EDEL453_spring2013_unit_2_PAVALON_Economics4th_Day4 %281%29 (1) | Resource | Lesson Plan

Title of Unit: Economics Everywhere Title of Lesson: Productive Resources Submitted By: Kelli Pavalon, La’Quisha Johnson

A. Summary of the Lesson Plan: This social studies lesson plan is designed for fourth graders to learn about the different kinds and examples of productive resources in economics.

B. Target Population:  Grade Level: Fourth Grade  Skill Level: Students of all mixed abilities  Grouping: Whole group, group work (learning activity) C. Materials:  Paper/pencils  Social Studies Journals  Lesson Outline: http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.php?lid=557&type=educator  Baggies containing labeled index cards of resources from “Pancakes, Pancakes”(5)  Worksheet Activity 4—Farm Resources (Hw-25 copies)  SB presentation  Book for Read Aloud: “Pancakes, Pancakes” D. Objectives: o NV State Social Studies Standards  o E10.4.4 Define productive resources.

Student-Friendly Standards • I can tell and explain the different types of resources in economics. • I can name each type of productive resource.

E. Procedure: 1. Warm-Up Activity: Review what we learned from yesterday’s lesson. Introduce today’s lesson by asking students the following question for discussion: What comes to your mind when you think of the word, “resources”? What kinds of resources do you and your family need, want? Brainstorm your ideas about resources with your team mates by offering ideas in a round robin. Then, discuss student responses as a whole class. 2. Begin SB presentation. Students may add info/pictures to their cornell notes if they want. Explain to the students that many things are needed to make a good or a service. These things are called productive resources. Tell the students that productive resources include o human resources, natural resources, and capital resources 3. Define human resources as the workers/laborers. Define natural resources as things that come from nature and are unchanged by human hands. Ask students for examples of natural resources. [Water, air, trees, minerals, dirt, animals] Define capital resources as
Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2013 Karen Powell- Instructor page 1

Title of Unit: Economics Everywhere Title of Lesson: Productive Resources Submitted By: Kelli Pavalon, La’Quisha Johnson

man-made tools and equipment used to produce a product. Ask students for examples of capital resources. [Factories, equipment, and tools such as hammers, saws, and computers] 4. Do learning activity: Read the book, “Pancakes, Pancakes” to the students. Ask questions before I begin reading the book to help them make predictions and generate their own questions. After reading the book, talk about the term “Productive Resources”. These are the resources that allow us to be productive and include natural resources, capital resources and human resources. Tell students we will be doing a team activity to classify and sort natural, human, and capital resources that are used in the book, “Pancakes, Pancakes.” Pass out a baggy containing all of the resources talked about in the book. Tell students they must work as a team to sort and classify each of the human, natural, and capital resources. I will walk around to assist as needed, and observe students’ understanding.  Closure: Review and discuss what we learned about today. Ask students to tell/discuss with their shoulder partner two examples of each kind of resource we learned about today. Assign social studies homework: Pass out and explain Productive Resources worksheet. Inform students we will be continuing on with our econ unit tomorrow. F. Assessment:  What will you use to measure student understanding? I will be able to measure student understanding by seeing how they do with the learning activity, and might also use a ticket out the door, asking students to name a resource and what kind it is. I will also take a look at student’s notes.

 Explain how you will know students understand the concepts from the lesson. I will know that my students are understanding the lesson if they are engaged, creating meaningful and purposeful discussion. Making sure students are engaged and their responses/discussions are on point is really important. I would also prepare a quiz at the end of the week/ unit.

G. Reflection: 1. Which part of the lesson do you think will be the easiest for you to teach? I think the activity will be fun to teach and monitor as students work together cooperatively to sort resources, and discuss them.

2. Which part will be most challenging for you to teach?

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 2

Title of Unit: Economics Everywhere Title of Lesson: Productive Resources Submitted By: Kelli Pavalon, La’Quisha Johnson

I think introducing the terms because they seem like big words and could be overwhelming for some students.

3. How will you follow up or extend this lesson? We planned on the next lesson being about trade. If I had the time to extend this lesson, I would create more interactive activities for students to practice with the terms.

4. What will you do for students who don’t grasp the concepts? I would pull students to the back for a more intimate instructional setting where I can offer more examples and individualized assistance. Have students who understand “coach” their classmates who may be struggling.

5. Which part of the lesson, if any, do you think might need to change? I might need to have students work on sorting activity with partners instead of groups. 6. When you were writing this lesson plan, what was the most difficult part? Finding ways all students can learn, making sure activities are meaningful and leave students wanting to know more about economics.

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 3

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.