodology. Topics include interaction of light with matter. 454/554. phase. An introduction to the analysis and design of discrete time systems. 1 credit. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. including selection of input probability distribution and output data analysis are developed and applied. transport parameters. Automatic Control Systems. Topics include campus LAN models and design. Lecture 3 hours.797/897. direct memory access and controller design. Relevant aspects of laser engineering and design will be covered. Prerequisites: ECE 323 and MATH 312. Computer Architecture. development of simulation modes.

Prerequisites: ECE 241 and 313. Lecture 3 hours. CMOS performance optimization. Topics include top-down design approaches. Formal Methods in Computer System Design. 495/595. and parallel and distributed simulation systems. control circuit design. Prerequisite: ECE 323 or equivalent Review of electrostatic and magnetostatic concepts. resonant cavities. Statistical Analysis and Simulation. wireless standards. Topics include wireless networks. Available for pass/fail grading only. 3 credits. and application decomposition issues. 605 and high level programming. cellular systems. 1-3 credits. Advanced Bio-electrics. and random processes. Graduate Seminar. Prerequisites: ECE 451 and 481 or permission of instructor. Student participation for credit based on academic relevance of the work experience. depending upon the need to introduce special subjects to target specific areas of master’s-level specializations in electrical or computer engineering. 605.design. Students will report on a particular technique and team to implement a chosen system model. Lecture 1 hour. The goal of this course is to develop understanding of the various modeling paradigms appropriate for conducting digital computer simulation of many types of systems. Course focuses on using mathematics and logic to specify computer systems (hardware and software) and verify their functional correctness. 648. This course introduces methods for using high level hardware description language such as VHDL and/or Verilog for the design of digital architecture. random variables. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. VLSI System Design. laboratory 2 hours. 651. 643. This course will be offered as needed. dynamic CMOS logic. Practicum. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career related experience. hardware modeling techniques. cellular automata. and their engineering applications. mobile and satellite). Bond graphs. Current topic areas include LANs. optical wave guides. equalization. Prerequisites: ECE 355 and 455 or permission of the instructor. wireless systems (fixed and mobile). Prerequisite: graduate standing. MANs. system dynamics. Directed research for the master’s thesis. A focus is placed on the analysis of protocols at different layers. algorithmic and register level design. 668. Wireless Communications Networks. time varying field. Computer Architecture Design. propagation effects (fixed. 1 credit. 3 credits. modulation technologies. Lecture 3 hours. (offered fall) 482/582. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Engineering Systems Modeling. layout and design rules implementing logic circuits in CMOS. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree in physics. Topics in Electrical or Computer Engineering. low power design. Prerequisite: ECE 341. 3 credits. 731/831. 3 credits. (Cross-listed with ENGN 630) 642. The techniques and concepts discussed typically include concept graphs. Prerequisites: ECE 543. existing and future wireless systems (practical examples). biological and environmental fields. 496/596.this is an additional project in the organization. or biology. 667. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career related experience. and networking systems performance analysis. speech processing for wireless. Computer Networking. TCP/IP networks. Lecture 3 hours. network architectures. Bayesian nets. 1 to 3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Lsystems. 630. and design of asynchronous circuits. Markov models. Lecture 3 hours. Digital computer design principles. 1-3 credits. This class will cover necessary foundation and state-of-the-art application for wide area and local area wireless networks. Electromagnetism. transmission lines. This course is designed to provide undergraduate and graduate students in electrical and computer engineering the ability to design and synthesize VLSI chips using CMOS technology focusing towards the development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. Student is usually already employed . A one-semester course covering advanced topics in bio-electrics. Thesis. memory design. Prerequisite: ECE 443/543. The course will cover advanced applications of pulsed power and plasma in the medical. 699. numerical linear algebra and linear operator theory are used throughout. 652. such as Matlab. (cross listed with MSIM 605) 623. 3 credits. Meant to be used for one-time experience. 1-9 credits. Work may or may not be paid. synthesis methods. Advanced Digital Design. 601. Prerequisites: MATH 307 and one undergraduate course in probability or statistics. Maxwell’s equations. diversity and channel coding. 669. high performance processor design. This includes a review of probability spaces. 3 credits. Concepts from linear algebra. 741/841. and state variable representations of discrete time systems. Graduate seminar presentations concerning technical topics of current interest given by faculty and invited speakers. virtual prototyping. 3 credits. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Petri nets. Lecture 1 to 3 hours. Topics include introduction to design tools. 1-3 credits. An introduction to probabilistic and statistical techniques for analysis of signals and systems. Lecture 3 hours. design abstractions. Lecture 3 hours. Design. and ATM. Analysis and simulation of systems with random parameters and stochastic inputs are considered. A comprehensive introduction to the analysis of linear dynamical systems from an input-output and state space point of view. An emphasis is placed on super-scalar architectures focusing on the pipelining and out-of order instruction execution operations. Lecture 2 hours. Linear Systems. The course focuses on design of state-of-the-art computing systems. mobile communications. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Some elements of state feedback design and state estimation are also covered. Prerequisite: MATH 307. Lecture 3 hours. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. simple radiation systems. Cooperative Education. It will provide the basis for understanding the radio and infrastructure aspects of the wireless networks and Internet. and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education/Career Management program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. The course is based on the ISO (International Standard Organization) OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) reference model for computer networks. Prerequisites: MATH 307 and one course on probability or statistics. clocking strategies. specification. Lecture 3 hours. and verification of complex systems are Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 45 . engineering. 3 credits. Project is completed during the term. plane wave propagation in various media. Final design project is required. Extensive use of software simulations in a high-level language. Prerequisite: departmental approval. Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Prerequisite: departmental approval. Lecture 3 hours. design of high performance circuits. 3 credits. 695. criteria. Internship.

transport coefficients. considering advanced memory and pipelining design and performance. ATM networks. Prerequisites: ECE 461/561 and601. Prerequisite: ECE 478/578. 780/880. carrier lifetime. Lecture 3 hours. I/O and storage hierarchy. 745/845. Short laser pulse production. Non-linear processes include harmonic generation. examining concurrent processors. Theory. formal power series methods and differential geometric design techniques. Prerequisites: ECE 461/561 and 601. 748/848. Semiconductor Process Technology. Linear and non-linear laser plus propagation. oxidation. Interaction of radiation with matter. computer architectures. lithography. Prerequisite: ECE 472/572. and wireless sensor networks. Multivariable Control Systems. Lecture 3 hours. network programming. Lecture 3 hours. the root locus method. Machine Pattern Analysis. VLSI process integration. Vegard’s law. stability. Lecture 3 hours. The course will focus on the physics. Special topics include robust and optimal control. Prerequisites: ECE 605 and high level programming. Digital Image Processing. The course starts with a review of computer architecture from an analytical standpoint. spontaneous and stimulated emission. 3 credits. Current application of lasers in science and technology. Prerequisites: ECE 461/561. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: CS 665. analysis. types of plasma reactors. The main goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the use of plasmas in surface processing. deep level impurities. Lecture 3 hours. NERFETs and surface acoustic wave devices. circuit switched networks. and control of computer communication systems. 763/863. Distributed Computer Simulation. Lecture 3 hours. fundamental processes occurring at the plasma surface interface. This is an advanced level course in data communications. diagnostic assembly and packaging. Lecture 3 hours. threshold voltage. Fast Fourier Transforms. A focus is placed on the analysis. The course is completed with a comparison study of different design tradeoffs. Gain in a laser medium. diffusion. and design of nonlinear control systems. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Basic principles and strategies for pattern processing and recognition systems. Parametric and non-parametric techniques including Bayesian classifiers and neural networks. Topics include: Microwave IMPATTs and TEDs. elastic and inelastic collisions. semiconductor sensors and device noise analysis. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 46 . breakdown theory. 3 credits. 775/875. Both the frequency domain and state variable approaches are utilized. yield and reliability. Digital Signal Processing II. Prerequisite: ECE 473/573 or equivalent. Schottky barrier height. 3 credits. 762/862. Laser pumping schemes. absorption. Prerequisites: ECE 601 and 651. distribution functions and the Boltzmann equation. The basics of time management in sequential simulation are introduced. Topics include resistivity. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 642 or permission of instructor. dry etching. and state feedback. Prerequisite: ECE 472/572 or permission of the instructor. Concepts of scale and spatial frequency. Nonlinear Control Systems. Prerequisite: ECE 481/581 or equivalent. Semiconductor Characterization. and design of discrete-time and sampled data control systems. Image filtering in spatial and transform domains. Review of time domain and frequency domain analysis of discrete time signals and systems. and image segmentation for computer vision. A study of basic fault tolerant strategies will be discussed as well as performance metrics for fault tolerant systems. 3 credits. channel length. contact resistance. Prerequisite: ECE 573. 783/883. 747/847. 3 credits. and optical. and power spectral estimation. Analysis of linear and nonlinear decision function for pattern classification. 3 credits. Plasma Surface Engineering. 777/877. 782/882. mobility. Advanced Semiconductor Devices. Computer Communication Networks. 774/874. The course will focus on design of fault tolerant computing systems. 3 credits. modeling. overview of diagnostics techniques of surface structural. Lecture 3 hours.emphasized. 481/581 and 601. application for switches and gas lasers. from both a hardware and software point of view. Fault Tolerant Computing. oxide and interface trapped charge. carrier doping concentration. Topics include phase-plane analysis. solar cells and photovoltaic devices. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. operational principles. A comprehensive introduction to techniques applicable in control of complex systems with multiple inputs and outputs. etc. network security. network control and performance analysis. Conservative and optimistic approaches to distributed time management are covered. Topics include crystal growth and wafer preparation process including epitaxy. resonant tunneling diodes. inter-connection networks. 3 credits. series resistance. 3 credits. alloys and compound semiconductors. real-time systems and safety-critical systems. Principles and techniques of two dimensional processing of images. 772/872. An introduction to mathematical representation. design and fabrication of modern integrated circuits that consist of nano-scale devices and materials. Course focuses on time management in distributed computer simulation. Then the majority of the course is dedicated to parallel computing. 3 credits. multi-rate signal processing. Lecture 3 hours. 742/842. chemical and electronic probes will be given. Lecture 3 hours. and applications of advanced semiconductor devices relevant to microelectronics. Lecture 3 hours. Digital Control Systems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 473/573. Applications include image enhancement and restoration. recursive and non-recursive digital filter analysis and design. 766/866. shared memory multiprocessors. Advanced Gaseous Electronics. analysis. Mathematical representation. 3 credits. Elementary theory of gas discharges. ion implantation. electron density processes. optimal linear filters. High Performance Computer Architecture. 776/876. thin film deposition. Lyapunov stability theory for autonomous and non-autonomous systems. fluid equations. Topics include packet switched networks. Students will learn to use a specification language to define a system (both the specification and the design) and an associated semi-automated theorem prover to analyze certain properties of the system. modulations doped structures and bandgap engineering. This course focuses on the design and analysis of high performance computer architectures. Lecture 3 hours. Principles and Applications of Laser Engineering. wave mixing and Raman scattering. Topics will include coding theory. chemical and physical characterization. Introduction of basic methods for semiconductor material and device characterization. Trainable pattern classifiers with statistical data sets. Prerequisite: CS 665. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. Physical and chemical processes of plasmas of significance to material processing. frequency response methods. 779/879. image compressing. Prerequisites: ECE 481/581 or 782/882. Topics include transfer function and state space representations.

Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Prerequisite: departmental approval. Organizational Structure Models. system objectives. 605. 614. Global Engineering and Project Management. project management systems. Cost Estimating and Financial Analysis. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 47 . project monitoring and control. Program Capstone. queuing theory. Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Scientific sampling and control charting for quality assurance and control. inventory management. Emphasizes the design nature of systems engineering problem solving. Lecture 3 hours. queuing theory. 601. concepts and process of systems engineering. organizational transformation. life cycle. Lecture 3 hours. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. Exploration of the systems approach to planning. Prerequisite: ECE 451/551 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Introduces the principles. Basic Organizational Systems and Models emphasizing rational. Spectrum controls and error control: design of digital communication systems. 3 credits. This course allows students to develop specialized expertise by independent study (supervised by a faculty 899. encoding and decoding of information for efficient transmission noise rejection. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. Finance. 607. Ph. facilities location and analysis. control. Lecture 3 hours. Topics include strategic planning. 1 credit. Models will be drawn from a variety of areas including Marketing. investment decisions. Prerequisite: two semesters of college calculus. Directed research for the doctoral dissertation. 3 credits. 795/895. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing. Lecture 3 hours. 613. Studying how logistical decisions impact the performance of the firm and the entire supply chain. Examination of problem formulation. Case studies and a term project are required. 3 credits. structural. 3 credits. 1 credit. principles. 999. methods and tools for effective design and management of projects in global transnational technology-based organizations. Application of linear and nonlinear optimization techniques to managerial. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. 420/520. cost estimation and control. Lecture 3 hours. and Strategic and Operational Management. project selection. Major emphasis on contracts and liability. Lecture 3 hours. Topics include: optimization methods. 3 credits. forecasting. natural and open systems. Engineering Law. I/O Psychology. capital budgeting. and the evaluation of system alternatives. PSK and FSK. contextual nature of project management. design. A systems approach is taken in the examination of social. Prerequisite: departmental approval. Case studies. project knowledge. 3 credits. inventory analysis. financial reports and analysis. 610. Introduction to decision analysis and stochastic models. inventory management. planning. 3 credits. Written submission is required. Organizational Behavior Models. Stochastic Decision Methods. Focus areas will include strategic management. Prerequisite: ENMA 603 or equivalent. Operations Research. Lecture 3 hours. and organizational environments. analysis. Statistical Concepts in Engineering Management. project management evaluation and auditing. and search techniques. 3 credits. 3 credits. intended to fulfill the non-thesis Master’s Examination requirement. Prerequisite: ENMA 603. Project Management. After successfully passing the candidacy examination. The course includes case studies and/or a project. all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete. Modules covered include: History and Systems of Organizations and Management. Development of system requirements. 1-9 credits. This course introduces concepts of organizational management and leadership. Lecture 3 hours. The fundamental tools and techniques of project management. Introduction to Systems Engineering. Quality Systems Design. Dissertation Research. Comprehensive demonstration of the ME or MEM candidate’s competence in the fields covered by the program of study. QAM. Markov processes. Quality Deming's way. including accounting principles. 422/522. Lecture 3 hours. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. Digital Communications. role of the project manager. and interpretation as they apply to the study of complex systems. manufacturing. which are approached from a systems and complex systems perspective to explain the behavior of systems. risk and uncertainty in decision making. evaluation.D. Lecture 3 hours. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. and quality management problems. linear and other programming models. Analysis of Organizational Systems. procedural and environmental aspects that are of consequence to technical professionals and managers. This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts in the analysis of organizations. Introduction to the monetary aspects of engineering projects. Project organization. 3 credits. Basic legal concepts and procedures for understanding the implications of engineering management decisions. 3 credits. Electrical and Computer Engineering 999. network analysis. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 3 credits. digital base band modulation techniques including DAM. Integrated analysis of the process quality assurance and improvement function. dynamic programming. probabilistic inventory problems. Use of case studies and oral and written reports to reinforce course concepts. 604. operational. and information systems for supply chains. Lecture 3 hours.787/887. 603. Integration of Systems perspectives. 606. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of minimum of 18 credit hours in program of study. distribution and transportation networks. Foundation. Emphasis on: sensitivity analysis and duality. Engineering Management — ENMA 415/515. and leadership of projects in technology-based organizations. optimal detection of symbols and sequences. Organizational Behavior. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Organizational Systems Management. project risk and failure analysis. project life cycle. systems analysis. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. Monte Carlo simulation of dynamic systems. Introduction to concepts and tools in probability and statistics with applications to engineering design. 602. scheduling implementation. and includes case studies stressing realistic problems. Lecture 1 hour. 600. Prerequisite: junior standing. and logistical problems. depreciation. Optimization Models. Fundamental concepts of digital communication including: introduction to formal theoretic and signal space concepts. control and evaluation. Lecture 3 hours. scheduling. Deterministic and stochastic models for decision making. multi-criteria optimization.

oral presentation. Practicum. Systems Assessment and Audit. Special emphasis will be placed on knowledge generation and generalization systems. Supervised and approved by a faculty member with the approval of the graduate program director. 1-6 credits. 715/815. Reading and application of current research in the field is stressed. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. 697. Special emphasis on life cycle design for cost. operation. Economic Analysis of Capital Projects. A variety of research methodologies will be investigated. Case studies. Lecture 3 hours. methodologies. Crisis Project Management. Topics in Engineering Management. Lecture 3 hours. Allows students an opportunity to gain short-duration career-related experience. Independent Study in Engineering Management. 640. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career related experience. Internship. 717/817. This course examines a variety of systems engineering topics with emphasis on the development of the fundamentals of systems engineering. System Design or Redesign: Organization Change. ensuring the system is designed. Contact instructor for more details. 3 credits. Academic requirements will be established by the graduate program director and will vary with the amount of credit desired. handling and recovery. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. The student will develop an understanding of select systems models. The course focuses on the application of scientific and engineering efforts to transform an operational need into a defined system configuration through the interactive process of design. Lecture 3 hours. and planning for systems engineering and management. Prerequisite: ENMA 603 or equivalent. Topics include: complex and hierarchical Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 48 . cost risk analysis.the quality cost concept and economic aspects of quality decisions. and evaluation. 668. systems integration. The knowledge of programming and spreadsheets is expected. 3 credits. technology forecasting. Analysis of Complex Organizational Systems. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. Case studies. Lecture 3 hours. system and decision analysis. Emphasis on problem formulation. inherent design characteristics for system quality. systems engineering life-cycle methodologies and processes. 3 credits. utility theory. Prerequisite: ENMA 420/520. data analysis. Lecture 3 hours. techniques and constraints. Introduction to parametric cost modeling techniques and methodologies. This course is intended to prepare students to undertake substantiated. particularly theses or dissertations. Work may or may not be paid. Topics include capital budgeting techniques (including multiattribute decision making). 1-3 credits. Student participation for credit based on academic relevance of the work experience. sources of supporting data. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. test. Lecture 3 hours. Graduate level research colloquium examining the application of a systems perspective to design. This course provides further discussion of the role of systems engineering and integration in the development of complex systems of systems. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. and current research in engineering economics. criteria. Cost Engineering. The course will focus on the approaches necessary to integrate research intent. 3 credits. This course is an advanced treatment of economic analysis. Student is usually already employed . The models will be applied as tools for assessment. operation. Prerequisite: permission of graduate program director. Optimization Methods. 695/696. management and design of organizational systems. Lecture 3 hours. analysis. rigorous. 667. and evaluation of project knowledge systems. 714/814. Organizational Systems Mapping. Integrated Systems Engineering I. and design optimization on cost bases. Focus will be on developing models and their applications in different domains including manufacturing and service. Prerequisite: ENMA 600 or equivalent. This course examines the role and nature of systems engineering and management. Research paper required. Prerequisites: ENMA 601 and 604. Meant to be used for one-time experience. scholarly research. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. and support. literature review. and a course project. experimentation and accepted canons of research. Individual study selected by the student. problems. 701/801. 704/804. 699. Research Methods in Engineering Management. Project is completed during the term. It is specifically designed to provide the fundamental understanding of systems engineering and complex systems. 3 credits. 1-3 credits. Covers advanced methods in Operations Research and Optimization. 3 credits. Organization of the quality function for process quality improvement. Emphasis will be placed on the management of organizational level processes and activities related to crisis preparation. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. 721/821. and verification and validation. Prerequisite: ENMA 721 and permission of the graduate program director. This course examines organizations as complex systems. 3 credits. 3 credits. 3 credits.this is an additional project in the organization. 1-3 credits. Systems Analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Design of Project Knowledge Systems. Integrated Systems Engineering II. Research leading to a Master of Science thesis. Cooperative Education. 1-3 credits. Modules will include: Complex Systems Theory and Models. Available for pass/fail grading only. 641. proposal preparation. 700/800. 3 credits. 3 credits. generation and application of statistical relationships between life cycle costs and measurable attributes of complex systems. Graduate-level research colloquium examining the existing and potential role of project management approaches and analysis procedures in the handling of crisis-related activities. Case studies and a semester project. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management. Prerequisite: ENMA 640. Oral presentations and term project required. developed and implemented in accordance with the baseline. projects and research papers. Gap/Variance Analysis. problems and reports. Lecture 1-3 hours. 669. Case studies are used. Modern optimization tools will be used to implement models for case studies. 703/803. Enterprise and Complex System Dynamics. It is targeted at engineering managers who actively participate in the capital budgeting process and project justification. requirements development and management. quality function deployment. integrated schedule management and analysis. Prerequisite: ENMA 604 or equivalent. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the interdisciplinary aspects of systems development. 723/823. Topics include system architecture development. The use of system dynamics modeling and simulation in various enterprise and complex system application areas. Thesis. justification of new technologies.

reliability testing and modeling. Semester project. 899. Viscous flow topics include boundary layers. thin airfoil theory. software systems for requirements capture and control. 3 credits. Mechanical Engineering Power Systems Theory and Design. Dissertation Research. vulnerability and risk governance. Lecture 3 hours. Exact and approximate methods to find natural frequencies. and students. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. separation. and continuous systems.D. Systems of Systems Integration. use and analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Independent Study in Engineering Management. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Basic mechanics governing vehicle dynamic performance. Course encompasses fundamentals of heating." Off-line quality engineering and applied design-of-experiments methods. disfunctionality. multi-degree of freedom. Seminar. 751/851. and turbulent flow. Development of advanced methodologies. Lecture 3 hours. Motorsports Vehicle Dynamics. 1 credit. An examination of organizations as socio-technical systems. by use of complexity analysis. This course cannot replace any of the approved ME option courses. Robust Engineering Design. resilient design and management under normal and stress conditions. Prerequisite: ENMA 641. After successfully passing the candidacy examination. Semester project. Critical Infrastructure Systems. Analytical methods in vehicle dynamics. 413/513. system of systems.D. Supervised research prior to passing Ph. Research in Engineering Management. risk modeling. response surface methods. 771/871. Inviscid flow concepts including: Euler equations. Ph. the dynamics of growth. Lecture 3 hours. (cross-listed with AE 406/506) 407/507. A project is required. students focused on doctoral research. Approaches to the management of risk. tools for systems thinking. 3 credits. 3 credits. 888. Prerequisites: ME 312 and 315. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. A project is required. 1-12 credits. Prerequisites: ME 205. formulate problems. Adopting an agent based modeling approach under conditions of uncertainty. Lecture 3 hours. final delivery review. Requirements capture and resolution. Laboratory consists of various vehicle dynamics tests on model vehicles. researchers. Energy Conversion. 750/850. Performance analyses and design concepts of gas turbines. and model development. and heat exchangers. Case studies. magneto Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 49 . 999. full factorial and fractional factorial designs. 3 credits. 412/512. Lecture 3 hours. Robust design approach based on "Taguchi Methods. A systematic approach to basic principles of design. Topics in Engineering Management.D. Lecture 3 hours. modeling and simulation tools. Environmental Control. 3 credits. 796/896. 2 hours per week. The course is designed to enable engineers and engineering managers from all disciplines to recognize potential applications. 795/895. and cost estimation. topics. air conditioning. quality of work life. 797/897. including socio-technical approaches to design and management. 1-9 credits. combustion. 3 credits. 406/506. 1-3 credits. Baseline control during integration. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/520 or equivalent) is assumed. configuration management of requirements baselines. including stochastic dominance and multi-attribute methods. operation and analysis of thermoelectric. Prerequisites: ME 205 and MATH 307. economics and management of critical infrastructure systems. Vibrations. Prerequisites: ENMA 821 and permission of instructor. (cross-listed with AE 457/557) 411/511. A weekly exchange of ideas and issues between faculty and Ph. verification testing. how to write quality requirements. 220. Thermodynamic properties of gases and vapors relating to power generating devices. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. architecture frameworks and their comparisons. and thermodynamic principles. vorticity. Principles of participative design and decision making. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. extensions of decision analysis. 3 credits. Engineering principles as applied to the analysis and design of systems for automatically controlling man or machine environments. Mechanical Engineering — ME 404/504. Socio-technical Systems Design. architecture development. singularities. Prerequisite: ENMA 641. Independent study projects will be related to engineering management and completed under the supervision of a certified faculty member. and design of building energy systems. Introduction to the theory and practice of reliability engineering. failure data collection and analysis. stream function. external flows. Engineering Management 999. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management. all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Reliability and Maintainability. use of software packages. Prerequisite: ME 312. laboratory 3 hours. refrigeration. and analyze data. Lecture 3 hours. and 340 and MATH 312. photovoltaic. Prerequisites: ME 312 and 315. work-energy relations. integration testing prior to delivery. Introduction of relevant kinetic theory. malicious attacks and/or presence of natural perils. Discussion of research projects. plan experiments. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and graduate program director. 3 credits. scheduling. internal combustion engines.g.system dynamics. validation testing. Systems of Systems Design. Prerequisites: ENMA 821 and permission of graduate program director. 3 credits. Lecture 2 hours. Lecture 3 hours. candidacy exam. 3 credits. applications to project management. collective resource approaches to planning. threat analysis. Topics include scheduling. Reliability evaluation models and techniques. Risk Analysis. 724/824. and analysis of the results. and problems of Engineering Management faculty. probability assessment methods. ventilating. organizational ecology. dynamic/chaotic behavior. e. Prerequisites: ME 303. 1 credit. 728/828. semi-autonomous work groups. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENMA 601. mechanical system reliability. Seminar discussions and team projects. lift and drag. Topics include software tools for capturing requirements. finite wing theory. 312. Free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped. verification and validation. Fluid Dynamics and Aerodynamics. thermionic. and airfoil design will be discussed. 898. and circulation laws. baseline control. and 340. 743/843. 763/863. In addition. including issues of risk. Designed for advanced individualized study into an engineering management topic area. single-degree of freedom. solid state. velocity potential. steam power plants and heat exchanger equipment from theoretical and applied viewpoints. maintained systems. cryogenics. maintainability and availability.

Lecture 3 hours. 605. Castigliano’s Theorems. Basic concepts of finite element method. (Cross-listed with AE 601. Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering. (Cross-listed with AE 603. structure-property relationship in polymers. applications to engineering problems such as beam deflection. Basic principles of operation and performance of propulsion systems—including turbojet. Prerequisite: ME 315. super-elasticity. shock-expansion theory. 1-3 credits each semester. Lecture 3 hours. Energy and Variational Methods in Structural Mechanics. 332.Meyer expansions. Prerequisites: ME 315. and pipe networks. 416/516. Lecture 3 hours. method of weighted residuals. material selection criteria and procedures. Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 1-3 credits. fuel cell. Characteristics of metals.) 607. materials selection criteria and procedures. Introduction to Gas Dynamics. general considerations of fabrication and mechanical behavior. 495-496. Prerequisites: ME 201. Lecture 3 hours. Advanced Dynamics. Lecture 1. Linear stress. ceramics and composites. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH 691. 3 credits.5 hours. 431/531. 424/524. Corequisite: MATH 691. Environmental Effects on Materials. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. Lectures variable. Basic solar radiation processes on earth are followed by engineering analysis of collectors (flat-plate. and ramjet engines. inter-relationship among materials. Lecture 3 hours. 440/540. 3 credits. Analysis. 3 credits. energy storage methods. shape memory effect. Equations of equilibrium. Lecture 3 hours. 441. analysis and design. 3 credits. exact and approximate solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. thermoplastic and thermosets. strain displacement. different types of tests to determine mechanical properties. Rigorous development of the macroscopic theory of thermodynamics. Concepts of energy and variational methods. and plane elastic problems. Numerical methods for linear algebra eigenvalue problems. design and processing. service requirements. formulations of fluid mechanics and solid mechanics problems. Applications in mechanical engineering. flow around diamond shaped airfoils.hydrodynamic devices. high-temperature restraint polymers. etc. Indicial notations and tensor calculus. and gears. turbofan. Prerequisites: CS 150. laboratory 3 hours. numerical implementation of finite-element method. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisites: ME 201. 606. Prerequisites: ME 312 or 414/514. Lectures variable. design processes involving modeling. momentum and energy equations. boundary conditions. Prerequisites: ME 201. numerical and analytical solutions for some of the basic mechanisms.) 608. Lecture 3 hours. introduction to internal and rotational flows. and 340. integration. Prerequisite: MATH 316 or ME 340. 438/538. Degradation of metal due to corrosion. Lecture 3 hours. ion and plasma thrusters. relationship between structure and properties. (cross-listed with AE 602) 611. 3 credits. beams. 3 credits. ordinary and partial differential equations. and constitutive equations using Airy and complex potential stress functions. methods of calculating rolling and sliding velocities and accelerations of contacting bodies. Corequisite: MATH 691. 417/517. rate of deformation tensor. Prandtl. conservation principles. damage mechanisms in polymers. liquid metal embrittlement. 220. Lagranges equations and rigid body dynamics. and solar power generators. (Cross-listed with AE 630. compatibility. Theory of Elasticity. application to flows in pipes and blade passages. 609. summer) 595. stress and strain tensors. focusing. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 50 . 3 credits. flow in ducts with heating and cooling. Simple applications. ME 220 and MATH 312. permission of the chair is required. thick-walled cylinders and various stress raiser problems. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in mechanical engineering or engineering mechanics. 203 and 225. Prerequisites: ME 205 and 332 and MATH 312. Lecture 3 hours. buckling and vibration problems. Prerequisites: MATH 691 and AE 601. stress-corrosion. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing. such as crazing. Solar Power Engineering. ceramics. Torsion of thin walled sections. phase and chemical equilibria. Derivatives of vector functions and rotation frames of reference. 3 credits. Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions. calculus of variations. 414/514. space heating and cooling techniques. curve fitting optimization. Computer-Aided Design of Mechanical Systems.). constitutive formulations from elastic solids and viscous fluids. 3 credits. laboratory sessions on data acquisition. and 332. spring. 422/522. oblique shocks. and plates. Advanced Fluid Dynamics. polymers. polymers crystallinity. Course seeks to define engineering limits of converter efficiency and other performance criteria. and implementation of analog and digital controllers. Topics in Mechanical Engineering. and dynamic simulation. 3 credits. Basic relations necessary for analysis of plane motion mechanisms. Application to mechanical systems is emphasized with computer applications. 3 credits. cams. Prerequisites: ME 205 and MATH 312. Advanced Classical Thermodynamics. dealloying. 3 credits. plane engineering boundary value problems for beams. Prerequisites: ME 303 and 311. Co-requisite: MATH 691. systems design. 3 credits. heat conduction. applications to bars. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. turboprop. and wind tunnel mechanics. isotopic. Prerequisite: ME 436. 3 credits. introduction to turbulent flows. 3 credits. introduction to state-space and digital control. 426/526. Co-requisite: ME 332. flow in constant area ducts with friction. toughening mechanisms in ceramics. 203. structural basis for equations of state and general properties of matter. amorphous metals. Prerequisite: graduate standing. creep and combined creep and fatigue of metals. Typical case studies are beam and plate designs. disks. Modern Engineering Materials. 3 credits. One-dimensional compressible flow considering isentropic flow. dynamics of particles. Lecture 3 hours. analog-computing. Propulsion Systems. turbine blade design. normal shocks. Control System Design and Applications. General three-dimensional elasticity problems.) 610. Structure and Properties of Materials. Lecture 3 hours. variational principles of structural mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. computer-aided design and implementation of practical control systems. (offered fall. 3 credits. Advanced topics include: thermal stress analysis and plates and shells. or ME 607. interpolation functions. Lecture 3 hours. system identification. Limitations of conventional materials. differentiation. and verification.. 203. boundary-layer theory. Approximate methods of solution. Conservation laws of mass. an introduction to chemical rockets. radiation etc. and 225. receivers/boilers. Mechanisms Analysis and Design. Case studies are used to introduce students to CAD software. strengthening mechanisms in metals. effects of high and low temperatures on materials.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. and kinetic phenomena such as diffusion and nucleation applied to phase stability and transformations in solids. along with the application of materials and methods to prevent corrosion. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. Turbulent Flow I. Advanced Materials Science. power reactor control and kinetic behavior. principles and procedures related to analysis of stresses and strains in machine components. compressible boundary layer flows. 654. Formulation of state space equations governing dynamics and stability of linear systems. photo-elasticity theory and two-dimensional techniques. multiphase flows. modal coordinates. including safety coefficients. power plant waste-heat utilization. temperature control parameters. 3 credits. introduction to turbulence modeling. Concepts. State observers and estimators. Modern Control Theory. Basic turbulent flow concepts. Analytic and numerical solutions to steady and unsteady. observability. plasticity. boundary value and characteristic value problems. applications to boundary layers. number of parts to be produced. strain gage-based transducers. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. criteria for yielding. electrical resistance and semi-conductor strain gages. and three-dimensional problems. shear layers. eddy viscosity/diffusivity concept. It will cover the chemical and metallurgical processes occurring during corrosion. To demonstrate the solutions of (1-D and 2-D) continuum mechanics problems such as solid mechanics. (cross listed with AE 634/CEE 710/810) 632. Lecture 3 hours. directionally solidified composites. Theory of Vibrations. one-equation models. 3 credits. corrosion and radiation. strain crystallizing of polymers. life required. Real cycles. two-equation models. hodographs. 3 credits. 655. zero-equation models. 622. problems in laminar and turbulent boundary layers for incompressible and compressible flow. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. axial and centrifugal pumps and compressors. Finite Element Analysis I. Stress and strain tensors. special purpose strain gages. Practical and computer applications are incorporated. plumes. Co-requisite: MATH 691. and other types of corrosion related failure will be discussed. fluid mechanics and heat transfer. 621. Prerequisite: MATH 691. particulate composites. energy analysis. influence of high and low temperatures. 3 credits.614. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Theory and Design of Turbo-machines. internal flows in nozzles and diffusers. material selection. Corrosion of metals will be emphasized. stress gages. and separated flows. energy transfer in free convection. Energy Utilization and Conservation. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. axial and centrifugal turbines. Controllability. Thermodynamics of phase equilibria. 615. Prerequisite: ME 436 or equivalent. Nuclear Engineering. full potential equations. 3 credits. Introduction to the Theory of Plasticity. commercial. transfer functions in frequency domain. Principles of thermal and chemical refining processes. 3 credits. 3 credits. heat transfer in internal and external flow fields. incremental and boundary value problems. introduction to second-moment closures. design considerations. (cross-listed with AE 713/813) 646. 3 credits. fundamentals of metal castings including flow of molten metal and heat transfer during solidification. 644. compensation and principle stress separation methods. origin of turbulence. equations of elasticity. Lecture 3 hours. initial and subsequent yield surfaces. Co-requisite: ME 611. 651. Conduction Heat Transfer. Consideration of function of parts along with factors such as forces. Compressible Flow. 3 credits. maximum cost. fluid motion in Turbo-machines. organic fluid-bottoming cycle. modes of vibration of discrete systems. 619. short-fiber and continuous-fiber reinforced composites. experiments. Lecture 3 hours. 635. effects of processing on properties. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. composites. modeling melting and solidification processes. accumulative poisons. Lecture 3 hours. Corrosion of Materials. 3 credits. 3 credits. Nuclear power plant systems. shear gages. Stress corrosion cracking. kinematics. jets. strain gage circuits. (cross listed with AE 640 and CEE 716/816) 636. Lecture 3 hours. Macroscopic behavior of materials with respect to elasticity. but nonmetals (polymers. along with design of systems to minimize the effects of corrosion and make use of corrosion resistant materials in their production and development. fracture. 3 credits. two-dimensional compressible flow. Prerequisites: ME 414/514 and 610. primary and secondary plant as a transient system. Prerequisite: ME 610. State feedback control design. 3 credits. statistical theory of solid solutions. environmental restrictions. cavitation and two-phase flow considerations. plastic stress-strain relations. Lecture 3 hours. generalized quasi-1 D internal flows. Convection Heat Transfer. Prerequisites: ME 404/504 and MATH 691. Overview of scope of efficient energy utilization in industrial. performance and design criteria. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Conservation equations in compressible flows. small perturbation equations. 620. 3 credits. corrosion fatigue. Advanced Design. fluid-rotor energy transfer. Thermo-mechanical Processing of Materials.) 640. introduction to three dimensional flows. two-. etc. Prerequisites: ME 414 and 610. Lecture 3 hours. transonic stages. and power-generation fields. Prerequisites: ME 201. 203. Finite element analysis to illustrate different aspects of stress analysis. Lecture 3 hours. modes of vibration of continuous systems and approximate systems response. weight and space restrictions. wakes. 3 credits. 618. combustion chambers. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Brittle coatings. 623. Lecture 3 hours. one-. and visco-elasticity. Lecture 3 hours. This course covers the basics of corrosion theory and electrochemical foundation of corrosion processes. introduction to turbulence measurements. Prerequisite: ME 609 and permission of the instructor. To provide insight into the theoretical formulation and numerical implementation of finite element methods. Introduction to applied modal analysis. on-line computer evaluation. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 51 . combined gas and steam cycle. Conservation equations. Experimental Stress Analysis. yield criteria. Composite Materials. and ceramics) will be discussed. super-plastic forming of metals. basic plasticity experiments. total energy concept for residential and commercial buildings. extended surfaces. radial equilibrium. prediction of elastic failure properties. system management. Prerequisite: ME 610. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: MATH 692. matrices. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 650. Optimal control methods. theory of diffusers and nozzles. (Cross-listed with AE 650. district heating. transportation. Reinforcements. method of characteristics. and 225. To provide an understanding of the finite element method (FEM) as derived from an integral formulation perspective.

applications to fatigue life estimation. 1-3 credits. Numerical control. homogeneous. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Study of principles of concurrent engineering with emphasis on the design & manufacture interface for single products. and applications of reliability-based methods for engineering analysis and design. (available for pass/fail grading only) 699. Computer-integrated manufacturing. A Process Modeling project will be the key component of this course to reinforce the principles of Process Re-Engineering. multi-axial stresses. multi-component fluxes in terms of driving forces and phenomenological coefficients. Lecture 3 hours. A study of theoretical background. conservation equations for Multi-component systems. Student participation for credit based on academic relevance of the work experience. 3 credits. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours. Partial differential Statistics of distributions. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 436. Fatigue and Fracture. Prerequisite: ME 680 or permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours. Cooperative Education. and evaluation of the transport properties. ductile and brittle fracture. effect of mean stresses. Design of injection-molded and stamped parts for cost. Lecture 3 hours. Optimum solution for practical engineering systems. Programmable logic control. etc. (available for pass/fail grading only) 686. Lecture 3 hours. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 52 . 734/834. Current topics in Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Mechanics are reviewed. Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. moments of the Boltzmann equation. 3 credits. DADS. 3 credits. 669.this is an additional project in the organization. 3 credits. GENESIS and other commercially available software will be introduced. Prerequisites: ME 404/504 and 623. stress-controlled and strain-controlled fatigue. Lecture 3 hours. 742/842.and time-domain modal identification techniques with applications to different model structures. computational implementation. momentum. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management Center. An introduction to manage uncertainties and risk in strength design of mechanical components. 713/813. radiation in presence of other modes of energy transfer. Vectors and matrices. and energy transfer. Internship. Sensitivity analysis of discrete systems. Prerequisite: ME 644. Prerequisites: ME 611 and 618. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours. Robots and Manufacturing Automation. 706/806. Lecture 3 hours. component mode synthesis. dual methods for constrained optimization. Project(s) course to allow graduate students to complete a practical engineering assignment in design and manufacturing areas. Automatic production and assembly. Basic concepts in isotropic. 3 credits. 670. 692. multilevel optimization and recent developments in engineering optimization. Available for pass/fail grading only. Engineering Software for Computer-Aided Analysis and Design. Process Modeling and Re-Engineering. 1-3 credits. large eddy simulation. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in mechanical engineering or engineering mechanics. emitting. the Boltzmann equation and the collision integrals. Lecture 3 hours. Manufacturing processes. Student is usually already employed . 718/818. optimization decomposition. Master’s Project. investigation under the direction of the student’s major professor. Independent Study. kinematic analysis and design optimization. measurements and excitation techniques. Modal Analysis and Identification. Lecture 3 hours. 1-6 credits. 1-3 credits. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Testing of hypotheses and decisions.667. Logic control systems. 690. Case studies. approximate and advanced methods for radiation transfer analyses. PATRAN. diffusion in solids and in laminar and turbulent flows. direct parameter identification. Unconstrained and constrained nonlinear programming (NLP) problems. Theoretical basis of modal analysis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. fracture testing. Quality control. and wall turbulence. Practicum. Engineering Design with Uncertainties. 1-3 credits. Thesis. direct numerical simulation. 3 credits. Engineering Optimization II. 3 credits. 680. crack-tip plasticity. Concurrent Engineering. Supervised and approved by the advisor. Topics. 3 credits. 682. Prerequisite: graduate standing. free-shear. Mechanical Engineering Seminar. one point closure models. Rapid prototyping projects. Lecture 3 hours. often by guest lecturers. radiation interchange in nonparticipating media. Turbulent Flow II. 3 credits. Divided into areas of fatigue and fracture. Individual analytical and/or experimental study selected by the student. Lecture 3 hours. notches. Formulation and solution algorithms for Linear Programming (LP) problems. and scattering media. variable amplitude loading. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Linear algebra. Another major topic is Parametric Design by Guided Iteration. 715/815. and sub-grid scale models. Logic diagramming. 698. sensitivity analysis of distributed systems. 684. Lecture 3 hours. two-point closure models. 3 credits. Introduction to advanced CAD software for finite element modeling and analysis. Theory of Transfer Phenomena. 668. frequency. Chapmann-Enskog expansions. and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. coherent structures. 3 credits. special topics on combined mass. 697. MSC/NASTRAN. Prerequisite: ME 715/815 or CEE 715/815. An introduction to various diffusion processes. Prerequisite: MATH 312. 695. Online computer control. linear elastic fracture mechanics. Engineering Optimization I. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Study of methodologies and available tools to analyze “problem” processes and determine solutions to improve bottom-line performance. Prerequisite: approval by the department and Career Management Center. Applied Mathematics for Design and Manufacturing. Thermal radiation and radiation properties. 685. molecular transfer phenomena in fluids. 1 credit. Research leading to the Master of Science thesis. Individual project. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career-related experience. criteria. Radiation Heat Transfer. Projects in Design and Manufacturing. Lecture 3 hours. 717/817. radiant energy transfer through absorbing. 3 credits. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. statistical theories of turbulence. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career-related experience. multi-body dynamic analysis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ME 682. Industrial robots.

795/895. Parameter optimization. space structures. 790/890. and management of integrated production/manufacturing systems. fundamentals of CAD/CAM. 3 credits. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 999. Treatment of the next generation of manufacturing technology. After successfully passing the candidacy examination. 748/848. 746/846. trends in manufacturing control. Topics in Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. integration of relaxation rates in the conservation principles of fluid mechanics. type and number synthesis. The major topics include constrained motion. Chemically Reacting Flows. Elastic and plastic properties of nanoscale materials. application of graph theory. introduction to dimensional synthesis via path and function generation. Prerequisites: ME 610 and 611. Lecture 3 hours. Classification of mechanisms. strain gradient dislocation plasticity. Chemical kinetics in homogeneous and surface processes. 3 credits. Shvab-Zeldovich formulation. application to engine processes. constrained dynamics and spatial dynamics. Topics in Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Mechanics. Topics include manufacturing strategy. 3 credits. flexible manufacturing systems. thin film mechanical and structural properties. and shop floor control. group technology. Lecture 3 hours. non-dimensional parameters and limit case applications. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. chemical kinetics of single and multi-step chemical reaction systems. and center point curves. and combustion engines. control. factory simulation. Prerequisites: ME 414/514 and 610. flammability limits. Lecture 3 hours. Chemical equilibrium in reacting systems. Lecture 3 hours. Dissertation Research in Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Mechanics. robotics. 757/857. 780/880. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. The objective of this course is to present basic methods for the computer formulation and solution of the equations of kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems which are often made of interconnected bodies. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. CIM architecture and communication. 3 credits. 3 credits.744/844. nonlinear optimal control system. 3 credits. accounting for manufacturing. Study of the design. 899. Kinematic Synthesis of Mechanisms. conservation equations for multi-component reacting systems. Prerequisite: ME 744/844. Topics include modeling of production systems. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: ME 636. Nanoscale Mechanical and Structural Properties of Materials. Mechanical Engineering 999. Lecture 3 hours. Contemporary Manufacturing Technology. Fundamentals of Combustion. concurrent engineering. 745/845. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 3 credits. Lecture 3 hours. Lecture 3 hours. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. 3 credits. gaseous diffusion flames. Variable credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. premixed laminar flames. Optimal Control Theory. 3 credits. principle of virtual work. finite displacement theory including concept of poles. circle point. optimization approaches. Computational Methods in Multibody Dynamics. Ph. all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete. Selected topics in mechanical engineering or engineering mechanics. structural error minimization using Chebychev’s approximation.D. optimal feedback control with and without the presence of uncertainty. Lecture 3 hours. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 53 . current applications to robot manipulators. 750/850. process planning. 1 credit. robot hands. nanoindentation and nanoindentation creep. kinetic-based investigations of hardening mechanisms in nanolayers composites. detonation and deflagration waves. Selected topics in mechanical engineering or engineering mechanics. expert systems for synthesis. optimization problem for dynamic systems with terminal and path constraints. 796/896. and issues in manufacturing systems design.

and some of the current contractors as well as future contractors who may choose to locate either at the Research Park or the business incubator. through their tele-tech-net program at Eastern Shore Community College. public administration. This foundation enables graduates of these programs to advance in a broad range of careers in the public and private sectors. and economic forces. Graduate courses are taught during the day and in the evening facilitating flexible combinations of formal learning and fullor part-time employment. leadership abilities.A.D. program in public administration and urban policy. Army. The college offers master’s degrees in accounting. political. program in business administration and a Ph. Ph.D. and a certificate program are offered through virtual system (a University distance learning program) during evenings and weekends.D. In addition. the Master of Public Administration program is one of approximately 200 graduate programs certified as meeting the standards of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). The College of Business and Public Administration is one of approximately 467 schools in the world to have achieved accreditation on the graduate and undergraduate levels by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB). The M. or marketing tracks. Also. Additional information about this program may be obtained through the Military Science and Leadership Department. and. Students come from a variety of backgrounds with undergraduate degrees from many different colleges and universities. business administration.B. Master of Business Administration. in Business Administration—finance. Master of Urban Studies. analytical skills. College of Business and Public Administration Old Dominion University’s College of Business and Public Administration has as its principal objective the preparation of liberally educated specialists who will enter the challenging world of business or public administration.D. Also housed within the college is the Department of Military Science and Leadership.S. Master of Public Administration. The college also offers a Ph. In addition. program in Business Administration may be of interest to several of the existing employees at NASA Wallops. management. NOAA. the US Navy. the college offers a joint master’s degree in computer information science with the Computer Science Department.Completing the Master of Business Administration degree or a Ph. All programs in the college are designed to promote the following: professional competence. a strong sense of business ethics and public purpose. economics. Graduate School of Business and Public Administration The Graduate School of Business and Public Administration offers seven degree programs: Master of Arts in economics. The mission of this department is to provide professional instruction and leadership development for selected students who desire to serve in the active or reserve components of the U. facility in the communication arts. and urban studies. the school offers a master’s in computer information science option jointly with the Computer Science Department. in Public Administration and Urban Policy. and Ph. The graduate accounting program has received its own accreditation through the same agency. Currently Old Dominion University offers the MBA and Ph. an understanding of social.D.D. Master of Science in accounting. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 54 .

lectures. International Business.B.A.B. the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center. Information Technology and Enterprise Integration. regardless of the undergraduate field of study.A. the Peninsula Higher Education Center in Hampton. Nondegree graduate students must satisfy the admission index for graduate study or receive special permission from the graduate program director in the College of Business and Public Administration in order to enroll for graduate credit. Each student will also have to select an advanced course in international business in a discipline of his or her choice. The program leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration is designed for the student whose undergraduate preparation is in non-business areas as well as for students with undergraduate training in business and is open to any qualified holder of a bachelor’s degree. and independent research projects are the major components of an integrated approach to the study of business management. program is structured to provide students with the opportunity to design a program of study to meet their individual needs. mediation. Case studies. business ethics. In an ever changing and increasingly global environment.B. business plan development. and employment law. leadership.) program at Old Dominion University is designed to present broad but thorough insights into issues relevant to all effective managers. In addition. Program of Study Core Hours (27 credit hours) ACCT 601 Accounting for Managers DSCI 600 Statistics ECON 604 Managerial Econ and International Trade FIN 605 Financial Management MGMT 602 Organizational Management MKTG 603 Marketing Management ECON 612 Global and Applied Macro-Economics IT 610 Information Systems for Managers OPMT 611 Operations Management with Quantitative Analysis Electives (18 credit hours) General Electives 15 Series of One-Hour Modules 3 Capstone: MGMT 750 Business Policy & Strategy 3 Total Program 48 M. Master of Business Administration The Master of Business Administration (M. Maritime and Port Management. Financial Analysis and Valuation. The Old Dominion University M. and the M. The program is designed to accommodate both full-time and part-time students with courses offered during the day as well as in the evening at four locations–the main campus in Norfolk. program at Old Dominion University is fully accredited by the AACSB International. Concentrations are available in each of the following areas: Business and Economic Forecasting.B.B.A. Additional flexibility is provided by the requirement that each student select three one-hour electives from a wide series of choices.All graduate students are advised to check specific program requirements before enrolling in 400/500 level courses. Among the topics included are: effective business writing. Students have the opportunity to interact with the business community on projects with faculty supervision. students may participate in internships. Some may choose a program with a twelve-hour concentration plus six hours of electives. and Public Administration. Concentrations: Business and Economic Forecasting: ECON 625 Mathematical Economics ECON 706 Econometrics I ECON 707 Econometrics II ECON 708 Econometrics III Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 55 . these skills are applicable to both the private and public sectors.A. Others may elect not to choose a concentration and develop a general M.A. and the Northern Virginia Higher Education Center in Sterling. program with eighteen hours of general electives. The program provides students with a great deal of flexibility to select courses of interest.

D.B. economics.A. The objective of the program is to prepare individuals of superior promise and potential for careers in higher education as faculty members engaged in teaching and research and for high level administrative and research careers in the private and public sectors.Financial Analysis and Valuation: FIN 735 Portfolio Analysis FIN 737 International Financial Management FIN 740 Options and Futures Markets FIN 741 Corporation Financial Policy FIN 668 Internship or FIN 697 Selected Topics in Finance Information Technology and Enterprise Integration: IT 620 Systems Analysis & Design IT 635 Telecommunication and E-Commerce IT 650 Database Management Systems IT 664 Information Systems Project Management IT 665 Network and Information Systems Administration IT 672 Information Architectures IT 668 Internship or IT 695 Selected Topics in Information Systems International Business Concentration ECON 752 International Trade ECON 753 International Finance FIN 737 International Financial Management MGMT 721 Strategic Management for Multinational Enterprises MKTG 640 Global Marketing Management PORT 610 International Shipping and Supply Chain Management Maritime and Ports Management Concentration PORT 610 International Shipping and Supply Chain Management PORT 611 International Maritime Transport PORT 612 Port Operations and Management PORT 613 International Maritime and Admiralty Law PORT 614 Port Planning and Economics Public Administration Concentration PADM 603 The Environment of Public Administration PADM 651 Introduction to Public Administration PADM 695 Advanced Topics PADM 711 Urban Services Administration PADM 714 Privatization PADM 715 Management of Nonprofit Organizations PADM 718 Contract Management PADM 725 Business. Government and Society PADM 730 Theories of Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving PADM 734 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution PADM 738 Conflict Mediation and Arbitration B.D. degree requires competence in basic disciplines of international business.D.A. and high potential for making significant contributions to their field of specialization in business. research methods.A./M. and in one of the following functional areas of business: finance.) is a scholarly. Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration (Ph. Program A five-year B. The Ph.B.) The Doctor of Philosophy degree in business administration (Ph. Persons completing the degree program must have demonstrated an in-depth knowledge of international business.Fall BUSN 800 International Business Seminar ECON 801 Micro-Economic Theory ECON 806 Econometric Theory & Modeling ECON 807 Econometrics II Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 56 . research tools.A./M. For specific information please refer to the undergraduate catalog. Finance Curriculum First Year . strategic management or marketing. research-based program with a professional orientation. program is available for selected undergraduate students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 57 . Marketing Curriculum First Year Fall BUSN 800 International Business Seminar DSCI 700 Linear Methods for Business Decisions DSCI 711 Multivariate Statistical Methods for Business MKTG 801 Marketing Theory Seminar Spring DSCI 712 Advanced Statistical Models in Business Research MKTG 826 Seminar in International Marketing Strategy MGMT 821 Seminar in International Management *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Second Year Fall MKTG 802 Seminar in Marketing Concepts and Issues MKTG 813 Fundamentals of Survey Research FIN 862 Seminar in International Finance *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Spring MKTG 827 Seminar in Marketing Strategy MKTG 814 Seminar in Advanced Marketing Methodology ECON 852 International Trade *BUSN 801 Research Teaching Colloquium Third Year Work on dissertation research *Advanced doctoral level statistical/research methods course can substitute for BUSN 801 series. Management Curriculum First Year Fall BUSN 800 International Business Seminar DSCI 700 Linear Methods for Business Decisions DSCI 711 Multivariate Statistical Methods for Business MGMT 840 Seminar on Strategy Formulation Spring DSCI 712 Advanced Statistical Models in Business Research MGMT 821 Seminar in International Management MKTG 826 Seminar in International Marketing Strategy *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Second Year Fall MGMT 842 Seminar on Strategy Implementation MKTG 813 Fundamentals of Survey Research FIN 862 Seminar in International Finance *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Spring MGMT 830 Seminar in International HR MGMT 835 Topics in Organization Theory and Behavior MGMT 845 Advanced Topics in Strategy *BUSN 801 Research Teaching Colloquium Third Year Work on dissertation research *Advanced doctoral level statistical/research methods course can substitute for BUSN 801 series.MGMT 821 Seminar in International Management MKTG 826 Seminar in International Marketing Strategy *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Second Year Fall ECON 808 Econometrics III FIN 860 Seminar in Financial Theory FIN 862 Seminar in International Finance *BUSN 801 Doctoral Research/Teaching Colloquium Spring FIN861 Seminar in Investments FIN 863 Seminar Current Financial Topics ECON 852 International Trade *BUSN 801 Research Teaching Colloquium Third Year Work on dissertation research *Advanced doctoral level statistical/research methods course can substitute for BUSN 801 series.

IS 795/895 Islam. Examples of the types of 2-year Technical and Career Programs that could be offered through distance learning at the Workforce Development and Education Center. IS 702/802 Collective Security. The program consists of four graduate courses that expose students to international shipping. IS 706/806 Causes of War. Power and Trans-nationalism. Some of the labs may have to be taken on-site at the specific educational institution offering the program. ENGN 622 Remote Sensing Track Two: PORT 612 Port Operations and Management. port management.Homeland Security Certificate The need to address problems related to Homeland Security is increasing in numerous government and private organizations. Ports and Logistics Management Certificate This certificate program is designed to help working maritime and port professionals develop and sharpen their maritime and port management skills. Program Requirements The certificate is awarded based upon the student’s successful completion of 12 credit hours of graduate level courses in Ports and Maritime Management: PORT 611: International Maritime Transport. PORT 613: International Maritime and Admiralty Law. integration of electro/mechanical systems for automation projects as well as the development of robotic work cells. The certificate allows students to draw courses from several colleges of the University to tailor a program particularly suited for their needs. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 58 . Upon successful completion of this program. Career Programs Leading to an Associate Degree Automated Manufacturing/ Robotics Technology. IS 720/820 Global Security. IS 795/985 Politics of Middle East. This certificate program in Homeland Security is designed to provide knowledge useful in the development and improvement of organizational processes related to avoiding. CRJS 575 Comparative Justice (from Sociology and Criminal Justice) Maritime. dealing with and recovering from major security-related problems. PORT 612: Port Operations and Management. students should be able to: • • • Set up and operate conventional and computer numerically controlled machine tools. PORT 614 Port Planning and Economics Track Three: Students may choose any two courses from the following list: IS 701/801 Global Change and American Foreign Policy. Specific courses offer basic instruction in Computerized Numerically Controlled (CNC) programming of machine tools. IS 740/840 The Political Economy of Development. and. Students may earn a certificate of proficiency (33 credits) or an associate degree (63-64 credits). IS 707/807 Interdependence. port operations and planning and port economics. Track One: CEE 513 Geographic Information Systems. Describe the structural and functional characteristics of various types of robots and automated systems. PORT 614: Port Planning and Economics. preparing for. maritime law. War and National Question on the Russian Frontier. All are within a 30-60 minute drive of the Center. Associate in Applied Science (ROBO) The Automated Manufacturing/Robotics Technology program is designed to prepare students for various fields within the manufacturing industry. Prepare manual and computer-assisted programs for directing the operation of numerically controlled machine tools.

Document automation specifications in textual and graphical format. Develop. Assembly and Fixture Design 3 Third Semester (15 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 PHY 101 Technical Physics II 3 TME 210 CNC Operations and Manual Programming 3 TDD 216 3 Dimensional CADD Parametric Modeling OR TEL 200 Electro/Mechanical Systems 3 TME 212 Computer-Aided Machining 3 Fourth Semester (16 credits) TME 220 Robotics and Programmable Controllers 3 TME 222 Advanced Computer Aided Machining 3 TME 229 Fluid Power and Controls 4 Humanities Elective 3 Social Science Electives 3 Total Hours Required: 63-64 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 59 .CADD 3 TME 111 Machining Technology 3 Second Semester (16-17 credits) * MAT 111 Technical Mathematics II 4 PHY 100 Technical Physics I 3 TCC 121 Project Management Processes 3 TCC 122 Two Dimensional CADD 3 OR TEL 101 DC Analysis (4) TDD 128 Detailing. assembly. Identify methods and equipment needed to integrate a robotic work cell. The associate degree in applied science will be awarded after satisfactory completion of the four-semester program. Integrate automated materials handling. manufacturing and transfer equipment within a work cell. Explain the aspects of flexibility associated with computerized automation systems. write and modify programmable controller networks.• • • • • • Define accident prevention procedures associated with the operation of automated equipment. First Semester Credits (16 credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 * MAT 110 Technical Mathematics I 4 TCC 111 Technical Communications 3 TCC 112 Technical Graphics . or an automated system.

CADD 3 TCS 100 Blueprint Reading 3 Second Semester (16 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 * MAT 111 Technical Mathematics II 4 PHY 100 Technical Physics I 3 TCC 122 Two-Dimensional CADD 3 TCS 131 Construction Estimating 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 60 . Construction Management Technology. field superintendents. estimators. while completing a basic survey of the theory and technology of the construction industry. engineers. MAT 161 may be elected instead. These students range from skilled trade workers who seek supervisory or management positions to recent high school graduates beginning a career in the field of Construction Management. the student should be able to: • • • • • • • Interpret construction specifications and drawings. Research methods and materials for construction projects under the supervision of an engineer or architect. Evaluate accurate observations of construction projects for conformance with construction documents. The program has been designed to meet the needs of a variety of students. Use contemporary information systems in the context of construction management. First Semester (16 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 * MAT 110 Technical Mathematics I 4 TCC 111 Technical Communications 3 TCC 112 Technical Graphics . Provide to. information relevant to project management.MAT 140. Upon successful completion of this program. Associate in Applied Science (CTEC) The program in Construction Management is intended to prepare graduates for employment in the construction industry as entry-level assistants to project managers. The associate degree in applied science will be awarded after satisfactory completion of the four-semester program. and obtain from. the project schedule. Communicate effectively as a member of the construction project team. Assemble basic information needed to estimate quantities and costs of construction materials and components. Emphasis is placed on the development of knowledge and skills in modern information systems as they relate to strategic planning and process management. MAT 141 or MAT 160. expediters and inspectors.

I 3 PHY 101 Tech Physics II 3 Social Sciences Elective 3 **Construction Technology Elective 3 **Construction Technology Elective 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) Humanities Elective 3 TCC 121 Project Management Processes 3 ARC 121 Architectural Graphics I 3 TCS 112 Methods and Materials of Constr. surveying and Layout 3 TME 216 Statics and Strength of Matrls. 4 Total Hours Required: 60-63 Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Management Associate of Applied Science Degree Culinary Arts Option First Year Summer Session II Credit Hours SDV 100 Fundamentals of College Study Fall Semester HMR 101 Introduction to Hospitality Management HMR 102 Principles of Food Preparation HMR 110 Healthy Cooking HMR 155 Sanitation and Safety Systems BIO 120 Nutrition ENG 101 Fundamentals of English I Spring Semester HMR 150 Baking and Pastry Production Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 61 .Third Semester (15 credits) TCS 111 Methods and Materials of Constr. ** Construction Technology Electives(listed below) ARC 226 Mechanical/Elect. II 3 **Construction Technology Elective 3 * MAT 140 and MAT 141 or MAT 160 and MAT 161 may be elected instead. Systems 3 TCS 108 Construction Supervision 3 TCS 109 Construction Project Administration 3 TCS 132 Construction Estimating II 3 TCS 141 Construction First Aid and Safety 3 TCS 199 CSEL (COOP Experience) 3 TCS 221 Const.

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 62 . installation. devices or systems in accordance with predetermined specifications. maintenance and repair. Assemble electrical and electro-mechanical devices. Use established maintenance procedures for scientific and industrial instruments. Identify electrical/electro-mechanical components. Upon successful completion of this program. testing. Associate in Applied Science (ETEC) The associate degree in Electronics Technology prepares students for employment as electronics technicians who work on a variety of highly specialized electronics equipment and products in locations from the original manufacturer to the final user. Test input/output parameters of electrical/mechanical devices.HMR 151 Hospitality Marketing HMR 154 Food Service Management ENG 151 Fundamentals of English II GEN ED Mathematics Requirement Second Year Fall Semester HMR 202 Food Service Cost Control SDV 101 Career Development SPH 101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication SPN 101 Fundamentals of Spanish I GEN ED Social/Behavioral Science Requirement Spring Semester HMR 252 Purchasing and Menu Planning HMR 254 Garde Manager HMR 255 Beverage Management HMR 260 Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Field Experience 1 Electives Students must also select six of the following courses: HMR 103 International Cuisine I HMR 104 International Cuisine II HMR 105 Italian Cuisine HMR 106 Seafood HMR 107 Dessert and Pastry Art HMR 108 Vegetarian Cooking HMR 109 French Cuisine Electronics Technology. This work may include design. Calibrate scientific and industrial instruments. construction. students should be able to: • • • • • • • Identify malfunctions in electrical and electro-mechanical instruments. Repair non-functioning electrical and electro-mechanical instruments.

from business to business-through the Internet. selling and buying of products and services-both retail to the consumers. Associate in Applied Science (ECM) Electronic Commerce is the advertising. Electronic Commerce. First Semester (17 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 * MAT 110 Technical Mathematics I 4 TCC 111 Technical Communications 3 TEL 101 DC Analysis 4 Humanities Elective 3 Second Semester (18 credits) * MAT 111 Technical Mathematics II 4 PHY 100 Technical Physics I 3 TEL 110 Electronics I 4 TEL 121 TEL 121 Digital Electronics 4 ENG 112 English Composition II 3 Third Semester (18 credits) TEL 102 AC Analysis 4 TEL 111 Electronics II 4 TEL 200 Electro/Mechanical Systems 3 TEL 210 Electronics Troubleshooting and Repair 4 PHY 101 Technical Physics II 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) TEL 124 Microprocessors I 3 TEL 199 CSEL or Technical Elective 3 Social Sciences Elective 3 COM 100 Intro to Interpersonal Communication 3 Career Elective 3 Total Hours Required: 68 * MAT 140. The program in Electronic Commerce is intended for small business owners and employees of companies that engage in electronic commerce to develop and deploy ebusiness solutions. including use of microcomputers to manipulate content and access information. and wholesale. The emphasis in the program is on the development of sound business and computer skills to participate in the growing world of electronic commerce. MAT 161 may be elected instead. written and graphic form.• Present technical information in oral. MAT 141 or MAT 160. With this Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 63 . The associate degree in applied science will be awarded after satisfactory completion of the four-semester program.

focus. Emphasis in the program is on the management. Develop a supply chain strategy for a business operation. Develop and maintain a web page to market a product or service. marketing. how to provide customer service through the Internet. Apply business principles to electronic commerce. Discuss the legal. and how the Web site fits into a company's larger goals and marketing scheme. This program combines traditional liberal arts and business courses with hands-on computer skills. advertising and legal implications of operating a business that conducts electronic commerce. Use computer software and applications to enhance business operations. Develop a marketing plan for a business engaged in electronic commerce. Upon successful completion of this program. the program teaches individuals how to attract people to the Web site. First Semester (15 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 BUS 100 Introduction to Business 3 MATH 105 Business Mathematics 3 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 Social Science elective 3 Second Semester (16 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 BUS 102 Introduction to Electronic Commerce 3 IMM 100 Interface Design 3 BUS 210 Principles of Management 3 DPR 113 Data Base Management-Access 4 Third Semester (15 credits) BUS 130 Business Communications 3 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 BUS 243 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 234 Electronic Marketing 3 ACC 100 Applied Accounting 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) BUS 235 Supply Chain Management 3 DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 IMM 122 Programming for the Web 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 64 . Identify terms used in electronic commerce and related technologies. students should be able to: • • • • • • • • • Discuss electronic commerce concepts and practices. political and ethical issues associated with an international business that engages in electronic commerce. what to do with customers once they are on a Web site. Discuss the global impact of electronic commerce on business.

multifaceted entity with a variety of entry and access points along a continuum of care. An associate degree in applied science will be awarded upon completion of the required program with a 2. financing. It will also be useful for those individuals with no previous health care experience who seek non-clinical entry-level positions in health care. Explain the priorities of managing risk. terminology. quality improvement and measuring outcomes. Upon successful completion of this program.0 GPA and a "C" or better in all Allied Health courses. Develop personal qualities needed to function effectively with individuals and organizations. Analyze the health care delivery system as a multidisciplinary. or who plan to continue their education in the field of health care administration. Demonstrate proficiency in computer applications used in a health care environment. Function within an ethical and legal framework appropriate for a managed care environment. structure and products of health care management. The program is intended for health care workers who need new knowledge and skills to compete in the changing health care marketplace. Apply economic and business practices to the health care setting.Science Elective 3 CSEL or BUS/DPR/IMM elective 3 Total Hours Required: 61 Health Care Management. practice patterns and the utilization of personnel and services. Develop skills for coordination of care and services in managed care settings. students should be able to: • • • • • • • • • • Describe principles. First Semester ENG 100 English Composition I *MAT 105 Business Mathematics SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 65 . Assess issues and trends in health care management. Describe emerging health care delivery systems and their impact on delivery. Associate in Applied Science (AHM) The Health Care Management curriculum prepares students for management roles in a health care environment that is rapidly changing from one focused on episodes of treatment for acute disease to lifelong health maintenance and wellness promotion.

Students with previous health care experience may NOT be required to take some or all of the following courses: AHM 233 Medical Terminology AHM 100 Orientation to Health Care AHA 207 Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Management AHM 140 Professional and Communication Issues in Health Care AH/BUS Elective Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 66 . Examples might include. etc. respiratory therapy. training and work experience in an allied health field through credit for prior learning. medical secretary. dietitian. A Certificate of Competency in Managed Care is also available. but are not limited to: medical assistant. Students may be asked to take one or two courses within this core based on portfolio assessment. Enrollment is limited to health care professionals. physician assistant. radiation technology. nursing. Advanced-Standing: 15 credits Nine to fifteen credits for the Allied Health core may be awarded for previous education. medical technology.DPR 100 Introduction to Computers AHM 100 Orientation to Health Care Second Semester AHM 233 Medical Terminology AHM 140 Professional and Communication Issues in Health Care COM 100 Speech Communications OR BUS 130 Business Communications BUS 100 Introduction to Business ENG 112 English Composition II Third Semester BUS 211 Supervision BUS 230 Principles of Marketing AHM 130 Medical Coding Concepts for Allied Health AHA 207 Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Management _______ Allied Health or Business Elective Fourth Semester AHA 209 Philosophy of Managed Care AHA 210 Outcomes Measurement and Management AHA 206 Reimbursement and Financing Methods AHA 217 Quality Improvement and Accreditation Process AHA 213 Managing Utilization and Risk TOTAL HOURS REQUIRED: 60 **MAT 130 may be selected instead. surgical technology. health unit coordinator.

and Allied Health Instructor. Medical Supply Manager. Utilize skills and knowledge related to proficiency in health care computer applications. Examples of positions that would be applicable include: Billing Supervisor. Communicate effectively and appropriately in oral and written exchanges.Health Studies. Patient Service Representative. Demonstrate the analytic and critical reasoning skills necessary to function effectively in health care settings. The program offers a broad view of health care related topics while providing a basic liberal studies foundation. Discuss the bio-psycho-social and economic principles that guide and govern health care delivery systems. Analyze the ethical and legal issues related to health care. Advance personal career paths and interests related to employment in health care. Medical Administrative Assistant. Students acquiring this degree would be able to pursue advancement opportunities within varied health care settings. Associate in Applied Science .General Option(HSTU) The Associate of Applied Science in Health Studies is designed to offer students interested in working within the health care field an opportunity to attain the associate degree. Explain aspects of and factors related to current trends and in health care management and delivery. This program is especially advantageous for students who have completed certificates of competency and proficiency programs offered by the Allied Health and Nursing department and wish to complete a degreed course of study. Upon completion of this program the student will be able to: • • • • • • • • Know the terminology and bio-psycho-social foundations related to the function of the human body. First Semester ENG 100 English Composition I DPR 100 Introduction to Computers AHM 100 Orientation to Health Care AHM 233 Medical Terminology BIO 100 Biological Science Second Semester ENG 112 English Composition II SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology AHM 140 Professional and Communication Issues in Health Care *HUMANITIES ELECTIVE OPEN ELECTIVE Third Semester AHM 104 Body Structure/Function I Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 67 .

Associate in Applied Science The associate degree in Heating. ENG 113 or above. Upon successful completion of this program. The goal is to provide an educational program for current technicians. PHI. SPA. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration prepares students for employment as HVAC&R technicians who work on a variety of equipment and products. students should be able to: Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 68 . This work may include installation. maintenance and repair of various types of climate control units. ECO.OR BIO 117 Human Anatomy AHA 207 Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Management MAT 120 Modern College Math I ** AH ELECTIVE ***SOCIAL SCI ELECTIVE Fourth Semester AHM 105 Body Structure and Function II OR BIO 118 Human Physiology PSY 140 General Psychology AHA 209 Priciples of Managed Care BIO 220 Nutrition and Well Being OPEN ELECTIVE Total credits: 60 or 62 * Humanities Electives include: Any courses listed as ART. and for the basic preparation of individuals seeking entry to this field. DRA. PSY (above 140) or SOC (above 110) For students holding external certificates who wish to transfer credits to this program Natural Science electives will satisfy these credit requirements. Ventilation. AHS. Heating. ITA. HUM. Ventilation. FRE. POL. MUS. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. COM ** AH elective include: Courses listed as AHM. The Delaware Valley chapter of The Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) has joined with the College to develop this program. AHU. RTH ( must be a skills course related to clinical or administrative responsibilities) *** Social Science electives: Any course listed as HIS. AHN.

Diagnose trouble in hydronic and oil burner systems. Perform specific installation and start-up procedures to insure operational efficiency and safety of HVAC&R equipment. Detail the techniques of servicing equipment and start-up to develop service ability with hands-on experience. Cite the procedures of heat loss and heat gain load calculations. Diagnose trouble in operating safety controls. Identify how to handle refrigerant and detail potential environment hazards of fluorocarbons. Interpret wiring diagrams and building blueprints. Detail duct fabrication and installation in residential and light commercial buildings. Describe the cycle of operation of residential and light commercial HVAC&R equipment.• • • • • • • • • • • • Identify and explain the functions of components in residential and light commercial HVAC&R equipment. Cite procedures for servicing gas and oil heating systems.Commercial 3 HVA 110 Hydronic Heating Systems 2 MAT 111 Technical Mathematics II 4 * Humanities Elective 3 Fourth Semester (18 credits) HVA 109 HVAC Troubleshooting 3 HVA 204 Blueprint Reading for HVAC&R Technicians 2 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 69 . Describe the operation of hydronic and oil burner systems. First Semester (16 Credits) HVA 100 Introduction to HVAC&R Electrical Fabrication 2 HVA 101 Introduction to Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 2 HVA 104 Practical Problems in Mathematics for HVAC&R Technicians 3 HVA 106 Piping 2 HVA 201 Refrigerant Certification 2 HVA 202 Oil and Gas Burner Service 2 ENG 100 English Composition I 3 Second Semester (17 credits) HVA 103 Advanced Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 2 HVA 200 Advanced HVAC&R Electrical Fabrication 2 HVA 107 Gas Heating and Ventilation 3 HVA 108 Duct and Sheet Metal Fabrication/Installation-Residential 3 MAT 110 Technical Mathematics I 4 TCC 111 Technical Communications 3 Third Semester (16 credits) HVA 203 Heat Pump Systems 2 HVA 112 Oil Burner and Hydronic Steam Heating 2 HVA 111 Advanced Duct and Sheet Metal Fabrication/Installation.

or ECO 220 Hotel and Restaurant Management. and presentations. Apply federal. and local laws and regulations that are specific to the hotel and restaurant industry. and customers in writing and speech. Use terminology specific to the hotel/restaurant/food service industry. HIS 120. or HUM 170 ** Natural Science Electives: PHS 120 to 140 *** Social Science Electives: SOC 100 to 200. Prepare a wide variety of foods typically served in a hotel.HVA 113 Hydronic Troubleshooting 3 MTT 129 Solids (CAM) Modeling 3 ** Natural Science Elective 4 *** Social Science Elective 3 TOTAL HOURS REQUIRED: 67 * Humanities Electives: HUM 105. employees. spreadsheets. Upon successful completion of this program. Supervise the operations of a front desk in a hotel or motel. Use financial information to control internal costs and maximize operational effectiveness. HUM 110. Hotel and Restaurant Management graduates can enter the industry at a supervisory level and perform certain management functions and duties. HUM 160. prepare. students should be able to: • • • • • • • • • • • Choose from a wide variety of career options in the hotel/restaurant management field. Use computer application software to prepare reports. Plan. state. Apply human resource management principles in dealing with employees. or food service establishment. Communicate effectively with employers. Be certified in food handling sanitation. HUM 120. Use accepted accounting practices to record transactions. serve and cost a meal for a group. restaurant. First Semester (16 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MATH 105 * Business Mathematics 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 70 . Associate in Applied Science (HRM) The Hotel/Restaurant Management program is designed for individuals seeking specialized training as preparation for a career in the vast hospitality industry.

students should be able to: Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 71 .DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 HRM 100 Introduction to Hospitality Industry 3 HRM 110 Food Handler's Sanitation 1 SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology OR PSY 140 General Psychology 3 Second Semester (15 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 ACC 100 Applied Accounting OR ACC 111 Financial Accounting 3 HRM 150 Professional Cooking I 3 HRM 155 Front Office Management 3 HRM 162 Law of Innkeeping and Food Service 3 Third Semester (15 credits) BUS 130 Business Communications 3 BUS 110 Sales and Sales Supervision OR BUS 230 Principles of Marketing 3 HRM 151 Professional Cooking II 3 HRM 253 Food Service Management 3 Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) BUS 215 Human Resource Management 3 HRM 254 Catering 3 Humanities Elective 3 HRM CSEL or HRM electives 6 Total Hours Required: 61 * Finite Mathematics (MAT 130) may be substituted. Specific topics of coverage will include fluid power and controls. Industrial Systems Technicians work directly with engineers. Upon successful completion of this program. electric motors and control systems. Industrial Systems Technology (ISTD) The associate degree in Industrial Systems Technology prepares students for employment as Industrial Systems and Maintenance Technicians with responsibility for installing. repairing and/or replacing a variety of equipment in a manufacturing environment. conveyors. troubleshooting. programmable logic controls and process control. gear and belt-drive systems. designers and plant management as well as specialized equipment installers. maintaining.

2 PCT 100*Plant Equipment .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Demonstrate knowledge associated with mechanical systems. Troubleshoot. Use various electrical test and measurement devices. Perform measurements. belt and gear drives and associated mechanisms. safety and accident practices and procedures.3 ELT 204Introduction to PLC . Analyze and troubleshoot industrial electrical circuits.3 credits 16 Fourth Semester HVA 206Industrial Piping . temperature and related measurements.3 credits16 Second Semester ISTD 101Industrial Drive Systems .3 ELT 203Industrial Electrical Systems . Interpret and troubleshoot programmable logic control systems.3 TEL 101DC Analysis . replace or install various types of industrial piping. including control circuits. Repair.3 TME 115Basic Technical Skills . pressure.2 TME 229Fluid Power and Controls . Make effective use of manual and powered hand tools. Interpret and follow appropriate OSHA Standards. Prepare and implement a plan for preventive maintenance of equipment. repair and install electrical and mechanical equipment.4 HVA 106Piping .4 ENG 112English Composition II .3 MAT 110Technical Mathematics I . Read and interpret industrial system drawings and schematics. remove. to include: conveyors.3 ISTD 105 Industrial Systems Drawing Interpretation . as well as apply appropriate health. First Semester ENG 100English Composition 1 .4 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 72 .4 ISTD 100Intro to Industrial Systems Technology . Communicate technical information effectively in written and oral manners. Describe the operation of a fluid power unit and explain flow. calculations and calibrations necessary for the proper installation and alignment of equipment.3 PHY 100Technical Physics I .3 TCC 111Technical Communication . Read and interpret industrial system drawings and schematics.3 credits 15 Third Semester COM 100Intro to Interpersonal Communication .

Students are offered a choice of specializations: Programming. ***TEL 200-For Industrial Systems Technology majors TEL 110 as a prerequisite is waived in lieu of students completing ELT 203 Industrial Electrical Systems or permission of instructor. Computer Applications. The student will choose one of seven options to complete the requirements for specific the associate's degree. Ventilating.3 HVA 100Introduction to Heating.4 TCS 108Construction Supervision . Game Development and Help Desk.2 WLD 100Introduction to Welding Processes . students take 12 credits from the required Information Technology Core. attend required information technology core courses.4 _______ISTD Elective ** .3 TCC 121Project Management Processes . Network Engineering.MAT 111Technical Mathematics II . In addition. All students are required to take the general education core courses listed below.3 *PCT 100-For Industrial Systems Technology majors PCT 101 as a co-requisite is waived in lieu of students completing ISTD 100 Introduction to Industrial Systems Technology or permission of instructor. All students interested in Information Technology majors take core courses required for the associate in applied science and in addition. Information Technology (IT). Associate in Applied Science The Associate in Applied Sciences in the Information Technology fields at Delaware County Community College blends the theoretical with the practical.3 credits 16 Total Hours Required: 63 **ISTD AAS Degree Elective Listing: ***TEL 200Electro/Mechanical Systems . Interactive Multimedia.3 _______Social Science Elective .2 TEL 102AC Analysis . Web Development. the use of specialized laboratory facilities and participation in co-curricular programs in their specialization area. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration and Electrical Fabrication .3 ISTD 200Pumping Systems . General Education Core (21-26 credits) English 100 English Composition I 3 English 112 English Composition II 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 73 .3 TCS 109Construction Project Administration . Students select an option with specialized courses and related electives. Students have the benefit of classroom instruction.

A programmer usually works with an analyst to help determine the best way to approach a problem or implement a desired feature for a new version of a software package. analysts and management Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 74 . The Computer Programming curriculum is designed to prepare students for employment as computer programmers.121 MAT 130 . design.Math Sequence Electives (select one) 6-10 MAT 120 . It is the job of the computer programmer to design and update the software that runs on the computer. implement and maintain computer applications to meet the functional objectives of a business. software aides and utilities in the development and application of a computer program. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of mathematics and its relation to computers Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively using appropriate computer technology with programmers. This option emphasizes the more popular computer languages used in businesses today. develop. the computer system library. In conjunction with the general education and IT core requirements the student should be able to: • • • • • Analyze problems with respect to the requirements of the computer and the required results Plan detailed program logic to solve problems and convert the logic to a wellstructured applications program using a problem-oriented language and providing program documentation Demonstrate the ability to use debugging techniques. A computer programmer works with a computer analyst and computer engineer to analyze.161 Social Science Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Science Elective 3-4 Information Technology Core (12 credits): DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 Computer Programming Option (DPRP): (32-33 credits) This concentration is intended to prepare students for a career or further study in computer programming.141 MAT 150 and MAT 160 . test. A programmer codes the changes and then tests and debugs the software.131 MAT 140 .

20 Second Semester ENG 112 English Composition II 3 MAT 121 Modern College Mathematics II or above 3 .4 credits 15 .18 Third Semester DPR 205 Introduction to JAVA Programming 4 DPR 207 Introduction to Oracle: SQL 3 DPR 209 Introduction to Perl Programming 4 DPR 222 Visual Basic Programming 4 credits 15 Fourth Semester DPR 212 Data Structures and Algorithms 4 DPR 226 Object Oriented C++ 4 Social Science Elective 3 Choose 2 DPR Electives from below Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 75 .5 DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 Science Elective 3 .Programming Core (32-33 credits) DPR 108 Introduction to Computer Science 3 DPR 205 Introduction to Java Programming 4 DPR 207 Introduction To Oracle: SQL 3 DPR 209 Introduction to Perl Programming 4 DPR 212 Data Structures/Algorithms 4 DPR 222 Visual Basic Programming 4 DPR 226 C++ Object Oriented Programming 4 DPR Electives (Choose two From below) DPR 113 Database Management 4 DPR 141 UNIX Operating System 3 DPR 206 Programming for the Web 3 CSEL or IMM/DPR/NET Electives 3 Semester by Semester breakdown First Semester ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MAT 120 Modern College Mathematics I or above 3 .5 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 DRP 108 Introduction to Computer Science 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 Humanities Elective 3 credits 18 .

Computer Applications Core (28-30credits) BUS 130 Business Communication 3 BUS 214 Organizational Behavior 3 BUS 225 Professional Development 3 DPR 113 Database Management 4 DPR 114 Word 3 DPR 115 Excel 3 DPR 253 Integrated Software 3 Choose two electives from IMM/NET/DPR 6-8 Semester by Semester breakdown FIRST SEMESTER ENG 100 English Composition I 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 76 . Discuss business terminology and concepts. This program option prepares students to use the Microsoft Office suite of products. Use Microsoft Excel to create. Upon successful completion of this program. Complete mastery of each application is stressed. This concentration is intended to prepare students for a career or further study in computer applications. the most popular computer software product employed in business and government.18 Total credits needed for this program: 65-71 Computer Applications Option ( ITCA): (28-30 credits) The Computer Application option prepares students for employment as Data Entry Keyers. reports and other documents using Microsoft Word. Use strategies for merging and integrating source data from different applications using commands for object linking and embedding. Develop personal qualities needed to function effectively with individuals and organizations in business.DPR 141 UNIX Operating Systems 3 DPR 113 Database Management Systems 4 DPR 206 Programming for the Web 3 credit 17 . The learning sequence established by this curriculum is designed to prepare students to qualify to take certification examinations leading to Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS). tables. Use Microsoft PowerPoint to design and create informational and motivational slides that contain hyperlinks. memos. process. Analyze and resolve problems common to entry-level management personnel. the student should be able to: • • • • • • • Create letters. clip art and animation. and format worksheets and charts using a variety of features.

17 SECOND SEMESTER ENG 112 English Composition II 3 MAT 121 Modern College Mathematics II or above 3 .MAT 120 Modern College Mathematics I or above 3 . Because of the constantly changing nature of the technology in this program. students are advised to meet on a consistent basis with their faculty advisor. Students may also take courses to prepare for NovellÃs CNE or MicrosoftÃs MCSE certification.4 credits 15 .18 THIRD SEMESTER BUS 130 Business Communications 3 DPR 113 Database Management Systems 4 DPR 114 Microsoft Word 3 DPR 115 Microsoft Excel 3 Social Science Elective 3 credits 16 FOURTH SEMESTER BUS 225 Professional Development 3 DPR 253 Integrated Software 3 Humanities Elective 3 Two Elective From DPR/IMM/NET 6 .5 DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 Science Elective 3 . In conjunction with the general education and IT core requirements the student should be able to: • Install and configure NetWare network operating system.8 credits 15 . The program includes the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully complete many of the tests required for NovellÃs Certified Network Administrator certification and MicrosoftÃs Certified Professional certification.17 Total credits needed for this program: 61-68 Network Engineering Option (DPRN): (34 credits) The Network Engineering option prepares students for employment as networking specialists in the telecommunications industry.5 BUS 214 Organizational Behavior 3 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 credits 15 . Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 77 .

and propose solutions for problems relating to network cabling. test. Administer. and propose solutions for problems relating to network protocols. Administration (6. servers. Networking Core (34 credits) NET 115 Windows 2000 Professional 4 NET 116 Windows 2003 Server 4 NET 117 MS 2000 Directory Services Implementation & Administration 4 NET 210 CCNA CISCO Network Support 6 NET 230 Network Administration (6. manage. Analyze. test. and troubleshoot NetWare operating system. Administer. hubs. and propose solutions relating to network printing. including the Internet (TCP/IP) protocol suite.5 DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 NET 115 MS Windows 2000 Professional 4 NET 116 MS 2003 Server 4 credits 17 . design an appropriate network topology and its transmission media.19 THIRD SEMESTER IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 NET 117 MS 2000 Directory Services 4 Implementation & Administration NET 210 CCNA CISCO Network Support 6 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 78 . workstations.17 SECOND SEMESTER ENG 112 English Composition II 3 MAT 121 Modern College Mathematics II or above 3 . Analyze.• • • • • • • Install and configure Microsoft operating system. and other physical network devices. manage.5 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 Humanities Elective 3 credits 15 .x) 4 NET 231 Network Adv. and troubleshoot an operating system.x) 4 NET 232 Network Design and Implementation (6. test.x) 4 NET 241 Network Protocols: TCP/IP 4 Semester by Semester breakdown FIRST SEMESTER ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MAT 120 Modern College Mathematics I or above 3 . Given a set of factors and constraints. Analyze.

NET 230 Network Administration 6.x 4 credits 17 FOURTH SEMESTER NET 231 Network Advanced Administration 6.x 4 NET 232 Network Design & Implementation 6.x 4 NET 241 Network Protocols 4 Science Elective 3 - 4 Social Science Elective 3 credits 18 - 19 Total credits needed for this program: 67-72 Web Development Option (ITWD): (30 credits) The Web Development option is designed for students interested in pursuing a career as a Web professional. Completion of this program option will provide students with the skills needed for entry-level positions as Web page designers/developers. Concepts covered include information design, navigation, and interface design. Students also learn to create Web sites using HTML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, and PERL/CGI, and how to incorporate new media technologies such as sound, video, and animation into Web sites and use state-of-the-art development tools such as Dreamweaver, Flash, Director, Sound Forge XP, Photoshop, and Media Studio Pro. In conjunction with the general education and IT core requirements the student should be able to:
• • • • •

Plan for a professional Web site including graphics design, structural analysis, and data gathering. Apply user interface design principles to create successful document organization. Create Web documents using current HTML/XHTML standards. Create Web pages using advanced formatting techniques, tables, frames, forms, Cascading Style Sheets, and Web publishing applications. Upload files to a Web server and update and maintain Web sites. Incorporate scripting languages into Web documents to add control and interactive elements.

Web Development Core (30 credits) IMM100 Interface Design and Director 3 IMM 205 Flash 3 DPR 108 Introduction to Computer Science 3 DPR 206 Programming for the Web 3 DPR 207 Introduction To Oracle: SQL 4 DPR 141 UNIX Operating System 3 DPR 209 Introduction to Perl Programming 3 NET 115 Windows 2000 Professional 4 or

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NET 230 Network Administration 6.x 4 DPR electives (select ONLY one of the following) DPR 205 Introduction to Java Programming 4 DPR 222 Visual Basic Programming 4 DPR 226 C++ Object Oriented Programming 4 Semester by Semester breakdown First Semester ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MAT 120 Modern College Mathematics I or Above 3 -5 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 Humanities Elective 3 credits 15 - 17 Second Semester ENG 112 English Composition II 3 MAT 121 Modern College Mathematics II or Above 3 - 5 DPR 108 Introduction to Computer Science 3 IMM 100 Interface Design And Director 3 Social Science Elective 3 credits 15 - 17 Third Semester DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 NET 115 Ms 2000 Professional OR NET 230 Network Administration 6.X 4 DPR 141 UNIX Operating System 3 DPR Elective (Select 1 From Below) 4 (DPR 205, DPR 222, DPR 226) credits 17 Fourth Semester DPR 206 Programming for the Web 3 DPR 207 Introduction to Oracle SQL 4 DPR 209 Introduction to Perl Programming 3 IMM 205 Flash 3 Science Elective 3-4 credits 16-17 Total credits needed for this program: 63-68

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Interactive Multimedia Option (IMM): (28 credits) The Interactive Multimedia option prepares students for employment as Multi-Media Artists, & Animators and Graphic Designers. This program option provides the student knowledge and skills to develop World Wide Web (WWW) pages and Computer-Based Training (CBT) applications that employ a variety of audio and visual media including animation, video and graphics. In conjunction with the general education and IT core requirements the student should be able to:
• •

• •

• •

Identify elements of effective multimedia, CBT and/or web applications. Utilize the instructional design process for CBT, multimedia and/or web applications, including needs and assessment, audience analysis, media selection, storyboarding, materials development and program evaluation. Determine the appropriate platform (or combination of platforms) for specific audience/environment (text, audio, video) and desired results for CBT, multimedia, and/or web applications. Use appropriate authoring tools and programming languages required for production of CBT, multimedia and web applications. Use high-level programming languages required for multimedia, CBT or web application development. Identify and incorporate the effective elements of interface design into a CBT or web application. Design and create multimedia, CBT or web projects that illustrate appropriate use of text, color, sound, video and user interactivity. Demonstrate ability to work in teams to create multimedia, CBT and/or web applications.

Interactive Multimedia Core (28 credits) IMM 100 Interface Design Using Director 3 IMM 110 Multimedia Graphics and Design 3 IMM 201 Audio and Video for Multimedia 3 IMM 202 Authorware 3 IMM 205 Flash 3 IMM 250 Portfolio Development 3 DPR 108 Introduction to Computer Science 3 DPR 205 Introduction to Java Programming 4 or DPR 226 C++ Object Oriented Programming 4 DPR 206 Programming for the Web 3 Semester by Semester breakdown FIRST SEMESTER ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MAT 120 Modern College Mathematics I Or Above 3 - 5

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17 THIRD SEMESTER DPR 105 Management Information Systems 3 DPR 206 Programming For The Web 3 IMM 205 Flash 3 DPR 205 Introduction To Java Programming OR DPR 226 Object Oriented C++ 4 Science Elective 3 . students should be able to: • • • • Create engineering drawings and related documents for design using computerassisted techniques. Plan and implement technical projects under engineering supervision.DPR 100 Introduction To Computers 3 DPR 108 Introduction To Computer Science 3 IMM 100 Interface Design And Director 3 credits 15 .17 FOURTH SEMESTER IMM 110 Multimedia Graphics & Design 3 IMM 202 Authorware 3 IMM 250 Digital Portfolio 3 Social Science Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 credits 15 Total credits needed for this program: 61-66 Mechanical Technology. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 82 . Associate in Applied Science (ATEC) The associate degree in Mechanical Technology is designed to prepare graduates with the knowledge and skills required of technicians in a variety of industrial fields. Present technical and graphical information in an organized fashion. Assist in the design of mechanical and electro/mechanical systems in accordance with standard engineering practices. Upon successful completion of this program.17 SECOND SEMESTER ENG 112 English Composition II 3 MAT 121 Modern College Mathematics II Or Above 3 .5 IMM 120 Web Page Development 3 IMM 201 Audio & Video For Multimedia 3 NET 110 Network Technologies 3 credits 15 .4 credits 16 .

The Delaware County Community College Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.org). Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 83 . The responsibilities of the medical assistant include administrative and clinical duties. MAT 141 or MAT 160. First Semester (16 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 * MAT 110 Technical Mathematics I 4 TCC 111 Technical Communications 3 TCC 112 Technical Graphics CADD 3 TME 111 Machining Technology 3 Second Semester (16 credits) * MAT 111 Technical Math II 4 PHY 100 Technical Physics I 3 TCC 121 Project Management Processes 3 TCC 122 Two Dimensional CADD 3 TDD 128 Detailing. Associate in Applied Science (MED) The Medical Assistant program prepares students as multi-skilled health care workers who function as assistants to physicians in a variety of ambulatory care settings. Assembly and Fixture Design 3 Third Semester (16 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 PHY 101 Technical Physics II 3 TME 216 Statics & Strength of Materials 4 TME 210 CNC Operations and Manual Programming OR TDD 216 Three-Dimensional CADD 3 Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester (17 credits) TME 220 Robotics and Programmable Controllers 3 Humanities Elective 3 TME 229 Fluid Power and Controls 4 TME 231 Technical Mechanics 4 TCC 228 Design Project Methods OR TDD 203 Kinematics OR TME 199 CSEL 3 Total Hours Required: 65 * MAT 140. MAT 161 may be elected instead.caahep. Back to top ↑ Medical Assistant.• The associate degree in applied science will be awarded after satisfactory completion of this four-semester program.

Upon successful completion of this program. Additionally. Any deficiencies must be remedied prior to registering for Medical Assistant Techniques and Practicum I (AHM 106). Full CPR certification is required. "BCLS" and "Heart Saver" are not acceptable. students should be able to: • • • • • Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomical structure and physiological functioning of the human body and of medical terms descriptive of body systems. Documentation of completion of the above must be on file in the Health Center prior to entering the Medical Assistant Externship (AHM 199). Students may be removed from the program for violation of patient safety. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 84 .upon the recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of The American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Describe the ethical and legal responsibilities of the medical assistant in the health-care delivery system. a complete blood count. All medical assistant applicants are required to submit a "Criminal History Record Information Report" and be free of any conviction of elder or child abuse for 10 years prior to beginning the first clinical course. reading and English skills. Apply selected principles of biophysical and psychosocial sciences in providing assistance to the physician. All medical assistant students will need to have on file in the Health Center the results of a complete physical examination including: laboratory tests. Health problems that can interfere with the applicant's ability to meet program competencies are considered individually. These externships are work/learning experiences for which the student receives no monetary remuneration or other reimbursement. Maintain business and patient health records. confidentiality or behavior incompatible with acceptable standards pending outcome of the appeal process. a 9-panel urine drug screen and TB testing prior to beginning the clinical component of the program. which is renewable every two years) or "Course for the Professional" (American Red Cross at 610-566-4580. Medical assistant applicants are required to take college placement tests in math. Certain manual dexterity and sensory abilities that will enable the student to competently perform required technical skills are necessary for successful completion of the Medical Assistant program. You must submit a photocopy (both sides) of "Health Care Provider" (American Heart Association at 610-940-9540. Identify the business/administrative and clinical duties of the medical assistant. which is renewable annually). students must have medical health insurance and be in compliance with recommendations for the Hepatitis B vaccine. Selected clinical externships will be provided in local medical offices and health care clinics under the supervision of the allied health faculty. serology.

0 G. medical assistant students are required to purchase uniforms and miscellaneous supplies. In addition to the normal tuition and fees. and a "C" or better in all allied health courses. The graduate is then eligible to write the examination for national certification administered through the American Association of Medical Assistants. 727-210-2350. FL 33656. First Semester AHM 104 Body Structure & Function I AHM 233 Medical Terminology ENG 100 English Composition I DPR 100 Introduction to Computers PSY 140 General Psychology Second Semester AHM 105 Body Structure & Function II AHM 140 Professional and Communication Issues in Health Care ENG 112 English Composition II AHM 100 Orientation to Health Care Third Semester AHA 207 Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Management AHM 106 Medical Assistant Techniques & Practicum I AHM 185 Medical Office Management SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology Fourth Semester AHM 107 Medical Assistant Techniques & Practicum II AHM 108 Conditions of Illness AHM 130 Medical Coding Concepts for Allied Health AHM 220 Applied Microbiology Humanities Elective Summer I or II AHM 199 Medical Assistant Externship Total Hours Required : 60 A certificate program is also available. Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs.• Function as an assistant to the physician in medical and/or other clinical settings.. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 85 . Clearwater.A. An associate degree in applied science will be awarded upon successful completion of the required program with a 2. 1361 Park St.P.

Analyze and resolve problems common to entry-level management personnel. First Semester (15 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 MATH 105 Business Mathematics 3 BUS 100 Introduction to Business 3 OFF 100 Keyboarding and Document Processing 3 OFF 215 Professional Development 3 Second Semester (15 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 BUS 214 Organizational Behavior 3 OFF 200 Microsoft Computer Applications 3 OFF 202 Microsoft Word I 3 Social Science Elective 3 Third Semester (15 credits) BUS 130 Business Communications 3 OFF 201 Advanced Microsoft Computer Applications 3 OFF 203 Microsoft Word II 3 OFF 252 Computerized Office Procedures 3 Science Elective 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 86 . process. Upon successful completion of this program. the student should be able to: • • • • • • • • • Create letters. tables. and format worksheets and charts using a variety of features. the most popular computer software product employed in business and government. and create databases for efficient data access and retrieval. Complete mastery of the product is stressed. clip art and animation. Discuss business terminology and concepts. Use Microsoft PowerPoint to design and create informational and motivation slides that contain hyperlinks. Use Microsoft Excel to create. Use strategies for merging and integrating source data from different applications using commands for object linking and embedding.Back to top ↑ Microsoft Office Specialist. Use Microsoft Access to plan. memos. Use FrontPage to develop a web site. Associate in Applied Science (ASEC) The Microsoft Office Specialist program prepares students to use the Microsoft Office products. reports and other documents using Microsoft Word. Develop personal qualities needed to function effectively with individuals and organizations in business. structure.

the student should be able to: Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 87 . The Associate in Applied Science Degree: Paramedic .Advanced Life Support program. The competencies and course content have been developed with significant consideration of the coursework developed by the Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic (EMT-P): The National Standard Curriculum. medical and CPR skills during practical examination Criminal Background Check Child Abuse Background Check Physical Examination and Drug Testing DCCC Placement Test GED/High School Diploma Valid Driver's License Delaware County Community College Program Manager for Public Safety Programs admits individuals to this program.Advanced Life Support Associate in Applied Science (EMTP) DCCC has instituted the following prerequisites and entrance requirements for individuals seeking enrollment in the Paramedic . Prerequisites: Current Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Certification (Pennsylvania or National Registry) Current Healthcare Provider level Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (American Red Cross or American Heart Association) Admissions criteria: • • • • • • • • • Oral interview Attain a score of 70% on a 100 question EMT written examination Demonstration of proficient trauma. Upon successful completion of this program.Fourth Semester (15 credits) OFF 253 Integrated Software 3 OFF 254 MS Web Software 3 Humanities elective 3 CSEL/Business elective(s) 6 Total Credits Required: 60 credits Paramedic . The primary focus of the program is to provide an educational vehicle and skill set for emerging paramedic professionals. The technical core of the program focuses on the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage and mitigate emergency medical disasters.Advanced Life Support program is designed for individuals who are seeking careers as paramedics and/or careers that are related to medical emergencies.

All Respiratory Therapy applicants are required to submit a "Criminal History Record Information Report" and be free of any conviction of elder or child abuse for 10 years Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 88 . Demonstrate the ability to comprehend. Demonstrate technical proficiency in all skills necessary to fulfill the role of a paramedic. treatment.• • • • • • • Demonstrate communication skills. Perform mathematical calculation skills. testing and care of patients with breathing abnormalities. Record documentation accurately. Demonstrate personal behaviors consistent with professional and employer expectations. apply. and evaluate clinical information. Perform pharmacology mathematical skills. First Semester (14 Credits) BIO 117 Human Anatomy 4 EMS 203 Introduction to Advanced Life Support I 4 ENG 100 English Composition I 3 NUS 102 Nursing Mathematics 1 EMS 205 Introduction to Advanced Life Support II 2 Second Semester (18 credits) EMS 120 Airway Management and Ventilation 3 EMS 110 Patient Assessment 3 BIO 118 Human Physiology 4 EMS 140 Trauma Systems and Mechanisms of Injury 5 ENG 112 English Composition II 3 Third Semester (16 credits) EMS 210 Medical Emergencies I 4 EMS 220 Paramedic Concepts and Practices I 6 EMS 136 Special Considerations -Assessment Based Management Seminar 3 SOC Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester (13 credits) EMS 211 Medical Emergencies II 4 EMS 221 Paramedic Concepts and Practices II 6 HUM Humanities Elective 3 Total Credits Required: 61 Back to top ↑ Respiratory Therapy. Associate in Applied Science (RESP) The Respiratory Therapy curriculum prepares allied health specialists for the management.

All Respiratory Therapy students will need to have on file in the Health Center the results of a complete physical examination including: laboratory tests. Admitted students must pass a drug test prior to beginning the program. a complete blood count. Provide appropriate mechanical assistance to support respiration when necessary. these students must have medical health insurance and be in compliance with recommendations for the Hepatitis B vaccine. Any remediation in English and reading must be satisfied before beginning the program. Credits for BIO 117 and BIO 118 must be current within five academic years of the date of beginning the program. Students who fail or withdraw from a respiratory therapy course and wish to repeat said course must: • • Have a GPA of 2. This service will be provided at a special college planning for advisement and registration for clinical. Students must achieve a grade of “C†or better in BIO 117. Perform diagnostic pulmonary function testing and blood-gas analysis. Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 to remain in the program. Upon readmission to the program. Maintain all equipment used in respiratory support. not the College Admissions office. The Pennsylvania State Board of Medicine reserves the right to deny a license to any candidate who has been convicted of a felony or any offense relating to the use or sale of alcohol or controlled substances in Pennsylvania or any other state. physiology. Health problems that can interfere with the applicant's ability to demonstrate achievement of program competencies are considered individually. students should be able to: • • • • • • • Administer therapeutic medical gases. Upon successful completion of this program. BIO 118 and CHE 110.prior to beginning the first clinical course. an objective evaluation will be used to determine if the placement of the student within the curriculum is appropriate. Administer drugs that are given through inhalation procedures. Petition for readmission is made through the Respiratory Therapy department. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 89 . Exercise judgment and accept responsibility in therapeutic procedures based on observation of patients and knowledge of anatomy. If a student is granted reentry into the program at his/her exit point. Certain manual dexterity and sensory skills are necessary for successful completion of the Respiratory Therapy program. Additionally. the student must complete the program within two years following the graduation of his/her initial class. pharmacology and clinical medicine. serology and TB testing. Readmission to the program is on a space available basis and only if the student can graduate within two years of his/her initial class. Students must progress through the curriculum in sequence. Administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation.5.

respiratory therapy students are required to purchase uniforms. Spring Semester (16 credits) RTH 102 Respiratory Therapy Principles II 2 RTH 103 Respiratory Therapy Practicum II 6 CHE 110 General Chemistry 4 BIO 118 Human Physiology 4 First Year. insurance and miscellaneous supplies. Summer II Semester RTH 105 Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical II 5 Second Year. Summer I Semester RTH 206 Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical III 4 Total Hours Required: 77 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 90 . Fall Semester (15 Credits) RTH 100 Respiratory Therapy Principles I 4 RTH 101 Respiratory Therapy Practicum I 4 BIO 117 Human Anatomy 4 PHY 140 General Psychology 3 First Year. the credential Registered Respiratory Therapist is awarded. the degree of associate in applied science is awarded. Upon completion of the two-year program with a grade of "C" or better in all respiratory therapy courses. The graduate is immediately eligible for the Entry-Level Certification Examination and after passing the Entry-Level Certification Examination. First Year. the student is eligible for the Advanced Practitioner's Examination.In addition to normal tuition and fees. Summer I Semester RTH 104 Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical I 5 First Year. Spring Semester (17 credits) RTH 202 Respiratory Therapy Principles IV 3 RTH 203 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Practicum IV 6 RTH 205 Pulmonary Pathophysiology Clinical Rounds I 2 ENG 112 English Composition II 3 Humanities Elective 3 Second Year. Fall Semester (15 credits) RTH 200 Respiratory Therapy Principles III 3 RTH 201 Respiratory Therapy Clinical Practicum III 6 RTH 204 Pulmonary Pathophysiology Clinical Rounds I 2 ENG 100 English Composition I 3 AHM 220 Applied Microbiology 1 Second Year. Upon successful completion of the Advanced Practitioner's Examination.

Create advertising promotions appropriate to the small business. Generally. sales.*MAT 100 will be prerequisite to the program (or demonstrate equivalent competence on placement exam). marketing. The associate dean. See Electives Listing First Semester (15 Credits) ENG 100 English Composition I 3 BUS 149 Small Business Management 3 Business Elective MATH 105 Business Mathematics 3 History/Social Science Elective 3 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 91 . students should be able to: • • • • • • • • Use terms and tactics within the small business environment. finance. Show proficiency in microcomputer applications within the management and operating needs of the small business environment. should be consulted when considering use of credits for transfer. Demonstrate the skills necessary to operate office equipment commonly used in the small company. business/computer information systems. Practical knowledge in small business management. understands the principles unique to small business operation. The 60-61 credit program leads to the awarding of the associate in applied science degree. Analyze and resolve problems involving financial statement comparisons. Upon successful completion of this program. Associate in Applied Science (BUSC) The Small Business Management program is designed to prepare students in both operational and skill aspects of the small enterprise. evaluation and control. Such preparation will equip students with specific areas of skills or management to either enter an existing small firm or begin their own entrepreneurial enterprise. Collegesponsored Experiential Learning may be taken for credit while working in a small business with specific managerial duties. advertising and supervision are designed to prepare students for entry-level needs. Understand personal qualities needed to function effectively with individuals in supervision. Develop effective communication to administer policy both internally and externally. Courses are designed so that the student. Back to top ↑ Small Business Management. through logical steps. Be able to develop a marketing plan. transfer is not intended through this program.

AHM 220 (Applied Microbiology) and remediation in English and reading must be satisfied before beginning AHS 100. The program includes courses in general and technical education. In addition to normal tuition and fees. the surgical technology student is required to purchase protective eyewear and regulation shoes. dialysis unit or ambulatory surgery unit. Students who fail or withdraw from a surgical technology course and wish to repeat that course must: Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 92 . central processing department. Associate in Applied Science (ORT) The Surgical Technology program prepares students to function as health-team members under the supervision of registered professional nurses or licensed physicians. Back to top ↑ Surgical Technology. All Surgical Technology applicants are required to submit a "Criminal History Record Information Report.Second Semester (15 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 ACC 100 Applied Accounting 3 BUS 233 Financial Planning 3 DPR 100 Introduction to Computers 3 BUS 215 Human Resource Management 3 Third Semester (16 credits) BUS 130 Business Communications 3 BUS 230 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 110 Sales and Sales Supervision 3 Science Elective 4 History/Social Science Elective 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) BUS 231 Principles of Advertising 3 BUS 211 Supervision 3 Business Elective OR BUS 199 3 Humanities Elective 3 Open Elective 3 Total Credits Required: 60-61 A certificate program is also available." Based on student ability and clinical focus. this program offers a multi-competency experience that prepares graduates for positions in the operating room. Selected clinical experiences are provided in local hospitals under the supervision of a College nurse instructor.

Credits for BIO 117 and BIO 118 must be current within five academic years of the date of beginning the first clinical course. You must submit a photocopy (both sides) of "Health Care Provider" (American Heart Association at 610-940-9540. serology and TB testing. a complete blood count. Assist in patient care during the immediate postoperative period. Petition for readmission through the Surgical Technology department. should be able to: • • • • • Identify the responsibilities of the surgical-team member in the care of the surgical patient. Students may repeat the surgical technology courses only once! Students may "wait out" of the program only a total of three years beginning with the last semester attended in surgical technology. not the College Admissions office. Additionally. Prepare the surgical suite for an operation. under direct supervision of a registered professional nurse or licensed physician. Students may be dropped from the curriculum for violation of patient safety and/or behavior inconsistent with professional standards pending the outcome of the appeal process. Prepare the patient.5. which is renewable annually) to the College Health Nurse prior to the first day of class.Have a GPA of 2. Full CPR certification is required for all students before entry into clinical courses. for surgery. Certain manual dexterity and sensory skills that enable the student to competently perform required technical skills are necessary for successful completion of the Surgical Technology program. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the clinical area. these students must have medical health insurance and be in compliance with recommendations for the Hepatitis B vaccine. Assist the surgical team throughout the intraoperative period. Second-year surgical technology students are required to have a record of a physical examination prior to the beginning of the third term. All Surgical Technology students who have a course with a clinical component will need to have on file in the Health Center the results of a complete physical examination including: laboratory tests. the student. Health problems that can interfere with the applicant's ability to demonstrate achievement of program competencies are considered individually. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 93 . physically and psychologically. "BCLS" and "Heart Saver" are not acceptable! Certification must be inclusive from September 1 through June 30 of each year. Upon successful completion of the curriculum. which is renewable every two years) or "Course for the Professional" (American Red Cross at 610-566-4580.

A certificate program is also available. 3 Open Elective 3 Total Hours Required: 63 Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 94 . See Electives Listing.only offered in Summer I (13 credits) AHS 200 Surgical Technique III 1 AHS 201 Surgical Technique Practicum III 6 Humanities Elective 3 Open Elective 3 Fourth Semester (15 credits) ENG 112 English Composition II 3 SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology 3 PSY 140 General Psychology 3 AHA 207 Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Mgmt. Applied Microbiology (AHM 220) 1 credit First Semester (17 Credits) AHS 100 Surgical Technique I 6 AHS 101 Surgical Technique Practicum I 4 BIO 117 Human Anatomy 4 ENG 100 English Composition I 3 Second Semester (17 credits) AHS 102 Surgical Technique II 4 AHS 103 Surgical Technique Practicum II 6 BIO 118 Human Physiology 4 AHA 204 Computer Applications in Allied Health 3 Third Semester . Prerequisite to AHS 100.An associate in applied science degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the required program with a "C" or better in all surgical technology courses. The graduate is eligible to write the examination for national certification administered through the Association of Surgical Technologists (AST).

Virginia and with Wytheville Community College in Wytheville. It is this type of collaborative relationship we envision the Workforce Development and Education Center would have with Eastern Shore Community College in partnership with Old Dominion University. Virginia.The following pages show the TELETECHNET courses offered by Old Dominion University in partnership with New River Community College in Dublin. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 95 . Old Dominion University offers bachelor. master. doctoral degrees as well as certificate programs. At the New River Community College Campus.

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copyright is retained on all digital catalog Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 100 .Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.

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and WHEREAS. it is mutually agreed by and between the parties as follows: A. the RESIDENTS agree that it is necessary that each must pay a specified sum during fiscal year 2006 to meet the needs of this joint endeavor. Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 108 .MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING FACILITY UTILIZATION COSTS BETWEEN SOUTHWEST VIRGINA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER AND UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. General cleaning and maintenance. and WHEREAS. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY and RADFORD UNIVERSITY (hereinafter “RESIDENTS”). NOW THEREFORE. CENTER will provide: 1. VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY. the CENTER will serve in the capacity of facility manager. concerning the sharing of costs and allocations of space within the facility operated by the CENTER. b. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY AND RADFORD UNIVERISTY This agreement is made and entered into this __ day of ________. and UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA. All utility services. it is desirable for all parties to work collaboratively in the use of resources to the greatest advantage in service to the higher education needs of the citizens of the region. 2005 by and between SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER (hereinafter “CENTER”). UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA’S COLLEGE AT WISE. VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY. WHEREAS. UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA’S COLLEGE AT WISE. Facilities & Scheduling a.

c.

Shared access to all classrooms, computer labs, science lab, grand hall, tiered auditorium, for institution courses offered at the Center.

d. e. f.

Shared faculty offices space. Audiovisual equipment subject to availability. One administrative office and one workspace for a support staff member.

g.

2 digital phone lines with D.I.D. (Direct Inward Dial) numbers and associated voicemail boxes. Additional digital or analog phone lines with voicemail boxes can be installed for an additional annual fee of $300 per D.I.D.

h. 2.

One storage closet and assigned cabinet space.

Furnishings, Fixtures and Equipment a. Administrative offices: shared access to copiers; fax machine; postage machine; color printer; digital scanner; telephone system; office furniture; computer server/network. b. Classrooms and labs: access to shared furniture, computers, printers, software, TV’s, VCR’s, projectors, screens, sound equipment, Videoconferencing units, SVETN classroom, LCD panels, basic equipment and supplies for science lab, and a video security system.

3.

Administrative, Instructional & Student Support Services The CENTER will provide public relations; budgeting and financial management; scheduling of the facility and special events; strategic planning with Board of Trustees, institutions and State government; mail pick-up, distribution and delivery; rental of post office box & bulk mail permits; program development and coordination; grant writing; science lab manager; and video tape for televised courses. The CENTER will provide staff for Information Desk and reception area in the Administrative Office Suite.

4.

Operation & Maintenance Services The CENTER will provide the normal utilities, general hazard insurance, custodial services, maintenance services, parking, security system, grounds maintenance, snow removal, and interior landscaping.

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RESIDENTS WILL: 1. Each pay the sum of $49,000 per fiscal year to the CENTER as the per capita cost for services and facilities provided by CENTER; payable by December 31 of each fiscal year. 2. Each pay for the maintenance and replacement of equipment, furniture and any other personal property owned by individual RESIDENTS. 3. Promptly pay, as billed by CENTER, for direct expenses incurred, (e.g. postage, long distance telephone charges, copying costs, paper, other disposables and the like). 4. Each RESIDENT shall be responsible for their individual cost of office supplies. 5. Each RESIDENT shall be responsible for their own costs of specialized insurances, as they individually deem necessary and appropriate.

GRAND HALL USAGE 1. RESIDENTS may have up to four (4) complimentary events per fiscal year, including sponsored or co-sponsored events. For RESIDENTS that exceed four (4) complimentary events, they will be charged the discounted rates listed in #3. For all events, RESIDENTS must pay direct expenses for linens, food, beverage, etc. 2. In order to qualify as a sponsored or co-sponsored event, a RESIDENT institution’s name must appear prominently on all publicity and print materials including the agenda, program, media ads, etc. Otherwise,

the current non-profit or corporate rates will be charged for the event. 3. The following rates are fixed rates for RESIDENTS for the 2006-08 biennium: i. ii. iii. iv. 4. 0 – 100 participants: 101 – 200 participants: 201 – 300 participants: 301 – and up per person: $100 $150 $200 $1 per person

When labor-intensive setup or an inordinate amount of technical assistance is required for a complimentary or sponsored event, an additional fee may be assessed depending on the complexity of the

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 110

event. The CENTER’S Director of Facility & Special Events will make final determinations on any additional charges assessed.

It is further agreed that should conflicts occur in scheduling, the decision of the CENTER shall be final. Should conflicts occur in the interpretation of this

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING, the affected parties shall meet together in good faith and resolve their differences. In the event the parties to a disagreement are unable to resolve their differences through meeting and consultation, the Agency Heads of the parties in dispute, or their designees, shall meet to consult and resolve the dispute in an amicable fashion.

Each party shall be responsible for their own acts of negligence and no party shall be deemed an indemnitor for the other.

This agreement shall be effective upon its execution and shall continue until June 30, 2006. In the event any RESIDENT desires to terminate this agreement, it may do so, provided termination is in writing to be effective at the conclusion of the quarter next following the quarter in which notification of termination is given. In the event the

CENTER desires to increase the annual fee, it may do so, provided that six month written notice is provided to all parties. All costs and reimbursements required

hereunder shall be computed on a per diem basis to the effective date of termination.

Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 111

for. and on behalf of The Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center ________________________________ Signature of Agency Head _________________________________ Title Read and approved as to legal sufficiency: _______________________________________________ __________________ Signature of Attorney for SW VA Higher Education Center DATE Workforce Development & Education Center Feasibility Study – Page 112 . and on behalf of ____________________________________________________________ (RESIDENT) ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Signature of Authorized Representative Title Signed this ______________day of _____________________. for.Signed this ______________day of _____________________. 2005. 2005.

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