Phillips Curve Specification  And the Decline in U. S. Output and Inflation Volatility * 
 

   
       

Robert J. Gordon  Northwestern University and NBER 

            ____________________    *I am grateful to Rob McMenamin for excellent research assistance on this paper and to  Ian Dew‐Becker for his insights and assistance on previous related papers.       

First Draft to be Presented at Symposium on   The Phillips Curve and the Natural Rate of Unemployment,  Institut für Welwirtschaft  Kiel, Germany  June 3‐4, 2007   

 

Phillips Curve Specification  And the Decline in U. S. Output and Inflation Volatility 
    Journalists have recently characterized the Fed’s view that the slope of the United States  Phillips Curve (PC) has become substantially flatter, by a factor of at least half, since the mid‐ 1980s.  The flattening of the Phillips curve is documented in a particular style of PC research  based on the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (NKPC) literature, in which PC specifications  involve links between the current inflation rate and short lags on inflation, and on the current  unemployment rate.  The first part of this paper uses a wide variety of statistical tests to show  that the Fed’s PC equation, as based on research by Roberts (2006), is strongly rejected both by  traditional and nontraditional tests when compared to the Gordon “triangle” model that was  developed in the early 1980s.  The Roberts version of the NKPC is entirely nested in the triangle  model, allowing each of its exclusion restrictions to be tested, and each is rejected at high levels  of statistical significance.      The remainder of the paper asks why the volatility of inflation, of output changes and of  the output gap has declined substantially after 1984, a finding on which U. S. macroeconomists  share an unusual consensus.  Our analysis based on a small macroeconometric model concludes  that about 1/3 of the reduction in the volatility of real GDP can be traced to the role of supply  shocks in the triangle inflation equation.   More important are errors in the output gap or “IS”  equation that quantifies the role of monetary policy in reducing output when interest rates are  high and stimulating output when interest rates are low.      To highlight the role of Phillips curve specifications in the analysis of reduced U.S.  business cycle volatility, we show that the Roberts/NKPC type Phillips curve specification  misses much of the role of supply shocks in contributing to reduced volatility in both inflation  and output.    Finally, we find no role at all for monetary policy in reducing the volatility of  inflation or output, unless monetary policy is more broadly defined to include the component of  “IS stabilization” represented by the financial deregulation of the late 1970s that reduced the  volatility of residential construction.           Robert J. Gordon    Department of Economics    Northwestern University    Evanston IL 60208‐2600    rjg@northwestern.edu    http://faculty‐web.at.northwestern.edu/economics/gordon   ABSTRACT 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 1

I.  Introduction 
    Has the slope of the American Phillips Curve (PC) become flatter in the past two 

decades?  Recently the Wall Street Journal announced on its front page the finding of recent  research at the Federal Reserve Board demonstrating a sharp flattening of the PC since the mid‐ 1980s.  The primary Fed study by Roberts (2006) attributes to monetary policy both the change  in slope and the related marked reduction in U. S. business cycle volatility.   The channel of  monetary policy influence comes from an increased Fed responsiveness to output and inflation,  so that any pressure for higher inflation or any movement of the output gap away from zero are  “nipped in the bud”.  A flatter PC directly contributes to the interplay between monetary policy  and output stabilization, as movements of the output gap above zero generate less inflation  than formerly, requiring less monetary tightening and thus a smaller subsequent downward  adjustment in output. 1   However, both of these two conclusions are highly controversial.  The verdict that the 

PC slope has flattened is highly sensitive to specification choices, and a primary purpose of this  paper is to examine the interplay between model specification and conclusions about the  stability of PC parameters.  Further, while all research agrees that output has become less  volatile since the mid‐1980s, much of it contradicts Robert’s conclusion that the improved  conduct of monetary policy is responsible.  Stock and Watson (2002, 2003) were among the first  to quantify the role of smaller shocks in contributing to improved stability, and Gordon (2005) 

1.   Also representing the Fed view are Kohn (2005) and Williams (2006).  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 2

concluded that roughly two‐thirds of the improvement in stability resulted from smaller  demand shocks, one‐third from smaller supply shocks, with no remaining role for monetary  policy at all. 2           

The specification of the Phillips curve is integral to the analysis of declining business 

cycle volatility because Roberts, Stock‐Watson, and Gordon all based their conclusions on small  three‐equation models of the economy in which the Phillips Curve is the first equation, joined  together with an interest‐rate equation based on the Taylor rule and an “IS” equation relating  the output gap to interest rates.  In addition to studying the sensitivity of the PC slope  coefficient to alternative specifications, this paper also examines the sensitivity of conclusions  regarding output volatility in a three‐equation model to choices in the specification of the  Phillips curve.      Blanchard‐Simon (2001) and others have noticed the parallel decline of inflation and 

output volatility.   We can quantify the role of declining inflation volatility in contributing to  declining output volatility, and we can inquire as to the sources of the improved stability of the  inflation rate.  The Roberts approach points to a flatter slope in diminishing the transmission of  movements in the output gap into changes of the inflation rate.  A second hypothesis is that,  even without a change in the PC slope, declining output volatility would have directly  contributed to improved inflation stability.  A third hypothesis is that inflation depends not  only on demand shocks but on explicit supply shocks that can be identified and quantified, and 

2.  Blanchard‐Simon (2001) pointed to several of the same factors as Stock‐Watson and Gordon, but they 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 3

that a reduction in the size and importance of the supply shocks contributed directly to  improved inflation stability and indirectly to improved output stability.   While all three of  these hypotheses could in principle be complementary, the approach of Roberts (2006) and of  Stock‐Watson (2002, 2003) does not allow for separate testing because they do not quantify the  role of explicit supply shock variables.    The primary emphasis in this paper is on the role of PC specification in drawing 

conclusions about shifting slope parameters and on the sources of reduced business cycle  volatility.  A sharp contrast is drawn between the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (NKPC) of  which one version is used by Roberts, and my own long‐standing “triangle” approach dating  back to Gordon (1977, 1982). 3   The Roberts NKPC includes only two variables, the current  unemployment rate and four quarterly lags on inflation.  In contrast, the “triangle” description  of my model refers to its three‐sided representation of the U. S. inflation process.  The base of  the triangle is inertia, represented by long lags on inflation.  The left side of the triangle is the  representation of demand pressure on inflation, proxied by short lags on the unemployment  gap.  The right side of the triangle contains explicit variables representing supply shocks.  These  are the oil‐food shocks, changes in relative import prices, changes in the productivity growth  trend, and dummy variables for the 1971‐75 Nixon‐era price controls.  Fortunately the Roberts‐ style NKPC is entirely nested in my more comprehensive approach, and the differences 

did not build an econometric model to quantify the shocks or the role of their decline in magnitude.   3.  The most recent published versions of the triangle model are in Gordon (1997, 1998) and Dew‐Becker  and Gordon (2005).  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 4

between the two specifications amount to exclusion restrictions in the Roberts version that can  be explicitly tested both individually and jointly. 

Plan of the Paper 
   The paper begins by comparing two measures of output volatility based alternatively 

on the rolling standard deviation of changes in output and of the level of the output gap.  As  others have noticed, the change‐based measure declines after the mid‐1980s substantially more  than the gap‐based measure, but even the gap‐based measure declines markedly.   Then we  compare the evolution of volatility for output change and inflation, emphasizing both the joint  rise in volatility in the 1970s and decline after the mid‐1980s, but also the additional fact that  output volatility was high during 1955‐65 when inflation volatility was very low.      The next section contrasts the Roberts version of the NKPC with the more 

comprehensive triangle PC specification in which the Roberts PC equation is nested.  We  develop a “transformation” grid to translate the Roberts equation into ours, at each step testing  the exclusion restrictions that are implicit in the Roberts approach and indeed in the rest of the  NKPC literature.  We trace the transformation between the two specifications by alternatively  introducing the three main differences into the Roberts equation – long lags, the inclusion of  specific supply shock variables, and the use of a time‐varying (TV‐NAIRU) instead of constant  NAIRU. 4    At each stage in the transformation, we can examine the interplay between lag  length, supply shock variables, and the variability of the NAIRU, i.e., is the significance of 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 5

supply‐shock variables dependent on allowing for long lags, or vice versa?    We base our evaluation of alternative specifications on the statistical significance of  variables and lags that are excluded in the Roberts approach and included in our approach.  In  addition, our evaluation technique includes the use of post‐sample dynamic simulations, a  technique of model evaluation that unfortunately is rarely used in contemporary time‐series  econometrics.  For each specification to be compared, the parameters are estimated on data  subtracting the last ten years (e.g., 1962‐96 instead of the available 1962‐2006), and then  predicted values of that specification are generated for the final ten years (1997‐2006) by feeding  back the lagged dependent variable endogenously rather than assuming it to be exogenous.    Testing specifications with dynamic simulations in models where the lagged dependent  variable plays an important role in the explanation can reveal sources of “drift” in predicted  values away from actual values.  The paper then turns to the three‐equation model that, as in the papers by Roberts and  Stock‐Watson, is designed to trace the interplay among inflation, the output gap, and the  interest rate responses of the Fed.  In this paper we examine the role of alternative PC  specifications in drawing inferences from the multiple‐equation model used by Gordon (2005)  regarding the causes of the decline in both output and inflation volatility after the mid‐1980s.   For instance, we can suppress the contribution of the supply shocks in the triangle inflation  equation or suppress the error term in the Roberts NKPC equation.   Our goal is to quantify the 

4 .  The time‐varying NAIRU (TV‐NAIRU) was introduced by Gordon (1997) and Staiger‐Stock‐Watson 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 6

role of alternative PC specifications in the analysis of reduced post‐1984 U. S. economic  volatility.   We find that the Roberts approach greatly understates the role of declining shocks in  achieving business cycle volatility and thus erroneously concludes that monetary policy, rather  than the decline of shocks, was the primary mover of reduced volatility.   

II.  Measures of Reduced Business‐Cycle Volatility    Four‐quarter Changes in Real GDP 
     Perhaps the clearest way to become convinced of the decline in business cycle volatility 

over the postwar era is to study the plot in the top frame of Figure 1, showing four‐quarter  changes in the growth rate of real GDP over the 237 quarters between 1948:Q1 and 2007:Q1,  spanning the entire quarterly data base of the U. S. National Income and Product Accounts  (NIPA).  The top frame also plots a horizontal line representing the mean growth rate of real  GDP over this period, which is 3.35 percent per annum.      As shown in the top frame of Figure 1, the four‐quarter percentage changes behave very 

differently before and after 1984.   Prior to 1984, there are sharp zigs and zags, while after 1984  the fluctuations are much more moderate.  The pre‐1984 fluctuations are equally severe above  and below the mean of 3.35 percent per year.  In contrast, there is nothing like that experience of  volatility after 1984.  The four‐quarter growth rate of real GDP was never negative over the  entire 22‐year period between 1983:Q1 and 2007:Q1 except in the brief interval associated with  the 1990‐91 recession, namely 1991:Q1‐Q3.  In fact, some doubt has been cast on the NBER’s 

(1997, 2001). 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 7

declaration of a recession in early 2001, because the four‐quarter change in real GDP never  became negative in that episode and indeed in Figure 1A never fell below +0.2 percent in any  quarter in 2001.    Corresponding to the decline in volatility evident in the top frame of Figure 1 is a 

measure of that volatility displayed in the bottom frame, the rolling 20‐quarter standard  deviation of the four‐quarter growth rate of real GDP.  There was a sharp and apparently  permanent decline after 1987 from a range of 1.5 to 3.5 percent down to a range of 0.5 to 1.5  percent.  Because the calculation of the rolling standard deviation as a 20‐quarter mean causes  the post‐1983 drop in volatility to be reflected five years later, we can dramatize the movement  toward stability by splitting the time period of the bottom frame of Figure 1 at 1987:Q4.  As  displayed in Table 1, the mean of the standard deviations plotted in the bottom frame of Figure  1 is 2.77 percent for 1952:Q4‐1987:Q4 and a much lower 1.24 percent for 1988:Q1‐2007:Q1.   Expressed as a percentage log change as in Table 1, the decline in the standard deviation for  output changes is ‐80.3 percent.   

The Output Gap 
  In principle part of the variance of real GDP changes could reflect changes in the growth 

rate of natural real GDP, and we would not consider these changes to reflect business cycle  volatility.  Also, some of the volatility evident in the top frame of Figure 1 could be very short‐ term quarterly movements caused by volatile inventory changes that cancel out over two or  three years.  To check these possibilities, the top frame of Figure 2 displays the log output ratio 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 8

or “output gap” as a percent (100 times the log ratio of actual to natural real GDP). 5     The  dividing line of shifting output volatility at the year 1984 is not quite as stark in Figure 2 as in  Figure 1, partly because the output gap is a level rather than a rate of change and thus cumulates  and partially smoothes out the volatile pre‐1984 rates of change shown in Figure 1.  In fact,  Roberts (2006) points to the role of reduced short‐term volatility of inventory changes in  explaining why the output change measure in Figure 1 appears to exhibit a greater decline in  volatility than the output gap measure in Figure 2.    However, there is still ample evidence of a decline in the volatility of the output gap  after 1984.  The bottom frame quantifies the shift in the volatility of the output gap by plotting  (in parallel with Figure 1) its rolling 20‐quarter standard deviation.  There is less dramatic  evidence in the bottom frame of Figure 2 of a post‐1984 drop in output volatility than in Figure  1.  As shown in Table 1, the log ratio of the rolling standard deviation when 1988‐2007 is  compared with 1952‐87 drops by 59 percent for the output gap as compared to 80 percent for  four‐quarter changes of real GDP.   

Inflation and Output Volatility   
  An important source of high output volatility before 1984 was high inflation volatility, 

and we show later that the reduction of inflation volatility after 1984 made a substantial  contribution to the post‐1984 decline in output volatility.  We will also show that high inflation 

5.  Natural real GDP is estimated by taking an average of a Hodrick‐Prescott (parameter 6400) and a  Kalman filter (parameter sv=15) applied to data on the quarterly change in real GDP.  This method is  developed and further explained in Gordon (2003).  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 9

volatility prior to 1984 can be linked to the behavior of an explicit set of supply shock variables.   Figure 3 compares the 20‐quarter standard deviation of four quarter changes in real GDP and  the GDP deflator, where the close relationship between output and inflation volatility is evident  in the 1974‐88 period.  We also note that output volatility was relatively high in 1952‐1962  despite the low volatility of inflation, and that very low inflation volatility in 1990‐2007 did not  prevent an increase in output volatility associated with the 1990‐91 or 2001 recessions and  subsequent recoveries.    Table 1 shows that the log percent measure of inflation volatility declined after 1987 by 

100 percent, as compared to 80 percent for output changes and 59 percent for the output gap.   The bottom section of Table 1 shows that the ratio of the volatility measure for inflation to that  for output changes was highest in 1973‐87 and a roughly similar lower value for 1952‐72 and  1987‐2007.  The fact that output volatility was as high in 1952‐72 as in 1973‐87, while inflation  volatility was substantially lower, suggests that there was a separate component of output  volatility unrelated to inflation behavior in the 1952‐72 period.  Gordon (2005) decomposes this  into the separate contributions of three components of instability on the demand side –  government military spending, residential investment, and inventory investment.     

III.  Contrasting the New‐Keynesian and Triangle Specifications of the Phillips  Curve 
    This section begins by comparing the generic New‐Keynesian Phillips Curve (NKPC) 

specification with the particular variant used by Roberts to arrive at his joint conclusions that 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 10

the slope of the PC has significantly flattened since the mid 1980s and that monetary policy is  responsible for both the flatter slope and the increased stability of output.  The literature  contains two versions of the NKPC, one in which the driving force of inflation is the  unemployment (or output) gap, and the other in which the gap is replaced by the change in  marginal cost.    In this paper we refer only to the unemployment‐gap version of the NKPC, both because  it is the version used by Roberts and also because the marginal cost version requires the added  complexity of estimating an equation for wages in addition to prices. 6    Then the triangle model  is introduced and contrasted with the Roberts version of the NKPC, which is nested in the  triangle model by excluding longer lags on both inflation and unemployment, by omitting all  supply shock variables, and by assuming that the NAIRU is constant. 

The NKPC Model 
  The NKPC model has emerged in the past decade as the centerpiece of macro conference 

discussions of inflation dynamics and as the ʺworkhorseʺ of the evaluation of monetary policy.   The point of the NKPC is to derive an empirical description of inflation dynamics that is  ʺderived from first principles in an environment of dynamically optimizing agentsʺ (Bårdsen et  al. 2002).  Most expositions of the NKPC, e.g., Mankiw (2001), begin with Calvoʹs (1983) model  of random price adjustment.   

6.  Some papers in the NKPC literature treat changes in marginal cost as exogenous, which is  unacceptable as the change in marginal cost , e.g., the real wage divided by productivity, is inherently  endogenous and requires separate equations for wage change and price change.  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 11

 

The theoretical background is that firms follow time‐contingent price‐adjustment rules.  

The firmʹs desired price depends on the overall price level and the unemployment gap. 7   Firms  change their price only infrequently, but when they do, they set their price equal to the average  desired price until the next price adjustment.  The actual price level, in turn, is equal to a  weighted average of all prices that firms have set in the past.  The first‐order conditions for  optimization then imply that expected future market conditions matter for todayʹs pricing  decision.  The model can be solved to yield the standard NKPC that makes the inflation rate (pt )  depend on expected future inflation (Et pt+1 ) and the unemployment (or output) gap:                                                                  pt  = αEt pt+1  + β(Ut ‐U*t ) + et ,                                                       (1)    where U is the unemployment rate.  In our notation lower case letters represent first differences  of logarithms and upper‐case letters represent either levels or log levels. 8   The constant term is  suppressed, and so the NKPC has the interpretation that if α=1, then U*t represents the NAIRU.    Much of the NKPC literature estimates the unemployment or output gap with the Hodrick‐ Prescott (HP) filter used to estimate the NAIRU or output trend, but Roberts sets the NAIRU  equal to a constant, as we discuss further below.    A central challenge to the NKPC approach is to find a proxy for the forward‐looking 

7. Most NKPC papers focus on the output gap, but the high negative correlation between the output and  unemployment  gaps  allows  them  to  be  used  interchangeably,  see  below.    Mankiwʹs  (2001)  exposition  followed here uses the unemployment gap.  8.  Note in particular that lower‐case  p in this paper represents the first difference of the log of the price 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 12

expectations term (Et pt+1 ).  Surprisingly, there is little discussion in the literature of this aspect,  or the implications of the usual solution, which is to use instrumental variables or two‐stage  least squares (2SLS) to estimate (1).  In particular, no paper in the NKPC that I have reviewed  contains an explicit treatment of the two stages of the 2SLS estimation and an interpretation of  the reduced‐form equation that results when the first stage is substituted into the second stage.   The first‐stage equation to be included in the 2SLS estimation is: 
4

 Et pt+1   = 

∑λ p
i=1

i  t‐i

 + φ(Ut ‐U*t ).  

(2) 

Substituting the first‐stage equation (2) into the second‐stage equation (1), we obtain the  reduced‐form  
4

pt  = ∀

∑λ p
i= 1

i  t‐i

 +(∀Ν+∃)(Ut ‐U*t ) + et                                                                                 (3) 

  Thus in practice the NKPC is simply a regression of the inflation rate on a few lags of inflation  and the unemployment gap.  As pointed out by Fuhrer (1997), the only sense in which models  including future expectations differ from purely backward‐looking models is that they place  restrictions on the coefficients of the backward‐looking variables that are used as proxies for the  unobservable future expectations:  ʺOf course, some restrictions are necessary in order to separately identify the  effects of expected future variables.  If the model is specified with unconstrained  leads and lags, it will be difficult for the data to distinguish between the leads, 
level, not the price level itself.  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 13

which solve out as restricted combinations of lag variables, and unrestricted  lags.ʺ (p. 338)    And, as shown in Fuhrerʹs paper, these restrictions are implicitly rejected by the data in the  sense that he finds that the expected inflation terms are ʺempirically unimportantʺ when  unconstrained lagged terms are entered as well.    The Roberts (2006) version of the NKPC is of particular interest here, because of his 

finding that the slope of the PC has declined by more than half since the mid 1980s.  Roberts  describes his equation as a “reduced form” NKPC and indeed it is identical to equation (3)  above with two differences,  the NAIRU is assumed to be constant, and the sum of coefficients  on lagged inflation is assumed to be unity.  Thus the Roberts (2006, equation 2, p. 199) version  of (3) is: 
4

pt  = 

∑α p
i= 1

i  t‐i

 + γ+∃Ut + et                                      

(4) 

where the implied constant NAIRU is –γ/β. 

The “Triangle” Model of Inflation and the Role of Demand and Supply Shocks  
  The inflation equation used in this paper is almost identical to that developed 25 years 

ago (Gordon, 1982).  It builds on earlier work (Gordon, 1975, 1977) that combined the Friedman‐ Phelps natural rate hypothesis with the role of supply shocks in directly shifting the inflation  rate and creating macroeconomic externalities in a world of nominal wage rigidity.    The term  ʺtriangleʺ model refers to a Phillips Curve that depends on three elements, inertia, demand, and 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 14

supply, and in which wages are implicitly solved out of the reduced form.  The specification has  three distinguishing characteristics — (1)  the role of inertia (the bottom of the triangle) is  broadly interpreted to go beyond any specific formulation of expectations formation to include  other sources of inertia, e.g., wage and price contracts; (2) the driving force from the demand  side is an unemployment or output gap; and (3) supply shock variables appear explicitly in the  inflation equation rather than being forced into the error term as in the NKPC or Roberts  approaches.   This general framework can be written as:                                                            pt  =  a(L)pt‐1 + b(L)Dt + c(L)zt + et .                                                       (5)       As before lower‐case letters designate first differences of logarithms, upper‐case letters  designate logarithms of levels, and L is a polynomial in the lag operator.       As in the NKPC and Roberts approaches, the dependent variable pt is the inflation rate.  

Inertia is conveyed by a series of lags on the inflation rate (pt‐1).  Dt is an index of excess demand  (normalized so that Dt=0 indicates the absence of excess demand), zt is a vector of supply shock  variables (normalized so that zt=0 indicates an absence of supply shocks), and et is a serially  uncorrelated error term.   Distinguishing features in the implementation of this model include  unusually long lags on the dependent variable, and a set of supply shock variables that are  uniformly defined so that a zero value indicates no upward or downward pressure on inflation.     The estimated version of equation (5) includes lags of past inflation rates, reflecting the 

influence of several past years of inflation behavior on current price setting, through some 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 15

combination of expectation formation, overlapping wage and price contracts, and buyer‐ supplier relations.  If the sum of the coefficients on the lagged inflation values equals unity, then  there is a ʺnatural rateʺ of the demand variable (DNt ) consistent with a constant rate of inflation. 9     The basic equations estimated in this paper use current and lagged values of the unemployment  gap as a proxy for the excess demand parameter Dt, where the unemployment gap is defined as  the difference between the actual rate of unemployment and the natural rate, and the natural  rate (or NAIRU) is allowed to vary over time.      The estimation of the time‐varying NAIRU combines the above inflation equation, with 

the unemployment gap serving as the proxy for excess demand, with a second equation that  explicitly allows the NAIRU to vary with time:                                                          pt  =  a(L)pt‐1 + b(L)(Ut‐UNt ) + c(L)zt + et ,                                            (6)                                                            UNt  =  UNt‐1 + ηt , Eηt  = 0, var(ηt )= τ 2  (7)      In this formulation, the disturbance term ηt in the second equation is serially uncorrelated and is  uncorrelated with et .  When this standard deviation τη = 0, then the natural rate is constant, and  when τη  is positive, the model allows the NAIRU to vary by a limited amount each quarter.  If  no limit were placed on the ability of the NAIRU to vary each time period, then the time‐ varying NAIRU (hereafter TV‐NAIRU) would jump up and down and soak up all the residual 

9.  While the estimated sum of the coefficients on lagged inflation is usually roughly equal to unity, that  sum must be constrained to be exactly unity for a meaningful ʺnatural rateʺ of the demand variable to be 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 16

variation in the inflation equation (6). 10      The triangle approach differs from the NKPC and Roberts approaches by including long 

lags on the dependent variable, additional lags on the unemployment gap, and explicit  variables to represent the supply shocks (the zt variables in (5) and (6) above), namely the  change in the relative price of non‐food non‐oil imports, the effect on inflation of changes in the  relative price of food and energy, the acceleration in the trend rate of productivity growth, and  dummy variables for the effect of the 1971‐74 Nixon‐era price controls. 11   Lag lengths were  originally specified in Gordon (1982) and have not been changed since then.     The top frame of Figure 4 displays four‐quarter moving averages of the relative import 

price variable.  Its central role in explaining the spike of inflation in 1974‐75 is clearly visible, as  is its role in the Volcker disinflation of 1982‐85, the accelerating inflation of the late 1980s, and  the slowdown of inflation in 1997‐2001.   As plotted in the bottom frame of Figure 4, the food‐ energy effect has somewhat different timing than the import price effect.  Note also the different  orders of magnitude of the import and food‐energy effects, reflecting the fact that they are 

calculated.     10.  This method of estimating the TV‐NAIRU was introduced in simultaneous papers by Gordon (1997)  and Staiger‐Stock‐Watson (1997).  SSW developed the technique while adopting Gordon’s previous  triangle model, and so those two papers were a merger of technique and substance.   11.  The relative import price variable is defined as the rate of change of the non‐food non‐oil import  deflator minus the rate of change of the dependent variable, e.g., PCE deflator.  The relative food‐energy  variable is defined as the difference between the rates of change of the overall PCE deflator and the ʺcoreʺ  PCE deflator.  The Nixon control variables remain the same as originally specified in Gordon (1982).  Lag  lengths remain as in 1982 and are shown explicitly in Table 2.  The productivity trend is a Hodrick‐ Prescott filter (using 6400 as the smoothness parameter) minus a six‐year moving average of the same H‐ P trend.  The only changes from the previous published paper on this approach (Gordon, 1998) is in the 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 17

defined differently. 12      The only major change in the current inflation equation involves productivity growth, 

where we follow the approach introduced in Dew‐Becker and Gordon (2005).  In previous  papers the difference in the growth rates of actual and trend productivity or “productivity  deviation” had been entered into the inflation equation.   But this misses the main impact of the  1965‐80 productivity growth slowdown and post‐1995 productivity growth revival, which is the  change in the growth of the trend itself.   Here we create a productivity trend growth  acceleration variable equal to a Hodrick‐Prescott filter version of the productivity growth trend  minus a six‐year moving average of the same trend.  This productivity trend acceleration  variable is plotted in Figure 5.  Its deceleration into negative territory during 1964‐1980 might be  as important a cause of accelerating inflation in that period as its post‐1995 acceleration was a  cause of low inflation in the late 1990s.  Note also that the productivity growth trend revival of  1980‐85 may have contributed to the success of the “Volcker disinflation,” a link that has been  missed in most of the past PC literature. 

Estimating the TV‐NAIRU   
  The time‐varying NAIRU is estimated simultaneously with the inflation equation (6) 

above.  For each set of dependent variables and explanatory variables, there is a different TV‐

treatment of the productivity effect, see Dew‐Becker and Gordon (2005).  12.  Namely, the import variable is the change in the relative price of imports, which reaches a peak of  about 15 percent in 1974‐75.  The food‐energy variable is not the relative price of food and energy, but  rather the difference between the growth rates of the PCE deflator including and excluding food and 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 18

NAIRU.  For instance, when supply‐shock variables are omitted, the TV‐NAIRU soars to 8  percent and above in the mid‐1970s, since this is the only way the inflation equation can  “explain” why inflation was so high in the 1970s.  However, when the full set of supply shocks  is included in the inflation equation, the TV‐NAIRU is quite stable, shown by the dashed line  plotted in Figure 6.      The TV‐NAIRU series as plotted in Figure 6 that is associated with our basic inflation 

equation for the PCE deflator does not fall below 5.7 percent or rise above 6.5 percent over the  period between 1962 and 1988.  However, beginning in the late 1980s, the TV‐NAIRU drifts  downwards until it reaches 5.3 percent in 1998, and then it displays a further dip in 2004‐06 to  4.8 percent.   One hypothesis to be explored below is that Roberts reaches his conclusion that  the Phillips curve has flattened because he forces the NAIRU to be constant, and that a decline  in the TV‐NAIRU is an alternative to a flatter PC in explaining why inflation has been relatively  well‐behaved in the past 20 years. 13   Some of the NKPC literature estimates the TV‐NAIRU by directly applying an H‐P filter 

to the time series of the unemployment rate.  As shown in Figure 6 using two alternative H‐P  parameters (1600 and 6400) this “direct” approach to estimating the TV‐NAIRU results in an  unexplained increase in the TV‐NAIRU from 4 percent in 1970 to 8 percent in 1985, whereas the 

energy, and this variable peaks at 3.3 percent in 1974‐75.  13.  After developing the technique described above for estimating the TV‐NAIRU, the recent work of  Stock and Watson has abandoned that approach in favor of using a direct Hodrick‐Prescott filter to  estimate the NAIRU in equations which omit explicit supply shock variables.  See Staigher‐Stock‐Watson  (2001) and Stock‐Watson (2006).

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 19

triangle approach has no such unexplained increase because of its introduction of explicit  supply shock variables. 14   The Roberts specification forces the NAIRU to be constant.  Figure 7 displays the Roberts 

estimate of the NAIRU for the PCE deflator, a constant 7.0 percent.  It seems illogical for a Fed  research paper to tell the Board of Governors that the NAIRU is 7.0 percent in 2007 when the  actual unemployment rate is 4.5 percent.  Furthermore, if the Fed Board of Governors believed  Roberts’ research, it would have been raising interest rates continually over 2006‐07 to prevent  inflation from accelerating as implied by the divergence between the actual unemployment rate  and the Roberts NAIRU of 7.0 percent.  The pessimism of Roberts’ specification about the  NAIRU is reflected in its wildly exaggerated forecasts of accelerating inflation as reported in the  simulation experiments shown below.   

Roberts vs. Triangle:  Estimated Coefficients and Simulation Performance 
  We next turn to the estimated coefficients, goodness of fit, and simulation performance 

of the Roberts and triangle PC specifications.  Table 2 displays the estimated coefficients for  both the Roberts and triangle specifications for the PCE deflator.    Since the sample period is  uniform across the columns of Table 2, the sum of squared residuals is the basic metric that  allows us to compare the goodness of fit of the alternative specifications.  In both specifications the sum of coefficients on the lagged inflation terms is always very 

14.  Basthista‐Nelson (2007) are among those authors who exclude explicit supply shock variables from  their equations and derive estimates of the TV‐NAIRU that are extremely high, e.g., 8 percent in 1975 and  10 percent in 1981 (2007, p. 509, Figure 6).  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 20

close to unity, as in previous research. 15   The sum of the unemployment gap variables in the  triangle approach is around ‐0.6 for the PCE deflator, which is consistent with a stylized fact  first noticed in the 1960s that the slope of the short‐run Phillips curve is roughly minus one‐half.     An elementary textbook on specification bias would explain why the Roberts unemployment  coefficients are lower than in the triangle specification, namely that when supply shock  variables are excluded that are positively correlated with inflation and negatively correlated  with the unemployment gap, then the coefficient on the unemployment gap is biased  downward toward zero.      Of the supply shocks in the triangle model, the change in the relative import price effect 

has a highly significant coefficient of 0.06 in the PCE deflator equation, which is less than half of  the 14 percent share of imports in nominal GDP.  The coefficient on the change in the  productivity trend is entered with lags 1 and 5, and the sum of these coefficients is highly  significant at a value of about minus unity.  The productivity trend effect helps to explain why  inflation accelerated in 1965‐80 and was so well‐behaved in 1995‐2000.  The coefficients for the  Nixon control variables are highly significant and have the expected signs and magnitudes  similar to those in past research, that is, the Nixon price controls significantly reduced inflation  in 1971‐72 and raised inflation in 1974‐75.      While most papers presenting time‐series regression results display coefficients, 

15.  The inclusion of lags 13‐24 (years four through six) is strongly significant in an exclusion test at the  0.0000 confidence level.  As stated in the notes to Table 2, we conserve on degrees of freedom by 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 21

significance levels, and summary statistics, few go beyond that and display results of dynamic  simulations.  Yet the performance of the inflation equation, especially in the Roberts/NKPC  version which includes no variable whatever to explain why inflation increased in 1975 while  unemployment increased as well, the entire statistical result depends on lagged dependent  variable terms.  For the Roberts/NKPC model, inflation today is whatever it was yesterday, which is not  a model at all.    To unveil the heavy dependence of the Roberts/NKPC model on the “today‐is‐ yesterday” methodology, dynamic simulations generate the predictions of the lagged  dependent variable endogenously rather than feeding through the actual value of lagged  inflation.  This makes dynamic simulations the preferable method for testing.  To run such  simulations, the sample period is truncated ten years before the end of the data interval, and the  estimated coefficients through 1996:Q4 are used to simulate the performance of the equation for  1997‐2006, generating the lagged dependent variables endogenously.  Since the simulation has  no information on the actual value of the inflation rate, there is nothing to keep the simulated  inflation rate from drifting far away from the actual rate in a positive or negative direction. 16    The bottom section of Table 2 displays results of a dynamic simulation for 1997:Q1 to 2006:Q4  based on a sample period that ends in 1996:Q4.  Two statistics on simulation errors are 

including six successive four‐quarter moving averages of the lagged dependent variable at lags 1, 5, 9, 13,  17, and 21, rather than including all 24 lags separately.    16.  I have been running dynamic simulations of Phillips curves for at least 25 years and cannot  understand why this has not become a standard testing technique in models where there is a strong  dependence of results on the lagged dependent variable.  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 22

provided, the mean error (ME) and the root mean‐squared error (RMSE).   The simulated values  of inflation in the triangle model are extremely close to the actual values, with a mean error over  40 quarters of only ‐0.08.   The RMSE of the simulations is lower than the standard error of  estimate for the 1962‐96 sample period.  These simulation results are substantially better than  those reported in Gordon (1998).  The Roberts and triangle results agree on only one aspect of the inflation process, that  the sum of coefficients on the lagged inflation terms is always very close to unity.  However, the  Roberts coefficients on the unemployment rate are much lower than the triangle coefficients on  the unemployment gap.  As we shall see, this is an artifact of the exclusion restrictions in the  Roberts approach which are statistically rejected in the triangle approach.  The measures of goodness of fit in Table 2 also reject the Roberts specification by a wide  margin.  First, the triangle sum of squared residuals (SSR) is only 27 percent of the Roberts SSR.  The triangle model explains almost four times the variance of inflation as does the Roberts  model.         However, the most telling indictment of the Roberts specification is in the dynamic  simulation results shown in the bottom section of Table 2 and in Figure 8, which shows the time  path of the four‐quarter moving average of the simulated post‐sample behavior of the inflation  rate over 1997‐2006 in the two specifications.  The Roberts specification predicts that inflation  would soar to close to 10 percent in 2006, whereas the triangle model after ten years comes up  with a small error, a simulated value in 2006:Q4 of 2.6 percent compared to the actual 1.9 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 23

percent.  Over the entire 40‐quarter simulation period, the mean error for the triangle model  using the PCE deflator is nearly zero (‐0.08 percent) whereas the same statistic for the Roberts  model is several orders of magnitude higher, ‐4.67 percent.  The Root Mean‐Squared Error of  the triangle simulation is only 12 percent of the Roberts version, namely 0.60 percent in the  second column of Table 2 compared to 5.06 percent for Roberts in the first column of Table 2. 

IV.

The “Translation Matrix” between the Roberts/NKPC and Triangle  Specifications 

    The triangle model outperforms the Roberts/NKPC model by several orders of magnitude,  as displayed in Table 2 and Figure 8.  This raises a question central to future research on the   U. S. Phillips curve: what are the crucial differences between the triangle and Roberts  specifications that contribute to the superior performance of the triangle model?  The three key  differences are the inclusion in the triangle model of longer lags on both inflation and the  unemployment gap, the inclusion of explicit supply‐shock variables, and the allowance for a  time‐varying (TV) NAIRU in place of Roberts’ assumption of a fixed NAIRU.  In this section we  quantify the role of these differences, taking advantage of the fact that the Roberts model is fully  nested in the triangle model.  Each exclusion restriction in the Roberts model can be tested by  standard statistical exclusion criteria, and as we will see, every one of Roberts’ exclusion criteria  is rejected at high levels of statistical significance. 17

Which Differences Matter in Explaining the Poor Performance of the Roberts/NKPC? 

17.   Dew‐Becker (2006) has previously traced the statistical significance of stripped‐down Roberts‐type  Phillips Curves and reached conclusions that are similar to those arrayed in Table 3.  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 24

In everything that follows, the sample period is 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4.  Subsequently we will  look at the variability of the Phillips curve coefficient (on the unemployment rate or  unemployment gap) in rolling regressions in order to assess Roberts’ core claim that the PC has  become flatter since the mid‐1980s.  Table 3 provides the “translation matrix” that guides us  between the Roberts specification for the PCE deflator and the triangle specification. a   There are  24 lines that allow us to trace the role of each specification difference between triangle and  Roberts/NKPC, and the individual lines of alternative specification are evaluated based not just  on the SSR measure of goodness of fit, but also on the post‐sample simulation performance in  1997‐2006 based on coefficient estimates for 1962‐1996.  We have already seen in Table 2 that the performance of the Roberts specification for the  PCE deflator is inferior to that of the triangle specification by both the criterion of goodness of  fit (SSR) and also the less conventional criterion of dynamic simulation performance (ME and  RMSE).   In Table 3 the basic Roberts variant is on line 1 and the basic triangle variant is on line  21.  Roberts’ line 1 and the triangle line 21 have SSR’s of 233.3 and 63.2, exactly the same as in  Table 2 above.    Table 3 allows the three main differences between the Roberts/NKPC and triangle  specifications to be evaluated, step‐by‐step.  Is the crucial difference contributing to the better  statistical performance of the triangle model dependent on the longer lags, on the supply  shocks, on the TV‐NAIRU, or an interaction of these differences?  In the 24 lines of Table 3, the first 12 lines exclude supply shock variables, and lines 13‐24 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 25

include the supply shock variables.  Scanning down the column for “SSR”, we find that the  variants on lines 13‐24 including supply shocks all have SSR’s below 100, while most of the  SSR’s that exclude supply shocks have values above 200.  Thus our first conclusion is that the  exclusion of explicit supply shocks in the Roberts/NKPC research is the central reason for its  empirical failure either to explain postwar inflation or to track the evolution of inflation in post‐ sample 1997‐2006 simulations.    What difference is made by long lags and by the TV‐NAIRU?  When supply shocks are 

omitted as in lines 1‐12 of Table 3, there is little difference among the alternative variants which  yield SSR’s ranging from 172.7 to 233.3.  Simulation mean errors (ME) range from ‐1.60 to ‐4.67,  and the lower values are those that include long lags and allow the NAIRU to vary over time.    More interesting is the set of results that include supply shocks, lines 13 to 24 in Table 3.  

The matrix in Table 3 reveals important interactions between lag lengths, the TV‐NAIRU, and  the inclusion of supply‐shock variables.  When supply shocks are included but lag lengths are  short, as in lines 13‐14, 17‐19, and 22, the post‐sample simulation errors are very large.  When  supply shocks are included, the best results are on lines 15‐16 with a fixed NAIRU and on lines  20‐21 with a TV‐NAIRU.    Clearly, long lags on the dependent variable (inflation) matter in the  specification of a PC including supply shocks.   The right section of Table 3 contains a large number of significance tests on the exclusion of  variables which are omitted in the Roberts specification and included in the triangle  specification.  Starting on line 3, even without supply shock variables, the significance value of 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 26

excluding lags 9‐24 on the lagged dependent variable is 0.00 and on lags 1‐4 of the  unemployment gap is 0.02.  Throughout lines 1‐12 of Table 3, we learn that excluding short lags  (e.g., excluding lags 5‐8 from equations containing inflation lags 1‐4) is insignificant, whereas  excluding lags 9‐24 yields highly significant exclusion tests.    The most important section of Table 3 is in the bottom half, lines 13‐24.  Here all lines 

have the full set of supply‐shock variables.  The lines differ only in the length of lags included  on the lagged dependent (inflation) variable and on lagged unemployment, and also on  whether the NAIRU is forced to be fixed or is allowed to vary over time.  We can interpret the  bottom half of Table 3 by looking at blocks of four rows.      The first group of four rows, 13 through 16, share in common the inclusion of supply 

shocks, the assumption of a fixed NAIRU, and alternative lags on the dependent variable.  The  mean error in the dynamic simulations falls by 80 percent when lags up to 24 are included, and  the exclusion of lags 9‐24 is rejected at a 0.00 significance value.  The same result occurs in lines  22‐25 when with a time‐varying NAIRU the significance of long lags on the dependent variable  are strongly supported at significance levels of 0.00.   

The Fragility of the Conclusion that the PC has Flattened 
  Roberts’ research has been highly influential in leading the Federal Reserve to believe 

that the Phillips Curve has become flatter over the past two or more decades.  Yet we have seen  that every assumption of the Roberts (and more broadly NKPC) specification are  rejected at  high levels of statistical significance.   

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 27

 

Has the Phillips Curve flattened?  The Roberts specification says “yes” and the triangle 

specification says “no”.  Figure 9 evaluates changes in coefficients by Roberts’ own preferred  method (2006, Figure 2, p. 202), rolling regressions that shift the sample period of the regression  through time in order to reveal changes in coefficients.  The number of quarters in our basic  results in Table 2 is 180 (1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4), and we cut this in half to 90 quarters and run  rolling 90‐quarter regressions which alternatively start in each quarter from 1962:Q1 to 1984:Q3.      As shown in Figure 9, the Roberts unemployment coefficient rises from ‐0.17 in 1962 to a 

peak value of ‐0.41 in 1974, and then declines back to roughly zero in 1982‐84.  This appears to  support the basic conclusion of the Roberts (2006) paper, that the Phillips Curve has flattened.   Yet with the triangle model that fits the data so much better and provides a greatly superior  post‐sample dynamic simulation performance, there is no evidence at all of a decline in the  slope of the Phillips curve.  As shown in Figure 9, the Phillips curve based on the triangle model  has a roughly stable PC slope of about ‐0.6 to ‐0.7 from 1963 to 1977, and then the slope rises  toward about ‐0.7 to about ‐0.9 in the final ten years of the rolling regressions.  Interactions Among Specification Choices    An important difference between the Roberts and Triangle approaches is the Roberts 

assumption that the NAIRU is constant.  Figure 10 displays the different evolution of the PC  coefficient in alternative regressions in which the NAIRU is assumed to be constant vs. time‐ varying.  The two lines in Figure 10 correspond to lines 21 and 24 in Table 3.  As shown in  Figure 10 the PC coefficient is substantially more volatile when the NAIRU is assumed to be 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 28

constant than when it is allowed to vary.  The volatility of the fixed‐NAIRU coefficient is not  surprising, since some of the movements in the TV‐NAIRU are “substitutes” for the movements  of the PC coefficient.  The basic triangle specification with the TV‐NAIRU rather than a constant  NAIRU leaves open the question of why the NAIRU changed but yields coefficients that are  more stable over time.   

V.  Properties of a Four‐Equation Macro Model 
    The rest of this paper develops a small econometric model to assess the role of changes 

in demand and supply shocks and in monetary policy as causes of reduced business‐cycle  volatility during the post‐1983 period.  Our approach differs from that of Blanchard‐Simon  (2001), who called attention to many of the same factors, including the correlation between  output and inflation volatility (displayed in Figure 3 above), but who did not develop an  econometric model to quantify the exact role of the different causes.  Our approach is closer to  that of Stock‐Watson (2002, 2003), who used several different macroeconometric models to  assess the role of less volatile shocks.    Like Stock‐Watson (S‐W)’s “SVAR” model (2002, p. 154), our model contains equations 

for the inflation rate, the short‐term interest rate following a Taylor rule specification, and  output (what S‐W call the “IS” equation).   However, we go beyond Stock‐Watson in our  specification of the inflation process.   Their SVAR model subsumes all of the supply shocks in  the inflation equation into the error term, as in the NKPC specification used by Roberts.   Instead, we use the triangle inflation specification described and tested above in order to 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 29

identify the role the supply shocks in achieving the stabilization of both inflation and output.    The model developed in this paper starts with the inflation equation developed above  and adds three extra equations, two of which are similar to those in the Stock‐Watson SVAR  model and in the three‐equation model developed by Roberts.  In addition to the inflation  equation, the second equation explains the nominal Federal funds rate as responding to the  output gap and to deviations of actual inflation from the Fed’s inflation target.  Then the third  equation makes the change in the output gap a function of lagged inflation and the change in  the Federal funds rate.   Since the triangle inflation equation is specified with the  unemployment gap rather than the output gap as its demand‐side variable, we add a fourth  equation that links the unemployment gap  to current and lagged values of the output gap.   Using a notation that is consistent with the treatment of inflation above, the four‐equation  model can be written:     

pt  =  a(L)pt‐1 + b(L)(Ut‐UNt ) + c(L)zt + ept .                                                     (8)      Ft  =  R* + p* + d(L)(pt ‐ p*) + f(L)Gt + eFt .                                                      (9)      ∆Gt  =  h(L))pt‐1 + j(L))Ft +  egt .                                                            (10)        Nt  =  k(L)Gt +  eUt .                                                                  (11)   Ut‐U  

     The Phillips Curve equation (8) is identical to that written above as equation (6).  The Taylor  rule equation (9) for the nominal Federal Funds rate (F) includes the Fed’s target for the real 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 30

funds rate (R*), its target for the inflation rate (p*), a response including possible lags to the  deviation of the actual inflation rate from the inflation target, and a response including possible  lags to the level of the output gap (G), which in turn is the log ratio of actual to natural real GDP  as plotted above in the top frame of Figure 2..  The output gap or “IS” equation (10) makes the  change in the gap ∆G a function of one or more lags of the first difference of the inflation rate  and of the change in the nominal Federal Funds interest rate.  Finally, the Okun’s law equation  (11) makes the level of the unemployment gap depend on the current value and one or more  lags of the output gap.      Much of the literature on Taylor Rule equations like (9) includes a correction for first‐

order serial correlation.  If we make the error term in (9) follow an AR(1) process:     eFt =  ρeFt‐1 +uFt,    uFt~N(0,s).                                                                   (12)    then equation (9) is replaced by      Ft  =  ρFt‐1 + (1‐ρ)[R* + p* + d(L)(pt ‐ p*) + f(L)Gt] + uFt .                                          (13)  The Roberts (2006, p. 203) specification for the Taylor Rule is identical to (13) except for the  exclusion of lagged terms on inflation and the output gap, and for the statement of the target  nominal interest rate as R* + pt rather than R* + p* as in (13).  This means in practice that a sum  of the d coefficients in (13) of 1.0 is equivalent to a sum for Roberts of 0.0. 

Estimated Coefficients of the Four‐Equation Model 
  The columns of Table 4 list the four dependent variables in the model, with the middle 

columns providing alternative sets of results for the interest rate equation.  The choice of the 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 31

three sub‐intervals reflects apparent changes in Fed reactions corresponding roughly to the  three periods identified by Stock‐Watson (2003, Table 5), divided up in 1979:Q2 at the start of  the Volcker period and in 1990:Q2 at end of the period in which the Fed appeared to fight  inflation aggressively while ignoring output deviations.     The first column of Table 4 exhibits coefficients in the inflation equation for the PCE 

deflator, which is identical to the equation already discussed in the first column of Table 2.   The  three middle columns show estimated Taylor rule equations for three periods split in 1979 and  1990.  As a shorthand, we will refer to the three sub‐intervals respectively as the “Burns,”  “Volcker,” and “Greenspan‐Bernanke” responses.  These coefficients show that before 1979 the  Burns Fed “accommodated” inflation, raising the nominal interest rate by only 0.64 of any  increase in the inflation rate, hence reducing the real interest rate and stimulating demand.   After 1979 the inflation response jumped from 0.64 to 1.57, so that the Volcker Fed raised the  nominal Federal funds rate more than the increase of inflation above its target rather than less.   Further, the Volcker Fed did not respond at all to the output gap.  The Greenspan‐Bernanke Fed  actually responded less to inflation than the Burns Fed and put a slightly higher weight on  output stabilization than the Burns Fed.  This surprising finding that the Greenspan‐Bernanke  Fed accommodated inflation may be an artifact of the low volatility of inflation during their  regime, as displayed above in Figure 3.          The “IS” equation for the first difference of the output gap, shown in the next‐to‐last 

column of Table 5,  shows an insignificant positive response to the first difference of the 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 32

inflation rate, suggesting no direct feedback from a sharp increase of inflation to a sharp  decrease in output as might have been suggested by the economy’s behavior in the 1970s.  The  responses to changes in the nominal Federal funds rate are of plausible size and highly  significant; an increase in the funds rate by 100 basis points causes a decline in the output gap  by one percentage point with a long lag distributed over the next 10 quarters. 18   The final  column in Table 5 exhibits the Okun’s Law equation, showing that the unemployment gap  responds to the output gap over the current and first two lagged quarters with a highly  significant coefficient of ‐0.49, supporting the 2‐to‐1 responsiveness of the output gap to the  unemployment gap endorsed by research over the past 40 years in place of the 3‐to‐1  responsiveness originally discovered by Okun. 

Single‐Equation Model Simulations 
  The aim of building the model is to use it to decompose the sources of business cycle 

volatility.  For this purpose we will focus on three different sources of volatility and its post‐ 1983 reduction, namely set of supply shocks included in the inflation equation, the error term in  the output gap equation, and shifts in the parameters in the interest rate equation that reflect  changes in Fed policy. 19   In this section we will examine the performance of each equation 

18.  The current and first lags of the interest rate are omitted in the output gap equation because of  simultaneity; in the short‐run changes in output and interest rates tend to be positively correlated as “IS  shifts” move the economy along the “LM curve.”  We use the nominal rather than real interest rate  because it fits better, perhaps reflecting the role of nominal interest rate ceilings before 1980.  19.  No attention is paid to errors in the Okun’s law equation, which is viewed here as a purely  mechanical bridge between the output and unemployment gaps.  Further, because of the large role of the 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 33

without model interactions; that is, each equation’s predicted values are examined using actual  historical values for the endogenous explanatory variables.  Subsequently we will examine  simulations that feed back simulated values of the endogenous variables.   Figure 11 displays a dynamic simulation of the PCE deflator for the period 1965:Q1‐ 2006:Q4 in which the coefficients are estimated through 2006 but the lagged dependent variable  is fed back endogenously.  One simulation uses the actual values of the supply‐shock variables;  the other sets the values of all the supply shock variables equal to zero but retains the actual  historical values of the unemployment gap.  Simulated inflation with no supply shocks remains  roughly equal to the full‐shock simulation through early 1973 and then stays consistently below  the full‐shock simulation by a large amount through 2006.  Since the only variable driving an  acceleration or deceleration of inflation is the unemployment gap, the severe recessions of 1974‐ 75 and 1981‐82 cause marked declines in the inflation rate, sending it close to zero in 1984‐5 and  again in 1994‐95.   Notice that the difference between the two simulations narrows in the late  1990s, since the full‐shock simulated value of inflation fails to accelerate in 1995‐2001, due to the  role of beneficial supply shocks that provided the Greenspan Fed with good luck and enabled it  to avoid raising the Fed funds rate as it had in 1987‐89.    We now turn to the single‐equation behavior of the interest rate equation, taking its  explanatory variables as exogenous.   All the simulations in this paper assume that the inflation  target (p*) in equation (6) is 2.0 percent and that the real interest rate target (R*) is 3.0 percent.   

lagged interest rate variable in the Taylor Rule equation (13), the interest rate errors are small and 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 34

As in Table 4, the coefficients on inflation and the output gap are allowed to shift at 1979 and  1990.   The fitted values of the equation are extremely close to the actual values, which is no  surprise in light of the correction for serial correlation, and there is no need to plot them.      The central topic of this paper is the contribution of the Phillips Curve specification to 

explaining the reduced volatility of the output gap, as already examined above in the two  frames of Figure 2.  The predictive performance of the output gap equation is shown in Figure  12.  While the equation is estimated in first difference form, the actual and predicted values of  the first differences are converted back to the level of the output gap for graphing in Figure 12. 20     Clearly, the output gap has a life of its own that is not captured by the simple “IS” equation.    The output gap equation predicts a much smaller recession in 1974‐75 than actually occurred.   The equation’s predictions overstate the severity of the 1980‐85 slump and also fail to capture  the output gap’s rise above zero in the late 1980s.  Further, the predicted values completely miss  the timing of the ups and downs of the output gap after 1990.    These errors in the output gap equation are not bad news for the model.  Rather, they 

remind us that output determination depends on far more than movements back and forth  along the slope of a fixed IS curve, as is implied by our model (based in turn on the Stock‐ Watson SVAR) which makes changes in interest rates the only significant source of changes in  the output gap.  Obviously shifts in the IS curve matter as well, and it would take a much more 

uninteresting.  20.  The errors in the first difference equation are translated into errors in the level of the output gap by 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 35

complex model to capture the sources of these IS shifts.  Missing from the predictions of the  output gap equation in Figure 10 are such important events as Vietnam war spending in the late  1960s and the timing of the hi‐tech investment boom of the late 1990s.  In the full‐model  simulations discussed below we will explore the effects of suppressing the error term in the  output equation.   Our interpretation of the output gap error is based on Gordon (2005), in  which three main forces drive the increased stabilization of the output gap error term – the  reduced share and volatility of government military spending, the increased stability of  inventory investment, and financial reforms that reduced the volatility of residential structures  investment. 21   Table 5 summarizes the single‐equation results.  The top four lines calculate standard 

deviations of the actual values of the inflation rate, Federal funds rate, and level and first  difference of the output gap.  The reported standard deviations for the actual inflation rate and  output gap are similar to those in our text discussions of Figures 2 and 3 above, with a decline  in the standard deviation of the output gap and inflation of about 76 percent in logs.  In contrast  the volatility of the interest rate declined by much less, about 40 percent in logs.    How well do the simulations (for the inflation equation) and predicted values (for the 

other equations) replicate the lower standard deviations of the actual values?   Simulated  inflation falls by 81 percent, slightly more than the actual value, and simulated inflation declines 

forcing the level errors to have a mean of zero over the 1965‐2004 period. 21.   The role of financial market reforms in achieving reduced volatility has been studied in detail by  Dynan, Elmendorf, and Sichel (2005).  

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 36

by a smaller 61 percent when supply shock variables are excluded.  However, as we have seen  in Figure 11 above, much of the pre‐1984 inflation volatility in the “no‐shocks” scenario is due  to the role of deep recessions in forcing inflation much lower than the actual outcome.  A full  understanding of the role of supply shocks requires us to unleash the full set of model  interactions, since without supply shocks in the 1970s there would not have been the spikes of  the interest rate in 1981‐82 nor the deep recession of 1981‐82.    The single‐equation predictions for the Federal funds rate differ from the other 

equations because the error term is so small, virtually eliminated by the serial correlation  correction.  The predicted value for the interest rate has a decline in its standard deviation of 37   percent in Table 5, very similar to the actual decline of 41 percent.  The output gap equation  yields a predicted value that has a decline in its standard deviation of 55 percent, much less  than the actual 76 percent decline.  Eliminating the error term in the output gap equation cuts  the standard deviation by half before 1984 and by about 40 percent after 1984, indicating that a  reduction in the variance of the output error contributed to business cycle stabilization after  1983.     

Full‐Model Simulations  
  To assess the role in achieving reduced business‐cycle volatility of supply shocks in the 

inflation equation, and of the error term in the output gap equation, we run full model  simulations with alternative shocks set equal to zero, one at a time and then all together.    Table  6 contains five sections, one each for the standard deviation of  inflation, of the interest rate, and 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 37

of the output gap, then the average value of inflation and the average absolute value of the  output gap.  Within each section there are four lines corresponding to the full model  simulations and alternative simulations that suppress the shocks one at a time and all together.     The contrast between the single‐equation and full‐model simulations can be seen by 

comparing Tables 5 and 6.  Here is the log percent change of the standard deviations for 1984‐ 2006 relative to 1965‐83 for each of the three variables, comparing the actual values, the single‐ equation simulation values, and the full‐model simulation values.      Log Percent Ratio of Standard Deviations, 1984‐2004 to 1965‐83            Four‐Quarter            Inflation Rate    Interest Rate    ∆Output Gap    Actual Values        ‐76.3      ‐40.9      ‐80.2  Single‐Equation Simulations    ‐80.6      ‐37.0      ‐54.9  Full‐Model Simulations     ‐62.9      ‐7.8      ‐49.9      The full‐model simulations share with the single‐equation simulations that they include the  exogenous effects of the supply‐shock variables in the inflation equation, as well as the error  terms in the interest rate and output gap equations.  But they differ in that they use endogenous  model‐generated values rather than exogenous data‐generated values for the endogenous  variables in each equation.  The switch to the full model simulations reduces the estimated post‐ 1983 decline in the volatility of all three variables, the inflation rate, the interest rate, and the  change in the output gap.     

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 38

Counter‐Factual Full‐Model Simulation Results Supressing Supply and Demand  Shocks 
  We can now discuss the relative role of the supply and demand shocks in explaining the 

model’s simulated volatility of the economy.  Because of the serial correlation correction, errors  in the interest rate equation play no role in the explanation.   We start with the alternative  simulations for the inflation rate as described in the top section of Table 6.  For the first period,  suppressing the supply shocks eliminates about two‐thirds of the standard deviation of  inflation in the first period, while suppressing the output gap error eliminates about 25 percent  of the standard deviation of inflation in the first period.  Suppressing supply shocks reduces the  second‐period standard error by about half, but suppressing the output error actually raises  volatility as compared to the “all shocks” variant.    Figure 13 illustrates the role of supply  shocks and the output error in explaining the behavior of the inflation rate.  The dark solid line  shows the full model simulation, which is virtually identical to the single‐equation simulation  depicted in Figure 11.   Suppressing the output error reduces the inflation rate by between three  and four percent throughout the simulation period.  Since the output equation cannot generate  the excess demand of the late 1960s, without the output error the model forecasts less inflation  throughout the full 40‐year simulation period.  What remains when the output error is  suppressed represents the combined contribution of the supply shocks, causing an acceleration  of inflation of six percentage points between 1972 and 1975, and a reversal in which inflation  decelerated by about seven  percentage points between 1981 and 1987.  Thus, ironically, the 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 39

“Volcker disinflation” that has usually been attributed to monetary policy actually should be  credited in large part to the reversal of supply shocks, not just the decline in the real price of oil  but also the effects of the dollar appreciation of 1980‐85.     Turning to the Federal funds rate, Table 6 shows that eliminating supply shocks in 1965‐

83 reduces the standard deviation of the interest rate by more than one‐third, as does  eliminating the output error.   In the second period supply shocks have no impact in reducing  volatility, but suppressing the output error reduces the standard deviation of the interest rate by  about one‐third.  Thus when we compare 1965‐83 with 1984‐2006, there was a reduction in the  volatility of the interest rate by about two‐thirds when the effects of both supply shocks and  output errors are combined.  Yet, surprisingly, the role of these shocks was about the same in  each period so that they contributing nothing to the stabilization of interest rates, as we can see  in the second section of Table 6 when we compare the “All Shocks” and “No Shocks” outcomes.  The simulations for the interest rate are displayed in Figure  14.  Due to the correction  for serial correlation, suppressing the model’s own‐equation interest rate error makes virtually  no difference.  Compared to the basic model simulation, suppressing the supply shocks makes a  big difference in holding down the interest rate between 1974 and 1985, but after 1985 reduces  the interest rate by very little.   Suppression of the output error also makes a big difference in  reducing the interest rate throughout the 40‐year simulation period, and particularly between  1977 and 1992.  Recall that eliminating the output error works directly through the output gap  term in the interest rate equation and indirectly through the effect of a lower output gap in 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 40

reducing the inflation rate and hence reducing the interest rate through the inflation term in the  interest rate equation.      The next section of Table 6 for the standard deviation of the output gap shows that 

about half of the volatility of the output gap in the first period was caused by the output error  but, surprisingly, none of the volatility in the second period.  Suppressing the supply shocks  eliminates about one‐third of the output gap volatility in the first period but none in the second  period.        The Fed’s objective as captured in the model’s interest rate equation is not the standard 

deviation of the inflation rate but rather its average value.  As for the output gap, the Fed’s goal is  for the output gap to be zero, and hence to minimize the average absolute value of the output  gap.  The bottom two sections of Table 6 report on the effect of shocks on these two central  objectives of Fed policy.      Suppressing the supply shocks would have converted the actual decline in the average 

inflation rate across the two periods from 5 to 2.2 percent, into an identical 3.2 percent across  both periods.  That is, supply shocks were adverse before 1983 and beneficial after 1983.  Thus  supply shocks are the whole story of why inflation declined by so much after 1984.   In contrast  the output error made inflation higher in both periods, and with no output error the inflation  rate would have been negative after 1984.      Overall, both the supply shocks and the output error contributed to the high volatility of 

inflation and the output gap before 1983, as well as to the high average value of inflation and 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 41

the high average absolute value of the output gap.  Suppressing the supply shocks makes the  economy’s behavior in the first period similar to its behavior in the second period, thus  eliminating the puzzle of reduced volatility, and in fact suppressing the supply shocks makes  average  inflation in the second period slightly  higher than in the first period.  Suppressing the  output error makes the economy more stable and inflation lower in both periods.  Without the  output shocks, the output gap would have been much smaller and less volatile in both periods,  and without the output error we still would have had a puzzle of improved post‐1983 volatility  that would have been resolved by the role of the supply shocks.   

VI.
 

 What Difference does PC Specification Make to Full‐Model Conclusions? 
This paper has placed primary emphasis on the contrast between the Roberts version of 

the NKPC and the alternative triangle model, which performs with orders of magnitude better  in both standard goodness of fit measures and also in post‐sample dynamic simulations.   We  now ask how much difference the use of the triangle vs. Roberts inflation equation makes in the  evaluation of the sources of reduced business cycle volatility since 1984.    Table 7 is arranged with the same five vertical sections as we have already examined in 

Table 6.  In each section there are four rows, so that we may contrast the impact in the triangle  model of omitting the set of supply shock variables, with the Roberts model where the  analogous exercise is to eliminate the error term in his inflation equation.  In the next version of  this paper, we will add an extra line for the triangle version to omit both the set of supply shock 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 42

variables and the error term in the triangle equation.  An important caveat in Table 7 is that the  only difference between the Roberts and triangle results refer to the inflation equation.  The  interest rate, output gap, and unemployment gap equations in our basic model are used  throughout in deriving the results of Table 7.    The top section of Table 7 shows that removing the explicit supply shock variables from 

the triangle model reduces the standard deviation of inflation much more before 1984 than after  1983.  Thus the supply shocks continue to explain most of the changed volatility of inflation  after 1983.  The third and fourth line of the top section substitute the Roberts approach.  While  the Roberts equation yields the same decline in volatility after 1984, its diagnostic ability is  impaired.  Removing the error term in the Roberts equation yields a much higher 1.48 standard  deviation than with the triangle approach (0.82 standard deviation), and the Roberts equation  without the error term suggests that the standard deviation of inflation should have increased  after 1983.    The next section of Table 7 shows that the triangle and Roberts PC specifications reach a 

similar conclusion.  Suppressing the triangle supply shocks imply that interest rate volatility  would have been higher post‐1984, and the suppression of the error term in the Roberts PC  equation yields the same conclusion, although by a smaller amount.    An important difference between the triangle and Roberts results appears in the third 

section of Table 7, where we examine the effect of alternative inflation equations in explaining  changes in the standard deviation of the output gap.  In the triangle model removing the supply 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 43

shocks removes about 1/3 of output volatility in the pre‐1984 period and nothing after 1984.   Thus the supply shock variables in the triangle PC equation explain a substantial part of the  reduction in output volatility after 1983.    The results with the Roberts inflation equation in the multi‐equation model for the 

standard deviation of the output gap can be dismissed as perverse.   With the inflation error in  its own PC equation, the Roberts model cannot explain any of the standard deviation of the  output gap before or after 1984.  Omitting the inflation error leaves the Roberts inflation model  clueless as to why the actual standard deviation of inflation declined after 1984.    

VI.  Conclusion 
    This paper began with the journalistic characterization of the Fed’s view that the slope of 

the United States Phillips Curve (PC) has become substantially flatter, by a factor of at least half,  since the mid‐1980s.  The flattening of the Phillips curve is documented in a particular style of  PC research based on the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (NKPC) literature, in which PC  specifications involve links between the current inflation rate and short lags on inflation, and on  the current unemployment rate.  The first part of this paper uses a wide variety of statistical  tests to show that the Fed’s PC equation as based on research by Roberts (2006) is strongly  rejected both by traditional and nontraditional tests when compared to the Gordon “triangle”  model that was developed in the early 1980s.     The remainder of the paper asks why the volatility of output changes and the output 

gap has declined substantially after 1984, a phenomenon on which U. S. macroeconomists share 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 44

an unusual consensus about its existence but not about its causes.  Our analysis based on a  small macroeconometric model concludes that about 1/3 of the reduction in the volatility of real  GDP can be traced to the role of supply shocks in the triangle inflation equation.   More  important are errors in the output gap equation that quantifies the role of monetary policy in  reducing output when interest rates are high and stimulating output when interest rates are  low.    To highlight the role of Phillips curve specifications in the analysis of reduced U.S. 

business cycle volatility, we show that the Roberts/NKPC type Phillips curve specification  misses much of the role of supply shocks in contributing to reduced volatility in both inflation  and output.  Not only is the triangle approach necessary to understand the evolution of the U. S.  inflation rate over the postwar era, but also the triangle approach is required to examine the  sources of reduced business cycle volatility.  Papers that omit the supply‐shock variables and  long lags integral to the triangle approach understate the role of reduced shocks in explaining  the lower volatility of both inflation and output changes in the postwar U. S. economy.        

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 45

  REFERENCES                          BÅRDSEN, GUNNAR, EILEV S. JANSEN, AND RAGNAR NYMOEN (2002).  ʺTesting the New  Keynesian Phillips Curve.ʺ  Paper presented at Workshop on The Phillips Curve:  New  Theory and Evidence, Facföreningsrörelsens Institut För Ekonomisk Forskning (Trade  Union Institute For Economic Research), Stockholm, May 25‐26.     BASISTHA, ARABINDA, AND NELSON, CHARLES R. (2007).  “New Measures of the Output Gap  Based on the Forward‐Looking New Keynesian Phillips Curve,” Journal of Monetary  Economics, vol. 54 (no. 2, March), 498‐511.    BLANCHARD, OLIVIER, AND SIMON, JOHN (2001).  “The Long and Large Decline in U. S. Output  Volatility,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, vol. 32 (no. 1), 135‐64.    CALVO, GUILLERMO A. (1983).  ʺStaggered Price in a Utility Maximizing Framework,ʺ Journal of  Monetary Economics, vol 12,  383‐98.    DEW‐BECKER, IAN (2006).  “Was Lucas Right?  Evidence on Structural Shift in the Phillips  Curve,” senior honors thesis submitted to Northwestern Economics Department, May.    _________  AND GORDON, ROBERT J. (2005).  “Where Did the Productivity Growth Go?  Inflation  Dynamics and the Distribution of Income,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, vol. 36,  no. 2, 67‐127.    DYNAN, KAREN E., ELMENDORF, DOUGLAS W., AND SICHEL, DANIEL E. (2005).  “Can Financial  Innovation Help to Explain the Reduced Volatility of Economic Activity?”  Journal of  Monetary Economics (Carnegie‐Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy), vol. 53  (January), 123‐50.    FUHRER, JEFFREY C. (1997).  ʺThe (Un)Importance of Forward‐Looking Behavior in Price  Specifications,ʺ Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, vol 29 (3),  338‐50.    GORDON, ROBERT J. (1975).  ʺAlternative Responses of Policy to External Supply Shocks,ʺ  Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, vol. 6, 183‐206.     _________   (1977).   ʺCan the Inflation of the 1970s Be Explained?ʺ Brookings Papers on Economic  Activity, vol. 8, 253‐77.    _________ (1982)  ʺInflation, Flexible Exchange Rates, and the Natural Rate of Unemployment.ʺ   In Workers, Jobs, and Inflation, Martin N. Baily, ed.  Washington:  Brookings, 88‐152. 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 46

  _________ (1997).  ʺThe Time‐Varying NAIRU and its Implications for Economic Policy.ʺ  Journal  of Economic Perspectives, vol. 11 (Winter), 11‐32.    _________(1998).  ʺFoundations of the Goldilocks Economy:  Supply Shocks and the Time‐ Varying NAIRU,ʺ Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, vol. 29 (no. 2), 297‐333.    _________ (2003).  “Exploding Productivity Growth: Context, Causes, and Implications,”  Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, vol. 34, no. 2, 207‐79.    _________ (2005).  “What Caused the Decline in U. S. Business Cycle Volatility?” in Christopher  Kent and David Norman, eds., The Changing Nature of the Business Cycle, Sydney:   Reserve Bank of Australia, 64‐106.      IP, GREG (2007).  “Policy Makers At Fed Rethink Inflation’s Roots,” Wall Street Journal, February  26, A1.    KOHN, DONALD L. (2005).  “Inflation Modeling:  A Policymaker’s Perspective,” speech given at  Quantitative Evidence on Price Determination Conference, Washington, D.C.,  September 29.    MANKIW, N. GREGORY (2001).  ʺThe Inexorable and Mysterious Tradeoff between Inflation and  Unemployment,ʺ Economic Journal, 111 (May), 45‐61.    ROBERTS, JOHN M. (2006).  “Monetary Policy and Inflation Dynamics,” International Journal of  Central Banking 2 (September),  193‐230.    STAIGER, DOUGLAS, STOCK, JAMES H., AND WATSON, MARK W. (1997).  ʺThe NAIRU,  Unemployment, and Monetary Policy,ʺ Journal of Economic Perspectives vol. 11 (Winter),  33‐49.    __________ (2001).  ʺPrices, Wages, and the U. S. NAIRU in the 1990s,ʺ in Alan B. Krueger and  Robert M Solow, eds., The Roaring Nineties:  Can Full Employment Be Sustained?  New  York:  The Russell Sage Foundation and the Century Foundation Press,  3‐60.    STOCK, JAMES H., AND WATSON, MARK W. (2002).  “Has the Business Cycle Changed and Why?   NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2002,  159‐218.    __________ (2003).  “Has the Business Cycle Changed?”  In Monetary Policy and Uncertainty:  Adapting to a Changing Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, 9‐56. 

Phillips Curve Specification and Business Cycle Volatility, Page 47

_________ (2006).  “Why Has U. S. Inflation Become Harder to Forecast?”, NBER Working Paper  12324, June.      WILLIAMS, JOHN C. (2006).  “The Phillips Curve in an Era of Well‐Anchored Inflation  Expectations,” unpublished working paper, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco,  September. 

Appendix 

TABLE 1  Rolling Standard Deviations of Output Changes, Output Gap, and Inflation  Over Selected Intervals, 1952:Q4 to 2007:Q1 
      Rolling Standard Deviations  1952:Q4- 1973:Q1- 1952:Q4- 1988:Q11972:Q4 1987:Q4 1987:Q4 2007:Q1 2,72 1,14 1,85 41,9 68,0 2,83 1,59 2,42 56,2 85,5 2,77 1,33 2,09 48,1 75,6 1,24 0,49 1,16 39,5 93,5   Log Percentage  Change    1988‐07 vs. 1973‐87  -80,3 -100,0 -59,0 -19,7 21,3

Variable    Four‐Quarter Change in Real GDP  Four‐Quarter Change in GDP Deflator  Output Gap  Ratio GDP Deflator to Real GDP  Ratio Output Gap to Real GDP 

TABLE 2  Estimated Equations for Quarterly Changes in    PCE Deflators, 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4 
  Variable     Constant  Lagged Dependent Variable     Unemployment Gap  Unemployment Rate  Relative Price of Imports  Food‐Energy Effect  Productivity Trend Change  Nixon Controls ʺonʺ  Nixon Controls ʺoffʺ     R2  S.E.E  S.S.R     Dynamic Simulation  1997:Q1 ‐ 2006:Q4     Mean Error  Root Mean‐Square Error  1-24 1-4 0-4 0 1-4 0-4 15 0 0
a

  Roberts

 

 

Lags 

   Triangle 

1,01 * 1,00 ** 0,96 ** -0,57 ** -0,15 * 0,06 0,90 -0,97 -1,54 1,91 0,79 1,16 233,3 0,94 0,64 63,2 ** ** ** ** **

Note b -4,67 5,06 -0,08 0,60

a) Lagged dependent variable is entered as the four-quarter moving average for lags 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, and 21, respectively b) Dynamic simulations are based on regressions for the sample period 1962:Q1-1996:Q4 in which the coefficients on the lagged dependent variable are constrained to sum to unity.

Table 3 Transformation of Philips Curve
Exclude inf  U lag  Fixed or TV  Supply  Inf Lag 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 1 to 4 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 1 to 4 1 to 4 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 1 to 4 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 1 to 4 1 to 4 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 1 to 8 1 to 24 1 5 9 13 17 21 length 0 0 0 0 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 0 0 0 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 0 to 4 NAIRU Fixed Fixed fixed fixed Fixed TV TV TV TV Fixed Fixed Fixed Fixed Fixed fixed fixed Fixed TV TV TV TV Fixed Fixed Fixed shock No No No No No No No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes R2 0,79 0,79 0,81 0,79 0,80 0,80 0,80 0,82 0,80 0,79 0,82 0,80 0,91 0,90 0,92 0,92 0,90 0,91 0,91 0,93 0,94 0,90 0,93 0,93 SEE 1,16 1,16 1,09 1,16 1,13 1,11 1,12 1,07 1,12 1,14 1,07 1,11 0,77 0,78 0,70 0,70 0,77 0,76 0,76 0,65 0,64 0,78 0,68 0,67 SSR 233,3 228,0 183,3 229,8 217,6 211,8 209,1 174,4 212,3 214,5 172,7 207,2 96,1 95,1 70,0 78,5 94,1 91,7 89,9 57,8 63,2 93,4 63,6 70,3 ME -4,67 -4,47 -3,63 -3,53 -4,42 -2,05 -2,03 -1,84 -1,60 -4,37 -3,92 -3,62 -3,84 -3,88 -0,57 -0,56 -4,15 -3,05 -2,79 -0,08 -0,08 -4,03 -0,76 -0,78 RMSE 5,06 4,84 3,87 3,77 4,73 2,32 2,31 2,12 1,92 4,67 4,15 3,84 4,37 4,39 0,97 0,92 4,64 3,33 3,03 0,67 0,60 4,48 1,09 1,05 lags 5‐8 Sig  F Stat Level 0,98 0,42 2,35 0,00 3,08 0,54 0,70 1,88 0,59 0,67 2,27 0,01 17,68 16,89 17,57 23,60 15,85 15,93 15,70 21,41 28,30 15,26 18,07 23,20 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,00 0,03 0,02 Exclude inf lags  Exclude  U lags  9‐24 F Stat Sig  Level 1‐4 F Stat Sig  Level Exclude  Supply  Shocks Sig  F Stat Level

0,43

0,79 3,16 0,00 0,85 0,50

0,75

0,56 4,79 0,00

0,27

0,90 4,01 0,00

TABLE 4 Coefficients from Four‐Equation Model, estimated for 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4
Dependent Variable Nominal Federal Funds Rate 1960:Q1‐ 1979:Q3‐ 1990:Q3‐ 1979:Q2 Lags  included Endogenous Variables Inflation Inflation minus Inflation Target ∆ Inflation Rate Federal Funds Rate Error Term ∆ Federal Funds Rate Level of Unemployment Gap Level of Output Gap Level of Output Gap 1-24
a

1990:Q2 Volcker

2006:Q4 Greenspan‐ ∆ Output  Bernanke Gap Unemploy‐ ment Gap

Inflation  Rate

Burns

1,00 ** 0,64 ** 0,79 ** -0,57 ** 0,52 ** 0,16 0,63 ** -0,49 ** 1,57 0,72 ** 0,37 0,02 0,96 ** -0,95 **

0-1 1-4 1 2-10 0-4 0-1 0-2

Exogenous Variables Relative Price of Imports 1-4 0,06 ** Food‐Energy Effect 0-4 0,90 ** Productivity Trend Change 15 -0,97 ** Nixon Controls ʺonʺ 0 -1,54 ** Nixon Controls ʺoffʺ 0 1,91 ** R2 0,94 0,91 S.E.E 0,64 0,73 S.S.R 63,2 38,5 a) Lagged dependent variable is entered as the four-quarter moving

0,82 1,36 70,8

0,94 0,42 10,5

0,20 0,72 87,2

0,71 0,71 89,8

Notes: (*) indicates that coefficient or sum of coefficients is significant at 5 percent level. (**) at 1 percent level

Table 5 Single Equation Simulations
Log Percent Ratio  of 1984‐2006 to  1965:Q1‐1983:Q1 Inflation Rate FF Rate Level of Output Gap First Difference of Output Gap 2,66 3,65 2,92 1,09 Simulation Results 2,52 1,69 1984:Q1‐2006:Q4 1,24 2,43 1,36 0,49 1965‐83 -76,3 -40,9 -76,4 -80,2

Simulated Inflation Simulated Inflation Without Supply Shocks Predicted FF Rate First Difference of Output Gap

1,12 0,92

-80,6 -61,3

3,34 0,50

2,30 0,29

-37,0 -54,9

Table 6 Standard Deviations of Full‐Model Specifications, Split‐sample  Taylor Rule, 1965:Q1 to 2006:Q4
Log Percent  Ratio of 1984‐ 2006 to 1965‐ 1965:Q1‐1983:Q1 All Shocks No Supply Shocks No Output Error No Shocks All Shocks No Supply Shocks No Output Error No Shocks All Shocks No Supply Shocks No Output Error No Shocks All Shocks No Supply Shocks No Output Error No Shocks All Shocks No Supply Shocks No Output Error No Shocks 1984:Q1‐2006:Q1 83 -62,93 -27,81 -24,68 34,08 -7,75 36,37 -6,80 -5,22 -49,89 -15,35 19,79 22,13 -80,76 2,10 -----45,52 -26,13 -40,03 -10,73 Standard Deviation of Inflation Rate 2,58 1,38 0,82 0,62 1,95 1,52 0,44 0,61 Standard Deviation of Fed Funds Rate 3,57 3,30 2,29 3,29 2,35 2,19 1,21 1,15 Standard Deviation of Output Gap 2,55 1,55 1,77 1,52 1,37 1,67 0,70 0,87 Average Inflation Rate 4,98 2,22 3,12 3,18 2,33 -1,78 0,33 -0,60 Average Absolute Value of Output Gap 2,06 1,31 1,71 1,32 1,97 1,32 0,84 0,75

Table 7 Standard Deviations of Full‐Model Specifications, Substituting in Roberts  Equations
Log Percent  Ratio of 1984‐ 2006 to 1965‐ 1965:Q1‐1983:Q1 1984:Q1‐2006:Q1 Standard Deviation of Inflation Rate Triangle with Supply Shocks 2,58 1,38 Triangle without Supply Shocks 0,82 0,62 Philips with Inflation Error 2,66 1,24 Phillips without Inflation Error 1,48 1,82 Standard Deviation of Fed Funds Rate Triangle with Supply Shocks 3,57 3,30 Triangle without Supply Shocks 2,29 3,29 Philips with Inflation Error 3,82 2,37 Phillips without Inflation Error 2,06 2,35 Standard Deviation of Output Gap Triangle with Supply Shocks 2,55 1,55 Triangle without Supply Shocks 1,77 1,52 Philips with Inflation Error 0,58 0,25 2,04 2,03 Phillips without Inflation Error Average Inflation Rate Triangle with Supply Shocks 4,98 2,22 Triangle without Supply Shocks 3,12 3,18 Philips with Inflation Error 5,59 2,60 Phillips without Inflation Error 3,88 2,30 Average Absolute Value of Output Gap Triangle with Supply Shocks 2,06 1,31 Triangle without Supply Shocks 1,71 1,32 Philips with Inflation Error 0,45 0,20 Phillips without Inflation Error 2,97 2,87 83 -62,93 -27,81 -76,31 20,80 -7,75 36,37 -47,73 13,37 -49,89 -15,35 -83,13 -0,45 -80,76 2,10 -76,68 -52,47 -45,52 -26,13 -80,31 -3,35

Figure 1A. Four Quarter Growth Rate of Real GDP vs Average Real GDP Growth, 1948:Q1 to 2007:Q1
14 12 10
Percent per year Actual Real GDP Growth

8 6 4 2 0 -2
Average Real GDP Growth

-4 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

Figure 1B. Twenty Quarter Rolling Standard Deviation of Real GDP Growth, 1952:Q4 to 2007:Q1
4,5 4 3,5 3
Percent

2,5 2 1,5 1 0,5 0 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

Figure 2A. Output Gap, 1950:Q2 to 2006Q4 6 4 2
Log Output Ratio

0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 1950

1955

1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 2B. Twenty Quarter Rolling Standard Deviation of Output Gap, 1955:Q1 to 2006:Q4 4 3,5 3
Percent

2,5 2 1,5 1 0,5 0 1950

1955

1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 3. Real GDP Growth Volatility vs Inflation Volatility, 1952:Q3 to 2007:Q1
4,5

4

3,5

Output Growth Volatility

3

2,5

2

1,5

1

0,5

Inflation Volatility
0 1950

1955

1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 4A. Four Quarter Average of Import Shocks, 1960:Q1 to 2006:Q4
20 15 10 5 0 -5 -10 -15 1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 4B. Four Quarter Average of Food and Energy Shocks, 1960:Q1 to 2006:Q4
4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 5. Acceleration of Trend Productivity Growth, 1960:Q1 to 2006:Q4
0,6 0,5 0,4 0,3 0,2 0,1 0 -0,1 -0,2 -0,3 -0,4 -0,5 1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

Figure 6. Actual Unemployment Rate vs. Time-Varying NAIRU, 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4
11 Unemployment rate 10

9 Unemployment HP λ=6400 8 Unemployment HP λ=1600 7

6 TV NAIRU 5

4

3 1962

1966

1970

1974

1978

1982

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

Figure 7. Time-Varying NAIRU vs. Constant NAIRU, 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4

Unemployment rate

9

Constant NAIRU

6

TV NAIRU

3 1962

1966

1970

1974

1978

1982

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

Figure 8. Predicted and Simulated Values of Inflation from Triangle and Roberts Equations 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4
12

Inflation 10 Roberts 8

6

4

2 Triangle 0 1963

1967

1971

1975

1979

1983

1987

1991

1995

1999

2003

2007

Figure 9. Roberts Vs. Triangle Unemployment Coefficients on 90 Quarter Rolling Regressions from 1962:Q1 to 1984:Q3
0

-0,1 Roberts -0,2

-0,3

-0,4 Triangle -0,5

-0,6

-0,7

-0,8

-0,9

-1 1963 1966 1969 1972 1975 1978 1981 1984

Figure 10. Constant NAIRU vs. Time Varying NAIRU Unemployment Coefficients on 90 Quarter Rolling Regressions from 1962:Q1 to 1984:Q3
0

-0,2 Constant NAIRU

-0,4

-0,6

TV NAIRU -0,8

-1

-1,2 1963 1966 1969 1972 1975 1978 1981 1984

Figure 11. Predicted Inflation with and without Supply shocks, 1962:Q1 to 2006:Q4
12 Predicted Inflation with Actual Shocks, 1965:Q1-2006:Q4 10

8

6

4

2 Predicted Inflation with Shocks Suppressed, 1965:Q1-2006:Q4 0

-2 1962

1965

1968

1971

1974

1977

1980

1983

1986

1989

1992

1995

1998

2001

2004

Figure 12. Actual and Predicted Level of the Output Gap
6 Estimated Error 4 Actual

2

0

-2

-4 Predicted -6

-8

-10 1965:01

1970:01

1975:01

1980:01

1985:01

1990:01

1995:01

2000:01

2005:01

Figure 13. Simulated Values of Four Quarter inflation Rate, 1965:Q1 to 2006:Q4
12

10 All Shocks 8

6 No Supply Shocks 4

2

0 No Output Error -2 No Shocks -4

-6 1965

1968

1971

1974

1977

1980

1983

1986

1989

1992

1995

1998

2001

2004

Figure 14. Simulated Values of Four Quarter Moving Average of Fed Funds Rate, 1965:Q1 to 2006:Q4
18 16 All Shocks 14 12 10 No Supply Shocks 8

6 4 2 No Output Error 0 No Shocks -2 -4 1965

1968

1971

1974

1977

1980

1983

1986

1989

1992

1995

1998

2001

2004