You are on page 1of 224

electrical systems

electronic systems diagnosis


student guide
COURSE CODE: 34S19T0 ORDER NUMBER: FCS-13450-REF

IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTICE


Appropriate service methods and proper repair procedures are essential for the safe, reliable operation of all motor vehicles, as well as the personal safety of the individual doing the work. This manual provides general directions for accomplishing service and repair work with tested, effective techniques. Following them will help assure reliability. There are numerous variations in procedures, techniques, tools and parts for servicing vehicles, as well as in the skill of the individual doing the work. This manual cannot possibly anticipate all such variations and provide advice or cautions as to each. Accordingly, anyone who departs from instructions provided in this manual must first establish that he compromises neither his personal safety nor the vehicle integrity by his choice of methods, tools or parts. As you read through the procedures, you will come across NOTES, CAUTIONS, and WARNINGS. Each one is there for a specific purpose. NOTES give you added information that will help you to complete a particular procedure. CAUTIONS are given to prevent you from making an error that could damage the vehicle. WARNINGS remind you to be especially careful in those areas where carelessness can cause personal injury. The following list contains some general WARNINGS that you should follow when you work on a vehicle.

Always wear safety glasses for eye protection. Use safety stands whenever a procedure requires you to be under the vehicle. Be sure that the ignition switch is always in the OFF position, unless otherwise required by the procedure. Set the parking brake when working on the vehicle. If you have an automatic transmission, set it in PARK unless instructed otherwise for a specific service operation. If you have a manual transmission it should be in REVERSE (engine OFF) or NEUTRAL (engine ON) unless instructed otherwise for a specific service operation. Operate the engine only in a well-ventilated area to avoid the danger of carbon monoxide. Keep yourself and your clothing away from moving parts when the engine is running, especially the fan and belts.

To prevent serious burns, avoid contact with hot metal parts such as the radiator, exhaust manifold, tail pipe, catalytic converter and muffler. Do not smoke while working on the vehicle. To avoid injury, always remove rings, watches, loose hanging jewelry, and loose clothing before beginning to work on a vehicle. Tie long hair securely behind your head. Keep hands and other objects clear of the radiator fan blades. Electric cooling fans can start to operate at any time by an increase in underhood temperatures, even though the ignition is in the OFF position. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that the electric cooling fan is completely disconnected when working under the hood.

The recommendations and suggestions contained in this manual are made to assist the dealer in improving his dealership parts and/or service department operations. These recommendations and suggestions do not supersede or override the provisions of the Warranty and Policy Manual, and in any cases where there may be a conflict, the provisions of the Warranty and Policy Manual shall govern. The descriptions, testing procedures, and specifications in this handbook were in effect at the time the handbook was approved for printing. Ford Motor Company reserves the right to discontinue models at any time, or change specifications, design, or testing procedures without notice and without incurring obligation. Any reference to brand names in this manual is intended merely as an example of the types of tools, lubricants, materials, etc. recommended for use. Equivalents, if available, may be used. The right is reserved to make changes at any time without notice. WARNING: MANY BRAKE LININGS CONTAIN ASBESTOS FIBERS. WHEN WORKING ON BRAKE COMPONENTS, AVOID BREATHING THE DUST. BREATHING THE ASBESTOS DUST CAN CAUSE ASBESTOSIS AND CANCER. Breathing asbestos dust is harmful to your health. Dust and dirt present on car wheel brake and clutch assemblies may contain asbestos fibers that are hazardous to your health when made airborne by cleaning with compressed air or by dry brushing. Wheel brake assemblies and clutch facings should be cleaned using a vacuum cleaner recommended for use with asbestos fibers. Dust and dirt should be disposed of in a manner that prevents dust exposure, such as sealed bags. The bag must be labeled per OSHA instructions and the trash hauler notified as to the contents of the bag. If a vacuum bag suitable for asbestos is not available, cleaning should be done wet. If dust generation is still possible, technicians should wear government approved toxic dust purifying respirators. OSHA requires areas where asbestos dust generation is possible to be isolated and posted with warning signs. Only technicians concerned with performing brake or clutch service should be present in the area. Copyright 2002 Ford Motor Company Produced and Coordinated by Technical Support Operations Ford Customer Service Division October, 2002

CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS
Customer Expectations: Service

1. Make it convenient to have my vehicle


serviced at your dealership.

5. Provide me with a clear and thorough


explanation of the service performed.

2. The Service Advisor should


demonstrate a genuine concern for my service needs.

6. Call me within a reasonable amount of


time after my service visit to ensure that I'm completely satisfied.

3. Fix it right the first time. 4. Complete servicing my vehicle in a


timely and professional manner. Expectation 3

7. Be responsive to questions or concerns


I bring to your attention.

Fix It Right The First Time, on Time. Both service advisors and technicians are important players when it comes to Expectation #3. Why Customers tell us Fixing It Right The First Time, on Time is one of the reasons they would decide to return to a dealer to buy a vehicle and get their vehicles serviced. Technician Training It is our goal to help the technician acquire all of the skills and knowledge necessary to Fix It Right The First Time, on Time. We refer to this as competency. Technicians Role Acquire the skills and knowledge for competency in your specialty via: New Model STST Self Study Self Study FordStar Broadcasts FordStar Broadcasts Ford Multimedia Training (FMT) Instructor Led

Instructor Led
The Benefits The successful implementation of expectations means: Satisfied customers Repeat vehicle sales Repeat service sales Recognition that Ford and Lincoln/Mercury technicians are the Best in the Business

TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS COURSE INTRODUCTION ..............................................COURSE INTRODUCTION1 DAY ONE.............................................................................................................DAY ONE1 Agenda ...................................................................................................................Day One3 Students Objectives ..............................................................................................Day One4 Prerequisite Review ...............................................................................................Day One5 Workstation 1.......................................................................................................Day One15 Workstation 2.......................................................................................................Day One27 Workstation 3.......................................................................................................Day One35 Workstation 4.......................................................................................................Day One51 Homework ...........................................................................................................Day One69 DAY TWO ..........................................................................................................DAY TWO1 Agenda .................................................................................................................. Day Two3 Students Objectives ............................................................................................. Day Two4 Workstation 1........................................................................................................ Day Two5 Workstation 2...................................................................................................... Day Two25 Workstation 3...................................................................................................... Day Two35 Workstation 4...................................................................................................... Day Two45 Homework .......................................................................................................... Day Two65 DAY THREE ..................................................................................................DAY THREE1 Agenda ................................................................................................................ Day Three3 Students Objectives ........................................................................................... Day Three4 Instructor-led Demonstration.............................................................................. Day Three5 Workstation 1...................................................................................................... Day Three9 Workstation 2.................................................................................................... Day Three15 Workstation 3.................................................................................................... Day Three21 Workstation 4.................................................................................................... Day Three25 Homework ........................................................................................................ Day Three35 DAY FOUR....................................................................................................... DAY FOUR1 Agenda .................................................................................................................. Day Four3 Students Objectives ............................................................................................. Day Four4 Workstation 1........................................................................................................ Day Four5 Workstation 2...................................................................................................... Day Four11 Workstation 3...................................................................................................... Day Four17 Instructor-led Demonstration.............................................................................. Day Four23

Electronic System Diagnosis

October, 2002

Table of Contents i

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ii Table of Contents

October, 2002

Electronic System Diagnosis

COURSE INTRODUCTION

COURSE INTRODUCTION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Course Introduction 1

COURSE INTRODUCTION
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS CURRICULUM PATH
Basic Electrical Theory and Operation 34S11W0 Battery Starting and Charging System Theory and Operation 34S12W0 Electrical Diagnostic Tools and Testing 34S13M0 Basic Electrical Diagnosis 34S14T0 (5 Days) Electronic Theory and Operation 34S15W0 Understanding Electronic Systems 34S16M0 New Generation Star Tester Operation 34S17W0 Basic Worldwide Diagnostic Tool Operation 34S18M0 Electronic Systems Diagnosis 34S19T0 (4 Days) Networks and Multiplexing System Operation and Diagnosis 34S20W0 Antitheft Systems Operation and Testing 34S21W0 Entertainment and Navigation Systems Operation and Testing 34S22W0 Speed Control System Operation and Testing 34S23W0 SRS Operation and Testing 34S24W0 Advanced WDS Tool Operation 34S25W0

Advanced Electronic Systems Diagnosis 34S26T0 (4Days)

Planned Training Pathway Ford Motor Company has identified the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the curriculum goals in the Electrical Systems specialty. The Planned Training Pathway is a series of courses designed to provide you with these skills and knowledge. The chart above illustrates the courses in this curriculum. Description The Electrical Systems Curriculum consists of sixteen courses. The web-based courses and FMT courses are self-paced training programs. The Classroom course is hands-on and is facilitated by an instructor. The information in the Web, FMT, and Classroom courses are designed to prepare you to successfully complete the instructor led course. You are currently in course seven of the Electrical Systems Curriculum, Electronic Systems Diagnosis.

2 Course Introduction

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

COURSE INTRODUCTION
Course Overview This course has been designed to include both lecture and hands on activities. Students will have several opportunities to practice what they learn in the form of workstations. Audience Profile This course is designed for any Ford, Lincoln and Mercury service technician who wants to start their certification process in any specialty as well as those who wish to be certified in Electrical Systems. Course Prerequisites All students must have completed the first eight courses in the curriculum prior to enrolling in this course. Students who do not show passing credit in their STARS planners for the previous courses should not be admitted to this class. Their presence will slow down the course flow, as well as monopolize valuable instructor time.
z z z z z z z z

Basic Electrical Theory and Operation (Web) Battery Starting and Charging System Theory and Operation (Web) Electrical Diagnostic Tools and Testing (FMT) Basic Electrical Diagnosis (Classroom) Electronic Theory and Operation (Web) Understanding Electronic Systems (FMT) New Generation Star Tester Operation (Web) Basic Worldwide Diagnostic System Tool Operation (FMT)

34S11W0 34S12W0 34S13M0 34S14T0 34S15W0 34S16M0 34S17W0 34S18M0

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Course Introduction 3

COURSE INTRODUCTION
Course Objectives The objectives of this course are to enable you to: z Use the SSCC (Symptom-to-System-to-Component-to-Cause) diagnostic process relating to electronic concerns. z Use special tools and service equipment associated with electronic diagnosis and repair. z Use all service publications in their available formats and to obtain needed information for diagnosis. z Perform diagnostic test procedures. z Perform repair procedures. Number Of Days This course has been designed to span a four-day period. Number Of Students This course has been designed to include up to twelve students. Course Requirements To meet the requirements of this course, you must satisfactorily complete the hands-on posttest and achieve a score of 80% or higher on the written post-test. Both tests will both be administered on the last day of class.

4 Course Introduction

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE

DAY ONE

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 1

DAY ONE

2 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE AGENDA DAY ONE AGENDA MORNING

ACTIVITY

TIME

Introduction

8:30 am to 8:45 am

Prerequisite knowledge review

8:45 am to 10:15 am

Break

10:15 am to 10:30 am

Lecture

10:30 am to 11:30 am

Lunch

11:30 am to 12:30 pm

DAY ONE AGENDA AFTERNOON

Workstations

12:30 pm to 4:00 pm

Explain homework assignment

4:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 3

DAY ONE STUDENTS OBJECTIVES


Use the NGS to retrieve continuous and on demand codes and to monitor and record PIDs Use the WDS to retrieve continuous and on demand codes Define power side switches, ground side switches, relays, and transistors. Use the DMM and WDS with the oscilloscope function to check the operation of a thermistor, a potentiometer, and a Variable Reluctance Sensors (VRS) NGS WDS Continuous and on demand codes Power side switches Ground side switches Relays Transistors Thermistors Potentiometers Variable Reluctance Sensors (VRS)

CONTENT

4 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW

PREREQUISITE REVIEW

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 5

PREREQUISITE REVIEW DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW


1. What is meant by the term "electronic systems"?

2. What is an input?

3. What is an output?

4. Name some electronic systems.

5. What are some of the advantages associated with electronic systems?

6 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW PREREQUISITE REVIEW


6. The instructor will walk you through this question later. Please move on to question 7.

Inputs

Module

Direct Outputs

Indirect Outputs

Symptom: System: Component:

Cause:

Diagnostic Strategy: Inspection and verification Retrieve DTCs. Monitor PIDs Active Commands

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 7

PREREQUISITE REVIEW DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW


7. What are the similarities and differences between a transistor and a relay?

8. What is the difference between direct module outputs and indirect module outputs?

9. Why should you determine how an electronic system operates before diagnosing it?

10. What is a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC)?

11. How are DTCs retrieved?

8 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW PREREQUISITE REVIEW


12. What do PID's allow you to do?

13. What does Output State Control (Active Commands) allow you to do?

14. What is a digital DC signal? (Write or draw your answer.)

BEC603-A/VF

15. Name some input devices that produce a digital DC signal.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 9

PREREQUISITE REVIEW DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW


16. What is an analog DC signal? (Write or draw your answer.)

BEC603-A/VF

17. What are some of the input devices that produce analog DC signals?

10 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW PREREQUISITE REVIEW


18. What is an analog AC signal? (Write or draw your answer.)

BEC603-A/VF

19. What are some of the input devices that produce analog AC signals?

20. What is the unit of measure for frequency?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 11

PREREQUISITE REVIEW DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW


21. What is duty cycle?

22. What is pulse width?

12 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE PREREQUISITE REVIEW PREREQUISITE REVIEW


NOTE: Use the following schematic to follow the instructors presentation.
Interval Wiper/Washer
HOT IN ACC OR RUN 18

I/P FUSE PANEL

25A

65

DG C101F C101M

65

DG

65

DG 589 O WINDSHIELD WIPER DYNAMIC BRAKE/RUN RELAY

S110 65 DG 65 DG 65 DG 65 DG ENGINE COMPARTMENT FUSE BOX WINDSHIELD WIPER SPEED RELAY WINDSHIELD WASHER PUMP MOTOR RELAY

56 61 Y/R 28 BK/PK C101M C101F 28 BK/PK 58 DB/O

W C112M C112F C113

941 950 58 W C101M C101F C119 57 950 58 W W/BK


M

W/BK

12V
LO M RUN PARK

HI

WINDSHIELD WIPER MOTOR

BK/W C119 WINDSHIELD WASHER PUMP MOTOR 0V S104 SEE GROUNDS G102

61

Y/R

28

BK/PK 0V C233 0V C113 C112F C112M BK S103


10 WIPER SPEED CONTROL 21

C233
WASHER PUMP CONTROL

16

BRAKE/ RUN RELAY CONTROL

15

PARK SENSE

GENERIC ELECTRONIC MODULE (GEM)

57

BK

57

GENERIC ELECTRONIC MODULE (GEM)

SEE GROUNDS

G101

19

INTERVAL DELAY/WASH INPUT

RETURN 14 10

MODE SELECT INPUT

GENERIC ELECTRONIC MODULE (GEM)

C233 590 DB/W 993 BR/W 589

C234 O

C258F C258M 590 DB/W 993 BR/W 589


6 HIGH WASHER SWITCH 100 K W MAX INT OFF LOW 82 K W 68 K W INT. #2 MIN INT INT. #3 INT. #6 INT. #5 INT. #4 36 K W INT. #5 INT. #3 INT. #2 20 K W 3.3 K W INT. #6 LOW MIN INT HIGH OFF MAX INT 47.5 K W 11.2 K W 4.08 K W

O C259 MULTI-FUNCTION SWITCH FOR SWITCH TESTING

51 K W

INT. #4

BEC550-B/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 13

PREREQUISITE REVIEW DAY ONE

14 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1

WORKSTATION 1

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 15

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 NGS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will use the NGS functions to retrieve Continuous Memory DTC's, On Demand DTC's, view PID's and create a recording while diagnosing the front windshield wiper system using the wiring diagram manual. 1. List below the components of the windshield wiper system using the wiring diagram manual. Inputs Module Direct Outputs Indirect Outputs

16 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS


TECHNICIAN A: Use the NGS during this workstation. 2. Perform the following steps. a. Verify that the fault switch is in position A. b. Verify the symptom. c. Connect the NGS to the DLC. d. Select VEHICLE AND ENGINE SELECTION. e. SELECT NEW VEHICLE and choose the model year for the vehicle you are working on. f. Select vehicle model and engine size. Confirm selection and press TRIGGER. g. Select DIAGNOSTIC DATA LINK. h. Turn the ignition switch on. i. Select the module that controls the wiper system. j. Select DIAG TEST MODES. k. Select RETRIEVE/CLEAR CONT DTCs. l. Select START by pressing button 3. Use the table below to record any DTCs received during continuous code retrieval. DTC DEFINITION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 17

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 NGS


3. Continuous DTCs indicate: (Circle all that apply). A. A fault condition exists right now (Hard Fault). B. A fault may be occurring now. C. Fault may be intermittent. D. System being tested has no power. 4. Briefly explain how Continuous DTCs can help you diagnose a vehicle's concern.

5. Why do we clear Continuous DTCs?

6. When using the NGS, why should you always write down Continuous DTCs before clearing them?

7. When clearing Continuous DTCs, why should you use the NGS as opposed to disconnecting the battery?

Press button 7 CLEAR and follow on-screen directions to clear Continuous Codes.

18 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS


8. Were any codes reset? YES NO.

If you answered yes list below.

a. After codes are cleared, press CANCEL to return to the previous menu. TECHNICIAN B: Use the NGS during this workstation. 9. Use the NGS to perform the ON-DEMAND Self Test. a. Select ON-DEMAND SELF-TEST and press TRIGGER. b. Press START. c. Follow on screen directions. d. Carefully observe the system being tested for changes during the on-demand self-test. Briefly explain what happens to the systems outputs during the On-Demand Self-Test.

10. Use the table below to record any DTCs received during the On-Demand Self-Test. DTC DEFINITION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 19

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 NGS


11. On-Demand DTCs indicate: (circle all that apply) A. A fault condition exists right now (Hard Fault). B. A fault may be occurring now. C. A fault may be intermittent. D. System being tested has no power. 12. Briefly explain how OnDemand DTCs can help you diagnose a vehicle's concern.

13. Using the wiring diagram provided, list below the components and or circuits that could be the cause of the On-Demand DTC(s).

20 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS


TECHNICIAN C: Use the NGS during this workstation. Press CANCEL twice to return to the diagnostic menu. 14. Use the NGS to perform PID (Parameter Identification) retrieval. a. Select PID/DATA MONITOR & RECORD and press TRIGGER. b. Press 3 DEFN to view PID definitions. c. For each of the PIDs listed below, highlight and press trigger to select (This symbol * will appear when a PID is selected. To deselect a PID highlight the PID and press TRIGGER). d. As you select each PID, record its definition in the space provided. NOTE: If a PID is not available write N/A. PIDs CCNT IGN_R WASH_SW WPMODE a. Press CANCEL once to view selection menu. b. Press START. DEFINITION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 21

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 NGS


15. According to the CCNT PID, how many codes are stored in memory?

16. Move the fault switch to position B. View each of the PIDs on the NGS while operating the corresponding component and write your results below. NOTE: If a PID is not available write N/A. PIDs IGN_R WASH_SW WPMODE 17. Move the fault switch back to position A. View each of the PIDs on the NGS while operating the corresponding component and write your results below. NOTE: If a PID is not available write N/A. PIDs IGN_R WASH_SW WPMODE 18. Based on the PID values above, your understanding of systems operation and the wiring diagram provided, list below the circuits or components that are the potential cause of the concern. READINGS READINGS

22 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS


Use the NGS to view and record the WP_MODE PID. 19. Move the fault switch to position B and continue with the next step. a. b. c. d. Press CANCEL to return to the PID selection screen. Press button 5 CLEAR to deselect all PIDs. Select the WP_MODE PID and press START to monitor. Operate the wipers in the positions listed below and record the WP_MODE PID values. WP_MODE PID VALUES

Switch Position High Low Interval One OFF e. Press TRIGGER to start recording. NOTE: The NGS is recording your actions.

f. Operate the wipers in the High, Low, and Interval 1 positions. g. Wait ten seconds and press TRIGGER again. NOTE: The recording is complete.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 23

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 NGS


Use the NGS to view the recording. a. b. c. d. e. When the next screen appears select VIEW RECORDING. Press TRIGGER to select WP_MODE. Press button 6 GRAPH. This is a graphical representation of the PID. Press Button 8 to move forward in time. Press Button 3 to move back in time.

20. Use the scroll knob to place the cursor at the trigger point (0.0) in the picture below. A T will appear when you reach the trigger point. Label the NGS with the WP_MODE values on the left of the screen. Label the NGS with the time values at the bottom of the screen. Draw the graph as it appears on the NGS.

WPMODE

0.0

BEC113-A/VF

a. Press CANCEL to exit graphing function. b. Press button 7 TABLE. This is a table displaying the PID information. c. Turn the scroll knob to see the wiper mode change. NOTE: You can use the PLAY, REWIND and FORWARD buttons. 21. Did the wiper mode PID change after the trigger point? YES NO

24 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS


22. How can a recording be useful when diagnosing a vehicle?

23. Reset the workstation a. Press CANCEL several times to return to the main menu. b. Select VEHICLE AND ENGINE SELECTION. c. Highlight DESELECT VEHICLE and press TRIGGER (this will erase the vehicle from NGS memory). d. Turn off the ignition switch and unplug the NGS. e. Move the fault switch to position A to prepare the workstation for the next group.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 25

WORKSTATION 1 DAY ONE NOTES

26 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2

WORKSTATION 2

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 27

WORKSTATION 2 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WDS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will learn the basic applications of the WDS. You will Dock/Un-Dock the Portable Test Unit (PTU), retrieve Continuos Memory Diagnostic Trouble Codes (CMDTC), and retrieve On Demand Diagnostic Trouble Codes (ODDTC). TECHNICIAN A: Use the WDS during this workstation If the WDS screen is blank, touch it. If nothing happens, the unit is in suspend mode. In this case, touch the green "ON" button in the upper RH corner. 1. Undock the PTU and list each step taken.

2. What happens if you undock accidentally? (DO NOT COMPLETE THIS STEP)

3. How does the WDS receive its power to keep its internal battery running when not docked?

28 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS


4. Use the repair order and your knowledge of system operation to answer the following question: a. Verify that the fault switch is in position A. b. Refer to the Repair Order and verify the customer concern. What system (s) may be responsible for this symptom?

5. List below the components of the system identified in question four using the EVTM /Wiring Diagram manual. Inputs Module Direct Outputs Indirect Outputs

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 29

WORKSTATION 2 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WDS


TECHNICIAN B: Use the WDS during this workstation Touch 16 PIN from the menu. Now select ALL-EXCEPT THOSE BELOW. Select the CONTINUE icon. 6. Explain what the CONTINUE icon allows the user to do.

a. Follow the instructions on the screen to connect the Data Link Cable to the vehicle. Select the CONTINUE icon to proceed. The key must be in the RUN position. b. Wait while the PTU establishes communication with the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). The vehicle specification screen will appear. NOTE: Respond to any additional information questions if necessary. c. If the vehicle information is correct, select YES. d. Use the keypad to enter the VIN number (if required), repair order (RO) number and odometer reading. Select the CONTINUE icon to proceed. e. Once the WDS has identified the vehicle. Select the TOOLBOX icon. f. Select SELF TEST from the menu, then select the CONTINUE icon. g. Select ELECTRICAL from the menu, and then select the system that is appropriate to the symptom on the repair order. h. Follow the instructions on the screen, then select the CONTINUE icon to proceed. Observe the vehicle while the test is being performed. 7. What do you observe happening to the vehicle?

30 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS


8. List DTCs retrieved: DTC TYPE (check one) DTC ODDTCs CMDTCs CLEARED CMDTCs

NOTE: Touch each DTC to view a definition of each code. 9. From the codes above list below the DTC(s) and definition(s) related to the concern.

10. What pinpoint test in the Workshop manual would help you diagnose this concern? (DO NOT PERFORM THE PINPOINT TEST.)

Pinpoint Test:

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 31

WORKSTATION 2 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WDS


TECHNICIAN C: Use the WDS during this workstation NOTE: The WDS has pinpoint tests available for some DTCs. These tests can be performed without a workshop manual. 11. Select a DTC related to your concern with a question mark and select the CONTINUE icon. List the options that are available from the Pinpoint Menu. PINPOINT MENU

a. Select EXIT from the Pinpoint Menu and then select the CONTINUE icon. b. Repair the fault by placing fault switch in position B. c. Rerun Self Test by selecting the RETEST icon. 12. List DTCs retrieved. DTC TYPE (check one) DTC ODDTCs CMDTCs CLEARED CMDTCs

32 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS


a. Clear DTCs by selecting the CLEAR CODES icon. 13. List DTCs retrieved. DTC TYPE (check one) DTC ODDTCs CMDTCs CLEARED CMDTCs

a. b. c. d.

To exit the test, select the MENU icon in the upper RH corner of the screen. Select exit. Select continue Select the LOG VIEWER icon in the lower LH corner of the screen.

14. What type of information does the Log Viewer provide?

a.

Select the CLOSE SESSION icon in the lower LH corner of the screen.

b. Select DELETE from the menu then select the CONTINUE icon to finish. c. Place fault switch in position A, turn off ignition, and disconnect all cables from the WDS and vehicle. d. Re-dock the WDS. e. To ensure the WDS is fully docked, the external power LED should be lit (green).

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 33

WORKSTATION 2 DAY ONE NOTES

34 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3

WORKSTATION 3

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 35

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will trace power flow and measure voltage in a basic electronic circuit. You will learn about inputs, processing and outputs. 1. Name the load(s) in the circuit below

2. What type of switch is used in the circuit below? A. Power side switch B. Ground side switch 3. Trace the power flow through the circuit below using colored markers. Use red to indicate power, blue for power-side switched circuits, green for ground-side switch circuits, and black for ground.
12V

V
C D

BEC100-A/VF

A: Switch (Input) C: Resistor

B: Module D: Lamps

36 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


4. What will the voltage readings be with the module's internal voltmeter (V) connected as shown when the external input switch is opened and closed? Switch Open Switch Closed
12V

V
C D

BEC100-A/VF

A: Switch (Input) C: Resistor

B: Module D: Lamps

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 37

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


TECHNICIAN A: Perform set-up and step 5 Turn on the power supply. Adjust the Amps setting to maximum. Setup the digital multi-meter (DMM) to measure DC volts. Connect the digital multi-meter (DMM) leads to the positive and negative terminals at the rear of the power supply. Adjust the volts knob on the power supply until the digital multi-meter (DMM) reads approximately 12 volts. 5. Use the colored jumper leads to connect the circuit as shown and measure voltage with the DMM. Take the reading with the external control switch in the opened and closed positions. Turn off the power supply after you have taken the readings. Switch Open Switch Closed

FE-32
OPEN

CLOSED

12V

SINGLE SWITCH BOARD

FE-30

FE-34
B+

INTERIOR LAMPS

GND SW SENSE A-D V

B+

D-A CPU

POS SW SENSE

COLLECTOR MEMORY

GLOVE BOX LAMP

BOARD WITH GLOVE BOX LAMP

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC101-E/VF

6. What type of signal does this input produce? A. Digital DC B. Analog DC C. Digital AC D. Analog AC Disconnect the jumper leads from the circuit boards.

38 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


7. Circle the power side switch input(s) in the schematic below.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 39

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


8. Name the load(s) in the circuit below.

9. What type of switch is used in the circuit below? A. Power side switch B. Ground side switch 10. Trace the power flow through the circuit below using colored markers. Use red to indicate power, blue for power-side switched circuits, green for ground-side switch circuits, and black for ground.

12V

Signal Return GRD

BEC102-A/VF

A: Switch (Input) C: Resistor

B: Module

11. What will the voltage readings be with the module's internal voltmeter (V) connected as shown when the external input switch is opened and closed? Switch Open Switch Closed

40 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


TECHNICIAN B: Perform step 12 12. Use the colored jumper leads to connect the circuit as shown and measure voltage with the DMM. Take reading with the external input switch in the opened and closed positions. Switch Open Switch Closed

12V

FE-34
GND SW SENSE A-D V CPU B+

D-A

FE-32
OPEN

POS SW SENSE

COLLECTOR MEMORY

CLOSED

SIGNAL RETURN
SINGLE SWITCH BOARD

BEC103-E/VF

13. What type of signal does this input produce? A. Digital DC B. Analog DC C. Digital AC D. Analog AC Disconnect the jumper leads from the circuit board.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 41

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


14. Circle the ground-side switch input(s) in the schematic below.

42 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


An Electronic system consists of inputs, a control module, and outputs. In this workstation you have taken voltage readings to see what the module sees when monitoring switched inputs. The Central Processing Unit (CPU) receives the input as ON and OFF signals. The input circuit voltage is converted into an eight-bit signal in the Analog to Digital (A-D) converter. This signal is compared to a look-up table, which resides in the CPU memory. The CPU makes decisions based on the look-up table and sends a signal to the Digital to Analog (D-A) converter. In this exercise you will predict what the module will do. Use the look-up table below to decide when the module turns the lights on or off.
12V 12V

B+

Look-Up-Table INPUT >3V <3V OUTPUT OFF ON N/O N/C

Power to CPU

Grd Switch Sense

Input

CPU Collector Base P N N Emitter

Signal Return GRD BEC106-E/VF

15. Will the module turn the lamp on or off when it sees the following input signals? INPUT OPEN CLOSED OUTPUT

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 43

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


16. Name the load(s) in the circuit below.

17. Is the relay in this circuit acting as a power side switch or a ground side switch? A. Power side switch B. Ground side switch 18. Is the output transistor in this circuit acting as a power side switch or a ground side switch? A. Power side switch B. Ground side switch 19. Trace the power flow through the circuit below using colored markers. Use red to indicate power, blue for power-side switched circuits, green for ground-side switch circuits, and black for ground.

12V

12V

B+

Look-Up-Table INPUT >3V <3V OUTPUT OFF ON N/O N/C

Power to CPU

Grd Switch Sense

Input

CPU Collector Base P N N Emitter

Signal Return GRD BEC106-E/VF

44 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


20. What will the available voltage be at the following locations with the input to the module in the Open and Closed positions? Location Collector Relay Output at N/O terminal Input Open=Relay OFF Input Closed=Relay ON

12V

12V

B+

Look-Up-Table INPUT >3V <3V OUTPUT OFF ON N/O N/C

Power to CPU

Grd Switch Sense

Input

CPU Collector Base P N N Emitter

Signal Return GRD BEC106-E/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 45

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


TECHNICIAN C: Perform step 21. 21. Use the colored jumper leads to connect the circuit as shown. Measure available voltage at the following locations with the input switch in the Open and Closed positions. Location Collector Relay Output 22. Name the components in the diagram as direct and indirect outputs. Direct: Indirect:
FE-32
OPEN

Input Open=Relay OFF

Input Closed=Relay ON

FE-33
COMMON

CLOSED

12V

RELAY

N/O

N/C

SINGLE SWITCH BOARD

SINGLE RELAY SOCKET

FE-34
GND SW SENSE A-D V CPU POS SW SENSE V COLLECTOR MEMORY B+
B+

FE-30

D-A

INTERIOR LAMPS

SIGNAL RETURN

GLOVE BOX LAMP

BOARD WITH GLOVE BOX LAMP

BEC107-E/VF

46 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


23. Explain the difference between direct and indirect outputs.

24. Why is it important to know the difference between direct and indirect outputs?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 47

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 INPUTS, PROCESSING AND OUTPUTS


25. In the circuit below label the direct output(s) with a D and the indirect output(s) with an I.

Hot at all times F1.104 30A 704 14 DG/LG

P93 Battery Junction Box (BJB) (14A003) 135

Hot in run F2.23 10A 1 C270b

P91 Central Junction Box (CJB) (14A068) 1316

Hot in start or run 90 4 210 C220a 20 LB

A30 Instrument cluster 90) 4WD high 623

Hot in run F2.23 10A 1 C270b

P91 Central Junction Box (CJB) (14A068) 1316

See page 1316 37 C144 294 S228 20 WH/LB P113 Auxiliary relay box 3 994

See page 1316 S232 20 WH 294 1 422 ABS 2 C1290 Y274 4x2 center axle disconnect solenoid 1 145 2 C1290 20 GY/BK 1 605 4 C1291 20 RD C1046 20 WH/LB 294 3 2 S120 20 WH/LB C1046 C1291 Y275 4x4 center axle disconnect solenoid

C2107 K377 Mechanical Shift On the Fly (MSOF) relay C2107 22 OG

5 779 14 BN

2 976

18 145 22 GY/BK

15 605 7

C192 22 RD C201c A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) 595

14

3 not used 27 14 784 20 LB/BK S142 783 28

C201c 22 GY C192

783 21 1

20 GY C110

5 2

C110 C3146 A257 Transfer case assembly 9) Magnetic clutch coil 15116, 15117, 15118

784 14

20 LB/BK C175 A147 Powertrain Control Module (PCM) (12A650) 2210, 2310, 2410, 2510

22 2

0 1 2

C1177 N628 4x4 High/Low indicator switch 0 1 2 0) Low 1) High 2) 4x2 15116, 15117, 15118

BEC907-A/VF

Turn off the power supply and DMM. Disconnect all wires and return Workstation 1 to its original condition and complete the last activity at your desks.

48 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 3 NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 49

WORKSTATION 3 DAY ONE NOTES

50 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

WORKSTATION 4

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 51

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE

Thermistors are variable resistors that change resistance when temperature changes. They provide temperature information to a module in the form of an analog DC signal. Thermistors are made of a special resistive material that is very sensitive to changes in temperature. In most thermistors, as temperature increases, the resistance of the thermistor decreases. As temperature decreases, thermistor resistance increases. This change of resistance is used in a voltage divider circuit to produce an analog DC voltage that indicates temperature. This analog voltage begins as five volts, which passes through a current limiting resistor inside the module and then is wired to the external thermistor. Thermistors are two-wire sensors that are part of a voltage divider circuit. The voltage supply and current limiting resistor are internal to the module. The wire from the current limiting resistor to the thermistor is called the signal wire. This is where the module monitors the analog DC voltage signal created by the change in temperature. The wire from the thermistor to ground is known as signal return.

12V

Volt Reg 5V

C
Thermistor Signal T

Signal Return

BEC108-A/VF

A: Thermistor (Input) C: Resistor

B: Module

52 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will use a Digital Multimeter and the WDS Oscilloscope to measure the input signals produced by a Thermistor circuit, a Potentiometer circuit and a Variable Reluctance Sensor circuit. You will also learn how to identify these devices in a Wiring Diagram. TECHNICIAN A: Perform steps 1 4. 1. Using the DMM, measure the resistance of the thermistor.

2. While monitoring the resistance of the thermistor, warm the tip of the thermistor with your fingers. What happens to the resistance? A. Resistance increases B. Resistance decreases C. Resistance stays the same

12V

FE-24
REF

FE-21

B+

THERMISTOR SIGNAL

SIGNAL SIG RTN

SIG RTN

SIGNAL

VREF

POTENTIOMETER SIGNAL

POTENTIOMETER THEMISTOR

SIG RTN

BEC114-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 53

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE


3. Connect the power supply leads to the Voltage Divider Input board (FE-21) "B+" and Ground terminals. Adjust the power supply to 12 volts. Using the DMM, measure and record the available voltages at the following terminals. Thermistor Signal Signal Return 4. Connect the thermistor to "Thermistor Signal" and "Signal Return". Measure and record the available voltage at the following terminals. Thermistor Signal Signal Return 5. While monitoring the voltage between the signal and signal return terminals, warm the thermistor with your fingers. What happens to the voltage? A. Voltage increases B. Voltage decreases C. Voltage stays the same 6. What type of signal does a thermistor produce? A. B. C. D. Digital DC Analog DC Digital AC Analog AC

54 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

7. In the circuit below circle the thermistor(s).

A231 Remote Climate Control (RCC) module 7 788 10 20 RD/OG 15 470 5 20 PK/BK 23 790 15 20 WH/OG 6 468 9 C228 20 BN C219 14 788 22 RD/OG S221 790 22 WH/OG 468 1 22 BN 218 2 A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) C201b 592 22 WH/VT C287 B241 470 10 788 20 RD/OG P78 Integrated control panel S206 See page 105 G200 26 20 PK/BK C263 470 20 PK/BK 15121 5 398 C287 20 BK/YE

C198 B203

C233 B206

(19E702) 1511

(19C734) 15120

BEC903-B/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 55

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE


A potentiometer is a type of variable resistor that produces an analog DC signal. It is commonly used to convert mechanical position into an electrical signal. Potentiometers are used in electronic systems where the module needs to determine the position of a component. Potentiometers are composed of a resistive material and a movable wiper. Voltage is applied to one end of the resistive material. The other end of the resistive material is connected to a signal return (ground). The movable wiper arm in the potentiometer is attached to the signal circuit. The tip of the wiper contacts the resistive material. The wiper arm follows the movement of the component it is monitoring. As the wiper moves, the voltage signal to the module increases or decreases.
12V

Volt Reg 5V VREF

Signal

Signal Return

BEC109-A/VF

A: Potentiometer (Input)

B: Module

56 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

TECHNICIAN B: Perform steps 8 11. 8. Measure and record the resistance of the potentiometer between "VREF" and "Signal Return" 9. Measure and record the resistance of the potentiometer between "Signal" and "Signal Return" 10. With the DMM still connected, turn the potentiometer through the full range of motion. Record the readings at each of the following positions: A. At rest B. travel C. Full travel

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 57

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE

11. Connect the potentiometer to the Voltage Divider Input board as shown and measure voltage between the "Potentiometer Signal" and "Signal Return" terminals. Record the readings at: A. Rest B. travel C. Full travel V V V

12V

FE-24
REF

FE-21

B+

THERMISTOR SIGNAL

SIGNAL SIG RTN

SIG RTN

SIGNAL

VREF

POTENTIOMETER SIGNAL

POTENTIOMETER THEMISTOR

SIG RTN

BEC110-D/VF

12. What type of signal does a potentiometer produce? A. B. C. D. Digital DC Analog DC Digital AC Analog AC

58 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

13. In the circuit below circle the potentiometer(s).

Hot at all times F2.16 15A

Hot in run F2.28 10A

P91 Central Junction Box (CJB) (14A068) 1310, 1315

15 See page 1310 S205 385 4 729 11 VBATT 22 RD/WH 20 WH/RD

29

C270b

1303 Radio

141 Module Communications Network

298 12

22 VT/OG

832

20 LB/PK 833 20 TN

914

20 TN/OG 915 20 PK/LB C219

10 VBATT

3 SCP +

C228 A231 Remote Climate Control (RCC) module

SCP

8 570 1 398 20 BK/WH C219 20 BK/YE

20

22

21

C228

436

20 RD/LG

437

20 YE/LG

438

20 RD/WH

250

20 OG

249

20 DB/LG

S206 See page 105 G200 6 1 5 8 7 C289

ATX902-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 59

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE

A Variable Reluctance Sensor (VRS) produces an analog AC signal. It uses magnetism to generate its voltage signal. Variable reluctance sensors are used to provide position and speed information. By monitoring the frequency of the signal, the module determines speed. Higher frequency indicates higher speed. A variable reluctance sensor consists of a toothed trigger wheel called a reluctor (indicator) and a sensor, which is made of a permanent magnet with a coil of wire wrapped around it. This sensor is located at a specific distance from the reluctor (indicator). This distance is called an air gap.

BED304-A/VF

A: Coil C: Air Gap

B: Permanent Magnet D: Reluctor

60 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4


TECHNICIAN C: Perform steps 14 16. 14. Use the DMM to measure the resistance of the variable reluctance sensor and write your results 15. Turn off the power supply and connect power and ground to the DC motor a. Turn on the power supply b. Use the DMM to measure the AC voltage between "VRS +" and "VRS -" at each speed setting. Record the VRS AC voltage at each setting: Low Med High VRS AC V VRS AC V VRS AC V.

12V

FE-23

LOW

MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +

VRS

BEC111-B/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 61

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE

16. Use the DMM to measure frequency. a. Adjust the dial to the AC voltage position. b. Press and hold the yellow button in the center of the dial until it beeps (one beep then two quick beeps). c. The meter will now read AC frequency. What is the unit of measure for frequency?

Record the VRS frequency at each speed setting. Low Med High Hz Hz Hz

62 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4


TECHNICIAN A: Perform step 17. 17. Use the WDS to view the wave form of a VRS on an oscilloscope. Connect the WDS to the VRS sensor as follows: a. If the WDS screen is blank, touch it. If nothing happens, the unit is in suspend mode. In this case, touch the green ON button at the upper RH corner. b. Connect the WDS probes to the VRS sensor, red to "VRS+" and black to "VRS"-. c. Turn on the power supply and set the motor speed to low. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 63

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE


TECHNICIAN B: Perform step 18. 18. Set the motor speed to medium. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

64 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4

TECHNICIAN C: Perform step 19. 19. Set the motor speed to high. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

20. When motor speed increases the AC voltage: A. Increases B. Decreases C. Stays the same 21. When motor speed increases the frequency: A. Increases B. Decreases C. Stays the same

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 65

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE

22. What type of signal is associated with a VRS? A. B. C. D. Digital DC Analog DC Digital AC Analog AC

23. In the circuit below circle the Variable Reluctance Sensor(s).

VREF

A147 Powertrain Control Module (PCM) (12A650) 6 84 20 DG/WH C143 B44 136 2 C175 18 DB/YE C193 B110 9 359

A274 AX4S/AX4N Transmission 293 C199 20 GY/RD

85 282 20 DB/OG

38 354 1 20 LG/RD C1064 B10 T

970 2

C1064

C143

See page 246 1 359 C193 20 GY/RD 359 M 20 GY/RD S100

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD

C180 B41

See page 246 J

See page 246 L

See page 243 B

See page 246 N

C180

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD S104

359 351 20 GY/RD

20 GY/RD

See page 246 K

See page 244 E

See page 244 H

C1073 B230

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD S112

See page 244 3 925 20 WH/YE 2 359 C1073 20 GY/RD 359 F 20 GY/RD

See page 244 G 359 20 GY/RD S107

63

91

C175 SIG A147 Powertrain ConRTN trol Module (PCM) (12A650)

BEC904-A/VF

Turn off the DMM and Power Supply. Remove leads from the VRS/Hall board (FE23).

66 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE WORKSTATION 4 NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 67

WORKSTATION 4 DAY ONE NOTES

68 - Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE HOMEWORK

HOMEWORK

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 69

HOMEWORK DAY ONE


Read the material in the following pages in preparation for activities in Days 2, 3 and 4. THE GENERIC ELECTRONIC CONTROL MODULE (GEM) The Generic Electronic Module (GEM) is a body module that controls various vehicle functions. Because the GEM is a microprocessor controlled system, it has self diagnostic capabilities

GEM
SWITCHED TO GROUND
DRIVER'S DOOR AJAR SWITCH PASSENGER DOOR AJAR SWITCH LIFTGATE DOOR AJAR SWITCH SLIDING DOOR AJAR SWITCH DOOR HANDLE SWITCH WASHER FLUID LEVEL SWITCH REAR WINDOW DEFROST SWITCH SEAT BELT SWITCH OIL LEVEL SWITCH KEY-IN IGNITION SWITCH

RELAYS
WIPER HIGH/LOW SPEED RELAY WIPER DYNAMIC BRAKE/RUN RELAY WASHER PUMP RELAY SLIDING MEMORY RELAY REAR WINDOW DEFROST RELAY BATTERY SAVER RELAY INTERIOR LAMP CONTROL RELAY (DELAYED ACCESSORY) RELAY ONE-TOUCH-DOWN (DRIVER POWER WINDOW) RELAY

O I U N T P P U U T T S S

SWITCHED TO BATTERY
KEY-IN RUN SWITCH KEY-IN RUN/ACCY SWITCH KEY-IN START SWITCH HEADLAMP ON SWITCH WINDOW UP/DOWN SWITCH DOOR LOCK/UNLOCK SWITCH WIPER PARK SENSE SWITCH

INDICATOR LAMPS
DOOR AJAR LAMP SEAT BELT LAMP LOW WASHER FLUID LAMP LOW OIL LEVEL LAMP

ANALOG
BATTERY VEHICLE SPEED SIGNAL WINDOW CURRENT SENSE (HIGH/LOW) SIGNAL WIPER MODE SELECT WIPER INTERVAL DELAY

DLC

BEC980-A/VF

70 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE HOMEWORK


GEM OPERATING STATES There are two basic GEM operating states, the Operational State and the Diagnostic State. Each of these states have diagnostic capabilities available. Operational State The Operational State allows the GEM to execute normal operating strategy, store Continuous DTC's when faults are detected, and automatically clear any continuous DTC's when 80 ignition START cycles have been achieved without the fault being detected. During the Operational State, all functions of the GEM are still enabled, having the following diagnostic capabilities: Detect faults and store Continuous DTC's Clear Continuous DTC's Report Continuous DTC's Report Parameter Identification (PID) values/ Datalogger Enter the Diagnostic State Diagnostic State Using a scan tool (NGS/WDS), the technician has the capability to control diagnostic testing of the GEM by turning on various outputs, reading GEM inputs, retrieving DTC'S, clearing DTC'S, and initiating diagnostic tests or commands. All GEM controlled outputs are set to a default condition upon entering the Diagnostic State. All GEM input/output activities will be affected. The GEM's functions will return to normal operation and the output devices will be reactivated when the Diagnostic State is exited. While in the Diagnostic State, all functions of the module are disabled, allowing for the following tests: On-Demand Self-Test Active Command Test/ Output State Command Report Parameter Identification (PID) values/ Datalogger Diagnostic State Entry A technician can enter diagnostic state by: Requesting a Self-Test Requesting an Active Command Mode/ Output State Command

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 71

HOMEWORK DAY ONE


DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC's) Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's) are common diagnostic fault codes used across all vehicle lines, systems, and subsystems. DTC's are: five-digit codes categorized as either Powertrain (P), Body (B), Chassis (C), or Undefined (U). DTC's have only one specific meaning attached to each code, regardless of which module generates the code. DTC's are used to indicate faults on one or more of the GEM's input/output circuits. The GEM has the capability to retain all DTC's in memory for 80 ignition START cycles. There are two types of DTC'S: Continuous DTC's (logged during normal vehicle operation), and On-Demand DTC's (logged during an On-Demand Self-Test initiated by the technician).

One of the greatest benefits DTC's allow us is the ability to detect system faults and report them. This is accomplished by an internal mechanism in the GEM that contains logic designed to observe a specific type of behavior, and if that behavior ventures outside of what the logic declares as "normal operation," the GEM will generate a Continuous DTC. The next time the technician requests information, the GEM will report the Continuous DTC(s). The most common conditions that would cause a DTC to be generated include: a circuit failure an open circuit a short circuit-to-ground a short circuit-to-battery DTC's also allow us to compare On-Demand Self-Test DTC's with Continuous DTC'S. If a DTC is detected during Continuous mode, but not during On-Demand Self-Test mode, then there is an intermittent fault (the failure existed once, but is now gone when On-Demand Self-Test is run). If a DTC is an On-Demand Self-Test code, there is a hard fault (an existing problem that can be isolated).

72 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE HOMEWORK


CONTINUOUS DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC's) Continuous DTC's are only logged during normal vehicle operation. When the GEM energizes an external device, a faulty circuit condition may exist. If the device is successfully energized before one second elapses, a Continuous DTC is not stored and no fault management action is taken. If the fault continues after a predetermined fault time, a Continuous DTC is stored and appropriate fault management action is taken. Continuous DTC's should be retrieved from the GEM before an On-Demand Self-Test is run. These Continuous DTC's are then compared by the technician against the DTC's retrieved after running an On-Demand Self-Test. Results of Continuous and On-Demand Self-Test DTC's will determine whether a fault is a hard fault or an intermittent one. After retrieving Continuous DTC's the codes should be manually cleared. Clearing DTC's Manually Using a scan tool (NGS/WDS), DTC's can be cleared manually in one of two ways, clearing only a single DTC, or clearing all DTC's at once. Clearing DTC's Automatically DTC's are cleared automatically when the fault is no longer detected by the GEM for 80 ignition START cycles.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 73

HOMEWORK DAY ONE


ON-DEMAND SELF-TEST An On-Demand Self-Test: does not involve elaborate testing covers most fault conditions The On-Demand Self-Test consists of an internal GEM test and a GEM subsystem input/output circuitry test. A general requirement of an On-Demand Self-Test is that no action by the technician, such as activating a switch during the test, will be required. The On-Demand Self-Test is designed to test the GEM's subsystem input output circuitry in a quick and efficient manner. While the On-Demand Self-Test is designed to test input/output circuitry, it cannot test complete circuits or components. Running an On-Demand Self-Test The technician cannot activate any controls while an On- Demand Self-Test is running or a false DTC may be generated. Before initiating a test, the GEM and its subsystems must be set up in a defined state. On-Demand Self-Test Results Results of an On-Demand Self-Test are in the form of DTC'S, which the NGS/WDS will display automatically.

74 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE HOMEWORK


DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC's) AND CUSTOMER CONCERN DIAGNOSIS Hard Faults Hard faults are reported as DTC's during an On-Demand Self- Test, and reflect faults that currently exist in the GEM control system. EXAMPLE: An On-Demand Self-Test is run on the windshield wiper/washer system, and the results of the test indicate an open in the relay coil's circuit. A fault is reported, indicating a failure currently exists. The technician can now use diagnostic testing to trace the circuit backwards from the suspected faulty component to the GEM. Intermittent Faults Intermittent faults are apparent when a Continuous DTC exists and an On-Demand Self-Test does not detect the same fault. NOTE: A DTC generated during a Continuous Test must also be a valid DTC for the OnDemand Self-Test. If the DTC is valid for both sets, and if the DTC was generated in the continuous mode but not after an On-Demand Self-Test was run, then the fault is classified as intermittent. EXAMPLE: An On-Demand Self-Test is run on the windshield wiper/washer system, and the results of the test indicate no faults are presently detected in the relay coil; yet, there is a Continuous DTC indicating an open in the relay driver circuit. The DTC has already been determined to be valid for both continuous and on-demand modes. Therefore the fault is classified as intermittent. INTERMITTENT FAULTS Continuous DTCs HARD FAULTS On-Demand DTCs Continuous DTCs (*) (*) Continuous DTCs may be caused by a hard fault if the continuous code has been cleared. Then the vehicle is operated and the code reappears.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 75

HOMEWORK DAY ONE


SYMPTOMS WITHOUT DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC's) In cases where there are no DTC'S, the technician must first determine, via customer symptoms, whether the concern is input or output related. FAULT ISOLATION During On-Demand Self-Test, inputs and outputs may be seen by the GEM as operating correctly, yet a concern may still exist. In a case such as this the concern is beyond GEM's vision. To verify whether the concern is an input or output problem, the technician should use Parameter Identifications (PIDs) to check for an input concern, or Active Commands to check for an output concern. To verify that the input devices and wiring are satisfactory, the technician would view the PIDs to see if GEM recognizes the inputs change of state. If the input is correct, the output is at fault. To verify that the output circuit is satisfactory, the technician would use Active Commands to activate the component. If the output is correct, the input is at fault. In order for the technician to verify an input concern, the technician must check Parameter Identifications (PIDs). In order for the technician to verify an output concern, the technician must utilize Active Commands. PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION (PID) DATA MONITOR/ DATALOGGER Parameter Identifications (PIDs) read information relative to a status of the GEM. PIDs are the primary diagnostic tool used to indicate input/output circuitry status. EXAMPLE: Without PIDs there were times when you may have needed a voltmeter to measure and check module status, but with a PID you can have the module report the status to you through the NGS/WDS. PIDs allow you to monitor input/output values as seen by GEM. ACTIVE COMMANDS/ OUTPUT STATE COMMAND Active Commands allow the NGS/WDS to control GEM outputs and enable the technician to toggle/actuate outputs (components), allowing for the examination and/or measurement of circuit values. The NGS/WDS places the GEM in the Diagnostic State prior to sending an active command. Active commands are used to turn on various output devices. Depending on the type of output being looked at, one of several things can be done: do a visual check, monitor PIDs or conduct a resistance or voltage measurement. The technician should first try to isolate the problem by starting at the suspected faulty component and working backwards through the circuit to the GEM.

76 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY ONE HOMEWORK


Customer Concern Diagnosis Customer concern diagnosis should follow a specific diagnostic procedure, Symptom to System to Component to Cause. EXAMPLE: A customer comes into your dealership with a concern that the illuminated entry is not operating. The Symptom would be that the illuminated entry is not operating. The System would be illuminated entry. The Component and the Cause portion of the procedure would be arrived at through diagnosis. The following process correctly indicates the diagnostic procedure: 1. Customer symptoms should be the primary consideration when performing diagnostic procedures. 2. Verify the Customer Concern. 3. Verify which system or systems are at fault then refer to the appropriate Workshop Manual section. 4. Check OASIS, TSBs and Vehicle History. Then, refer to the appropriate Workshop Manual section. 5. Use the Inspection & Verification chart to determine whether the concern is mechanical or electrical. 6. The the Inspection & Verification chart will initially recommend a visual check of the following items: blown fuse loose or corroded electrical connectors loose or corroded ground damaged switch damaged components Once a visual check of the system has been made, you will, then, be directed to access the GEM for Continuous DTCs and On-Demand DTCs. 7. Proceed to the Symptom or DTC Chart of the appropriate system identified. 8. The Symptom or DTC Chart will indicate an appropriate Pinpoint Test based on the verified concern and you may be directed to monitor PIDs and perform Active Commands. 9. The Pinpoint Test will initially recommend a visual check of the following items: - blown fuse - loose or corroded electrical connectors - loose or corroded ground - damaged switch - damaged component Once a visual check of the system has been made, you will then be directed to access the GEM for Continuous DTC's, On-Demand DTC'S, PID's and Active Commands. After the concern has been diagnosed and corrected, manually erase the DTC(s), operate the vehicle to try to reproduce the concern, then rerun Continuous DTC's and the On-Demand SelfTest.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day One 77

HOMEWORK DAY ONE


Listed below are the diagnostic steps that Ford Motor Company recommends you use when diagnosing a vehicle with a customer concern. They are out of order. Place the steps in the correct order by writing a number from 1 to 10 in the space provided. Activate the system to verify that the symptom is no longer present Isolate the concern Check OASIS, TSBs, and Vehicle History Rerun the continuous and on-demand self-test to verify that the repair corrected the concern Determine which system or systems are most responsible for the concern. Go to the Symptom or DTC Chart and identify the appropriate pinpoint test Perform the pinpoint test Identify and verify the customer's concern Repair the concern and manually clear DTCs Use Inspection & Verification chart to check for mechanical or electrical concerns and retrieve DTCs

78 Day One

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO

DAY TWO

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 1

DAY TWO

2 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO

DAY TWO AGENDA MORNING

ACTIVITY

TIME

Review of Day One workstations and homework

8:30 am to 10:15 am

Break

10:15 am to 10:30 am

Lecture

10:30 am to 11:30 am

Lunch

11:30 am to 12:30 pm

DAY TWO AGENDA AFTERNOON

Workstations

12:30 pm to 4:00 pm

Explain homework assignment

4:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 3

DAY TWO

STUDENTS OBJECTIVES
Monitor and record PID values for the Intake Air Temperature Sensor and the Throttle Position Sensor. Determine which DTCs will be set when faults are inserted in a circuit. Use the datalogger function to monitor and record PID values. Use the WDS to view and capture information using the datalogger function. Use Active Commands to control outputs. Use the SSCC process and the active command function to diagnose a lighting concern. Describe voltage reference and the meter function of the NGS active command mode. Describe normal operation of Hall Effect sensors and phototransistors. Describe output signals used in electronic systems: Duty cycle Pulse width Analog input

CONTENT
PID values WDS datalogger function Active commands and Output State Controls Hall Effect sensors Phototransistors Duty cycle Pulse width Analog input

4 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1

WORKSTATION 1

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 5

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


DIRECTIONS: TECHNICIAN A: Perform steps 1-18 of this workstation. In this workstation you will use the NGS to obtain PID values for the Intake Air Temperature Sensor and the Throttle Position Sensor. Please use the mockup sensors rather than the vehicles sensors for this workstation. IAT OVERVIEW The IAT provides air temperature information to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). The PCM uses the air temperature information as a correction factor when calculating fuel, spark and air flow to the engine. Some vehicles have a stand alone IAT and some vehicles have the IAT integrated in the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor.

1. Use the table below and the wiring diagram to identify the IAT Signal and Signal Return wires for the Intake Air Temperature (IAT) sensor on the vehicle you are working on. Write the circuit number and wire color for each wire in the table. Circuit Number IAT SIG SIG RTN Wire Color

6 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


a. b. c. d. e. f. Connect the NGS and prepare the NGS for the vehicle you are working on. Select diagnostic data link Select PCM Select PID data monitor and record. Choose SELECT ALL Select the IAT, IATV, TPV, and TP_MODE PIDs.

NOTE: Use the 1 and 0 on the NGS keypad to move forward and back one screen at a time. Use 2 and 9 to move to the beginning and end of the screen. g. Select START 2. With no faults in the IAT circuit complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values.

VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC801-B/VF

IAT Volts

NOTE: Connect the negative DMM lead to the battery ground. 3. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 7

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


4. Create an open in the IAT SIGNAL WIRE. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

IAT Volts

BEC802-B/VF

5. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM with an open signal wire? A. P0112 B. P0113 C. No DTCs will be set DTC CHART P0112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit Low Input P0113 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit High Input

Indicates the sensor signal is less than Self-Test minimum. The IAT sensor minimum is 0.2 volts or 121C (250F). Indicates the sensor signal is greater than Self-Test maximum. The IAT sensor maximum is 4.6 volts or -50C (-58F).

IAT V PID reading less than 0.2 volts with key ON and engine OFF or during any engine operating mode indicates a hard fault. IAT V PID reading greater than 4.6 volts with key ON and engine OFF or during any engine operating mode indicates a hard fault.

6. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO If you answered yes, which ones?

8 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


7. Repair signal wire and then create an open in the IAT SIGNAL RETURN wire. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

IAT Volts

BEC803-B/VF

8. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0112 B. P0113 C. No DTCs will be set 9. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 9

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


10. Repair signal return wire and then place resistor wire A in the IAT SIGNAL wire. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

IAT Volts

BEC804-B/VF

11. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0112 B. P0113 C. No DTCs will be set 12. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

10 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


13. Repair signal wire and then place resistor wire A in the IAT SIGNAL RETURN wire. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

IAT Volts

BEC805-B/VF

14. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0112 B. P0113 C. No DTCs will be set 15. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 11

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


16. Repair signal return wire and then create a short from the IAT SIGNAL wire to ground. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

Signal

V
SIGNAL T

IAT Deg.
PCM

Signal Return

SIGNAL RETURN

V
BEC806-B/VF

IAT Volts

17. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0112 B. P0113 C. No DTCs will be set 18. Warm the IAT with your finger while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

12 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


TECHNICIAN B: Perform steps 19-33 of this workstation. TP OVERVIEW The Throttle Position Sensor (TP) is mounted on the throttle body and is attached to the throttle shaft. The sensor is used to send three operating conditions to the PCM. Those conditions are closed throttle (CT), part throttle (PT) and wide open throttle (WOT). Please use the mockup sensors rather than the vehicles sensors for this workstation. 19. Use the table below and the wiring diagram to identify the VREF, TP Signal and Signal Return wires for the Throttle Position (TP) sensor on the vehicle you are working on. Write the wire color for each wire in the table.

SIG RTN

Circuit Number

Wire Color

TP

Circuit Number

Wire Color

VREF

Circuit Number

Wire Color

DTC CHART If during key ON engine OFF P0122 - Throttle TP voltage is below a Position (TP) Circuit Low Input minimum calibrated limit, the test fails. If during key ON engine OFF P0123 - Throttle TP voltage is above Position (TP) Circuit High Input maximum calibrated limit, the test fails.

A TP PID (TP V PID) reading less than 3.42% (0.17 volt) in key ON engine OFF, continuous memory or key ON engine running indicates a hard fault. A TP PID (TP V PID) reading greater than 93% (4.65 volts) in key ON engine OFF, continuous memory or key ON engine running indicates a hard fault.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 13

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


20. With no faults in the TP circuit, complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

TP Mode
PCM

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC808-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

21. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? If you answered yes, which ones? YES NO

14 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


22. Create an open in the TP VREF circuit and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

TP Mode
PCM

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC809-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

23. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 24. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? If you answered yes, which ones? YES NO

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 15

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


25. Repair VREF wire and then create an open in the TP Signal circuit and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

TP Mode
PCM

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC810-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

26. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set

27. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? If you answered yes, which ones? YES NO

16 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


28. Repair signal wire and then create an open in the TP Signal Return circuit and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

TP Mode
PCM

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC811-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

29. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 30. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 17

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


31. Repair signal return wire and then place resistor wire B in the TP VREF circuit and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC812-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

32. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 33. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

18 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


TECHNICIAN C: Perform steps 34-48 of this workstation. 34. Repair VREF wire and then place resistor wire B in the TP Signal circuit Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC813-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

35. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 36. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 19

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


37. Repair the TP signal wire and then place resistor wire B in the TP Signal Return circuit. Complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC814-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

38. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 39. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

20 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


40. Repair Signal Return wire and then create a short from the TP Signal circuit to ground and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC815-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

41. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 42. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 21

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


43. Repair signal wire and then create a short from the TP Signal Return circuit to ground and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC816-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

44. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. P0122 B. P0123 C. No DTCs will be set 45. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? YES NO

If you answered yes, which ones?

22 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS PID DATA


46. Repair signal return wire and then create a short from the TP VREF circuit to ground and complete the table below with voltage at component and PID values. VOLTAGE AT COMPONENT
VREF

PID VALUE

VREF

V
VREF

PCM

TP Mode

Signal

SIGNAL

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC817-B/VF

Signal Return

TP Volts V

47. Refer to the DTC Chart. What code will be set by the PCM? A. B. C. D. P0122 P0123 No DTCs will be set No communication

48. Operate the TP sensor while monitoring PIDs. Do any of the values change? If you answered yes, which ones? YES NO

Turn the ignition OFF and disconnect the NGS. Return Workstation to its original condition.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 23

WORKSTATION 1 DAY TWO NOTES

24 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO-WORKSTATION 2

WORKSTATION 2

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 25

WORKSTATION 2 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will use the WDS to view and capture information using the datalogger function. TECHNICIAN B: Use the WDS during this workstation. 1. Refer to the Repair Order and verify the customer concern. What system(s) may be responsible for this symptom?

2. List below the components that may be the cause of the concern of the suspected faulty system using the EVTM /Wiring Diagram manual.

Inputs

Module

Direct Outputs

Indirect Outputs

26 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. ID the vehicle Select TOOLBOX Select Self-Test Select CONTINUE Select BODY. Select SECURITY. Select PERIMETER. Select CONTINUE. Read instructions. Select CONTINUE.

3. Perform a self-test on the Perimeter anti-theft security system that is at fault. List any DTCs related to the concern.

a. Select the TOOLBOX icon. b. Select DATALOGGER. c. Select CONTINUE (This will bring you to the System Identification screen which is represented by this icon) d. e. f. g. Select BODY. Select SECURITY. Select PERIMETER. Select CONTINUE.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 27

WORKSTATION 2 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


NOTE: In order to view the functions of an icon, press and hold the icon and read the description in the status bar. 4. What does this icon allow you to do?

5. What does this icon allow you to do?

6. What does this icon allow you to do?

a. Press the PARAMETER SELECTION icon.

b. Press the CLEAR PIDs icon.

c. Select the KEY CODE, KEYPAD, and TNSMT_CMD PIDs NOTE: The selected PIDs are dark gray with white lettering. d. View the live data by pressing the CONTINUE icon. 7. What is the key code for this vehicle?

8. Use the vehicle key code to verify the customer concern. Was the customer concern verified? YES NO

28 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


9. List below the keypad PID values with the button pressed.

BUTTON 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-0

PID VALUES

10. What component or circuit could be the cause of the concern?

Using the WDS to record PIDs. Prepare the WDS to make a recording. a. Select the MENU icon. b. Select CAPTURE SET-UP to view the buffer settings. c. Use the arrows to set the duration to 30 seconds. d. Press the CONTINUE icon. e. Press each button on the vehicle keypad. f. Press the DATA CAPTURE icon.

NOTE: Watch the status bar in the lower right hand corner of the screen. Wait for the recording to end, before proceeding to the next step.

Select the PLAYBACK DISPLAY icon.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 29

WORKSTATION 2 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


11. View the recorded data by using the arrows located at the bottom of your screen. Did the PID values change? YES NO

a. Return to live data display. b. Press the TNSMT_CMD PID to highlight the box around it.

c. Select the PLOT FORMAT, LIMITS AND RANGE icon

d. e. f. g. h.

Select LOCK. Turn on the auto capture feature by selecting the AUTO CAPTURE button. Select Transition. Press the CONTINUE icon. Turn the ignition to the off position and remove the keys.

12. What happens to the PID when you press the UNLOCK button on the key fob?

13. What happens to the PID when you press the LOCK button on the key fob?

a. Press the PLAYBACK DISPLAY icon and view the recording. b. Use the arrow buttons at the bottom of the screen to move the cursor along the timeline.

14. How many seconds before 0 (Trigger Point) was the LOCK button pressed?

30 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


Press the TNSMT_CMD PID to highlight the box around it.

Select the Plot FORMAT, LIMITS AND RANGE icon

a. Press the GRAPH icon.

b. Press the CONTINUE icon. 15. Approximately 5 seconds before the trigger point, what was the TNSMT_CMD PID value?

16. Approximately 5 seconds after the trigger point, what was the TNSMT_CMD PID value?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 31

WORKSTATION 2 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


OSC Overview: Like the NGS, the WDS allows you to control outputs. This function is called output state control (OSC) on the WDS. Unlike the NGS, components are controlled from the same screen that monitors PID values. A # sign is used to indicate a device can be controlled. a. b. c. d. Reinstall key in ignition and turn on. Ensure that the headlamp switch is turned off. Use the Parameter Selection screen to select the output PID provided by the instructor. In the Live Data Display screen, select the same PID as in the previous step.

NOTE: Notice the # sign next to the PID. This indicates that this output can be controlled.

e. Press the OSC (Output State Control) Mode icon.

f. Press the CONTROL ITEM ACTIVATE icon. 17. What symbol is now displayed in place of the # sign?

18. Press the CONTROL ITEM INCREMENT icon. What happened to the PID value?

19. What happened to the output component on the vehicle?

32 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS DATALOGGER


20. Press the CONTROL ITEM DECREMENT icon. What happened to the PID value?

21. What happened to the output component(s) on the vehicle?

a. Press the CLEAR CONTROL ITEMS icon to allow the module to control the headlamps.

b. Press the OSC Mode icon to exit OSC Mode.

c. Press the VEHICLE SELECTION tab.

d. Select the CLOSE SESSION icon.

22. What option would you use to save the recordings? (Do not perform this step)

23. What option would you select to delete recordings?

a. Select DELETE SESSION. b. Select CONTINUE. Return the workstation back to its original condition.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 33

DAY TWO NOTES

34 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3

WORKSTATION 3

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 35

WORKSTATION 3 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will learn how to use the ACTIVE COMMAND MODES function of the NGS. Trace the schematic below with red, blue, green and black markers. NOTE: Red stands for power (12V) at all times, blues stands for power side switched circuit, green stands for ground side switched circuit, black stands for ground (0V) at all times.
Generic Electronic Module C19 22 GY/RD C18

1 765 1 22 YE/BK

2 761 2 22 YE/RD

3 657 3 22 RD/BK

4 576 4

Door ajar switch, left front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right rear 1) Door open 2) Door closed

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

57

20 BK

57

20 BK 57 20 BK

57

20 BK

57

20 BK

G205 Hot at all times F2.26 10A C23 792 20 TN/YE 10 792 1 5 20 TN/YE C21 Battery saver relay C21 Auxiliary relay box 1 6 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 LG Door ajar lamp C23

2 1005 792 20 TN/YE 8 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 VT/OG

705

20 LG/OG 705 4 20 LG /OG C20B Instrument panel dimming module 6) Off 7) On Auxiliary relay box 1 Interior lamp relay 705

S220 20 LG/OG

6 705 1 20 LG/OG 5

C22

2 1008 7 22 LG /OG C20 Generic Electronic Module

3 53

C22 20 BK/LB C24 Interior lamp assembly 1 0 C24 Glove box lamp n 0) Glove box closed 1) Glove box ope

57

20 BK

C24 G205

BEC712-A/VF

36 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


TECHNICIAN C: Use the NGS during this workstation. 1. Wire the Interior Lighting system as shown below. Turn on power supply and set to 12 volts. Verify the system operates by activating the door ajar switches. If the system does not work, notify your instructor.
REAR DEFROST AJAR

Interior Lighting System


RELAY

FE-26
COMMON

LF DOOR BATT RF DOOR INTERIOR LAMP SLIDING DOOR DOOR AJAR LIFT GATE
INTERIOR LAMPS B+

MODE SELECT

INTERVAL WASH

SIGNAL RETURN

PARK SWITCH

BEC400-D/VF

2. Prepare the NGS to test the GEM module from a 1995 Windstar with a 3.8 liter engine. a. Select diagnostic data link. b. Select the GEM module (This vehicle has Rear Defrost, Keyless Entry, Illuminated Entry, and Power Door Locks) and select SAVE (Button 8) c. Select active command modes. How many active command tests are available?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DOOR AJAR SWITCHES

AJAR AJAR AJAR TAIL GATE SLIDE DOOR

SLIDING DOOR

COIL

LF DOOR RF DOOR AJAR

FE-27

12V
COIL

N/O

N/C COMMON

LF DOOR

RF DOOR

N/O DOOR AJAR

N/C

DIRECT OUTPUTS

FE-25
VSS CKT 70 B+

FE-30

BRAKE RUN

WIPTER SPEED

GLOVE BOX LAMP

BOARD WITH GLOVE BOX LAMP

RELAY CONTROL GEM BOARD

INPUT

October, 2002

Day Two 37

WORKSTATION 3 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


3. List the active commands available for this module in the spaces below

a. Select BAT SAVER. b. Highlight BATT SAVR: c. Press TRIGGER.

OFF.

4. Explain what happened to the glove box lamp.

5. Explain what happened to the display on the left side of the NGS.

a. Press TRIGGER again. 6. Explain what happened to the Glove Box Lamp.

38 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


7. Explain what happened to the display on the left side of the NGS?

8. Briefly describe what Active Command test mode is. What does it allow you to do?

9. How can Active Command tests help you in diagnosis?

Active Commands and PIDs a. Press button 7 PIDs. b. Select the BATSAV, INTLMP and P_DR_SW PIDs. c. Press button 7 START. 10. Record the PID values in the spaces below. Active Commands BATT SAVR: OFF BATSAV: INT LAMPS: : OFF INTLAMP: P_DR_SW: d. Press TRIGGER again to turn the battery saver relay back on. 11. Record the PID values in the spaces below. Active Commands BATT SAVR: ON BATSAV: INT LAMPS: OFF INTLAMP: P_DR_SW: e. Highlight INT LAMPS: f. Press TRIGGER. OFF. PIDs

PIDs

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 39

WORKSTATION 3 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


12. What happened to the Interior Lamps?

13. Record the PID values in the spaces below. Active Commands BATT SAVR: ON BATSAV: INT LAMPS: ON INTLAMP: P_DR_SW: a. Press TRIGGER again to turn the Interior Lamps off. b. Remove the interior lamp relay. 14. Record the PID values in the spaces below . Active Commands BATT SAVR: ON BATSAV: INT LAMPS: OFF INTLAMP: P_DR_SW:

PIDs

PIDs

15. Turn on the interior lamp relay, record the PID values in the spaces below. Active Commands PIDs BATT SAVR: ON BATSAV: INT LAMPS: ON INTLAMP: P_DR_SW:

40 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


a. Turn off interior lamp relay. b. Install the interior lamp relay. c. Send a door ajar signal to the GEM module by using the switch for the passenger front door 16. Record the PID values in the spaces below. Active Commands BATT SAVR: ON INT LAMPS: OFF PIDs BATSAV: INTLAMP: P_DR_SW: 17. Did the GEM module "see" the door ajar signal? 18. Did the interior lamps come on when the door was ajar? YES YES NO NO

a. Close the passenger front door. b. Press CANCEL to return to the Active Command menu. c. Send a door ajar signal to the GEM module by using the switch for the passenger front door. 19. Did the interior lamps come on when the door was ajar? YES NO

20. Why should you exit Active Commands when testing system operation?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 41

WORKSTATION 3 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


Signal Simulation and voltage measurement from the Active Command Screen When viewing the Active Command screen, the NGS has the capability of measuring voltage and sending a signal from 0 to 6 volts. This feature can be used when diagnosing output faults. NOTE: The NGS uses the cigarette lighter adapter for a ground. 21. Re-enter BAT SAVER Active Command menu but do not select any PIDs. a. Insert a probe lead into the red SIG jack at the base of the NGS. b. Place the other end of the lead at the Interior Lamps relay N/O terminal. c. Use active commands to turn on the battery saver and interior lamp relay. What voltage does MEAS read?

22. Use Active Commands to turn the Interior Lamps off. What voltage does MEAS: read?

23. Remove the lead at the Interior Lamps relay N/O terminal. Remove the interior lamp relay. Watch the NGS screen closely, press button 4 SIG. What happened to the screen on the NGS?

24. Turn the NGS scroll knob until the SIGNAL OUT displays 6V a. Press TRIGGER What voltage does MEAS read?

NOTE: This voltage is coming out of the red SIG jack at the base of the NGS. It has no effect on the module or the Active Command sent to it.

42 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 NGS ACTIVE COMMANDS


25. Place the red lead at the interior lamp relay coil control side terminal. What voltage does MEAS read?

26. Use active commands to turn the Interior Lamps ON. What voltage does MEAS read?

27. Press button 4 SIG. Turn the NGS scroll knob until the SIGNAL OUT displays OFF Press TRIGGER What voltage does MEAS read?

Return workstation to its original condition.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 43

WORKSTATION 3 DAY TWO NOTES

44 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO-WORKSTATION 4

WORKSTATION 4

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 45

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will use a Digital Multimeter and the WDS Oscilloscope to measure the signals produced by a Hall Effect sensor circuit, a Phototransistor circuit and the Illumination circuits of the headlamp switch. You will also learn how to identify these devices in a Wiring Diagram. Hall Effect sensors are devices that allow current to flow when a magnetic field is present. They may be used to measure RPM and/or the position of moving parts. Hall Effect sensors feature a stationary permanent magnet positioned near the Hall device. When the Hall element is exposed to the magnetic field, the circuit is completed. When the Hall element is shielded from the magnetic field, the circuit opens. Many Hall Effect sensors operate electronically like a simple ground switch. Magnetism, instead of mechanical action, is used to open and close the circuit.

12V

B A
12V

S
V

BEC204-B/VF

A: Hall Effect Element C: Schmitt Trigger E: Module

B: Amplifier D: Transistor

46 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN A: Complete steps 1-6 of this workstation. 1. With the power supply for the DC motor turned off, create a Hall Effect speed sensor circuit as shown. a. Adjust the voltage for the module to 8 volts. b. Turn the trigger wheel so that the tooth of the wheel is away from the sensor. Measure and record the voltage between Signal A and Signal Return terminals. Hall Effect voltage V

12V

FE-23
B+

FE-20

A SIGNAL B

LOW

MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +
SIGNAL RETURN

VRS

BEC201-E/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 47

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


2. Place a metal scraper against the surface of the Hall Effect sensor facing the trigger wheel. a. Measure and record the voltage between Signal A and Signal Return terminals. V

Hall Effect voltage b. Remove metal blade.

3. What type of signal is created by this Hall Effect speed sensor circuit? A. B. C. D. Digital DC Digital AC Analog AC Analog DC

48 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


4. Circle the Hall Effect Sensor(s) in the schematic below.
7.3L Diesel
VREF VREF PWR A147 Powertr trol Mod (PCM) (

62 1291 20 RD/YE

38 354 20 LG/RD

See page 277 L 351 20 BN/WH

42 318

C175 20 GY/RD

14 2 C1236

17

21

23 1 S151

C110 C1272 Y265 Exhaus sure Re (EPR) C1272 15122

B5 Air Charge Temperature (ACT) 1 sensor

C104 B226 Engine Oil TemT perature (EOT) sensor C104

C1271 B279 Exhaust Back Pressure (EBP) sensor 15122 2

C1236

3 359

2 20 GY/RD 553

C1271

C1303 B285 Injection pressure sensor

359

20 GY/RD

359

20 GY/RD

570 2 C1180 B41 Camshaft position sensor (6B288) 15122

18 BK/WH

20 VT/LB

3 359

2 20 GY/RD 812

C1303

See page 276 J 359 20 GY/RD

20 DB/LG

3 796 20 LB

C1180

S153 795 manual transmission 20 22 33 39 20 DG 16 C110

30 M See page 277

87

65 SIG RTN

21

C175 A147 Powertrain Control Module (PCM) (12A650)

S106 See page 103 1017 G101

BEC905-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 49

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


5. Turn on the DC motor's power supply and adjust the speed to low, medium and high. Record the voltage at the Signal A terminal at each setting. Low Medium High V V V

6. Set the DMM to measure frequency. Adjust the DC motor's speed to low, medium and high. Record the frequency at the Signal A terminal at each setting. Low Medium High Hz Hz Hz

50 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


7. Connect the WDS to monitor the Hall Effect signal with the oscilloscope function. a. Connect the red probe to the Hall Effect Signal A terminal. Turn on the DC motor's power supply and adjust the speed to low. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 51

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN B: Complete step 8 of this workstation. 8. Adjust the DC motor's speed to medium. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

52 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN C: Complete step 9 of this workstation. 9. Adjust the DC motor's speed to high. Watch the yellow trace on the WDS and draw a picture of the trace in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

10. When the speed of the motor increases, the sensor's DC voltage: A. Increases B. Decreases C. Stays the same 11. When the speed of the motor increases, the sensor's frequency: A. Increases B. Decreases C. Stays the same

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 53

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


A phototransistor is an electronic device that acts like a simple ground side switch, except it is activated by light. Unlike standard transistors, phototransistors have only two leads. The two leads are the emitter and collector, which are wired into a circuit. When light strikes the base of the transistor, the transistor is forward biased and completes the circuit. Without the light the circuit is open.
12V

B A

0V

C
BEC205-A/VF

A: Base C: Emitter

B: Collector

54 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN B: Complete steps 12, 15 and 16 of this workstation. 12. Replace the Hall Effect speed sensor with the phototransistor speed sensor as follows: a. Disconnect the Hall Effect speed sensor from the module and connect the photo transistor speed sensor as shown. b. Connect the WDS red probe to the Signal A terminal. c. Rotate the speed sensor and watch the yellow trace on the WDS. What type of signal does the phototransistor produce? A. B. C. D. Digital DC Digital AC Analog AC Analog DC

13. Do both the Hall Effect speed sensor and the phototransistor speed sensor produce the same signal? YES NO.

12V

FE-20
B+

A SIGNAL B

SIGNAL RETURN

BEC203-C/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 55

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


14. Circle the phototransistor(s) in the schematic below.

A231 Remote Climate Control (RCC) module 7 788 10 20 RD/OG 15 470 5 20 PK/BK 23 790 15 20 WH/OG 6 468 9 C228 20 BN C219 14 788 22 RD/OG S221 790 22 WH/OG 468 1 22 BN 218 2 A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) C201b 592 22 WH/VT C287 B241 470 10 788 20 RD/OG P78 Integrated control panel S206 See page 105 G200 26 20 PK/BK C263 470 20 PK/BK 15121 5 398 C287 20 BK/YE

C198 B203

C233 B206

(19E702) 1511

(19C734) 15120

BEC903-B/VF

56 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


15. With the red probe still connected to the Signal A terminal, connect the black probe to the Signal B terminal. Rotate the speed sensor clockwise. Watch the yellow and red traces on the WDS and draw a picture of the traces in the chart below (to highlight the red trace touch the red "2" on the screen).

T
BEC112-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 57

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


16. Rotate the speed sensor counter-clockwise. Watch the yellow and red traces on the WDS and draw a picture of the traces in the chart below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

17. Do you notice a difference between rotating clockwise and counter clockwise? YES NO

If yes, what do you notice?

58 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN C: Complete steps 18-20 of this workstation. 18. Connect the power supply to the Headlamp switch. Turn on the headlamps and adjust the panel dimmer. Do the Illumination A and Illumination B operate properly? YES NO

19. Measure the voltage at the Illumination A and Illumination B terminals while controlling the Panel Dim. Record the readings at the following positions. Illumination A Dim Medium Bright V V V Illumination B V V V

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 59

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


20. Connect the WDS to the headlamp switch as follows: a. Connect the red probe of the WDS to the Illumination A terminal and the black probe to the Illumination B terminal. Set the Panel Dim to its highest setting and note the two traces on the WDS. Draw the two traces in the following picture.

T
BEC112-A/VF

60 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN A: Complete step 21 of this workstation 21. Set the Panel Dim to a medium setting and note the two traces on the WDS. Draw the two traces in the following picture.

T
BEC112-A/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 61

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO WORKSTATION 4 ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS


TECHNICIAN B: Complete step 22 of this workstation. 22. Set the Panel Dim to its lowest setting and note the two traces on the WDS. Draw the two traces in the following picture.

T
BEC112-A/VF

23. The signal for the Illumination A (yellow trace) is: A. B. C. D. Analog DC Analog AC Digital DC Digital AC

24. The signal for the Illumination B (red trace) is: A. B. C. D. Analog DC Analog AC Digital DC Digital AC

62 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 63

WORKSTATION 4 DAY TWO NOTES

64 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO HOMEWORK

HOMEWORK

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 65

HOMEWORK DAY TWO

Generic Electronic Module C19 22 GY/RD C18

1 765 1 22 YE/BK

2 761 2 22 YE/RD

3 657 3 22 RD/BK

4 576 4

Door ajar switch, left front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right rear 1) Door open 2) Door closed

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

57

20 BK

57

20 BK 57 20 BK

57

20 BK

57

20 BK

G205 Hot at all times F2.26 10A C23 792 20 TN/YE 10 792 1 5 20 TN/YE C21 Battery saver relay C21 20 LG/OG 705 4 20 LG /OG Instrument C20B panel dimming module 6) Off 7 7) On Auxiliary relay C22 box 1 Interior lamp relay 705 Auxiliary relay box 1 6 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 LG Door ajar lamp C23

2 1005 8 22 VT/OG C20 Generic Electronic Module 705 1 20 LG/OG

3 705

S220 20 LG/OG

6 5

2 1008 7 22 LG /OG C20 Generic Electronic Module

3 53

C22 20 BK/LB C24 Interior lamp assembly 1 0 C24 Glove box lamp 0) Glove box closed 1) Glove box open

57

20 BK

C24 G205

BEC700-D/VF

66 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO - HOMEWORK


Use the schematic shown in the previous page to answer all questions in this homework activity. 1. Identify the Inputs and Outputs in the circuit. INPUTS DIRECT OUTPUTS INDIRECT OUTPUTS

The customer is concerned that the interior lamps do not come on when any door is opened. 2. What is the SYMPTOM?

3. What SYSTEM is at fault?

4. Circle all COMPONENTS that may be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Door ajar switches GEM module Battery Saver Relay Interior Lamp Relay Interior Lamps Glove Box Lamp Instrument Panel Dimming Module Wiring / Connectors 5. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection and Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform basic electrical diagnosis

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 67

HOMEWORK DAY TWO

6. The Door Ajar lamp (an output of the GEM module) comes on when any door is open. Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Door ajar switches GEM module Battery Saver Relay Interior Lamp Relay Interior Lamps Glove Box Lamp Instrument Panel Dimming Module Wiring / Connectors 7. The interior lamps turn on with the Panel Dimmer Switch (part of Instrument Panel Dimming Module). Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Door ajar switches GEM module Battery Saver Relay Interior Lamp Relay Interior Lamps Glove Box Lamp Instrument Panel Dimming Module Wiring / Connectors 8. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection and Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform basic electrical diagnosis

68 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY TWO - HOMEWORK

9. There is a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) in the Module. DTC B1371. Interior Lamp Relay circuit failure. Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Door ajar switches GEM module Battery Saver Relay Interior Lamp Relay Interior Lamps Glove Box Lamp Instrument Panel Dimming Module Wiring / Connectors 10. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection and Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform basic electrical diagnosis 11. When measuring available voltage, where should the negative (black) lead of the DMM be placed?

12. What voltage would you expect at C19, pin 1 of the GEM module, with the left front door open?

13. What voltage would you expect at C19, pin 1 of the GEM module, with the left front door closed?

14. What voltage would you expect at pin 1 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay off?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Two 69

HOMEWORK DAY TWO

15. What voltage would you expect at pin 1 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay on?

16. What voltage would you expect at pin 2 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay off?

17. What voltage would you expect at pin 2 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay on?

18. What voltage would you expect at pin 3 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay off?

19. What voltage would you expect at pin 3 of the Battery saver relay, with the relay on?

20. What voltage would you expect at C20, pin 7 of the GEM module, with the Battery saver relay off and the Interior lamp relay off?

21. What voltage would you expect at C20, pin 7 of the GEM module, with the Battery saver relay on and the Interior lamp relay off?

22. What voltage would you expect at C20, pin 7 of the GEM module, with the Battery saver relay on and the Interior lamp relay on?

70 Day Two

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE

DAY THREE

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 1

DAY THREE
NOTES

2 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE AGENDA DAY THREE AGENDA MORNING


ACTIVITY TIME

Review of Day Two workstations and homework

8:30 am to 10:15 am

Break

10:15 am to 10:30 am

Continue Review

10:30 am to 11:30 am

Lunch

11:30 am to 12:30 pm

DAY THREE AGENDA AFTERNOON

Instructor Led Demo

12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Workstations

1:30 pm to 3:30 pm

Review Day Three workstations

3:30 pm to 4:00 pm

Explain homework assignment

4:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 3

DAY THREE STUDENTS OBJECTIVES


Diagnose an interior lighting concern using the workshop manual, wiring diagrams manual and appropriate diagnostic tools. Diagnose a wiper system concern using a DMM and NGS tester. Use the WDS to view a recording. Perform bench tests on a VRS and Hall Effect sensor.

CONTENT
Interior lighting system operation Wiper system operation WDS recording Windshield wiper system operation Variable Reluctance Sensors (VRS) Hall Effect Sensor

4 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMONSTRATION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 5

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO DAY THREE INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO


DIRECTIONS: Your instructor will give your team a Symptom relating to the System in the schematic below. Based on what you already know, use the following schematic and DTC chart on the next page to identify a Component and Cause of the concern provided.
Hot in start or run F2.5 10A Hot at all times F2.20 15A Hot in run F2.40 10A P91 Central Junction Box (CJB) (14A068) 1312, 1310, 1317, 1318

6 VBATT VBATT

C287 B202 Autolamp sensor (14A597) 1518

C202a N442 Multifunction switch (13K359) 14) High beam 15) Flash to pass 19) Low beam 15110

14

1 9 5

1 5

14

19 15

4 218 19

C287 22 WH/VT

3 18 DB/OG 164

C202a 18 VT/LB

196

C2145a A200 Lighting control module 594 1519

12 57 22 BK S219 160 28 20 DB/WH

26 161 33

C2145c 20 DG/OG

1 697 60 33 697

C2145d 22 BN C212 C146 20 BN D

See page 108

G200

160

20 DB/WH

Hot at all times F1.7 15A

161

20 DG/OG

P93 Battery Junction Box (BJB) (14A003) 136 196 2 16 DB/OG C1050 K37 High beam relay P93 Battery Junction Box (BJB) (14A003) 136

10 High beam indicator 200 200

18

C192

196 3

16 DB/OG

C1050

12

20 LG/B K S144

697 D

20 BN

3 161 3 20 DG/OG

4 1C

C145 1021 E1 Headlamp, left (13008) 1514

3 3

4 C 1

C144 1041 E7 Headlamp, right (13008) 1513

2 57

C1021 20 BK S108 See page 102 G101

2 57

C1041 20 BK S166 See page 103 G102

BEC900-C/VF

6 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO


Autolamp - DTC Chart B 1861 B 1862 B 1863 Left low beam circuit failure Right low beam circuit failure High beam relay coil circuit failure

Diagnostic Summary: Symptom: System: Component: Cause:

1. Will your concern set a DTC?

YES

NO

If you answered yes, which DTC would be set?

2. Would you require the use of a scan tool to diagnose your concern?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 7

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO DAY THREE INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO

8 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 1

WORKSTATION 1

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 9

WORKSTATION 1 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 1 NGS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


DIRECTIONS: Your instructor has provided you with a repair order that states the concern of the vehicle in this workstation. Verify the concern, perform tests and diagnose the concern. Fill in the worksheet and answer all questions. Inform your instructor if you finish early. VEHICLE INFORMATION Model: Year: Engine: 1. What is the reported symptom?

2. Symptom verified (Circle one) YES NO

3. Is the verified symptom the same as what is stated on the repair order? (Circle one) YES NO

If NO, what is different?

10 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 NGS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


4. Based on the symptom, what system is at fault?

5. Using the wiring diagram list the components or circuits that could be causing the concern?

6. Perform the needed diagnostic steps and record your actions and results in the spaces below. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. ACTIONS/TESTS RESULTS

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 11

WORKSTATION 1 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 1 NGS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


7. What is the cause of the concern?

Notify your instructor when you have identified the cause of the concern. 8. What service actions would you take to resolve the concern?

Make the repair. 9. Does the circuit now work properly? Explain.

10. Diagnostic summary Fill in the blanks. Symptom: System: Component: Cause:

Return the workstations to its original condition.

12 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 1 NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 13

WORKSTATION 1 DAY THREE NOTES

14 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 2

WORKSTATION 2

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 15

WORKSTATION 2 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 2 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


DIRECTIONS: Your instructor has provided you with a repair order that states the concern of the vehicle in this workstation. Verify the concern, perform tests and diagnose the concern. Fill in the worksheet and answer all questions. Inform your instructor if you finish early. VEHICLE INFORMATION Model: Year: Engine: 1. What is the reported symptom?

2. Symptom verified (Circle one) YES NO

3. Is the verified symptom the same as what is stated on the repair order? (Circle one) YES NO

If NO, what is different?

16 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


4. Based on the symptom, what system is at fault?

5. What components or circuits could be causing the concern?

6. Where in the service manual should you begin your diagnosis?

7. Perform the needed diagnostic steps and record your actions and results in the spaces below. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. ACTIONS/TESTS RESULTS

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 17

WORKSTATION 2 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 2 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


8. What is the cause of the concern?

Notify your instructor when you have identified the cause of the concern. 9. What service actions would you take to resolve the concern?

10. Diagnostic summary Fill in the blanks. Symptom:

System:

Component:

Cause:

18 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 2


NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 19

WORKSTATION 2 DAY THREE


NOTES

20 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 3

WORKSTATION 3

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 21

WORKSTATION 3 DAY THREE

22 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 3

1. Wire the Wiper System as shown below. The inputs have already been wired for you. Operate the wiper system to verify the symptom What symptom is present?

Wiper System
FE-28
RELAY COIL

FE-26
COMMON

12V
COIL MODE INTERVAL WASH MULTIFUNCTION SWITCH DOOR AJAR SIGNAL RETURN

N/O

N/C COMMON

N/O

N/C

DIRECT OUTPUTS

FE-25
VSS CKT 70 B+ BATT

LF DOOR

RF DOOR

INTERIOR LAMP

SLIDING DOOR

DOOR AJAR

63

LIFT GATE

58

FE-10

MODE SELECT

BRAKE/RUN

56

INTERVAL WASH

WIPER SPEED

28

57

SIGNAL RETURN

RELAY CONTROL
PARK SWITCH

INPUT

GEM BOARD

BEC302-E/VF

2. What components or circuits could be causing the concern?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 23

WORKSTATION 3 DAY THREE

3. Perform the needed diagnostic steps and record your actions and results in the spaces below. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. ACTIONS/TESTS RESULTS

4. What is your diagnosis?

5. What service actions would you take to resolve the concern?

6. Diagnostic summary Fill in the blanks. Symptom: System: Component: Cause: Workstation complete. Return the workstation to its original condition.

24 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4

WORKSTATION 4

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 25

WORKSTATION 4 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


DIRECTIONS: In this workstation you will use the WDS to view a recording and perform bench tests on a Hall Effect sensor and a VRS. 1. Adjust the power supply to 8 volts and connect the power supply to the DC motor as shown. Set the voltage to the DC motor to medium. Using the DMM, measure and record the AC voltage between VRS+ and VRS-. AC V AC HZ

12V

FE-23

LOW

MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +

VRS

BEC111-B/VF

26 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


2. Remove the DMM and connect the WDS oscilloscope to the VRS+ and VRS- terminals and view the signal trace. With the DC motor voltage still adjusted to medium, draw the signal below. Use a red marker to draw the signal.

T
BEC112-A/VF

3. With the DC motor still adjusted to medium, increase the air gap by gently moving the sensor away from the trigger wheel. With a blue marker draw the changes in the graphic above. 4. Using the DMM, measure and record the AC voltage between VRS+ and VRS-. Does the amplitude (peak voltage) change?

Does the frequency change?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 27

WORKSTATION 4 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


5. Restore the air gap to its original position. With resistor wire C, add resistance to the circuit between the VRS sensor and the oscilloscope probe as shown. Note what changes on the oscilloscope. Does the amplitude (peak voltage) change?

Does the frequency change?

12V

FE-23

LOW

MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +

R es is to r

VRS

BEC303-B/VF

28 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


Use the WDS Datalogger function to view a recording of the ABS system during a road test. a. Press the TOOLBOX icon. b. Select DATALOGGER c. Select PLAYBACK DISPLAY icon. d. From the Recordings Group, select VRS. 6. When was the first time there was at least a 5 MPH speed difference between one wheel speed sensor and another?

7. Look at the DTC chart and circle the code(s) the module would set during this recording. DTC CHART C1155-Front Left Anti-Lock Brake Sensor (Electrical/Static) Possible Causes The ABS module continuously monitors circuit integrity for opens or shorts. The ABS module compares the ABS speed sensors to verify they are in agreement. The ABS module monitors the speed sensor signal to verify a signal is produced. The ABS module monitors the speed sensor carrier voltage on both wires. If voltages vary more than .5vDC the test fails. If a speed sensor signal is not within 10% of the other speed sensor signals the test fails.

Open Circuit Shorted Circuit Module

C1158-Front Left Anti-Lock Brake Sensor (Coherency Fault)

Excessive Air Gap Excessive Circuit Resistance Damaged Indicator Mismatched Tires

C1233-Front Left Anti-Lock Brake Sensor (Input Signal Missing)

If a speed signal is not detected above 10 MPH (as determined by the other speed sensors) the test fails.

Excessive Air Gap Excessive Circuit Resistance

8. List what you think are the most likely possible causes of the concern in the recording.

Close the recorded session by pressing the menu icon and then selecting exit.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 29

WORKSTATION 4 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


Disconnect the VRS sensor and connect the Hall Effect sensor to the module as shown. Select the oscilloscope tab. Connect the WDS oscilloscope to view the signal trace. Connect the red lead to Signal A and the black lead to Signal Return.

12V

FE-23
B+

FE-20

A SIGNAL B

LOW

MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +
SIGNAL RETURN

VRS

BEC201-E/VF

30 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


9. With the DC motor voltage adjusted to medium, note and record the trace below.

T
BEC112-A/VF

10. Increase the air gap by moving the sensor away from the trigger wheel. Note what changes on the oscilloscope. Does the amplitude (peak voltage) change?

Does the frequency change?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 31

WORKSTATION 4 DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


11. Restore the air gap to its original position. With resistor wire C, add resistance to the circuit between the Hall Effect sensor and the signal A terminal of the module. The DC motor voltage should still be adjusted to medium. Draw the changes on the oscilloscope on the previous page. Does the amplitude (peak voltage) change?

Does the frequency change?

12V

FE-23
B+

FE-20

Resistor

A SIGNAL
LOW MED HIGH

SIGNAL B+

OFF

VRS +

SIGNAL RETURN

VRS

BEC505-E/VF

Return the workstation to its original condition before proceeding to question 12.

32 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE WORKSTATION 4 WORKSTATION 4 VRS AND HALL EFFECT DIAGNOSIS


Use the WDS Datalogger function to view a recording of the Automatic Four Wheel Drive system during a road test. a. Press the DATALOGGER icon. b. Press the LOAD SAVED RECORDINGS icon. c. From the Recordings Group, select HALL. 12. When was the first time there was at least a 5 MPH speed difference between the front and rear output shafts?

13. Look at the DTC chart and circle the code(s) the module would set during this recording. DTC CHART P1836Transmission Transfer Case Front Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit Failure Possible Causes Open Circuit Shorted Circuit Module Excessive Air Gap Excessive Circuit Resistance Damaged Indicator Open Circuit Shorted Circuit Module Excessive Air Gap Excessive Circuit Resistance Damaged Indicator Resistance Damaged Indicator Mismatched Tires

The GEM module periodically monitors the speed sensor signal and compares it to VSS.

If the speed sensor signal is not within 10% of the VSS signal the test fails.

P1837Transmission Transfer Case Rear Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit Failure

The GEM module periodically monitors the speed sensor signal and compares it to VSS.

If the speed sensor signal is not within 10% of the VSS signal the test fails.

14. List what you think are the most likely possible causes of the concern in the recording.

Close the recorded session by pressing the menu icon and then selecting exit.

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 33

WORKSTATION 4 DAY THREE NOTES

34 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE HOMEWORK

HOMEWORK

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 35

HOMEWORK DAY THREE

A 400 7 2 2 5 0 6 5 0 6 5 0 6 16 LB/BK C210 C504 1 5 0 6 N447 Master window adjust switch 0) Rest 1) Driver 2) Passenger 5) Up 6) Down

Hot at all times F1.12 20A 170 1 16 RD/LB C144

P93 Battery Junction Box (BJB) (14A003)

S212 400 5 16 LB/BK 400 1 16 LB/BK C2051 K50 Onetouch window relay C2051 22 YE/RD S210 Resistance wire .015 995 16 GY P111 Auxiliary relay box 1

5 57 16 BK S501

6 314

3 14 TN/LB 313 14 WH/YE

4 991

1 16 TN/LB 992 C D

C504

16 WH/BK 4 3 903 Used to sense current of driver window motor so that GEM will turn of f OTD relay when window is completely opened or when up window switch is pressed during OTD mode. 991 16 TN/LB 16 RD 2 1007

G200

B 4 400 12 16 LB/BK 1 5 C213 3 C210

C604 N105 Window adjust switch, passenger side 0) Off 1) Up 2) Down

903 S204

16 RD 996 12

S202 16 OG/WH C2100a 9 C2100b 11 C2100a A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) 12 992 C2100b 16 WH/BK C210

1 0 2

1 0 2

991

16 TN/LB

1 333

5 14 YE/RD 334

C604

11

C2100b A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) 11 15

14 RD/YE C608 M79 Power window motor , passenger side front (23394)

C 2 1 C524 M80 Power window motor, driver side front (23395) 992

S500 16 WH/BK

BEC915-A/VF

NOTE: The GEM Module used on this vehicle has three separate connectors. Notice in this schematic two different connectors to the GEM module have pins labeled "11" and two pins labeled "12".

Pin 11 in connector C2 100b is used to sense the one-touch-down request (switch pressed for less than 1 second) Pin 11 in connector C2 100a in conjunction with Pin 12 in connector C2 100a are used to sense the increase in current flow through the motor when it reaches the end of its travel to turn the one-touch relay off. Voltage on Pin 12 in connector C2 100b indicated the operator is raising the window.

36 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE HOMEWORK

Use the schematic shown in the previous page to answer all questions in this homework activity. 1. Identify the Inputs and Outputs in the circuit. INPUTS DIRECT OUTPUTS INDIRECT OUTPUTS

The customer is concerned that the driver's window does not operate properly, however, the passenger window operates normally. 2. What is the SYMPTOM?

3. What SYSTEM is at fault?

4. Circle all COMPONENTS that may be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Master Window Switch Passenger Window Switch Resistance Wire GEM Module One-Touch Window relay Left Power Window Motor Right Power Window Motor Wiring / Connectors

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 37

HOMEWORK DAY THREE

5. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection & Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform "basic electrical diagnosis" 6. The driver side window will go up with the switch. Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Master Window Switch Passenger Window Switch Resistance Wire GEM Module One-Touch Window relay Left Power Window Motor Right Power Window Motor Wiring / Connectors 7. The driver side window will go down with the switch held, but the one-touch down feature is not working. Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Master Window Switch Passenger Window Switch Resistance Wire GEM Module One-Touch Window relay Left Power Window Motor Right Power Window Motor Wiring / Connectors

38 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY THREE HOMEWORK

8. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection & Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform "basic electrical diagnosis" 9. There is a diagnostic trouble code in the module. DTC B1400 Power Window Driver One-Touch Window Relay Coil Circuit Short to Battery. Circle the COMPONENTS that may still be at fault to cause this concern. Fuse Master Window Switch Passenger Window Switch Resistance Wire GEM Module One-Touch Window relay Left Power Window Motor Right Power Window Motor Wiring / Connectors

10. What should your next diagnostic step be? A. Perform Active Commands (OSC) B. Monitor PIDs C. Perform Inspection & Verification D. Retrieve DTCs E. Perform "basic electrical diagnosis"

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Three 39

HOMEWORK DAY THREE

11. What voltage would you expect at C2100b, pin 12 of the GEM module, with the left front window switch in the up position?

12. What voltage would you expect at C2100b, pin 12 of the GEM module, with the left front window switch in the down position?

13. What voltage would you expect at pin 1 of the One-touch window relay, with the relay off?

14. What voltage would you expect at pin 1 of the One-touch window relay, with the relay on?

15. What voltage would you expect at pin 2 of the One-touch window relay, with the relay off?

16. What voltage would you expect at pin 2 of the One-touch window relay, with the relay on?

17. What voltage would you expect at C2100b, pin 9 of the GEM module, with the One-touch window relay off?

18. What voltage would you expect at C2100b, pin 9 of the GEM module, with the One-touch window relay on?

40 Day Three

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR

DAY FOUR

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 1

DAY FOUR
NOTES

2 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR AGENDA DAY FOUR AGENDA MORNING


ACTIVITY TIME

Review of Day Three homework

8:30 am to 9:00 am

Workstations

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Break

10:15 am to 10:30 am

Review workstations

10:30 am to 11:15 am

Instructor Led Demo

11:15 am to 12:00 pm

Lunch

11:00 am to 1:00 pm

DAY FOUR AGENDA AFTERNOON

Final Exam

1:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 3

DAY FOUR STUDENTS OBJECTIVES


Diagnose a rear defrost concern using the workshop manual, wiring diagrams manual and appropriate diagnostic tools. Use the NGS to view a recording and diagnose an electronic concern. Diagnose an interior lamp concern using DMM and NGS.

CONTENT
Rear defrost system operation NGS recording Interior lighting system operation

4 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 1

WORKSTATION 1

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 5

WORKSTATION 1 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 1 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


DIRECTIONS: Your instructor has provided you with a repair order that states the concern of the vehicle in this workstation. Verify the concern, perform tests and diagnose the concern. Fill in the worksheet and answer all questions. Inform your instructor if you finish early. VEHICLE INFORMATION Model: Year: Engine: 1. What is the reported symptom?

2. Symptom verified (Circle one) YES NO

3. Is the verified symptom the same as what is stated on the repair order? (Circle one) YES NO

If NO, what is different?

6 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


4. Based on the symptom, what system is at fault?

5. Use the wiring diagram to answer the following questions. a. What components or circuits could be causing the concern?

6. Perform the needed diagnostic steps and record your actions and results in the spaces below. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. ACTIONS/TESTS RESULTS

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 7

WORKSTATION 1 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 1 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS

8 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 1 WORKSTATION 1 WDS ON-VEHICLE DIAGNOSIS


7. What is your diagnosis?

Notify the instructor when you have identified the cause of the concern. 8. What service actions would you take to resolve the concern?

9. Diagnostic summary Fill in the blanks. Symptom:

System:

Component:

Cause:

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 9

WORKSTATION 1 DAY FOUR NOTES

10 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 2

WORKSTATION 2

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 11

WORKSTATION 2 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 2 NGS ON-BENCH DATA DIAGNOSIS


Generic Electronic Module C19 22 GY/RD C18

1 765 1 22 YE/BK

2 761 2 22 YE/RD

3 657 3 22 RD/BK

4 576 4

Door ajar switch, left front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right rear 1) Door open 2) Door closed

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

57

20 BK

57

20 BK 57 20 BK

57

20 BK

57

20 BK

G205 Hot at all times F2.26 10A C23 792 20 TN/YE 10 792 1 5 20 TN/YE C21 Battery saver relay C21 20 LG/OG 705 4 20 LG /OG Instrument C20B panel dimming module 6) Off 7 7) On Auxiliary relay C22 box 1 Interior lamp relay 705 Auxiliary relay box 1 6 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 LG Door ajar lamp C23

2 1005 8 22 VT/OG C20 Generic Electronic Module 705 1 20 LG/OG

3 705

S220 20 LG/OG

6 5

2 1008 7 22 LG /OG C20 Generic Electronic Module

3 53

C22 20 BK/LB C24 Interior lamp assembly 1 0 C24 Glove box lamp 0) Glove box closed 1) Glove box open

57

20 BK

C24 G205

BEC700-D/VF

12 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 NGS ON-BENCH DATA DIAGNOSIS


Diagnostic Situation: The door ajar light sometimes comes on while driving. While verifying the concern, you note that the door ajar light comes on intermittently. OASIS and service history show nothing about this concern, and your visual inspection reveals no obvious faults. 1. Identify the SYMPTOM and write on the space below.

2. What electronic module controls the door ajar light of this 95 Windstar?

3. What SYSTEM was affected?

4. The vehicle was road tested and PID data is stored in recorder area 1. A. Once the vehicle is moving, at what speed did the door ajar light first come ON?

B. When was the first time during the road test (in relation to when you pressed the TRIGGER) that the light came ON?

5. What occurs at the same time, which may provide you with a clue to the cause of the concern?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 13

WORKSTATION 2 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 2 NGS ON-BENCH DATA DIAGNOSIS


6. What component(s) would you suspect of causing this concern?

7. Were there times when the door ajar light came ON without a right rear door signal?

NOTE: When repairing a fault, you should always try and determine the cause of the failure. 8. What would you do next to determine the root cause of the concern?

9. How much time was recorded before the TRIGGER?

10. How much time was recorded after the TRIGGER?

11. What is the total recording time?

Exercise complete. Please return workstation to its original condition for the next team.

14 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 2 WORKSTATION 2 NGS ON-BENCH DATA DIAGNOSIS NOTES

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 15

WORKSTATION 2 DAY FOUR NOTES

16 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 3

WORKSTATION 3

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 17

WORKSTATION 3 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING DIAGNOSIS


Generic Electronic Module C19 22 GY/RD C18

1 765 1 22 YE/BK

2 761 2 22 YE/RD

3 657 3 22 RD/BK

4 576 4

Door ajar switch, left front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right front 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, right rear 1) Door open 2) Door closed

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

Door ajar switch, liftgate 1) Door closed 2) Door open

57

20 BK

57

20 BK 57 20 BK

57

20 BK

57

20 BK

G205 Hot at all times F2.26 10A C23 792 20 TN/YE 10 792 1 5 20 TN/YE C21 Battery saver relay C21 Auxiliary relay box 1 6 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 LG Door ajar lamp C23

2 1005 792 20 TN/YE 8 C20 Generic Electronic Module 22 VT/OG

705

20 LG/OG 705 4 20 LG /OG C20B Instrument panel dimming module 6) Off 7) On Auxiliary relay box 1 Interior lamp relay 705

S220 20 LG/OG

6 705 1 20 LG/OG 5

C22

2 1008 7 22 LG /OG C20 Generic Electronic Module

3 53

C22 20 BK/LB C24 Interior lamp assembly 1 0 C24 Glove box lamp n 0) Glove box closed 1) Glove box ope

57

20 BK

C24 G205

BEC712-A/VF

18 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING DIAGNOSIS


1. Wire the Interior lighting system as shown below. The inputs have already been wired for you. Operate the lighting system to verify the symptom. What symptom is present?

REAR DEFROST AJAR

Interior Lighting System


RELAY

FE-26
COMMON

LF DOOR BATT RF DOOR INTERIOR LAMP SLIDING DOOR DOOR AJAR LIFT GATE
INTERIOR LAMPS B+

MODE SELECT

INTERVAL WASH

SIGNAL RETURN

PARK SWITCH

BEC400-D/VF

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DOOR AJAR SWITCHES

AJAR AJAR AJAR TAIL GATE SLIDE DOOR

SLIDING DOOR

COIL

LF DOOR RF DOOR AJAR

FE-27

12V
COIL

N/O

N/C COMMON

LF DOOR

RF DOOR

N/O DOOR AJAR

N/C

DIRECT OUTPUTS

FE-25
VSS CKT 70 B+

FE-30

BRAKE RUN

WIPTER SPEED

GLOVE BOX LAMP

BOARD WITH GLOVE BOX LAMP

RELAY CONTROL GEM BOARD

INPUT

October, 2002

Day Four 19

WORKSTATION 3 DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING DIAGNOSIS


2. What components or circuits could be causing the concern?

3. Perform the needed diagnostic steps and record your actions and results in the spaces below. Use another sheet of paper if necessary. ACTIONS/TESTS RESULTS

20 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR WORKSTATION 3 WORKSTATION 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING DIAGNOSIS


4. What is your diagnosis?

5. What service actions would you take to resolve the concern?

6. Diagnostic summary Fill in the blanks. Symptom:

System:

Component:

Cause: Workstation complete. Return the workstation to its original condition

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 21

WORKSTATION 3 DAY FOUR


NOTES

22 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMONSTRATION

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 23

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO DAY FOUR INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO


DIRECTIONS: Using the schematic below create a symptom by creating an open, short or high resistance in a circuit or component. Based on what you already know, use the following schematic and DTC chart on the next page to identify a Component and Cause of the concern provided.
P91 Central Junction Box (CJB) (14A068) 1310, 1313, 1314, 1315

Hot in start or run F2.27 10A

Hot in run or acc F2.11 15A

Hot in run F2.32 10A 85

Hot at all times F2.07 40A 30 C2021

Controls current flow to rear heated window switch, heated grid and heated mirrors when energized. K1 Rear window defrost relay 15148

86

87

C2021

F2.12 10A

8 VBATT

16 VBATT

C201d A112 Generic Electronic Module (GEM) (14B205) 591, 592 C201b

11

C270b

18 185

C270c 12 BK 12 BN/LB C438 12 BN/LB S416 wagon

Provides rear defogger ON/OFF input to GEM.

186 1 186

C201a

938

20 BK/LG

1010 17

22 DB/OG

694 7

22 DG/VT C2009 1.2k P78 Integrated control panel 1 C402b 12 BK S402 1 C402a R19 Rear window defrost grid (18C618) 15129 15141 wagon

manual A/C 1 57 C2009 20 BK S203 See page 107 G108 G201

57 EATC 12 694 C2009 20 BK/YE 1 S206 See page 105 G200

C410

See page 1011 1012 G303

BEC901-A/VF

24 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

DAY FOUR INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO


Rear Defrost - DTC Chart B 1347 B 1345 B 1349 Heated backlight relay circuit failure Heated backlight input short to ground Heated backlight relay short to battery

Diagnostic Summary: Symptom: System: Component: Cause: 1. Will your concern set a DTC? YES NO

If you answered yes, which DTC would be set?

2. Would you require the use of a scan tool to diagnose your concern?

Electronic Systems Diagnosis

October, 2002

Day Four 25

INSTRUCTOR LED DEMO DAY FOUR


NOTES

26 Day Four

October, 2002

Electronic Systems Diagnosis