www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • May 9, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 227
RAINY DAY FUND
STATE PAGE 5
SCOTS TAKE
LEAD IN BAY
SPORTS PAGE 11
A FEW TIPS FOR
NEW GARDENERS
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
PEREZ SEEKS REVISION OF BALLOT MEASURE
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to Unreal events in
Real Estate. For buying or selling a home
in the Palo Alto Area,
Call John King at
650•354•1100
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
New homes and empty lots with
lots of green foliage growing is
what one sees now at the corner of
Glenview and Claremont drives in
San Bruno.
Approaching the third anniver-
sary of the fatal natural gas
pipeline explosion that occurred
in the neighborhood Sept. 9,
2010, the area is slowly and
steadily being rebuilt. The explo-
sion killed eight, injured 60,
destroyed 38 homes and forever
changed both the neighborhood
and the city.
In the coming weeks, the City
Council is expected to OK a utili-
ties project estimated to cost
about $7 million that will upgrade
all the underground necessities —
a last step before roads and side-
walks can be redone. Clues from
the past still remain. One empty
lot, for example, has the city
inspection sign up with stickers
— now faded and absent of color
— still standing. But overall, the
city is looking forward and many
changes will be arriving in the
coming months.
Mayor Jim Ruane called the
upcoming contracts a major piece
of the remaining rebuilding needs.
San Bruno’s rebuilding efforts continue
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The U.S. Marine Corps got a
scathing rebuke from U.S. Rep.
Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, yester-
day for a Facebook page called “F’N
Wook” that denigrates women in
the Marines and depicts them in
various forms of nudity and being
verbally and physically abused.
She sent a letter to Secretary of
Defense Charles Hagel and Marine
Corps General James Amos, before
the Facebook page disappeared
sometime later
in the day,
blasting the
“culture of
misogyny and
sexual harass-
ment” depicted
on several
F a c e b o o k
pages.
O t h e r
Facebook pages, however, such as
“Just the Tip, of the Spear” and “U
Speier blasts
Marines’ Web
pages, posts
Congresswoman takes issue with
Facebook pages denigrating women
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two San Bruno men charged with
killing an acquaintance at the
home of one’s parents and leaving
the victim in the driveway when
they couldn’t lift the body into a
trunk accepted plea deals yesterday
after prosecutors agreed one is not
Pair take deal in San Bruno killing
One imprisoned 20 years, other committed
to mental hospital; DA agrees killer insane
Jackie Speier
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
A current view of the neighborhood at Glenview and Claremont drives. See EFFORTS, Page 20
PHOTO COURTESY OF AMBER FARINHA
San Mateo County cyclists completed the Tour de San Mateo-Foster City Schools on Tuesday to promote National
Bike to School Day.The San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District partnered with the San Mateo County’s
Safe Routes to School initiative working toward creating safer routes for walking and bicycling with an emphasis
on the importance and need to increase physical activity among children, improve pedestrian safety, with a
concern for the environment and building connections between families, schools and the broader community.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Brandon Tyler will have a few
more friends biking with him to
work today.
Tyler, a 39-year-old from San
Mateo, rides 25 miles round-trip
daily to his job with the city of
Belmont as an equipment opera-
tor. Tyler’s actually increased the
distance in his commute during his
12 years working for the city.
Married with two young children,
Tyler noted the morning rides
allow him to get in some biking
without cutting into family time
as much.
Today, Tyler will be joined by far
more people during his commute
as it’s the 19th annual Bike to
Work Day. The event — put
together by the Peninsula Traffic
Congestion Relief Alliance in
partnership with the Bay Area
Bicycle Coalition, The Silicon
Community gets on board with biking
Many ways to celebrate Bike to Work Day
Brandon Tyler
See BIKE, Page 20
Nicholas Vargas and
Brandon Thompson See DEAL, Page 19
See SPEIER, Page 19
Scratch-and-sniff cards
prompt natural gas scare
GREAT FALLS, Mont. — Those
scratch-and-sniff cards the energy
company sends to customers to teach
them to recognize the artificial smell
added to natural gas? Turns out they
work pretty well.
Energy West general manager Nick
Bohr tells the Great Falls Tribune that
workers recently discarded several
boxes of expired scratch-and-sniff
cards in Great Falls. But when the
garbage truck picked them up and com-
pressed the load Bohr says “it was the
same as if they had scratched them.”
The resulting odor prompted numer-
ous false alarms and building evacua-
tions as the garbage truck traveled
through downtown Great Falls on
Wednesday morning, leaving the
smell in its trail.
Bohr says the company apologizes
for the disruption.
Kenyan company turns old
sandals into colorful objects
NAIROBI, Kenya — The colorful
handmade giraffes, elephants and
warthogs made in a Nairobi workshop
were once only dirty pieces of rubber
cruising the Indian Ocean’s currents.
Kenya’s Ocean Sole sandal recy-
cling company is cleaning the East
African country’s beaches of used,
washed-up flip-flops and other sandals.
About 45 workers in Nairobi make
100 different products from the dis-
carded flip-flops. In 2008, the compa-
ny shipped an 18-foot giraffe to Rome
for display during a fashion week.
Company founder Julie Church says
the goal of her company is to create
products that people want to buy, then
make them interested in the back-
story.
Workers wash the flip-flops, many
of which show signs of multiple
repairs. Artisans then glue together
the various colors, carve the products,
sand and rewash them.
Church first noticed Kenyan children
turning flip-flops into toy boats
around 1999, when she worked as a
marine scientist for WWF and the
Kenya Wildlife Service on Kenya’s
coast near the border with Somalia.
Turtles hatching on the beach had to
fight their way through the debris on
beaches to get to the ocean, Church
said, and a plan to clean up the debris
and create artistic and useful items
gained momentum. WWF ordered
15,000 key rings, and her eco-friendly
project took off.
It has not made Church rich, howev-
er. The company turns over about
$150,000 a year, she said. Last year it
booked a small loss.
But new investment money is flow-
ing in, and the company is in the
midst of rebranding itself from its for-
mer name — the FlipFlop Recycling
Company — to Ocean Sole.
The company aims to sell 70 per-
cent of its products outside Kenya. It
has distributors in the United States,
Europe and new inquiries from Japan.
Its biggest purchasers are zoos and
aquariums.
One of Church’s employees is Dan
Wambui, who said he enjoys interact-
ing with visitors who come to the
Nairobi workshop.
“They come from far ... when they
see what we are doing we see them real-
ly happy and they are appreciating.
We feel internationally recognized and
we feel happy about it,” Wambui said.
‘Charlie Brown’ actor to
be sentenced for stalking
SAN DIEGO — The man who was the
voice of Charlie Brown in several
“Peanuts” television shows faces pos-
sible prison time for stalking and
threatening his former girlfriend and a
plastic surgeon who had given her a
breast enhancement.
Peter Robbins is scheduled to appear
in San Diego Superior Court on
Wednesday for sentencing. He pleaded
guilty last month.
Prosecutors say the 56-year-old
called his former girlfriend up to 37
times in a 24-hour period, saying he
would kill her and her son if she did
not give back his dog and car. They
say Robbins repeatedly called the
plastic surgeon to demand a refund for
the breast enhancement.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Singer Billy Joel is
64.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1754
A political cartoon in Benjamin
Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette
depicted a snake cut into eight pieces,
each section representing a part of the
American colonies; the caption read,
“JOIN, or DIE.”
“There is nothing to fear except the persistent
refusal to find out the truth, the persistent
refusal to analyze the causes of happenings.”
— Dorothy Thompson,
American journalist and author (1894-1961)
Actress Candice
Bergen is 67.
Actress Rosario
Dawson is 34.
Birthdays
REUTERS
The collapsed control tower of Genoa’s port is pictured in this handout picture provided by the Coast Guard service.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy
drizzle in the morning. Highs in the upper
50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the mid 40s. West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs around 60.
West winds around 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming west 5 to 10
mph after midnight.
Saturday: Sunny in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s.
Saturday night through Wednesday: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
AHEAD HUSKY APPEAR DOUBLE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The rabbit’s cousin was having a —
BAD “HARE” DAY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
OATOF
TINAF
ITOWUT
SEDUXO
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
I n 1712, the Carolina Colony was officially divided into
two entities: North Carolina and South Carolina.
I n 1883, Spanish philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset was
born in Madrid.
I n 1936, Italy annexed Ethiopia.
I n 1945, U.S. officials announced that a midnight enter-
tainment curfew was being lifted immediately.
I n 1951, the U.S. conducted its first thermonuclear experi-
ment as part of Operation Greenhouse by detonating a 225-
kiloton device on Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific nicknamed
“George.”
I n 1958, “Vertigo,” Alfred Hitchcock’s eerie thriller star-
ring James Stewart and Kim Novak, premiered in San
Francisco, the movie’s setting.
I n 1961, in a speech to the National Association of
Broadcasters, Federal Communications Commission
Chairman Newton N. Minow decried the majority of televi-
sion programming as a “vast wasteland.”
I n 1962, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology succeeded in reflecting a laser beam off the sur-
face of the moon.
In 1974, the House Judiciary Committee opened public
hearings on whether to recommend the impeachment of
President Richard Nixon.
I n 1978, the bullet-riddled body of former Italian prime
minister Aldo Moro, who’d been abducted by the Red
Brigades, was found in an automobile in the center of Rome.
In 1980, 35 people were killed when a freighter rammed the
Sunshine Skyway Bridge over Tampa Bay in Florida, causing
a 1,400-foot section of the southbound span to collapse.
Actress Geraldine McEwan is 81. Actor-writer Alan Bennett
is 79. Rock musician Nokie Edwards (The Ventures) is 78.
Actor Albert Finney is 77. Actress-turned-politician Glenda
Jackson is 77. Producer-director James L. Brooks is 76.
Musician Sonny Curtis (Buddy Holly and the Crickets) is 76.
Singer Tommy Roe is 71. Singer-musician Richie Furay
(Buffalo Springfield and Poco) is 69. Pop singer Clint Holmes
is 67. Actor Anthony Higgins is 66. Blues singer-musician
Bob Margolin is 64. Rock singer-musician Tom Petersson
(Cheap Trick) is 63. Actress Alley Mills is 62. Actress Amy
Hill is 60. Actress Wendy Crewson is 57.
In other news ...
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place;Lucky Star,No.2,in second place;and
Big Ben, No. 4, in third place. The race time was
clocked at 1:40.04.
3 9 0
1 6 13 20 51 31
Mega number
May 7 Mega Millions
21 22 26 30 57 27
Powerball
May 8 Powerball
4 7 14 28 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 7 4 6
Daily Four
4 3 8
Daily three evening
9 27 28 34 47 6
Mega number
May 8 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
FOSTER CITY
Grand theft. Abackpack, laptop and wallet
were stolen from a vehicle on Shell Boulevard
before 8:19 p.m. Tuesday, May 7.
Fraud. Aperson’s ID was fraudulently used to
open a credit account on Thatcher Lane before
10:51 a.m. Tuesday, May 7.
DUI. Awoman was arrested for driving under
the influence at the intersection of State
Route 92 and Foster City Boulevard before
3:11 a.m. Saturday, May 4.
Petty theft. Someone stole $700 cash from
an apartment on Balclutha Drive before
12:03 a.m. Friday, May 3.
Arres t . A man was arrested on a $50,000
felony warrant on Vintage Park Drive before
9:01 p.m. Thursday, May 2.
SAN CARLOS
Ci t at i on. Aman was cited for driving with a
suspended license on the 2900 block of Eaton
Avenue before 1:19 p.m. Monday, May 6.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for providing
false ID to a police officer on the 1100 block
of Industrial Road before 1:49 a.m. Sunday,
May 5.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
1700 block of El Camino Real before 11:33
a.m. Friday, May 3.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
3300 block of La Mesa Drive before 8:32
a.m. Wednesday, May 1.
Police reports
Fired up
A woman was threatened by a former
employee near the intersection of East
Hillsdale Boulevard and Altair Avenue in
Foster City before 6:16 p.m. Monday,
May 6.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An agency that serves the homeless on
the Peninsula is reaching out to the public
for help after an April 23 fire gutted the “The
Villa” in San Jose, a shelter for women and
their children.
InnVision Shelter Network has found beds
for most of the single women, single moth-
ers and their children in facilities close to
the gutted shelter and is now seeking dona-
tions to assist them.
About 50 women and children were dis-
placed by the fire, said agency spokes-
woman Maria Duzon.
One of the displaced, Jennifer, a 29-year-
old San Mateo resident, is now living tem-
porarily with family and friends with her 2-
year-old daughter as she seeks out more per-
manent housing. She was referred to
InnVision Shelter Network after completing
a program with the local Women’s Recovery
Association. The Villa residences were set
up just for single women and any children
they may have.
“All of our lives have been thrown into
disarray. Everyone is scattered,” Jennifer
told the Daily Journal.
She was at a Target store yesterday buying
some new clothes for her and her child.
Although she works, Jennifer still needs
housing assistance.
The fire destroyed about half of the San
Jose facility and the agency’s insurance will
cover the costs to remodel it. The donations
are being sought to directly help the fire vic-
tims.
“The trauma of homelessness, combined
with the additional loss due to a fire, is dev-
astating. The displaced families lost their
necessities — things that we often take for
granted, such as a child’s beloved toy or a
mother’s work shoes. These homeless fami-
lies are destabilized and anxious as they
wait for the shelter to reopen, hopefully
within three to four months,” the agency’s
CEO Karae Lisle wrote in a statement.
The donations are needed to cover emer-
gency supplies, clinical services, special-
ized staff, bus passes, food and other
unfunded expenses.
The American Red Cross assisted the vic-
tims with cots, blankets and other emer-
gency services immediately after the fire and
Cisco Systems also made a donation to the
agency after the fire.
Yesterday morning, the agency received
about 50 online donations in about two
hours, Duzon said.
To make a donation go to:
https://14345.thankyou4caring.org/sslpag
e.aspx?pid=405; To donate by phone, call:
685-5880 ext. 123; For more information
on InnVision Shelter Network go to:
www.ivsn.org
Agency seeks help for fire victims
Comment on
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www.smdailyjournal.com
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City parolee accused of holding
his girlfriend under hot water to “know what
the fires of hell are like” and forced her 3-
year-old son to bite her twice was convicted
of multiple felonies that could return him to
prison for life.
Jurors deliberated six hours before finding
Marcus Randel Smith, 41, guilty of kidnap-
ping, forced oral copulation, assault with a
deadly weapon, false imprisonment, mak-
ing threats and misdemeanor domestic vio-
lence and assault by force. Jurors acquitted
Smith of child endangerment.
Smith, who was tried as a three-striker and
has prior convictions for making felony
threats and abusing a pre-
vious girlfriend, now
faces 25 years to life in
prison when sentenced.
According to prosecu-
tors, Smith attacked the
woman Feb. 24, 2012
because he questioned her
fidelity. A cable techni-
cian who arrived at the
home reportedly saw
Smith pushing the woman around and she
quietly begged him not to leave but he did
out of fear. She was ultimately able to
escape to a neighbor’s home to call police.
Before she fled, however, prosecutors told
jurors Smith forced her into a bedroom to
inspect her body for proof she was cheat-
ing. He also assaulted her and made the boy
bite her twice. He threatened to kill her and
forced her under hot water while saying it
represented the fires of hell before he sexu-
ally assaulted her. He also reportedly bran-
dished a baseball bat and threatened to kill
her, according to prosecutors.
Three-striker convicted of assaulting girlfriend
Marcus Smith
4
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CHP: Please don’t leave memorial
items on San Mateo Bridge
After a fatal limousine fire on the San
Mateo-Hayward Bridge, the California
Highway Patrol is asking that the communi-
ty refrain from placing items on the bridge
noting safety issues.
“Out of respect to those that have lost their
lives, there can be no symbols or tokens left
at the scene on the San Mateo Bridge as it is
extremely unsafe. In times of emotional pain
such as this, we are sensitive but we must
also remain diligent in our mission of safe-
t y,” according to a CHP press release.
The limousine caught fire just before 10:10
p.m. Saturday, May 4. Carrying nine passen-
gers westbound, the driver and four of those
passengers escaped. Five passengers were
unable to escape and sustained fatal injuries.
The California Highway Patrol, with the
assistance of allied agencies, continues to
investigate the incident.
“We also understand that sometimes there
is a need to exhibit expressions of love,
kindness and care. These expressions often
leave a lasting impression on the survivors.
While tribute can be absolutely positive, we
can’t risk the possibility of someone else
being physically harmed,” according to the
press release.
Police search for driver of
stolen Camry who fled traffic stop
Redwood City police spent much of
lunchtime yesterday searching for a suspect
who fled on foot after being pulled over in a
stolen Toyota Camry, a police lieutenant
said.
A traffic officer maneuvered behind the
1990s Camry just before noon and, after run-
ning the plates, learned that it had been
stolen from San Jose, police Lt. Sean Hart
said.
When the officer pulled over the Camry in
the 3500 block of Rolison Road, the male
driver fled on foot.
Hart said the officer ran after the driver, but
that the suspect managed to escape. Aperime-
ter was set up and officers searched the area
until around 1 p.m.
Police have no detailed description of the
driver.
“Officers are working to ID the suspect
from the items found inside the car,” Hart
said.
Ajuvenile female who was riding in the car
was detained at the scene.
Bay Bridge repair
could cost $5M-$10M
The planned repair for broken seismic safe-
ty rods on the new span of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge could cost between $5
million and $10 million, a state transporta-
tion official said Wednesday.
Officials still don’t know whether the
repair will be done in time for the span’s
scheduled Labor Day opening, but say it’s
still possible. A decision is expected May
29.
California Transportation Commission
Executive Director Andre Boutros told a meet-
ing of the Bay Area Toll Authority that the
repair for the 32 snapped rods involves
installing steel saddles.
The saddles would be placed over the base
of the seismic shock absorber that was ini-
tially intended to attach to the bridge by the
rods. About 430 steel cables covered in con-
crete will tie down the saddles. Another repair
option would have been more expensive.
Officials said they aren’t taking short cuts
in an attempt to get the bridge opened on
schedule.
“We’re dealing here with not only engi-
neering concerns but public confidence, and
public confidence has taken a beating over
the last few weeks, and we are mindful of
that,” said Steve Heminger, executive direc-
tor of the Metropolitan Transportation
Commission.
Bridge officials Wednesday also sent a let-
ter to the Federal Highway Administration
requesting an independent review of the
California Department of Transportation’s
investigation into the broken rods, and the
chosen fix.
Local briefs
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The chief of Oakland’s embattled police
department said Wednesday that he is step-
ping down due to medical reasons.
Chief Howard Jordan abruptly told City
Administrator Deanna Santana and the rank-
and-file that effective immediately he is on
medical leave and taking steps toward med-
ical retirement.
“Through my 24 years of wearing an OPD
badge and uniform, I have emulated the
department’s core values: Honesty, respect
and integrity — values I observed in the
men and women who worked with me and for
me,” Jordan said.
Jordan’s resignation came at a crucial time
for the city, which continues to deal with
one of the nation’s most violent crime and
robbery rates. He also faced mounting chal-
lenges in leading the
force after city officials
relinquished broad pow-
ers late last year over the
department to a court-
appointed director to
avert an unprecedented
federal takeover over
reforms involving a bru-
tality scandal.
After serving as chief
for less than two years and doing two stints
as interim chief, Jordan did not specify his
medical condition. He said his decision was
difficult but necessary.
Jordan’s stunning announcement came
moments before a scheduled news confer-
ence where consultant and former New York
and Los Angeles police chief William
Bratton was to present a plan on how
Oakland could reduce crime.
Oakland police chief stepping
down, citing medical causes
Howard Jordan
5
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
1101234.1
Jeanette Callis
Resident of San Carlos
Jeanette passed away on April 29, 2013,
cradled in the love of her daughters.
Jeanette was a woman of strong
convictions, feisty attitude, and a passion
for playing the piano.
Jeanette was born in Oakland, CA, to Cethil and Laura (Day)
Jones. She was raised in Dunsmuir, CA, but spent her adult
life in San Carlos. Jeanette was preceded in deathbyherloving
husband Dale Callis, son Gary Rossetto, and sister Constance
Krouskup. She is survived by her daughters Nanette Elaine,
Paulette Carey (George), and Sue Marshall (Bob); daughter-in-
law Patty Rossetto. She is further survived by her brother-in-law
Don Krouskup, loving niece Elaine, nephew Roger, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
Jeanette was an avid volunteer and an active member of
numerous organizations including the Community United
Church of Christ, Order of Eastern Star, Jr. Matrons, San
Carlos Villagers, Golden Gate District, and RWC Women’s
Club, Republican Women’s Club, Filoli, Sequoia Hospital
Auxiliary, to name only a few.
The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations in her
honor be made to your favorite charity. One of Mom’s was her
local ASPCA.
Memorial service celebrating her life will be on Saturday,
May 11, 2013, 1:00 PM at the Community United church of
Christ, 1336 Arroyo Ave., San Carlos. Reception will follow at
the San Carlos Masonic Lodge
Obituary
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eating fish is good for your
heart but taking fish oil capsules
does not help people at high risk
of heart problems who are already
taking medicines to prevent them,
a large study in Italy found.
The work makes clearer who
does and does not benefit from tak-
ing supplements of omega-3 fatty
acids, the good oils found in fish
such as salmon, tuna and sardines.
Previous studies have suggested
that fish oil capsules could lower
heart risks in people with heart
failure or who have already suf-
fered a heart attack. The American
Heart Association recommends
them only for people who have
high levels of fats called triglyc-
erides in their blood, says the
group’s president, Dr. Donna
Arnett of the University of
Alabama at Birmingham.
Fish oil capsules failed to pre-
vent flare-ups of atrial fibrilla-
tion, a common heart
rhythm problem, in a
large study in 2010.
The new
study was
led by
t h e
M a r i o
Negri Institute
for Pharmacological Research in
Milan. It tested 1 gram a day of
fish oil versus dummy capsules in
12,513 people throughout Italy.
They had not suffered a heart
attack but were at high risk of hav-
ing one because of diabetes, high
blood pressure, high cholesterol,
smoking, obesity or other condi-
tions. Most already were taking
cholesterol-lowering statins,
aspirin and other
m e d i -
c i n e s
t o
lower
their chances
of heart problems.
Researchers at first planned to
compare the rate of death, heart
attacks and strokes in the two
groups, but these were less fre-
quent than anticipated. So they
started measuring how long it was
before people in either group suf-
fered one of these fates or was hos-
pitalized for heart-related reasons.
After five years, the rate was the
same — about 12 percent of each
group had one of these problems.
“They’re very high-risk people
and so the level of other treat-
ments was very high,” Arnett said.
“When you’re being aggressively
treated for all of your other risk
factors, adding fish oil yielded no
additional benefits.”
Results are published in
Thursday’s New England Journal
of Medicine. Makers of fish oil
supplements helped pay for the
study.
Eating fish is known to help
protect against heart disease, and
the Heart Association recommends
it at least twice a week.
Study: Fish oil doesn’t help prevent heart attacks
Maldonado launches
drive to repeal inmate shift
SACRAMENTO — Potential
GOP candidate for governor Abel
Maldonado is
leading a cam-
paign to ask
voters to repeal
a law that has
shifted respon-
sibility for tens
of thousands of
criminals from
state prisons to
county jails.
Maldonado, a
f o r m e r
California sen-
ator and lieu-
tenant gover-
nor, announced
Wednesday that
he has formed
an initiative
committee to
start collecting
signatures to
put the measure on next year’s bal-
l ot .
Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat,
pushed for the criminal justice
realignment under a federal court
order to reduce prison crowding.
The corrections department
responded to Maldonado’s criti-
cism, saying counties can rehabil-
itate many lower-level offenders
more efficiently.
Maldonado is considering a run
for governor next year against
Brown, but he denied the ballot
drive is related.
Arouns the state
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The state
Assembly speaker on Wednesday
proposed changing a rainy day
fund measure on the November
2014 ballot that had been nego-
tiated by former Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger and Republican
lawmakers three years ago to
decrease budget volatility.
Speaker John Perez, D-Los
Angeles, announced his plan for
a replacement ballot measure that
p o t e n t i a l l y
makes it more
favorable for
the public
e m p l o y e e
unions that
s u p p o r t
De mo c r a t i c
l a w ma k e r s .
His proposal
calls for the
rainy day fund
to be built with extra capital
gains taxes from the wealthy
rather than from the state’s gen-
eral fund, which could take
money away from state pro-
grams.
Senate Minority Leader Bob
Huff, R-Diamond Bar, said
Perez’s plan would give
Democrats “political cover” for
increasing spending.
Republicans criticized
Democrats last year for moving
the rainy day fund ballot measure
from the June 2012 primary to
the November 2014 general elec-
tion. They called it a power grab
pushed by union interests seek-
ing to postpone the measure.
“All the Democrats have done
is kick it down the road and now
they’re trying to walk away from
it,” Huff said.
With two-thirds majorities in
both houses of the Legislature,
Democrats could change the bal-
lot measure without Republican
support.
Perez defended his plan, saying
that altering the previously
agreed-upon measure will better
protect the state budget from
future economic downturns.
Perez seeks revision of ‘rainy day’ ballot measure
Abel
Maldonado
Jerry Brown
John Perez
6
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
Information Fair
Friday, May 17, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Burlingame Recreation Center
850 Burlingame Avenue, Burlingame
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Senior Showcase
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`While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events sub|ect to change
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The nation’s slowly
improving jobs picture hides problems like
stagnant wages and fewer working hours that
strike directly at President Barack Obama’s
base of support — young people, racial
minorities and the less affluent.
As the president launches a new focus on
jobs, his traditional allies contend Obama
has put too much of an emphasis on a deficit-
cutting grand bargain with Republicans at the
expense of creating jobs.
New college graduates face a downbeat
labor market. The unemployment rate for
workers under age 25 with at least a bache-
lor’s degree has averaged 8.2 percent, com-
pared to 5.4 percent in 2007. The govern-
ment’s April jobs report showed a decline in
average weekly hours worked, and much of
the growth was in predominantly low-wage
sectors such as food services and drinking
places and retail trade. And a new study found
that nearly 2 million private-sector employ-
ees paid with taxpayer dollars earn wages too
low to support a family.
“My point is that we’ve got to shift the
national mood toward high wage and invest-
ment in America as opposed to cutting every
federal program and having this austerity-
based deficit-reduction thrust,” said Rep.
Keith Ellison, a Minnesota Democrat and co-
chairman of the House Progressive Caucus.
On Thursday, Obama is traveling to Austin,
Texas, to draw attention to his administra-
tion’s effort to boost jobs and wages and pro-
mote his efforts to bring jobs back to the
U.S. from overseas. Last week he spent three
days in Mexico and Costa Rica, in part to
highlight trade relations that he said would
help increase employment back home.
The economy has created 6.8 million pri-
vate-sector jobs over the past 38 months, but
nearly 12 million remain unemployed. The
unemployment rate edged down to 7.5 per-
cent from 7.6 percent in March and has fallen
0.4 percentage point since the start of the
year, though it remains high.
For the White House, creating jobs is as
much a political as it is an economic chal-
lenge. Republicans have long resisted any
further spending that would prime the econo-
my, arguing instead that Obama’s regulatory
regime and his new health care law are hinder-
ing job growth.
Obama pressed to do more on jobs, stagnant wages
By Connie Cass and Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For the first time, the
government is publicly revealing how
much hospitals charge, and the differences
are astounding: Some bill tens of thou-
sands of dollars more than others for the
same treatment, even within the same city.
Why does a joint replacement cost 40
times as much at one hospital as at another
across the country? It’s a mystery, federal
health officials say.
“It doesn’t make sense,” Jonathan Blum,
Medicare deputy administrator, said
Wednesday. The higher charges don’t
reflect better care, he said.
And the amounts are too huge to be
explained by obvious differences among
hospitals, such as a more expensive
regional economy, older or sicker patients,
or the extra costs of running a teaching
hospital, he said.
The average charges for joint replace-
ment range from about $5,300 at an Ada,
Okla., hospital to $223,000 in Monterey
Park the Department of Health and Human
Services said. That doesn’t include doctors’
fees.
Senate rejects firearms
on more federal lands
WASHINGTON — The Senate rejected an
effort Wednesday to expand the use of
firearms on some of the nation’s most fre-
quently visited federal lands, handing gun
control advocates a modest success.
The measure, backed by the National Rifle
Association, represented one of two efforts
Wednesday by gun rights supporters to take
the offensive in Congress. Across the
Capitol, a Republican-run House committee
voted to make it easier for some veterans
with mental difficulties to get firearms.
The rejected Senate proposal would have
let people use guns for any legal purpose on
lands managed by the Army Corps of
Engineers, which oversees nearly 12 mil-
lion acres that abound in lakes, rivers,
campsites and hiking trails. Currently, guns
on those properties are limited to activities
like target-range shooting and hunting, and
weapons must be unloaded while being car-
ried to those activities.
Senators voted 56-43 for the proposal by
Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., but it fell short
of the 60 votes needed for passage.
Eleven Democrats and one Democratic-
leaning independent voted for Coburn’s
plan, underscoring the party’s divisions on
the gun issue.
Those voting for Coburn’s proposal
included all four Democrats who opposed
the bipartisan bill expanding required feder-
al background checks to more gun buyers
that the Senate rejected three weeks ago.
The background check expansion has
been the pillar of President Barack Obama’s
effort to restrict guns following December’s
elementary school massacre in Newtown,
Conn.
Gay marriage momentum
expands to two Midwest states
ST. PAUL, Minn. — The national momen-
tum on gay marriage has been limited most-
ly to the East and West coasts, but it looks
like that’s about to change.
The Minnesota House votes Thursday on
legalizing gay marriage, and Gov. Mark
Dayton could be signing a bill as early as
next week. The Illinois Senate approved it
earlier, and supporters think they’ll soon
have enough votes in the House.
Delaware became the 11th state to
approve gay marriage earlier this week,
joining states like New York, Rhode Island
and Washington. But Iowa has been the only
state in flyover land with gay marriage, and
that came due to judicial action.
Minnesota’s push comes after supporters
mobilized last fall to block a constitutional
ban. It’s also become possible as Democrats
took full power of state government.
High hospital bills go public, but will it help?
REUTERS
Barack Obama addresses a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in
Washington, D.C.
Around the nation
NATION 7
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DOCTOR OZ DEEPAK CHOPRA
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
REUTERS
Family and friends of Travis Alexander react after Jodi Arias was found guilty of first-degree
murder in Phoenix, Ariz.
By Brian Skoloff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Jodi Arias said in a post-
conviction interview with a TVstation that
she prefers the death penalty over life in
prison.
Arias talked to Fox affiliate KSAZ in the
courthouse minutes after she was convicted
of first-degree murder. With tears in her
eyes, she said she feels overwhelmed and
that she was surprised because she didn’t
believe she committed first-degree murder.
She said in the interview that she would
“prefer to die sooner than later” and that
“death is the ultimate freedom.”
Arias previously said she considered sui-
cide after killing her lover Travis
Alexander. The county said Arias was
placed under suicide watch.
Arias was convicted of first-degree mur-
der Wednesday in the gruesome killing of
her one-time boyfriend in Arizona after a
four-month trial that captured headlines
with lurid tales of sex, lies, religion and a
salacious relationship
that ended in a blood
bath.
Arias fought back
tears, and family mem-
bers of the victim wept
and hugged each other as
the verdict was
announced in the hushed,
packed courtroom.
Outside, a huge crowd
that had gathered on the courthouse steps
screamed, whistled and cheered the news in
a case that has attracted fans from across
the country who traveled to Phoenix to be
close to the proceedings. Some chanted,
“USA, USA, USA!”
The jury of eight men and four women
took about 15 hours to reach its verdict
after four months of testimony, including
18 days on the witness stand by the 32-
year-old Arias. The jury will return to the
courtroom Thursday to begin the next
phase of the trial that could set the stage
for her being sentenced to death.
Arias says she prefers death penalty
Jodi Arias
By Meghan Barr and Thomas J. Sheeran
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — Aman suspected of keep-
ing three women captive inside his decrepit
house for a decade was charged Wednesday
with kidnapping and rape, accused of holding
them under conditions so oppressive they
were allowed outside for only a few moments
in disguise and never saw a chance to escape
until this week.
Investigators said the women apparently
were bound with ropes and chains, and a city
councilman briefed on the case said they were
subjected to prolonged sexual and psycho-
logical abuse and suffered miscarriages.
Ariel Castro, a 52-year-old former school
bus driver, was charged with four counts of
kidnapping — covering the captives and the
daughter born to one of them — and three
counts of rape, against all three women.
The women, now in their 20s and 30s, van-
ished separately between 2002 and 2004. At
the time, they were 14, 16
and 20 years old.
Prosecutors brought no
charges against Castro’s
two brothers, who were
arrested along with him
on Monday, saying there
was no evidence they had
any part in the crime.
Castro owns the run-
down home where the
women were rescued on Monday after one of
them, Amanda Berry, broke through a screen
door to freedom while he was away. The dis-
covery electrified Cleveland, where many
people had come to believe the missing
young women were dead.
Police Deputy Chief Ed Tomba said it was
the only opportunity they ever had to
escape.
“Something must have clicked, and she
saw an opportunity and she took that oppor-
tunity,” he said.
Cleveland man charged with
three women’s kidnap, rape
Ariel Castro
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Speech-to-Speech (STS)
Relay Service
STS Relay is for individuals with
speech disabilities or have difficulty
being understood on the phone.
STS access numbers
English 866-988-4288
Español 866-288-7504
STS Training & Help Line* Available 9-5 PM PST
English 866-844-2626
*This number is available for use exclusively by California residents and individuals associated
with themwho wish to learn more about Speech-to-Speech service.
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A former top
diplomat in Libya on Wednesday
delivered a riveting minute-by-
minute account of the chaotic
events during the deadly assault on
the U.S. diplomatic mission in
Benghazi last September, with a 2
a.m. call from Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton and con-
fusion about the fate of U.S.
Ambassador Chris Stevens.
In a slow, halting and sometimes
emotional voice, Gregory Hicks,
the deputy chief of mission who
was in Tripoli, described for a
House committee how a routine day
on Sept. 11, 2012, quickly
devolved as insurgents launched
two nighttime attacks on the facil-
ity in eastern Libya, killing
Stevens and three other Americans.
The hours-long hearing produced
no major revelation while reviv-
ing disputes over the widely
debunked comments made by U.N.
Ambassador Susan Rice five days
after the attacks and the inability
of the U.S. military to respond
quickly.
“I don’t think there’s a smoking
gun today. I don’t think there’s a
lukewarm slingshot,” said Rep.
Mark Pocan, D-Wi s.
The session exposed bitter parti-
san divisions as Republicans who
are pressing ahead with the inves-
tigation eight months after the
attacks insist the Obama adminis-
tration is covering up information
and Democrats decry politiciza-
tion of a national security issue.
A scathing independent review
in December faulted the State
Department for inadequate security
at the mission, but it has not been
the final word. Nor has congres-
sional testimony from former
Obama Cabinet officials and mili-
tary leaders.
In a jam-packed hearing room
where Republicans and Democrats
furiously traded charges, the soft-
spoken Hicks presented a lengthy
recollection of the events and
expressed frustration with a mili-
tary that he argued could have pre-
vented the second attack.
Hicks and two other State
Department witnesses criticized
the review conducted by former top
diplomat Thomas Pickering and
retired Gen. Mike Mullen, the for-
mer chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff. Their complaints centered
on a report they consider incom-
plete, with individuals who
weren’t interviewed and a focus on
the assistant secretary level and
lower.
Former U.S. official describes Libya attack
REUTERS
Mark Thompson,acting deputy assistant secretary for counterterrorism,left,
and Gregory Hicks, the deputy chief of mission who was in Tripoli, arrive
at the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on
‘Benghazi: Exposing Failure and Recognizing Courage’ on Capitol Hill.
By Raf Casert
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — Unlike the bril-
liant thieves in “Ocean’s Eleven,”
it appears that those behind the
clockwork-precision, $50 million
diamond heist at Brussels Airport
may not get a Hollywood ending.
After three months of virtual
silence on the matter, authorities
struck this week, detaining at least
31 people in a three-nation sweep
and recovering so many diamonds
from the loot Antwerp traders lost
that they are still figuring out the
exact value.
Officials said that among the
people held in Belgium, France
and Switzerland on Tuesday and
Wednesday are some with violent
criminal pasts; the one person
held in France is believed to have
been one of the robbers at the air-
port. The evidence seized includes
large sums of cash, precious
stones and luxury cars.
“It was a total surprise for us,”
said Caroline De Wolf of the
Antwerp World Diamond Center,
whose traders lost millions in the
Feb. 18 heist. “But we were
delighted when we heard.”
Six to eight people were
detained in Geneva, and 24 in and
around Brussels.
Thirty-one detained in probe of $50M Belgium diamond heist
Israel releases top Muslim
cleric in the Holy Land
JERUSALEM — Israeli police
detained the top Muslim cleric in
the Holy Land Wednesday in a rare
crackdown on a leading religious
figure, questioning him for several
hours before releasing him without
charge.
Later in the day, in the Gaza
Strip, an influential Muslim cleric
from Qatar received a hero’s wel-
come in a high-profile visit that
deepened the bitter division
between Gaza’s hardline Islamist
rulers and the West Bank’s Western-
backed Palestinian leaders.
The detention of the mufti of
Jerusalem, which followed recent
unrest at a disputed holy site in
Jerusalem, drew harsh condemna-
tion from Palestinian leaders and
neighboring Jordan and threatened
to complicate U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry’s latest effort to
restart Mideast peace talks.
Around the world
OPINION 9
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Downtown parking garage
Editor,
The public garages in downtown
San Mateo are nice and convenient
facilities for both local and visitors
alike. In addition to facilitating com-
merce, adding parking revenue dollars
and helping the local economy, the
sheltered parking and marked space
between cars makes them appealing.
The one with entrances on both B
Street and Ellsworth Avenue has a per-
manent foul smell. It does not take
much imagination to determine the
source of such, but I am sure it is
enhanced by the additional storage of
open garbage containers kept there
by the neighboring restaurants.
We need to maintain and steam
clean them regularly. Perhaps we
could encourage restaurants to put a
lid on those containers. With the
abundance of restaurants and nearby
stores in San Mateo, the garage is a
real asset 12 hours a day. Summer
temperatures would very likely make
the problem worse.
Concave mirrors are a necessity at
both exits to prevent the daily close
calls I see when cars exit while peo-
ple are crossing.
Oscar López-Guerra
San Mateo
Hats off on Mother’s Day
Editor,
With Mother’s Day just around the
corner, please allow me a few words
of honor to all mothers for giving
birth to children, most of whom face
that risk with open arms of love.
Later, many of those mothers can
be seen pushing baby carts through a
public park with the infant inside and
others doing the same with an older
child or two running alongside the
cart.
Their challenge has begun to pro-
vide their love and security to their
children as they grow up to face a dan-
gerous world of crime and hostility.
Her love and presence are what holds
the family together and, without that,
most families fail.
So hats off and big hugs of love to
all mothers on their day of special
honor.
Jack Rogers
San Mateo
Support child nutrition
Editor,
Mother’s Day honors the mothers
who nurture their children. However, I
know millions of mothers and chil-
dren who are not celebrating.
Before I was born, my mom had
access to prenatal doctor visits and a
class to learn about breastfeeding —
not to mention access to the grocery
store. Unfortunately, not all expect-
ing mothers are this lucky; one in
eight people go to bed hungry every
night, many of them expecting moth-
ers. And one-fourth of all children
under 5 years old are chronically
undernourished, so mothers watch
their children starve. On Mother’s
Day alone, 6,800 children will die
from hunger.
These deaths are all preventable
with greater investments in proven,
cost-effective nutrition programs.
The United States invests less than 1
percent of our international develop-
ment assistance in nutrition, a gross-
ly insufficient amount.
Today I ask President Obama to
honor mothers everywhere by pledg-
ing $1.35 billion for 2014 through
2016 for global nutrition programs at
the “Nutrition for Growth” conference
on June 8. It will save mothers’ and
children’s lives.
Mark Salamon
San Mateo
A kill switch for cellphones
Editor,
How innocent these things start
off. Let me paint a picture. Kill
switches for cellphones, followed by
a switch to kill your car engine and
next an implantable kill switch that
does exactly what it says. Think this
is impossible and would or cannot
happen in America? What do you
think a drone does? It’s a remote
killing machine soon to be used in
your backyard. You see, we are on a
path of destruction from within. It’s
happening so fast, under the radar
(pun intended) and then you’re dead.
Oops, sorry!
Harry Roussard
Foster City
Letters to the editor
Chicago Tribune
W
hen he ran for president,
Barack Obama laid out the
case against the detention
of inmates at Guantanamo Bay: “It is
expensive. It is inefficient. It hurts us
in terms of our international stand-
ing. It lessens cooperation with our
allies on counterterrorism efforts. It
is a recruitment tool for extremists. It
needs to be closed.”
Oh, wait. That wasn’t Candidate
Obama in 2008. It was President
Obama, last week. In seeking the
White House, he vowed to close the
camp. More than five years after tak-
ing office, it is still in business —
with no end in sight.
Obama has learned a couple of
things from this issue. The first is
how limited his power is to carry out
his promises. The second is that
issues that sound easy on the cam-
paign trail can turn out to be complex
and intractable.
If he sounds torn about what to do,
that’s not surprising. The fight
against al-Qaida and affiliated terrorist
groups is a different kind of war that
creates problems unknown in tradi-
tional wars. And more than 11 years
after 9/11, we as a nation are still
struggling to solve them.
Obama can take credit for reducing
the number of inmates to 166 from
about 245.
Obama laments the idea that “we’re
going to keep 100 individuals in no
man’s land in perpetuity.” But it
would be hard to reduce that number to
zero. Some 46 prisoners are deemed
too dangerous to let go, but the
administration has deemed them
unsuitable for prosecution because of
insufficient evidence.
That doesn’t entitle them to free-
dom.
As for the others deemed to pose no
danger, the president needs to be
negotiating with other countries to
find a safe destination. He could start
by appointing someone to work with
foreign governments on the issue — a
job that has been vacant for months
and was given little attention before.
Christopher Anders, an official of
the American Civil Liberties Union,
told Reuters that when it comes to
Guantanamo, “For the last three years
at the White House, it’s been like no
one home.”
Putting someone in that job and let-
ting the world know the issue has pri-
ority with the president could only
help. It’s hard to believe that with a
little horse trading, Obama can’t per-
suade a few nations to cooperate.
While steps like these wouldn’t
solve the problem of Guantanamo,
they would shrink it. That’s not quite
what Candidate Obama had in mind
five years ago. But an incomplete
solution is better than none at all.
The Guantanamo dilemma
Braced for
the future
B
ring on the Milk Duds and red wine! OK, maybe
not at the same time but still. Today, I will
have nuts on my salad, chew some gum and
maybe even indulge in the stale peanut brittle sitting
on a newsroom desk the better part of a week.
Today, the braces come off .
The treatment time was certainly far short of the two-
year estimate the ortho-
dontist gave to fix my bite
but when the patient is
closer to middle age than
teenage any length as a
metal mouth feels too
long. Granted, it probably
took my dentist longer to
convince me of braces
which isn’t that surprising
considering how many
years I probably spent
squinting before admitting
it was time for glasses.
The breaking point came
when he refused to fix a
few small chips in my
teeth, courtesy of grinding. They’ll just chip again
unless you fix your bite, he said, plus you’ll soon grind
your back teeth down to nothing. So in the name of
vanity and not having to gum my food in old age, I
caved although there were still tug-of-wars to be had.
Invisalign, I assumed. Won’t work well to fix the bite, I
was told. Put the braces on the back of my teeth, I sug-
gested. He gave the same response with a side of “those
tear up the tongue like crazy.” In the end, my teeth got
cozy with clear braces on the top and traditional on the
bottom which meant if I didn’t smile too widely, get
too close to others or indulge in red wine, coffee or
other stain-inducing foods, you’d hardly know about
my grill.
Every month, though, the dental assistant changing
the bands would ask with wide-eyed innocence, What
color? Pink? Blue? How about glow in the dark? as
though I wasn’t constantly striving for invisibility. I
flirted briefly with the idea of orange and black during
the Giants’ last World Series run but figured, with my
luck, the team would get knocked out of contention
before my next appointment, leaving me looking like a
Halloween relic. Besides, the braces made me hyper-
aware of what errant crumb or scrap might be in my
teeth; the last thing I wanted was to draw more atten-
t i on.
I tried finding some lining more silver than the bot-
tom braces themselves. Maybe I’ll get carded more, I
thought. Wrong. Maybe I’ll drink less coffee. Double
wrong, although I did take to using a straw which
admittedly looks ridiculous poking out of a mug.
Instead, the benefits were ones I didn’t expect, like
realizing that I missed regular flossing that didn’t
require intricate weaving and 15 minutes of time. Or,
bonding with youngsters over the best way to pack wax
around pokey ends. There was always an ample supply
of rubber bands for shooting at the dogs (although that
never happened) or to satisfy the need for really teeny,
tiny braids (that really never happened). I must also
mention during monthly appointments watching
movies in non-chronological segments that over the
span of a year added up to an entire feature. Of course,
having somehow always been stuck in the children’s
treatment room, these movies tended to be “Beverly
Hills Chihuahua” and “Brave,” which admittedly were
less jarring in the morning than watching lions maul
zebras during the nature documentary played in the adult
spaces.
But after today, no more. No more floss threaders. No
more passing on things crunchy and sticky. No more
leaving the cabernet until the night before the clear
elastics get changed. No more trying to gingerly eat a
steak sandwich when my back teeth don’t yet meet only
to have my dinner companion look at my mutilated
meal and plead, “Please stop.”
However, there is always the slim chance that my
orthodontist will take a look at my mouth this morning
and dash my dreams with a casual “Oops, I was wrong.
Three more months!” Now that would really bite.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,105.12 +0.32% 10-Yr Bond 1.76 -1.29%
Nasdaq3,413.27 +0.49% Oil (per barrel) 96.52
S&P 500 1,632.69 +0.41% Gold 1,473.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
J.C. Penney Co., up $1.21 at $17.61
A Maxim Group LLC analyst said that the struggling retailer’s return to
discounting should drive traffic back into stores.
AOL Inc., down $3.68 at $37.74
The Internet company’s first-quarter net income jumped 23 percent,but
adjusted earnings fell short of Wall Street predictions.
Live Nation Entertainment Inc., up 68 cents at $13.91
The concert promoter posted a slightly narrower first-quarter loss as
revenue grew 6 percent and corporate expenses fell.
Nasdaq
Whole Foods Market Inc., up $9.39 at $102.19
The natural foods store chain’s fiscal second-quarter net income rose 20
percent and it boosted its full-year profit forecast.
SkyWest Inc., down 88 cents at $14.37
The regional flight operator posted a 13 percent drop in first-quarter
revenue, blaming canceled flights because of bad weather.
The Wendy’s Co., down 34 cents at $5.78
The fast-food chain’s first-quarter net income fell 83 percent from a year-
ago period that included a big gain on the sale of an investment.
WebMD Health Corp., up $2.43 at $27.94
The health information company said CEO Cavan Redmond is leaving the
company after less than a year on the job.
Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp., up $3.27 at $68.15
The provider of information technology, consulting and outsourcing
services, said its first-quarter net income rose 17 percent.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — The Dow Jones indus-
trial average rose, closing above
15,000 for a second day after breach-
ing the landmark level for the first time
Tuesday.
On Wednesday, a day without any
major economic releases, investors
focused on company earnings as
reporting for the first quarter draws to a
close. Although earnings growth has
slowed from last quarter, profits are at
record levels and projected to rise
throughout the year.
Internet company AOLplunged as its
subscription revenue fell, and ham-
burger chain Wendy’s slumped after it
reported revenue that fell short of Wall
Street’s expectations. On the positive
side, high-end grocer Whole Foods and
the video game publisher Electronic
Arts rose sharply after predicting full-
year profits that were higher than ana-
lysts were expecting.
Scott Wren, a senior equity strategist
at Wells Fargo Advisors, predicted
more gains in the short term, but he
also said a pullback was likely at some
point because the rise in the market is
beginning to overstate the improve-
ment in the economy.
“We’re still going to keep grinding
higher,” Wren said. But, he added: “I do
think the market is ahead of itself.”
Stocks have defied predictions that a
sell-off would follow the spring surge
as signs emerged that growth could be
set for a slowdown. Both the Dow and
the Standard & Poor’s 500 index have
gained every month of the year and are
trading at record highs.
On Wednesday, AOL plunged $3.68,
or 8.9 percent, to $37.74 after the
company reported earnings that fell
short of the forecasts of Wall Street
analysts who follow the stock.
Subscription revenue fell 9 percent.
Wendy’s fell 34 cents, or 5.6 per-
cent, to $5.78 after it reported a 2 per-
cent rise in revenue to $603.7 million,
short of the $615 million forecast of
analysts.
Materials and information technolo-
gy companies gained the most of the
10 industry groups in the S&P 500
index, rising 0.9 percent and 0.8 per-
cent respectively. The two industry
groups have surged in the last month
and are finding favor with investors
after lagging the index for the first
three months of the year.
That suggests that investors are
moving from the so-called defensive
stocks — those which offer good divi-
dends and can grow regardless of the
state of the economy — into industries
that will benefit more if the economy
accelerates. Gains for the year so far
have been led by health care stocks,
which have advanced 19 percent, com-
pared with 8 percent for technology
companies.
“We’re seeing some sector rotation,”
said Chris Bertelsen, the Chief
Investment Officer of Global Financial
Private Capital. Defensive stocks
“have had a huge run this year ... I
think you are seeing some change of
attitude in the market.”
The Dow closed up 48.92 points, or
0.3 percent, at 15,105.12. The index
is 15.3 percent higher for the year. The
S&P 500 index was 6.73 points high-
er, or 0.4 percent, at 1,632.69, extend-
ing its advance for 2013 to 14.5 per-
cent.
About 90 percent of companies in
the S&P 500 index have reported their
earnings for the first quarter.
Financial analysts predict that earn-
ings will end up rising 5.1 percent ver-
sus the same period a year ago, accord-
ing to S&P Capital IQ. Although that’s
slower growth than the 7.7 percent
growth of the previous quarter, they are
expected to grow 12 percent by the
fourth quarter of 2013.
Whole Foods climbed $9.39, or
10.1 percent, to $102.19 after the nat-
ural foods store chain said its fiscal
second-quarter net income rose 20 per-
cent. The company also raised its prof-
it forecast for the full year.
Dow gains, holds on to 15,000 level
By Bree Fowler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Don’t worry, Pinterest
fans: Your sprawling virtual pegboards of
wedding dresses, handmade jewelry, craft
projects and food porn haven’t changed dra-
matically. They’re just easier to manage.
The popular link- and photo-sharing web-
site has rolled out an update, one offering
people simpler navigation and new ways to
arrange their boards to fit their needs.
Although the haphazard spirit of Pinterest
remains, the site is much less overwhelming.
I wasn’t a Pinterest user before, so the
redesign gave me a chance to take a good
look at the site for the first time. Before
that, I had refused to be sucked into yet
another form of social media. I figured I did-
n’t have much use for it.
In the months since I started testing out
Pinterest’s new look, though, I’ve found the
service helpful in organizing and sharing
my continually expanding recipe collec-
tion. And it’s fun to check what other peo-
ple around the world are looking at and to
see which strangers choose to follow me or
respond to what I’m sharing.
Although it is not a replacement for
Facebook or Twitter, and doesn’t pretend to
be, it is a beautiful and vast world with more
than 25 million users around the world.
For those who have never used Pinterest,
the free site lets people “pin” pictures from
websites they want to share on online peg
boards. You can choose to share the boards
with just a few close friends or the entire
Pinterest world. Others can comment on the
boards and pins, “like” them or repin items
on their own boards.
The result is an eclectic mix of millions
of boards spanning just about as many top-
ics. Although it doesn’t offer as much of a
chance to communicate and debate the way
Facebook and Twitter do, Pinterest is an
interesting and often beautiful supplement
to those social media networks.
Pinterest’s recent redesign is intended
to cut down on clutter and make the site
easier to manage, without drastically
changing its look. The new look contin-
ues to evolve. Most of the changes are
very subtle, and some have been tweaked
or reversed already, helping Pinterest
avoid the kind of backlash that Facebook
has weathered in the past.
Pinterest update cleaner, easier to manage
Trulia buying Market
Leader for more than $300M
NEWYORK — Real estate website operator Trulia is buy-
ing real estate software provider Market Leader Inc. for
more than $300 million in cash and stock.
Market Leader teams up with real estate brokerages and
franchisors to help their agents manage their leads and
convert those leads into closings.
Trulia said that the acquisition will enable it to provide
more extensive services to brokerages and franchisors and
help real estate agents increase their follow-up capabili-
ties.
Trulia Inc. said Wednesday that it will pay $11.33 per
share, which is an 18 percent premium to Market Leader’s
closing price Tuesday of $9.61. The companies said
Market Leader shareholders will receive $6 per share in
cash and 0.1553 shares of Trulia’s common stock for each
share they own.
Disney drops bid to trademark Day of Dead name
SANTAANA — Disney has dropped an effort to trade-
mark “Dia de los Muertos,” the name of the traditional
“Day of the Dead” holiday celebrated by millions in
Mexico and the U.S. The company announced Tuesday
that it was withdrawing a trademark request it made on
May 1 to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The appli-
cation prompted online criticism and petitions.
“What were they thinking?” Genevieve Barrios
Southgate, director of community programs at Bowers
Museum in Santa Ana, told the Orange County Register.
“Disney obviously responded to public pressure,” she
said. “I guess that’s what happens when you don’t have cul-
turally sensitive people as your advisers.”
Many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans observe the
November holiday, which honors deceased relatives and
loved ones. Traditions include cleaning and decorating
graves, leaving gift offerings for the dead and building
elaborate shrines decorated with sugar skulls and
marigolds.
Business briefs
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When the Carlmont baseball team was
losing three straight games late last month,
the Scots could not do anything right: too
many walks issued by the pitching staff,
too many defensive errors and not enough
clutch hits.
Fast forward two weeks and the Scots are
on top of their game. They racked up 12
runs on 17 hits in a 12-0 shellacking of
Terra Nova Wednesday afternoon in
Belmont, keeping Carlmont atop the Bay
Division standings and giving the Scots
one-game lead over Terra Nova for the
league championship.
“I feel like we’re clicking right now in
every facet (of the game),” said Carlmont
manager Rich Vallero. “We didn’t have that
a couple weeks ago.”
Carlmont (9-4 PAL Bay, 19-6 overall) did
everything right Wednesday. The Scots did
not commit an error, they were spraying the
ball around the ballpark and got as clutch a
pitching performance for which one could
ask. Matt Seubert was making his fifth start
of the season and he turned in one of the
best performances by a Carlmont pitcher
this season. The junior righty threw the
Scots’ first complete game of the season, as
well as their first shutout of year. Seubert
allowed only four hits while striking out
eight and walking four. Terra Nova (8-5, 18-
6) managed to get only one runner as far as
third and had only two others make it as far
as second.
“Just try to keep them off balance, throw
strikes and rely on my defense,” said
Seubert, explaining his approach.
His only real trouble came in the top of
the fifth inning with Carlmont already lead-
ing 10-0. Jeff Hendricks led off the inning
for Terra Nova with a double — the Tigers
only extra base hit of the game. Following
a flyout to left, Beau Eastman walked and
after a popout, Anthony Gordon walked to
An emphatic victory
<< Another walk-off win for the Giants, page 13
• A’s lose on disputed call, page 13
Thursday, May 9, 2013
WARRIORS WIN: GOLDEN STATE AVOIDS FOURTH-QUARTER COLLAPSE TO EVEN SERIES WITH SPURS >>> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Carlmont shortstop Aaron Pleschner fires to first to complete a double play during the Scots’12-0 win over Terra Nova Wednesday afternoon.
Carlmont buries Terra Nova 12-0 to take one-game lead in Bay race
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Serra certainly knows how to win ‘em in
style.
The Padres (11-3 in WCAL, 24-5 overall)
surged to victory in yesterday’s West
Catholic Athletic League Tournament semi-
final at Schott Stadium, rallying for four
runs in their final at bat to walk off with a 6-
5 win over Valley Christian. Christian
Conci notched the decisive hit, lining a sin-
gle through the middle on a two-strike offer-
ing to drive home Jordan Paroubeck with
the game-winning run.
“This is what we’ve been doing all year, ”
Conci said. “We’ve been down multiple
times this year. We never doubted ourselves.
We stayed the course and won the game.”
Valley Christian (7-7, 17-11) jumped out
to an early lead, scoring in each of its first
four at bats. The Warriors relied on a small-
ball attack, executing three stolen bases
and four bunts through the first three
innings. Conversely, Serra made some loud
contact early — paced by a 3-for-4 day for
leadoff hitter Michael Tinsley — but could
do little in the way of run production. The
Padres scratched out single runs in the first
and sixth and entered their final at bat trail-
ing 5-2.
“In the seventh inning, it all turned
around,” Tinsley said. “Everything just
kind of clicked, where we got the guy in
scoring position and that big hit came. It
just took that one little turn.”
That one little turn came in the form of a
leadoff walk to pinch hitter Nick Toomey.
Six straight batters went on to reach base
without Serra ever making an out in the
inning.
“I think the leadoff walk with Toomey
coming off the bench … in a subtle way,
you could feel the energy, and feel the
Walk-off win for Serra
F
or anyone who has followed
Peninsula Athletic League base-
ball this season, you may have
seen some eye-popping numbers coming
out the Ocean Division.
Specifically, the scores teams are put-
ting up against the bottom three teams in
the division — Jefferson, San Mateo and
Westmoor.
Take Tuesday, for example. Sequoia
pummeled Jefferson to the tune of 32-2.
That is not a mis-
print. South City
throttled San Mateo
13-5, while Mills
drilled Westmoor 15-
0.
And this is not an
isolated incident.
Those three team
have been regularly
shelled this season,
having been
outscored in Ocean
Division play 440-
133.
PAL commissioner Terry Stogner is
well aware of what is going on. But he
doesn’t know what can be done about it.
“I just hope it’s one of those years,”
Stogner said. “It’s no fun to play (those
types of lopsided games).”
Can the PAL go back to a three-division
system? Stogner said that is a no go
because, to have three divisions, there
would need to be six teams per division
and other than the three bottom teams of
the Ocean, no one else would feel their
team would belong in a Lake Division.
Implementing a 10-run mercy rule is a
non-starter as well.
Westmoor and Jefferson have had sub-
par baseball programs for years so the
problem there may lie in the fact there
just aren’t enough varsity-caliber players
at those schools. San Mateo, on the
other hand, could just be having a down
year. The Bearcats lost their manager just
before the start of league play, then shut-
tered the frosh-soph program because of a
lack of numbers and brought up the few
frosh-soph players to the varsity level
this season. Sergio Noriega, only a fresh-
man, appears to be a keeper for the
Bearcats as he is having a strong year,
batting over .300 on the season and
going 4 for 4 against South City Tuesday.
Changes
needed
See LOUNGE, Page 16 See SCOTS, Page 16
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The future home of the
San Francisco 49ers will be called Levi’s
Stadium.
The 49ers and Levi Strauss & Co. announced
an agreement Wednesday for a $220 million,
20-year naming rights deal for the team’s sta-
dium in Santa Clara.
Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh and 49ers CEO Jed
York announced the deal at Levi’s Plaza in San
Francisco. Santa Clara Mayor Jamie
Matthews and San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee
also attended the news conference.
While the stadium will be in the heart of
technology-rich Silicon Valley, the San
Francisco-based apparel company best
known for its jeans will hold the name. The
proposal, which also has an option to be
extended for an additional five years, will be
submitted to the Santa Clara Stadium
Authority for approval Thursday.
“Levi’s jeans were designed for the 49ers
during the gold rush,” York said. “It was a
good fit for them then and it’s a good fit
today.”
The upcoming season will be the 49ers’ last
at historic Candlestick Park in San Francisco.
The team is planning to move to the new $1.2
billion stadium, about 45 miles south in Santa
Clara and adjacent to the 49ers practice facili-
t y, for the 2014 season.
49ers reach stadium naming
rights deal with Levi Strauss
“Levi’s jeans were designed
for the 49ers during the gold
rush. It was a good fit for them
then and it’s a good fit today.”
—Jed York, 49ers president
See 49ers, Page 14 See PADRES, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Serving San Mateo County since 1999
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at 7 AM, 12 PM and 7 PM
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — Klay Thompson scored
34 points, Stephen Curry added 22 and the
Golden State Warriors withstood another
furious rally by the San Antonio Spurs for a
100-91 victory Wednesday night to even
their series at one game apiece and snap a
30-game skid in the Alamo City.
Thompson, who scored 29 points in the
first half, added 14 rebounds for Golden
State, which had not won in San Antonio
since Feb. 14, 1997. Harrison Barnes had
13 points, Carl Landry added 10 and Andrew
Bogut had six points and 11 rebounds.
Tim Duncan scored 23 points and Tony
Parker added 20 for San Antonio. Manu
Ginobili had 12 points and Kawhi Leonard
had 11 points and 12 rebounds for San
Antonio.
The Warriors host Game 3 on Friday
night.
The Warriors blew a 16-point lead with 4
minutes left in regulation in the series
opener and lost 129-127 in double over-
time.
It appeared they were headed for a similar
collapse Wednesday night.
Golden State led by 20 points with 8:38
left in the third quarter, but San Antonio
pulled within 97-89 on Ginobli’s 3-pointer
with 4:23 left in the game.
It was the closest the Spurs would come,
as they missed four of their last five shots.
The double-overtime victory game
appeared to leave San Antonio drained in the
first half, while the Warriors were energized.
After missing his first two attempts in the
series opener, Curry opened Game 2 with a
pair of 3 pointers, one over a charging
Duncan. He finished with 11 points in the
quarter, going 3 for 4 from the field and 2 for
3 on 3s. He was limited to 9 minutes after
picking up two fouls.
Curry’s second 3 sparked a 14-6 run that
gave Golden State a 17-12 lead. He had eight
points in the run and Thompson added five.
San Antonio went on an 8-2 run to pull
within 46-39, forcing a 3-second call on
Golden State’s defense and a pair of missed
shots.
The Spurs focused their defense on Curry
in the first half to varying success.
Curry did not score in the final 10 minutes
of the first half, but his drives drew the
defense and freed his teammates for open
jumpers. He was credited with only two
assists in the quarter, but his presence
helped Golden State outscore San Antonio
30-24.
Thompson hit consecutive 3s sandwiched
around three missed 3s by Green to give the
Warriors a 52-39 lead.
Thompson went 7 for 8 on 3s in the first
half and was 11 for 18 overall, while being
defended by Green and Leonard.
The Spurs went on a 16-4 run to pull with-
in 79-72 with 1 minute left in the third quar-
ter.
Bogut, a 50 percent free-throw shooter
during the regular season, was 2 for 4 at the
line after being intentionally fouled.
NOTES: Spurs F Aron Baynes and G
Nando De Colo were both inactive. . Duncan
is the career playoff leader in defensive
rebounds with 1,708. . Rookies started 122
games for Golden State this season. No
other playoff team has had its rookies start
even 20 games. . Curry was averaging a
league-high 12.3 points in the third quarter
entering Wednesday. He was held to 3 points
in Game 2.
Warriors end skid at 30
in San Antonio, tie series
REUTERS
Warriors guard Klay Thompson scored 34 points —including 11 of 18 from 3-point range as
GoldenState won inSanAntonio for the first time since 1997, evening the series.
Warriors 100, Spurs 91
SPORTS 13
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Buster Posey and
Andres Torres waited three hours before mak-
ing their contributions to yet another
walkoff win for the San Francisco Giants.
Make it five such victories for the reign-
ing World Series champions by early May.
Torres lined a game-ending single to right
field with two outs in the 10th inning to
score Posey for the winning run, lifting the
San Francisco Giants to a 4-3 victory
against the Philadelphia Phillies on
Wednesday to avoid a sweep.
“I think we’ve got a group of guys that’s
going to continue to scrap and go out there
and put pressure on the other team,” Posey
said.
“We’ve got a lot of guys who have been
here a few years and we’ve played a lot of
tight games the last three years. The more
you do it, the more, I don’t want to say com-
fortable, but I think you gain more confi-
dence when you’re in that situation more
often.”
Javier Lopez (1-0) pitched the 10th for the
win after Sergio Romo blew his second save
in 14 opportunities, failing to finish off
Barry Zito’s gem.
Posey hit a pinch-hit single to start the
10th against Antonio Bastardo (1-1) and was
sacrificed to second by Joaquin Arias. Posey
advanced to third on a wild pitch before
Torres came through with his fourth career
game-ending hit.
Manager Bruce Bochy praised Posey’s
base running with the game on the line.
“More than anything, at that point in the
game, I thought it was worth the chance to
take that risk,” Posey said of running for
third. You see it and go.”
Zito pitched another gem in his home
ballpark and Hunter Pence homered against
his former club for the second time during
the three-game series, but Romo wasn’t his
usual spot-on self in the ninth.
Pence sent a 2-2 pitch into the stands in
left field leading off the second for his sev-
enth homer. Marco Scutaro hit a go-ahead
single in the fifth to score Gregor Blanco
after he singled and stole second.
Still, Zito is 3-0 with a 0.55 ERA in his
four home starts this season — and the home
ERA ranked third-lowest in the majors. And
San Francisco has won Zito’s past 11 regu-
lar-season starts in the waterfront ballpark.
“We obviously don’t want to be playing
down to the wire,” Zito said. “We’d like to
go out there and boat-race teams, but unfor-
tunately it’s the big leagues and that doesn’t
happen too often.”
Torres singles in 10th as Giants beat Phillies
Giants 4, Phillies 3
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — Chris Perez has been in the
middle of more than his share of wild, dramatic
finishes.
Nothing, though, will top his latest outing.
This time, the umpires saved him.
“Luckily, we were on the right side of it this
time,” Cleveland’s colorful closer said.
Adam Rosales’ apparent game-tying home
run off Perez with two outs in the ninth inning
was ruled a double — even after three umpires
reviewed it on TV — and the Indians escaped
with a 4-3 win over the Oakland Athletics on
Wednesday night, Cleveland’s ninth win in 10
games.
With Perez protecting a one-run lead, Rosales
sent a drive off Perez that looked as if it cleared
the 19-foot-high wall in left field and hit a rail-
ing. However, second-base umpire Angel
Hernandez called it a double, and two other
members of the crew concurred with the original
ruling after leaving the field to review the video-
tape.
When the umpires returned and told Rosales
to stay at second, A’s manager Bob Melvin
sprinted onto the field and was immediately
ejected.
Following the game, a miffed Melvin could-
n’t grasp what had happened.
“Inconclusive, to the only four people in the
ballpark that could say that it was inconclu-
sive,” Melvin said. “Everybody else said it was
a home run, including their announcers when I
came in here later. I don’t get it. I don’t know
what the explanation would be when everybody
else in the ballpark knew it was a home run.
“Clearly, it hit the railing. I’m at a loss. I’m at
a complete loss.”
Rosales, too, was puzzled by the stunning
events in the ninth.
“Our whole team thought it was the wrong
call,” Rosales said. “The replays showed it hit
the railing. With six eyes on it (three umpires),
you would have thought they’d make the right
call.”
Oakland drops third straight to Cleveland
Indians 4, A’s 3
SPORTS 14
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The naming rights deal will not only help
fund the project, it will likely give another
boost to the 49ers’ hopes of hosting a Super
Bowl soon. The 49ers are bidding for the
Super Bowls played in February 2016 and
2017 with hopes of landing one.
A decision on which cities will host the
upcoming Super Bowls is expected to be made
during the NFL’s meetings in Boston from
May 20-22. Miami and San Francisco-Santa
Clara are in the running for the 2016 Super
Bowl and the runner-up will compete with
Houston for the following year’s game.
The annual average of $11 million is
believed to be the second-largest stadium
naming rights deal in the NFLand largest for a
single team. MetLife Stadium, home to the
New York Giants and New York Jets, has a
$400 million deal for 25 years.
The 49ers and Levi’s both touted their deep
roots in the Bay Area in coming together.
Levi’s, which reported net revenues of $4.6
billion for the 2012 fiscal year, was founded in
1853 when German immigrant Levi Strauss
opened a dry goods store in San Francisco. In
1873, Levi’s created the first blue jean by
adding copper rivets to denim pants for work-
ers in the American West. The 49ers have won
five Super Bowls and were the first major pro-
fessional sports team to be based in San
Francisco more than 60 years ago.
“Levi’s Stadium will connect two iconic
Bay Area brands that share similar values, a
rich heritage and a pioneering spirit,” Bergh
said. “Joining the incredible legacy of the
49ers organization is a perfect fit for the
Levi’s brand — and a chance for us to engage
with sports and music fans across the Bay Area
and around the world.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
game. The big junior right-hander allowed
three runs on five hits over six-plus innings
to take a no-decision.
Serra rallied for three straight hits off
Valley Christian reliever Ben Hughes.
Tinsley flared a single to right to move
Toomey to second. Mickey McDonald fol-
lowed with an RBI single to right field to
score Toomey. Paroubeck then scorched an
RBI single to right to plate Tinsley.
With Valley Christian sophomore right-
hander Mark Quinby into the game, Paul
Murray laid down a sacrifice bunt, then
reached safely on a throwing error which
allowed McDonald to score the tying run.
Conci followed with an initial attempt to
squeeze home the winning run, but the senior
fouled the pitch to the backstop. On the next
offering, Conci smashed a high fastball into
center to win it.
“Towards the end there, I guess (it was) the
old adage: better late than never,” Gianinno
said. “Guys really buckled down and did it
when it counted most.”
From the outset, Valley Christian seemed to
be in the driver’s seat. The Warriors made fast
work of Serra starter Matt Gorgolinski. The
senior right-hander lasted just 2 1/3 innings,
before Matt Blais emerged as the pitcher of
record. Blais yielded one run over 4 1/3
innings to earn the win, improving his record
to 3-1.
In the top of the first, Valley Christian got
on the board by virtue of two favorable bunts.
Warriors leadoff hitter Bryson Brigman
sparked the rally with a single to center. After
Brigman stole second, Will Chase bunted him
to third, but a hurried throw by Gorgolinski
sailed out of play allowing Brigman to score,
with Chase advancing to second. Keenan
Brigman bunted Chase to third, and Chase
later scored when a squeeze bunt by Hughes
went for an RBI single, giving Valley
Christian a 2-0 lead.
Serra answered back in the bottom of the
frame. Tinsley led off with a loud single to
left. With one out, Tinsley stole second, then
scored on the next pitch when Paroubeck
rapped an RBI single to right, cutting Valley
Christian’s lead to 2-1.
Valley Christian kept adding to its lead
though. In the second, Bryson Brigman
again got things started with a two-out walk,
then later scored on a bloop single to right by
Keenan Brigman.
In the third, Hughes led off the inning with
a single to right, then advanced to second on
a sacrifice bunt by Kyle Marinconz. An infield
single by Adam Belluomini knocked
Gorgolinski out of the game. Then with Blais
on the mound, Hughes scored on an RBI field-
er’s choice off the bat of Dalton Craig.
In the fourth, Chase drilled a one-out double
to left, then scored on a two-out single by
Kay, giving Valley Christian a 5-1 lead.
“[Small-ball is] the way we normally play,”
Valley Christian manager John Diatte said.
“We were looking for our opportunities to be
able to scratch out runs and we were able to
scrap some runs early. But we left 10 runners
on base and in later innings we just didn’t get
hits that we got earlier in the game.”
In the sixth, Serra scratched out a run.
Murray and Conci led off the inning with
back-to-back singles, then moved up on a
wild pitch. With one out, Neil Sterling hit an
RBI fielder’s choice to score Murray, cutting
Valley Christian’s lead to 5-2.
Then in the seventh, the Padres offense
came out intent on showing why they are the
No. 1-seeded team in the tournament.
“We were just ready to fight,” Tinsley said.
“We had no intention of going home right
now. And everyone, we all had a certain mind-
set, and everybody followed that perfectly.”
With the win, Serra looks to repeat as
WCALTournament champs tonight, squaring
off with the winner of yesterday’s semifinal
nightcap between St. Francis and Bellarmine.
First pitch at Schott Stadium is slated for 6
p.m.
Continued from page 11
PADRES
SPORTS 15
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
$12.00
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MENS
HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 21 13 .618 —
Boston 21 13 .618 —
New York 19 13 .594 1
Tampa Bay 15 18 .455 5 1/2
Toronto 13 22 .371 8 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 19 12 .613 —
Kansas City 17 13 .567 1 1/2
Cleveland 17 14 .548 2
Minnesota 15 15 .500 3 1/2
Chicago 14 18 .438 5 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 21 13 .618 —
Oakland 18 17 .514 3 1/2
Seattle 16 19 .457 5 1/2
Los Angeles 11 22 .333 9 1/2
Houston 10 24 .294 11
Wednesday’sGames
Seattle 2, Pittsburgh 1
Washington 3, Detroit 1
Baltimore 5, Kansas City 3
Cleveland 4, Oakland 3
Chicago White Sox 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Minnesota 15, Boston 8
Tampa Bay 10,Toronto 4
Houston 3, L.A. Angels 1
Texas 4, Milwaukee 1
N.Y.Yankees 3, Colorado 2
Thursday’sGames
Oakland (Colon 3-1) at Cleveland (Kazmir 1-1),9:05
a.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3) at Colorado (Francis 1-
2), 12:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 4-0) at Washington (Haren 3-3), 1:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 4-0) at Baltimore (F.Garcia 0-
0), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 3-2) at Boston (Lackey 1-2),4:10
p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 2-5) at Tampa Bay (Price 1-3), 4:10
p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 1-3) at Houston (Harrell 3-3),
5:10 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Cleveland at Detroit, 4:08 p.m.
San Diego at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 5:10 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 20 13 .606 —
Washington 18 15 .545 2
Philadelphia 16 19 .457 5
New York 13 17 .433 5 1/2
Miami 10 25 .286 11
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 21 12 .636 —
Pittsburgh 18 15 .545 3
Cincinnati 19 16 .543 3
Milwaukee 15 17 .469 5 1/2
Chicago 13 21 .382 8 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 20 14 .588 —
Colorado 19 14 .576 1/2
Arizona 18 15 .545 1 1/2
San Diego 16 18 .471 4
Los Angeles 13 19 .406 6
———
Wednesday’s Games
Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 2
Seattle 2, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 4
San Diego 1, Miami 0
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings
Washington 3, Detroit 1
Chicago White Sox 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Texas 4, Milwaukee 1
N.Y. Yankees 3, Colorado 2
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3) at Colorado (Francis
1-2), 12:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 4-0) at Washington (Haren 3-3),
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 3-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-4), 4:10
p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 1-4) at Arizona (Corbin 4-
0), 6:40 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 1-0) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 1-2), 7:15 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Chicago Cubs at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
THURSDAY
SOFTBALL
Capuchino at Carlmont, Terra Nova at Hillsdale,
Aragon at Burlingame, Half Moon Bay at
Sequoia, 4 p.m.
BASEBALL
Mills at Westmoor, Woodside at El Camino, South
City at San Mateo, Sequoia at Jefferson, 4 p.m.;
WCAL tournament championship at Santa Clara
University, 6 p.m.
BADMINTON
El Camino at Aragon, Menlo-Atherton at
Carlmont, Mills at Westmoor, Sequoia at South
City, Burlingame at Capuchino, Crystal Springs at
Woodside, Hillsdale at Terra Nova, Jefferson at
San Mateo, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Harker at Menlo School, Sacred Heart Prep at
King’s Academy, Half Moon Bay at Hillsdale,
Menlo-Atherton at Aragon, Carlmont at Terra
Nova, 4 p.m.; Capuchino at Burlingame, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY
TRACKANDFIELD
PAL championships at Terra Nova, 10 a.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
WHAT’S ON TAP
vs.Spurs
12:30p.m.
ABC
NBA
playoffs
vs. Spurs
NHL
playoffs
TBD
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
ESPN
@Seattle
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/10
vs. Atlanta
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/11
vs. Atlanta
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/10
vs.Philly
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/8
vs. Atlanta
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/12
vs.Atlanta
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/9
@Seattle
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/12
@Seattle
6:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/11
@Cleveland
9:05a.m.
5/9
@Cleveland
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/11
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
5/10 5/12
@Spurs
6:30p.m.
TNT
5/14
vs. Spurs
If necessary
5/16
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/25
@RSL
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/1
@Toronto
4:07p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/14
@Tornonto
4:07p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/15
vs. Texas
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/13
vs. Texas
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/14
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—Sent LHPFranklinMoralesto
Portland (EL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGOWHITE SOX—Optioned 1B Mike Mc-
Dade to Charlotte (IL).
OAKLANDATHLETICS—Placed OF Josh Reddick
on the 15-day DL,retroactive to May 7.Selected the
contract of 1B Daric Barton from Sacramento (PCL).
Released LHP Jordan Norberto.
TORONTOBLUEJAYS—Placed LHP J.A.Happ on
the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Edgar
Gonzalez from Buffalo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS —Placed 3B Chris
Valaika and RHP J.J.Putz on the 15-day DL.Recalled
RHP Will Harris from Reno (PCL).
ATLANTABRAVES—Sent RHPLuisAyalatoGwin-
nett (IL) for a rehab assignment.
LOSANGELESDODGERS—Placed 3B Jerry Hair-
ston Jr. on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 6.
Recalled 2B Elian Herrera and C Tim Federowicz
from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned INF Justin Sell-
ers to Albuquerque.
MIAMI MARLINS —Placed INF Chris Valaika on
the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Derek
DietrichfromJacksonville(SL).TransferredINFCasey
Kotchman to the 60-day DL.
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIES—Agreedtoterms with
LHP Bobby Bramhall on a minor league contract.
PITTSBURGHPIRATES—Optioned INF Josh Har-
rison to Indianapolis (IL).Recalled RHP Duke Welker
from Indianapolis. Promoted RHP Tim Alderson
from Altoona (EL) to Indianapolis. Assigned RHP
Quinton Miller to Altoona.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY — Family and
friends honored the memory of a
Utah soccer referee at an emotion-
al funeral service Wednesday
evening just hours after the
teenager who punched him before
he fell into a coma was charged
with homicide by assault.
After an afternoon wake at a
community center, a group of men
carried a wooden casket with the
remains of Ricardo Portillo in
silence about a quarter mile to a
nearby Catholic church. There,
about 200 people — most wearing
white shirts — listened to a funer-
al service conducted in Spanish.
The Rev. Javier Virgin told them
that Portillo completed his life
mission by sharing his talent for
refereeing with hundreds of
teenagers who played in games he
worked. Portillo, 46, was born in
Mexico, but had lived in Utah for
the past 17 years.
“He reached his goal of serving
others,” Virgin said in Spanish.
Earlier Wednesday, the teenager
who police say punched Portillo
was charged with homicide by
assault, a count issued when an
attack unintentionally causes
death.
Salt Lake County District
Attorney Sim Gill said he will seek
to try the teen as an adult.
The charge is less serious than
manslaughter. It carries a possible
sentence of up to five years in
prison for adults, but penalties can
be less for juveniles.
Gill said it became clear in look-
ing at the facts that the teenager’s
actions didn’t amount to murder or
manslaughter.
Teen charged
in death of ref
16
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
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FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
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ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
“I think San Mateo will rebound,”
Stogner said.
The biggest possible change on the hori-
zon may be expanding the league. Stogner
said he has been in talks with the West Bay
Athletic League administrators and there is
a chance the PAL may absorb the WBAL
teams.
“The WBAL may be in trouble with base-
ball,” Stogner said.
Central Coast Section by-laws say there
must be a minimum of six teams to form a
league. WBAL baseball has only been
around for a few years and it started with
seven teams. Woodside Priory, however,
dropped out this year, leaving the mini-
mum six teams.
But Stogner said Crystal Springs
Uplands School may be dropping its base-
ball program going forward, which would
leave five teams without a league. Stogner
said the PAL would be agreeable to taking
in the remaining five teams — Menlo
School, Sacred Heart Prep, Harker, King’s
Academy and Pinewood.
Stogner’s reasoning is it would allow the
PAL to go back to three division of six
teams each. Other than Menlo and Prep, the
WBAL is pretty weak. It would then allow
the PAL to take Pinewood, Harker and
King’s Academy and put them with
Jefferson, San Mateo and Westmoor and
voila, there’s your new Lake Division.
“I’m really doing this to help out teams
like Westmoor and Jefferson,” Stogner
said. “APinewood-Westmoor game might
be pretty interesting.”
At the very least it would be competitive,
which is all anyone wants. Stogner
believes the current PAL coaches would not
mind seeing the WBAL schools come into
the league.
“Most coaches just want to play the
best,” Stogner said.
PAL athletic directors and principals,
however, have been resistant to mixing
public and private schools.
Whatever the solution is, something
needs to be done because no one gains any-
thing from a 32-2 score.
***
The Serra tennis team finds itself in the
finals of the CCS team tournament by
virtue of a 12-6 win over No. 7 Saratoga
Wednesday at the Los Gatos Swim and
Racquet Club. The third-seeded Padres will
take on three-time defending champion
Menlo School, which has dropped only
five sets in three CCS matches thus far. The
Knights hammered No. 4 Bellarmine 17-1
in Wednesday’s other semifinal match.
Menlo has won a total of 10 CCS team
tennis titles since 1998.
Serra advanced to Wednesday’s semifinals
with an 11-7 win over No. 6 Stevenson
Monday afternoon.
***
Patrick Soli, a former standout golf at
Carlmont, helped lead Chabot College-
Hayward to the California Community
College Athletic Association Northern
California tournament title to secure a spot
in the state championship tournament.
Soli finished with an 8-under 136 after
the two-round tournament. The state cham-
pionship will be held on a course familiar
to Soli — Rancho Cañada Golf Club, the
same venue that hosts the CCS tournament.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
load the bases and bring up clean up-hitter
Curtis Casperson, who hit an 0-1 pitch to
Jesse Austin at third base, who stepped on
the bag to end the inning.
“I couldn’t have asked for anything more
(from Seubert),” Vallero said. “Baseball is
the most important thing in his life. He
expects perfection from himself. He’s been a
spot starter and we’ve gone to him when we
needed to hammer a game. We knew he was
going to attack the (strike) zone.”
Seubert’s performance was buoyed by the
fact he was pitching with a lead from the sec-
ond inning on.
“That helps a lot. When the offense gives
you runs, it’s easier to accept when [the
opposition gets] runners on base,” Seubert
said. “Our offense has been pretty good late-
l y. Getting some early runs is reassuring.”
The Scots wasted little time in getting to
Terra Nova starter Ray Falk, who came into
the game with a sub-2.00 ERA. Carlmont
touched him up for three runs in the bottom
of the first inning. While Jason Marley drove
in the first run of the game with a single to
left, Johnathan Corvello had the most sig-
nificant hit, a big chopper over the third
baseman’s head for a two-run single.
Those three runs turned out to be all the
Scots would need.
Carlmont had five players with two or more
hits, as well as four batters drive in two RBIs.
Leadoff hitter Kai Haake was 3 for 5 with two
RBIs and two runs scored, No. 2 hitter
Westmoreland was 2 for 5 with two runs
scored and an RBI. Marley, batting in the
three spot, picked up a pair of hits to go
along with his two RBIs. Aaron Albaum, in
the No. 7 slot, had three hits in his four
appearances, while No. 9 hitter Aaron
Pleschner had a pair of singles.
In addition to Corvello’s two-run single,
Justin Fink also drove in a pair of runs with a
two-run double in the fourth.
After the three-run first, the Scots put the
game away with a seven-run fourth, sending
13 batters to the plate in the process. They
tacked on two more in bottom of the sixth.
“No one took their foot off the gas after we
got up early,” Vallero said. “The last three
games our offense is starting to catch fire.”
While the Scots took their first step toward
the Bay Division title, there was no celebrat-
ing afterward. They know they still have
work to do to beat Terra Nova in Pacifica
Friday — where the Tigers have lost only
one game this year. ATerra Nova win would
make the two teams co-champions, with the
possibility of a tri-championship if
Burlingame sweeps Capuchino this week.
“We respect Terra Nova,” Vallero said. “But
I don’t want to be a co-champion.”
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
16
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
“I think San Mateo will rebound,”
Stogner said.
The biggest possible change on the hori-
zon may be expanding the league. Stogner
said he has been in talks with the West Bay
Athletic League administrators and there is
a chance the PAL may absorb the WBAL
teams.
“The WBAL may be in trouble with base-
ball,” Stogner said.
Central Coast Section by-laws say there
must be a minimum of six teams to form a
league. WBAL baseball has only been
around for a few years and it started with
seven teams. Woodside Priory, however,
dropped out this year, leaving the mini-
mum six teams.
But Stogner said Crystal Springs
Uplands School may be dropping its base-
ball program going forward, which would
leave five teams without a league. Stogner
said the PAL would be agreeable to taking
in the remaining five teams — Menlo
School, Sacred Heart Prep, Harker, King’s
Academy and Pinewood.
Stogner’s reasoning is it would allow the
PAL to go back to three division of six
teams each. Other than Menlo and Prep, the
WBAL is pretty weak. It would then allow
the PAL to take Pinewood, Harker and
King’s Academy and put them with
Jefferson, San Mateo and Westmoor and
voila, there’s your new Lake Division.
“I’m really doing this to help out teams
like Westmoor and Jefferson,” Stogner
said. “APinewood-Westmoor game might
be pretty interesting.”
At the very least it would be competitive,
which is all anyone wants. Stogner
believes the current PAL coaches would not
mind seeing the WBAL schools come into
the league.
“Most coaches just want to play the
best,” Stogner said.
PAL athletic directors and principals,
however, have been resistant to mixing
public and private schools.
Whatever the solution is, something
needs to be done because no one gains any-
thing from a 32-2 score.
***
The Serra tennis team finds itself in the
finals of the CCS team tournament by
virtue of a 12-6 win over No. 7 Saratoga
Wednesday at the Los Gatos Swim and
Racquet Club. The third-seeded Padres will
take on three-time defending champion
Menlo School, which has dropped only
five sets in three CCS matches thus far. The
Knights hammered No. 4 Bellarmine 17-1
in Wednesday’s other semifinal match.
Menlo has won a total of 10 CCS team
tennis titles since 1998.
Serra advanced to Wednesday’s semifinals
with an 11-7 win over No. 6 Stevenson
Monday afternoon.
***
Patrick Soli, a former standout golf at
Carlmont, helped lead Chabot College-
Hayward to the California Community
College Athletic Association Northern
California tournament title to secure a spot
in the state championship tournament.
Soli finished with an 8-under 136 after
the two-round tournament. The state cham-
pionship will be held on a course familiar
to Soli — Rancho Cañada Golf Club, the
same venue that hosts the CCS tournament.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
base, who stepped on the bag to end the
inning.
“I couldn’t have asked for anything more
(from Seubert),” Vallero said. “Baseball is
the most important thing in his life. He
expects perfection from himself. He’s been
a spot starter and we’ve gone to him when
we needed to hammer a game. We knew he
was going to attack the (strike) zone.”
Seubert’s performance was buoyed by the
fact he was pitching with a lead from the
second inning on.
“That helps a lot. When the offense gives
you runs, it’s easier to accept when [the
opposition gets] runners on base,” Seubert
said. “Our offense has been pretty good late-
l y. Getting some early runs is reassuring.”
The Scots wasted little time in getting to
Terra Nova starter Ray Falk, who came into
the game with a sub-2.00 ERA. Carlmont
touched him up for three runs in the bottom
of the first inning. While Jason Marley
drove in the first run of the game with a sin-
gle to left, Johnathan Corvello had the
most significant hit, a big chopper over the
third baseman’s head for a two-run single.
Those three runs turned out to be all the
Scots would need.
Carlmont had five players with two or
more hits, as well as four batters drive in
two RBIs. Leadoff hitter Kai Haake was 3 for
5 with two RBIs and two runs scored, No. 2
hitter Westmoreland was 2 for 5 with two
runs scored and an RBI. Marley, batting in
the three spot, picked up a pair of hits to go
along with his two RBIs. Aaron Albaum, in
the No. 7 slot, had three hits in his four
appearances, while No. 9 hitter Aaron
Pleschner had a pair of singles.
In addition to Corvello’s two-run single,
Justin Fink also drove in a pair of runs with
a two-run double in the fourth.
After the three-run first, the Scots put the
game away with a seven-run fourth, sending
13 batters to the plate in the process. They
tacked on two more in bottom of the sixth.
“No one took their foot off the gas after
we got up early,” Vallero said. “The last
three games our offense is starting to catch
fire.”
While the Scots took their first step
toward the Bay Division title, there was no
celebrating afterward. They know they still
have work to do to beat Terra Nova in
Pacifica Friday — where the Tigers have
lost only one game this year. ATerra Nova
win would make the two teams co-champi-
ons, with the possibility of a tri-champi-
onship if Burlingame sweeps Capuchino
this week.
“We respect Terra Nova,” Vallero said.
“But I don’t want to be a co-champion.”
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The wonderful thing about a garden is that
it is constantly evolving. No two years are
exactly the same. Trees grow taller, shrubs
get wider, storms cause damage and some-
times plants just die for no obvious reason,
creating opportunities to plant something
new.
I have been tending my current garden for
almost 20 years. When I look at old photos,
I am amazed at how much the garden has
changed. I never had a master plan for my
garden; instead, I made small changes every
year that over time, created the garden’s cur-
rent configuration.
After decades of working in the field of
horticulture, it is easy to forget that when I
started out, I really didn’t have a clue how to
begin a garden. No one is born with garden-
ing skills, after all; everyone has to start
somewhere. As in other endeavors, good
gardeners become good gardeners over
time, learning as much from their failures as
from their successes. They will be the first
to tell you there is always more to learn.
I have been fortunate as a garden designer
to work on gardens in some very diverse cli-
mates. Recently I began work helping some
friends create a new garden in Montecito, a
beautiful small town adjacent to Santa
Barbara. The property had not been cared for
in years, and with nearly year-round grow-
ing conditions the landscape looked more
like a jungle than a garden.
While the palette of plants that can be
grown in Southern California is completely
different from that of my Rhode Island gar-
den, the process of creating a new garden is
pretty much the same.
New to gardening? Tips for getting your hands dirty
The best way to learn how to garden? Get digging.
See GARDEN, Page 19
18
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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Whoever believes there’s nothing new
under the sun hasn’t seen the plants being
introduced for the 2013 gardening season.
Think multi-colored blooms, high-yield
vegetables bred for containers and ornamen-
tal edibles packing still more nutrition as
breeders try to anticipate consumer demand.
Grafted tomatoes appear to be the hottest
new trend in home gardening, while cocktail
gardens, featuring plants that make or
embellish alcoholic drinks, top this year’s
niche category.
“We’re looking for earlier (maturing) vari-
eties, things that work in smaller spaces and
plants that are different,” said Kevin
Roethle, head of new product development
for Ball Seed Co., a division of Ball
Horticultural Co. The West Chicago-based
company lists 295 new introductions for
2013.
“We’re trying to create contrasts,” Roethle
said. “Deeper colors on leaves and more
vibrant blossoms.”
Those attributes spur impulse buying, he
said. “You’re picking up milk and bread at a
quick-stop (grocery) and then you wind up
walking away with some flowers, too.”
Another trend sees many old standbys made
new again. These include bi-color dahlias
(Marissa, Ball), petunias (Glamouflage
Grape, Hort Couture) with deep colored
blooms and variegated foliage, and shade-
loving begonias (Sparks Will Fly, Ball) with
brilliant flowers above rich, dark leaves.
Other noteworthy plant releases for the
upcoming gardening season:
• Pint-size vegetables
including the first sweet corn
you can grow in a pot. No need to garden in
large rectangles when you can plant edibles
in 24-inch containers. On Deck Sweet Corn
(Burpee) leads the parade of several high-
yield vegetables being developed for patios
or tight spaces.
• Herbs that are emerging as the hot new
flowers. Many herbal varieties look great as
standalones or when mixed with traditional
blooms. Check out the new Cha Cha chive
(The Cook’s Garden) with its unique
“leafettes” and eminently edible flower
heads.
• Flowers with a surprising new look.
Throw away the trellises if adding the Sun
Parasol Garden Crimson mandevilla to your
landscape. This is the headliner in a new
series of compact bedding plant mandevillas
from Suntory, the Japanese company that
brought you the first blue rose in 2009.
Excellent branching also makes it a natural
for hanging baskets, Suntory breeder
Tomoya Misato said. And then there is
Longfield Gardens’ new Double Oriental Lily,
producing petals from the center of the flower
rather than a stamen. A Longfield spokes-
woman says that gives it the look of a double
bloom, while doing away with pollen stains.
• Niche. Cocktail gardening can be an
intoxicating hobby. Grow your own heady
mixtures using the Drunken Botanist plant
collection from Territorial Seed Co. in
Cottage Grove, Ore.
• Grafting. Over a billion tomatoes are
grafted annually for improved yields and dis-
ease resistance, industry analysts say. Many
heirlooms are uncommonly delicious, but
produce too few fruit and are prone to disease
and nematodes. These varieties become more
vigorous and deliver larger crops for longer
periods when grafted to proven rootstock.
Try the Black Krim and Big Rainbow tomato
heirlooms (Ball) for grafted combinations
that deliver good looks with good taste.
New blooms, veggies and more debuting for 2013
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
In a situation such as my friend’s, creating
a garden from an overgrown mess requires a
plan of action. If you are about to begin a new
garden of your own, the following steps
might help you get started.
• First, assess the site and what is growing
on it. Are there existing plants that are worth
keeping? In my friend’s case, the existing
garden was so overgrown that many of the
plants were in poor health. Often, it is cost
effective in the long run to clean house and
start over with new plants. Many inherited
gardens have large trees, which is a bonus,
but too many large trees can block out light.
Selective editing is as important to a garden
as planting.
• Be judicious. The majority of plants used
in landscapes grow quicker and larger than
most people realize. Several years of
unchecked growth, especially in foundation
plantings, usually results in overcrowding
and sickly looking plants.
• If the whole property seems overwhelm-
ing, start in one area and get it under control
first. I often recommend people begin work
on an area that they see the most, but begin
with a manageable undertaking. If you use the
back door of the house more than the front,
start there. You will be able to appreciate your
efforts every time you come and go, which
will motivate you to move to the next area.
• Prepare your site before buying plants.
Whether you are removing old existing plant-
ings or planting an empty area for the first
time, clean the space, amend the soil with
compost or some soil conditioner and rake
your soil so you have a neat space to work in.
• Use place holders before planting. Before
I begin planting a new area, I put sticks in the
ground to mark where I want plants to go.
This helps ensure adequate spacing between
plants, and allows me an accurate count of
how many plants I will need to buy for the
space.
Beginning a new garden is as easy as buy-
ing a few plants and digging a few holes. Give
yourself permission to make mistakes; that’s
how you will learn. In no time you will have
a beautiful garden and your friends will be ask-
ing you for advice!
Continued from page 17
GARDEN
Suckers Missed Christmas — USMC” are
still live and show many images that “con-
tribute to a culture that permits and seems to
encourage sexual assault and abuse,” accord-
ing to Speier’s letter. The three pages range
in fans from 1,100 to more than 48,000.
Speier has taken part in a huge effort the
past two years to end the epidemic of rape and
sexual assault in the military and said sys-
temic changes are needed to increase the
prosecutions of sexual crimes. She is the
author of three pieces of legislation to
change the military justice system’s treat-
ment of cases of rape and sexual assault.
“I am confident that if you reviewed the
contents ... that you would also be horrified
by the culture of misogyny and sexual
harassment depicted on the website,” Speier
wrote in the letter.
She sent the letter a day after a Pentagon
report revealed that sexual assault in the mil-
itary is a growing epidemic and that most of
them go unreported.
The report indicates that up to 26,000 mil-
itary members were sexually assaulted in
2012 and only 3,400 reported the incident.
Nearly 800 of them simply sought help but
declined to file complaints against their
attackers.
After Speier sent her letter, some Facebook
posts started to emerge critical of her effort.
Someone called “Shocker” on the “U
Suckers Missed Christmas — USMC”
Facebook page said he or she would travel to
San Francisco to do unmentionable things to
Speier and her husband.
The post also indicated that any effort to
delete the controversial Facebook pages
would only prompt the creation of new ones.
Female Marines are oft referred to as
“wooks” on the Facebook pages with state-
ments reading: “There are no female Marines.
Just Wooks.”
The rate of sexual assault has increased in the
past year and reforms adopted so far have been
woefully insufficient, according to this year’s
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office
(SAPRO) report released Tuesday.
“The military cannot eradicate this prob-
lem without fundamentally changing its
approach, including its tolerance of partici-
pation in these kinds of websites,” Speier
wrote in the letter to Hagel, Amos and Lynne
Halbrooks, the principal deputy inspector
general with the Department of Defense.
The SAPRO report was released as an
investigation into more than 30 Air Force
instructors for assaults on trainees at a base
in Texas is underway.
The Air Force’s head of sexual assault pre-
vention was also arrested on charges of grop-
ing a woman in a northern Virginia parking
lot just days before the SAPRO report was
released.
Continued from page 1
SPEIER
guilty by reason of insanity and the
other’s conduct was befitting 20 years in
prison.
Nicholas Jose Vargas, 26, actually plead-
ed no contest to second-degree murder in
February but was facing a jury trial this
Monday to decide if was not guilty by rea-
son of insanity during the killing of
Christopher Chastain, 23, on April 10,
2011 at his parents’ Cypress Avenue home.
On Wednesday, prosecutors stipulated that
Vargas should be committed to a state men-
tal facility rather than imprisoned for 16
years to life. He will be formally placed
May 29. Co-defendant Brandon David
Thompson, 28, also settled his case, plead-
ing no contest to voluntary manslaughter
and three counts of assault with a deadly
weapon in return for a 20-year term when
sentenced June 19.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said
Thompson’s deal is appropriate because the
level of Vargas’ involvement in Chastain’s
murder was more extensive. According to
prosecutors, Vargas placed a plastic bag
over Chastain’s head and hit him twice with
a pipe wrench while Thompson stabbed him
twice in the abdomen with a kitchen knife.
However, a doctor who evaluated Vargas
for the prosecution agreed with earlier con-
clusions that he was insane at the time of
the crime. Last year, court-appointed doc-
tors split on whether they believed Vargas
was insane but concluded he was mentally
competent to help defend himself against
charges stemming from the attack.
If a jury had found Vargas sane, he would
have had to serve 16 years before being eli-
gible for parole.
A motive in Chastain’s death remains
unclear although investigators initially
said Vargas may have thought Chastain had
harmed his sister in some way. That story
has since been disproven.
On the night Chastain died, he went to the
home of Vargas’ parents who slept upstairs.
After attacking and killing him, the defen-
dants reportedly dragged Chastain’s body
down the driveway to Vargas’ Honda Accord
but could not lift the man who weighed 275
pounds. Prosecutors say Thompson left the
scene and Vargas contacted his father inside
who followed the blood to Chastain’s body
and called 911.
Vargas has no prior criminal history in
San Mateo County, according to court
records. Thompson, though, was on parole
for a 2009 stolen vehicle conviction which
came with a two-year prison sentence.
Neither Vargas’ defense attorney, Connie
O’Brien, or Thompson’s lawyer, Richard
Keyes, returned a call for comment
Continued from page 1
DEAL
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, MAY 9
Petal Tales, Once Upon a Time. 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. The exhibit will be open
weekdays May 9 through May 12.
General admission is $20 for adult
members, $25 for adult non-
members and $10 for children.
Retired Public Employees
Association (chap. 46) Meeting.
10:30 a.m. San Mateo Elks Lodge, 229
W. 20th Ave., San Mateo. Lunch will
be served. $14. For more information
or to make reservations call 207-
6401.
Mother’s Day Party. 10:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
There will be lunch and music with
the Happy Time Banjo Band. Tickets
available at the front desk. For more
information call 616-7150.
Mother’s Day Brunch. 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Luceti’s, 109 W. 25th Ave., San
Mateo. Eric Van James will perform
jazz standards, popular songs and
show tunes on the piano. For more
information and reservations call
574-1256 or go to www.lucetis.com.
Expungent: How to Seal Your
Criminal and Conviction Records.
Noon. San Mateo County Law Library,
710 Hamilton St., Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 363-4913.
Community Paper Shredding. 1
p.m. to 2 p.m. San Mateo Elks Lodge,
229 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 345-9774.
HLC Members Meeting and
Reception. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
7555 Mission St., Daly City. Free. For
more information call 872-4444.
Health Insurance Counseling and
Advocacy Program (HICAP)
Presentation. 6 p.m. The Laurel
Room, San Mateo Library, 55 W. Third
Ave. A series of free Medicare
informational presentations and
counseling sessions at the Main
Library. The HICAP presentations and
one-on-one counseling sessions will
be held at the same time and
location on a quarterly basis through
the summer of 2013; the final session
is scheduled for Aug. 8. For more
information go to
cahealthadvocates.org or call (800)
434-0222.
Spring Art Show. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
San Mateo Clubhouse, 200 N. Quebec
St., San Mateo. The Mid-Peninsula
Boys and Girls Club Fine Arts
Program is holding its Spring Art
Show. Enjoy new work by more than
50 young artists, artists meet and
greet, raffle and more. Free. For more
information call 991-5707.
Live Jazz at Donato Enoteca. 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Donato Enoteca, 1041
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Live
jazz music will be played in the bar
every Thursday. No cover charge. For
more information call 701-1000 or
go to www.donatoenoteca.com.
Art Reception: The Invisible
Photographer. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Peninsula Jewish Community Center,
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
Laura Dirtadian will give a guided
tour and will discuss her
grandfather’s photography of
Jerusalem. Free. For more
information go to pjcc.org.
Leslie Bennett and Stefani Bittner
Book Talk. 7 p.m. 855 El Camino Real,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
call 321-0600.
Laurence Juber. 7 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $18.
For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Repetitive Strain Support Group.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Mills Health Center,
100 S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo.
Free. For more information call (800)
654-9966.
El Camino High School Presents:
‘Boogie Nights.’ 7 p.m. El Camino
High School Theater, 1320 Mission
Road, South San Francisco. $10. For
more information or to order tickets
call 877-8806.
FRIDAY, MAY 10
HLC Legislative Breakfast. 7:30 a.m.
to 9 a.m. Crowne Palza, 1177 Airport
Blvd., Burlingame. Free. Free. For more
information call 872-4444.
El Camino Grand Opening. 10 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. 636 El Camino Real,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information and to RSVP contact
636elcamino_rsvp@midpen-
housing.org.
Workshop on Federal Land
Records. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
National Archives at San Francisco,
1000 Commodore Drive, San Bruno.
Genealogical workshop on how to
locate U.S. land records. $15 payable
in advance. For more information or
to reserve a space call 238-3488.
Drop-In Adult Ping Pong. 1:30 p.m.
to 3:30 p.m. Twin Pines Senior and
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. Paddles are available
at the center. The event takes place
on the second and fourth Fridays of
each moth. Free. For more
information call 637-2976.
Notre Dame de Namur University’s
2013 President’s Gala. 6 p.m. Hyatt
Regency San Francisco Airport, 1333
Bayshore Highway, Burlingame. Mike
Nevin, Rosanne Faust and Marie
Batton to be honored. Includes a
cocktail reception, followed by
dinner and entertainment, as well as
a live auction and raffle. For more
information go to ndnu.edu/gala.
El Camino High School Presents:
‘Boogie Nights.’ 7 p.m. El Camino
High School Theater, 1320 Mission
Road, South San Francisco. $10. For
more information or to order tickets
call 877-8806.
The Stanford Savoyards present
The Sorcerer. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive,
Stanford University, Palo Alto. Tickets
are available through the Stanford
Ticket Office. $10 for students, $15
for seniors and Stanford staff/faculty,
$20 for general admission. For more
information and for tickets call 725-
2787 or go to
http://tickets.stanford.edu.
A Little Night Music. 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. $23-38. The show will be
performed Thursdays and Saturdays
at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.
Performances will run until June 2.
For tickets and more information call
349-6411.
The Sun Kings- A Beatles Tribute
as Nature Intended. 8 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $18.
For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, May 11
Peninsula Metropolitan
Community Church Annual
Rummage Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 1150
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. The
PMCC Church Ladies are holding
their Annual Rummage Sale.
Housewares, jewelry, books, DVDs,
CDs and small appliances. Hot dog,
chips and a soda available for $5. For
more information call 515-0900.
Drop-Off Electronic Collection. 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. City Hall Parking Lot,
610 Foster City Blvd., Foster City. Free.
For more information go to
www.rethinkwaste.org.
Stanford Math Festival for
Students. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Stanford
University, 326 Galvez St., Stanford.
$10 per student. For more
information call (510) 642-0143.
Mission Blue Nursery Plant Sale. 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Mission Blue Nursery,
3435 Bayshore Blvd., Brisbane. Free.
For more information contact
genevieve@mountainwatch.org.
Packing Demonstration. 10 a.m.
Edwards Luggage, Hillsdale
Shopping Center, San Mateo. Seating
is limited. For more information go
to edwardsluggage.com.
Pot a Flower for Mother’s Day. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. New Lead Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Free. Plants, pots and dirt
will be provided. For more
information go to www.newleaf.com.
San Carlos Kiwanis Club Presents:
Child Safety Day and Helmet
Giveaway For Children. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Central Middle School
Playground, 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. Free helmets, obstacle course
and give aways. Children ages five to
12 invited. For more information
contact spiep@sancarlos.k12.ca.us.
Filoli Flower Show: Mother’s Day
Weekend. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 86
Cañada Road, Woodside. $20
members; $25 non–members; $10
children ages 5 through 17. For more
information or to purchase tickets go
to http://www.filoli.org/special-
events-and-exhibits/flower-show.ht
ml. Last day to purchase general
admission tickets online: Thursday,
May 9 at noon. To purchase tickets
after noon, call Member Services at
364-8300, ext. 508.
Plant Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo Garden Center, 605 Parkside
Way, San Mateo. Free entry, plant
prices are greatly reduced. For more
information call 574-1506.
Women Getting HealthyTogether,
Naturally. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Vitality
Gateway Healing Center, 555
Veterans Blvd., Redwood City. Free.
For more information 369-7304.
National Police Week Celebration.
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Shops at
Tanforan, 1150 El Camino Real, San
Bruno. There will be K-9
demonstrations, cool police
vehicles and more. Free admission.
For more information go to
http://www.theshopsattanforan.co
m.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Valley Bicycle Coalition and Bike San
Mateo County — includes energizer
stations at 30 locations throughout
the county. Cyclists can take a quick
break, grab free coffee and get some
bicycle-related goodies.
“Bike to Work Day provides an
opportunity for people who are con-
sidering biking to work or to a transit
station to try it along with thousands
of other new and regular cyclists,
while being cheered on at the
Energizer Stations along the way.
Once people try cycling to work,
many of them make it part of their reg-
ular commute” said John Ford, execu-
tive director of the Peninsula Traffic
Congestion Relief Alliance, a public
agency that promotes commute alter-
natives to people who commute to,
through or within San Mateo County.
As part of the Bike Month festivi-
ties, Tyler was named San Mateo
County’s Bicycle Commuter of the
Year. It is Tyler’s second time getting
this honor — he also earned it in 2006
— which makes him think that per-
haps the pool should be bigger. He’s
excited to see more people get intro-
duced to cycling to work. In fact, a few
people in his department have been
doing it in recent months. Tyler is
offering support by sharing equipment
and offering advice.
“It’s a lot easier than people think,”
said Tyler, who said it’s not about speed
but simply getting out there and being
active.
Tyler also encourages those who get
out there and ride to be aware of the rules
of the road.
Anumber of organizations are getting
involved with the Bike to Work effort.
San Mateo’s Department of Public
Works installed more than 50 bike racks
— including both decorative and con-
temporary designs — in downtown San
Mateo to prepare for Thursday. The
effort was supported by the Downtown
San Mateo Association.
“We are installing the Peninsula’s
first ‘decorative’ children’s bike [rack]
to capture the attention of young peo-
ple, and help them associate bicycling
with fun,” said Director of Public
Works Larry Patterson.
Other bicycle improvement projects
are slated throughout the city includ-
ing the installation of four bicycle
corrals and the replacement of existing
day-use lockers at the city’s three
Caltrain stations with electronic bike
lockers. The projects are funded by a
state Transportation Development Act
Article 3 grant and a local grant from
the Peninsula Congestion Relief
Alliance totaling about $123,000.
Even county and school officials got
into the act this week.
County Supervisor Dave Pine will
lead a nine-mile ride from the County
Center in Redwood City to the Oracle
Energizer Station and back starting at
7 a.m. today. And San Mateo County
cyclists completed the Tour de San
Mateo-Foster City Schools on Tuesday
to promote National Bike to School
Day. The San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District partnered
with the San Mateo County’s Safe
Routes to School initiative working
toward creating safer routes for walk-
ing and bicycling with an emphasis on
the importance and need to increase
physical activity among children,
improve pedestrian safety, with a con-
cern for the environment and building
connections between families,
schools and the broader community.
Cyclists started at Highlands
Elementary School at 8 a.m. then rode
to all 20 schools in San Mateo and
Foster City, finishing at Abbott
Middle School at 2 p.m. Along the
way, cyclists received an escort from
both the San Mateo and the Foster City
police departments as they rode down
Hillsdale Boulevard, across the
lagoon, and over Highway 101 to
Saratoga Drive in San Mateo. In total,
the group traveled more than 33 miles.
For more information on bike safe-
t y, free classes and equipment tips
visit www.commuter.org.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
BIKE
Phase III of the rebuilding will
include underground amenities like
water and sewer lines in the area direct-
ly outside of the initial impact area,
explained City Manager Connie
Jackson. Projected to take nine
months, Jackson estimated the con-
tracts would go before the council
Tuesday, May 14.
Finishing the underground work —
which this phase should do — will
allow the community to focus on
streetscape details. Streets, for exam-
ple, can’t be refinished when so much
underground work will be done, said
Ruane.
Along with streets, there needs to be
work to reforest the canyon and com-
munity conversations about how to
rebuild the park. Discussing the park
could take time. People began sharing
differing opinions for their vision of
the park during the first community
meetings in 2010.
Once rebuilt, the park could be larg-
er, changing the options the commu-
nity can consider.
Looking through the neighborhood,
there are a number of undeveloped lots.
Pacific Gas and Electric owns seven
lots — a purchase they made from resi-
dents who decided to go for that
option. San Bruno has control of five
lots — part of a $70 million restitu-
tion deal with the city. And, a number
of privately-owned lots have yet to be
developed. Down the road, Jackson
said there is an effort to sell many of
the lots to one developer who will
build single-family homes. However,
two of the San Bruno lots could be used
to create more open space. It’s one of
many considerations going forward.
The upcoming work will be quite dis-
ruptive, said Jackson who said the city
is working hard to ensure residents
will have as little impact as possible
while the city rebuilds.
San Bruno as a whole could soon
start benefiting from a nonprofit being
formed as part of the $70 million resti-
tution deal with PG&E. Under the
agreement, San Bruno must create a
separate nonprofit public purpose enti-
ty to manage the funds and determine
how the money should be used. While
the City Council will not oversee the
money directly, it is charged with set-
ting up the structure. Earlier this year,
the council gave consensus for the
name the San Bruno Community
Foundation along with a purpose of
benefiting the community for years to
come. It also OK’d executing and filing
the articles of incorporation for the
nonprofit. The next step will be to cre-
ate the bylaws, said Ruane.
California Public Utilities
Commission staff recommended
Monday that PG&E pay a record $2.25
billion fine for decades of negligence
that led to the explosion. San Bruno
city officials had pushed for a fine of
that amount. PG&E will file its pro-
posal later this month and a CPUC
judge is expected to make a final fine
decision later in the year.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
EFFORTS
COMICS/GAMES
5-9-13
thursday’s PuZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOus
sudOku
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Earl Hines, familiarly
10 Engines
12 Gentle breeze
13 Potatoes au --
14 Not ready
15 Boy or man
16 Quaint lodging
18 Denials
19 Sweet wine
23 I love (Lat.)
26 Encountered
27 Black cuckoos
30 Shellfsh
32 Squid relatives
34 Group of ants
35 Black eye
36 Roulette color
37 Bastille Day season
38 Dazzle
39 With enthusiasm
42 Mal de --
45 Spinks defeater
46 Glimpse
50 Spoke
53 Heart
55 Documents
56 Suite providers
57 -- Park, Colo.
58 Point a fnger at
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2 Footnote abbr. (2 wds.)
3 Carved pole
4 Uris hero
5 Swampy area
6 Spring mo.
7 Watery
8 Syringe
9 “Iliad” deity
10 Movie studio
11 In a catty way
12 New Mexico tribe
17 Proft
20 Nile sun god (hyph.)
21 Biblical matriarch
22 Not pro
23 “Mad Men” network
24 Short-lived particle
25 Nobel Prize city
28 Macbeth’s burial place
29 Gush forth
31 Peau de -- (silk fabric)
32 Large bird
33 Wrath
37 Electric fsh
40 Traipses (about)
41 Busybody
42 Sulk
43 Historical periods
44 Enthralled
47 Flower holder
48 Soccer great
49 Many mos.
51 Peg on the links
52 Hosp. areas
54 Vast stretch of time
diLBErt® CrOsswOrd PuZZLE
futurE shOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GEt fuZZy®
thursday, May 9, 2013
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- You won’t fnd a better
day to decide upon a new course of action. You’ll
fnd the courage you need to move forward.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- This is a day where
your instincts and intuitions will have free rein. Pay
particular heed to those that provide you with the
insight necessary to fulfll your aims.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- A relationship with
an old friend could take on added signifcance. You
could join forces to further a mutual interest.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It’s a good day to establish
some new goals, especially if you’ve been having
diffculty achieving your old ones. Success will come
from a fresh perspective.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You could reap some
unusual benefts through social involvements with
friends. People who owe you favors will be looking
for a way to make good on their debts.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The possibility of you
generating additional income from unusual sources
looks promising. Don’t waste any more time -- get
moving!
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Although at times you
can appear to be a loner, in reality, you enjoy having
partners. Starting now, you’ll have a talent for
forming benefcial alliances.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- There are plenty
of indications that you could be unusually lucky
where your fnances and status are concerned. Good
things happen when you least expect them to.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You are now in
a cycle where things are trending quite favorably
both romantically and socially. A rise in popularity is
almost a certainty for you in the weeks ahead.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Some happy results
are indicated regarding several endeavors that you’ve
so far been unable to complete. Lady Luck is likely to
be responsible for this pleasant turn of events.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Happy circumstances
could unfold in a manner that will cause you to
revise your present plans. Your new ideas will be far
superior to your old ones.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- You’ll see early signs
that good luck is on the way. You’ll have much to
smile about in the coming weeks.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday• May 9, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, Avanti Pizza.
Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
ART LOVERS
We need theatre lovers to
promote our new season
of hit shows direct fro
Broadway. PT, Mon-Fri.
Great earnings potential
for the right person.
Call Elena at 650-340-0359
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
DELIVERY/SETUP PARTY RENTAL
Approx. $20 an hour. Must have own
uncovered pickup truck.
Tom, (650)368-5867
GARDENER WANTED - 30 hours per
week, must speak English, California li-
cense. Starting $11. an hour, (650)347-
2636
HIRING ALL Restraint/Bar Staff Apply
in person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos
HOUSEKEEPING -
Retirement community. Full
time, understand write & speak
English. Experience preferred
$10/hr + benefits. Apply 201
Chadbourne Ave., Millbrae.
LIVE-IN FEMALE Housekeeper/Nanny
Experience required (415)596-0549
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation
Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520921
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Cindy Lin Anderson
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Cindy Lin Anderson and Dan-
iel Anderson filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
Present name: Caleb Ming-Rui Lin An-
derson
Proposed name: Caleb Ming-Rui Ander-
son
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 5, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/23/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/22/13
(Published, 04/25/13, 05/02/13,
05/09/13, 05/16/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255391
The following person is doing business
as: Reflection, 115 Serramonte Center,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Charina
Pedron, 401 Concord St., Vallejo, CA
94591. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Charina Pedron /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 521509
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Tracy Cropper
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Tracy Lynn Cropper filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Faith Elizabeth Provost
Proposed name: Faith Elizabeth Copper
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 19,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/07/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/7/13
(Published, 05/09/13, 05/16/13,
05/23/13, 05/30/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255505
The following person is doing business
as: Friends Market, 200 San Felipe Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ravi Kant Dhingra, 2002 Dolphin Ct.,
San Leandro, CA 94579. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Ravi Kant Dhingra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255478
The following person is doing business
as: Warfighter Brewing Company, 360
Industrial Road, Unit E, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Warfighter Brewing Com-
pany, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Jon Barton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
23 Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
APRIL 30, 2013
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City
Clerk, City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California,
until 3 P.M., on May 28, 2013 and will, at 3:00 P.M. on that
date, be publicly opened and read at the City Hall, in Confer-
ence Room "B" for:
BURLINGAME BIKE ROUTE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT -
EAST, CITY PROJECT NO. 83000 within the City of Burlin-
game, San Mateo County, California.
Specifications covering the work may be obtained by prospec-
tive bidders upon application and a cash, non-refundable de-
posit of $45.00 ($55.00 if contract documents are mailed
through regular U.S. Postal Service (the City does not mail
through Federal Express), at the office of the City Engineer,
501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, CA 94010.
The project work consists of removal and new installation of
traffic traffic pavement markings, roadway legends and strip-
ing, installation of new bike route signs and poles, and instal-
lation of new Class II bicycle lanes and shared bicycle lanes
(SHARROW). Project streets are Airport Boulevard, Bay-
shore Boulevard, and Beach Road.
Special Provisions, Specifications and Plans, including mini-
mum wage rates to be paid in com-pliance with Section
1773.2 of the California Labor Code and related provisions,
may be inspected in the office of the City Engineer during nor-
mal working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlin-
game, California.
The contractor shall possess either a Class A license or -a
Class C-32 license prior to submitting a bid and at the time
this contract is awarded.
All work specified in this project shall be completed within 45
working days from date of the Notice to Proceed.
Augustine Chou
Engineering Programs Manager
DATE OF POSTING: APRIL 30, 2013
TIME OF COMPLETION: FORTY-FIVE (45) WORKING
DAYS
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255492
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria Celaya, 608 Linden Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria I. Hernandez De Gamino, 648 3rd
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria I. Hernandez De Gamino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255280
The following person is doing business
as: Dragon Benefit Advisors, 1700 S. El
Camino Real, #501. SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Dragon Financial & Invest-
ment Group, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Walter Chao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255276
The following person is doing business
as: Hotel Focus SFO, 111 Mitchell Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tiburon Hospitality, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
02/01/2013.
/s/ William R. Dixon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255604
The following person is doing business
as: Elite Performance, 1362 N. Carolan
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Lin
& Yeung Group, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Gary Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255559
The following person is doing business
as: International Rug Gallery - FBN, 32
E. 4th Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: International Rug Gallery Corp.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Farooq Bhat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255516
The following person is doing business
as: Winesavage.com, 440 Talbert St.
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Wine Sav-
age, LLC, NV. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ David Shefferman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255523
The following person is doing business
as: PawCrush Doggy Daycare, 36 N.
Claremont St. #3, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lisa Candelario, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Lisa Candelario /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255566
The following person is doing business
as: Miki’s Bickies, 722 Edgewater Blvd.,
#105, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Miyuki Shinozuka, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Miyuki Shinozuka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255527
The following person is doing business
as: GICO, 2000 Crystal Springs Rd.,
#601, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ar-
min Saberzadeh, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Armin Saberzadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255640
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: D & V Enterprises, 26 N. Dela-
ware St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: 1) Vernard Bailey, 15A N. Eldorado
St., San Mateo, CA 94401, 2) Daryl A.
Thomas, Sr., 3111 La Selva St., #6, San
Mateo, CA 94403, 3) Tracy Jenkins 26
N. Delaware St., San Mateo, CA 94401,
4) Kimberley Thomas 3111 La Selva St.,
#6, San Mateo, CA 94403. The business
is conducted by Copartners. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/20/2013.
/s/ Daryl Thomas /
/s/ Kimberley Thomas /
/s/ Tracy Jenkins /
/s/ Vernard Bailey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255533
The following person is doing business
as: Precision Hearing, 1860 El Camino
Real Ste. #304, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Kimberly Krantz Jennings,
3809 Signal Hill Tr., Copperopolis, CA
95228. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kimberly Jennings /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255487
The following person is doing business
as: Allartstudio, 1060-E El Camino Real,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Alla
Chertok-Tripolsky, 652 Leahy St., Red-
wood City, CA 94061. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Alla Chertok-Tripolsky /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255567
The following person is doing business
as: Ariam Consulting, 4 Sorrel Ln., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Maria Acuna,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Maria Acuna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255634
The following person is doing business
as: Family Nutraceuticals, 79 Clifside Dr.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Family Nu-
traceuticals, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
04/02/2013.
/s/ Paul Mosbauer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255678
The following person is doing business
as: Bright Morning Star, 43 Ericson Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bright
Morning Star, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/25/2013.
/s/ Christine S. Panos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255696
The following person is doing business
as: Art of Flowers, 1415 Rollins Road,
Ste. 210, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michael Toshio, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/15/2013.
/s/ Maria Toshiko Nakamura /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255679
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Top Notch Corals, 6 Adrian
Court, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Kenneth Hom, 512 7th Ave., San Bruno,
CA 94066 & Timothy Hom, 48 Linden
Ave., Apt. 1, San Bruno, CA 94066. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/2013.
/s/ Kenneth Hom /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255714
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: PIE Scientific, 3528 Broadview
Ct., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ximan
Jiangm same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Ximan Jiang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255801
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: G Trucking, 2513 Ford Ham
St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alsel Guzman, same address The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Alsel Guzman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255688
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunny Sushi Grill, 851 Cherry
Ave., Unit 34, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sunny Hong, Inc, CA The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Sunny Hongge Sun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255687
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunny Sushi Cuisine, 102 S. El
Camino Real, MILLBRAE, CA, 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Sun Hong He, Inc., CA The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Sunny Hongge Sun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255424
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Scent Tek, 5 Spring Valley Ln.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Brother’s
Forever, Inc, CA The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/08/2009.
/s/ Brent Youngblood /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255554
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Design Solutions, 4 Portofino
Ct.,SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Linda
Kendrix Burroughs, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Linda Kendrix Burroughs /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/13, 05/30/13.)
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: May 3, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
BRE SH BRISBANE BEV TRUST
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2000 SHORELINE CT
BRISBANE, CA 94005-1870
Type of license applied for:
70-On-Sale General Restrictive
Services
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 9, 2013
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 07, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
JACKS SM LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1750 S. EL CAMINO REAL
SAN MATEO, CA 94402-3061
Type of license applied for:
47- On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 9, 16, 23, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #236702
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name:
Chef’s Choice Catering, 393 Barbara Ln.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/04/2010. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Carolina Bilbae-
no, same address and Rosemarie Rodri-
guez, 143 Fawcett, Hercules, CA 94547
/s/ Carolina Bilbaeno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 03/26/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 04/18/13,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-253384
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Int’l.
Rug Gallery, 32 E. 4th Avenue, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 11/28/2012. The business
was conducted by: Farooq Bhat, 210 Es-
tates Dr., San Bruno, CA 94066 and
Khalid Farooq, 2363 Bermuda Lane,
Hayward, CA 94545.
/s/ Farooq Bhat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/22/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 04/25/13,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-254194
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Kiss-
es Gift House - Aban., 3249 Sheltercreek
Ln., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 1/28/2013. The
business was conducted by: Penbe Oz-
gurgen same address.
/s/ Penbe Ozgurgen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/17/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/02/13,
05/09/13, 05/16/13, 05/23/2013).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIVBS1300025
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Karen M. Rothgery, an indi-
vidual; All Persons Unknown, Claming
Any Legal, or Equitable Right, Title, Es-
tate, Lien, or Interest in the Property De-
scribed in the Complaint Adverse to
Plaintiff’s Title, or Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s
Title Thereto; and Does 1-20 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Nipa
Rothgery, an Individual, and as PER-
SONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE
ESTATE OF FRANK A. ROTHGERY.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
203 Public Notices
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Barstow Courthouse
235 East Moutain View St.
SAME
Barstow, CA 92311
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
RIckey Ivie, Esq. (SBN# 76864)
Benjamin A. Davis, Esq. (SBN# 255375)
Ivie, McNeill & Wyatt
444 S. Flower St., Ste 1800
LOS ANGELES, CA 90071
(213)489-0028 (213)489-0552
Date: (Fecha) Jan. 14, 2013
Glenda Ford, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside
CLAIMED!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, SOLD!
24
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Atkins diet credo
8 Medicare section
13 Freight lineup
14 Asian electronics
giant
16 *Classic paradox
18 Fjord relative
19 Extended break
from svc.
20 Together, on a
score
21 *Memorable site
of a 1965 Beatles
concert
26 Aetna’s bus.
27 Salmon for bagels
28 LBJ’s veep
29 Residents along
the Gulf of
Bothnia
31 “A nickel ain’t
worth a dime
anymore”
speaker
33 Self-effacing
36 *Comes up with a
solution
41 Horace works
42 Card game for
three
44 Some choristers
46 Down
49 Where agua flows
50 Assam export
51 *Body shop’s
reappraisal
55 Spheres
57 Reid or Robbins
58 Deg. for Dilbert
creator Scott
Adams
59 Device useful in
navigation, or in
discovering the
hidden theme in
the answers to
starred clues
65 Honeys
66 Lowly laborer
67 Party animals?
68 Responds to the
MAILER-
DAEMON
DOWN
1 “30 Rock”
network
2 Cry of wonder
3 One-fifth of DLV
4 West African
capital
5 Sporty
6 A little fresh air?
7 Phisher’s target:
Abbr.
8 French meat-and-
veggies dish
9 Silvery gray
10 South American
bird named for a
Greek Titan
11 Associated
12 Many air rifles
14 Half-human
Enterprise
counselor
15 Gets on
17 Antediluvian
21 Wily
22 Place for a shoe
23 Military vet
24 Name of three
Ottoman sultans
25 Falls spray
30 Ordinal extremes
32 “__ that a lot”
34 Verb ending
35 Antibiotic
allotments
37 “__ further
reflection ...”
38 Icing buds on
fancy cakes
39 Vegetable also
called lady’s-
finger
40 Tarry
43 Little piggy
44 Mountaintop
homes
45 Unwitting test
taker
47 Charge to bank
non-members,
often
48 Shinbones
50 1860s
presidential in-law
52 Some Nintendo
consoles
53 Angst-filled
genre
54 Parson’s home
56 Shot contents
60 Slangy smoke
61 “This American
Life” airer
62 Speed-skating
gold medalist
Jansen
63 Stop
64 Blockers for
QBs
By Mark Bickham
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
05/09/13
05/09/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
296 Appliances
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., SOLD!
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
296 Appliances
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
298 Collectibles
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
(650)375-8021
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
302 Antiques
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WIRELESS LANDLINE PHONE in good
condition selling for $40., (650)589-4589
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, SOLD!
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK DINETTE set with 4 wheel chairs,
good condition $99 (650)341-1728
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER - Leather, beige chair with
ottoman, excellent condition, $50.,
SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 ßOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV BASE cabinet, solid mahogany, dou-
ble door storage, excellent condition,
24"D, 24"H x 36"W on casters, w/email
pictures, $20 650 342 7933
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $99.,
(650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
306 Housewares
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO (650)315-5902
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, - SOLD!
LADDER - 24' aluminum 2 section ladder
$20., (650)342-7933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" chop saw (new) 100 tooth
carbine metal/wood blades $60 OBO
(650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO
(650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00
(650)591-0063
SKIL 18 VOLT CORDLESS DRILL with
two batteries, 1 hour charger, with hard
shell case and instruction booklet. Used
once. Perfect condition. $60., (650)591-
0063
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well $99.00 (650)355-2996
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75., (650)375-8021
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , good working condition, $12. both,
(650)347-5104
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEO 75 with jackets 75 with-
out $100 for all (650)302-1880
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
25 Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOUSE PHONE - AT&T, good condtion,
used, works well, speaker option, $30.,
(650)834-3527 or (650)589-4589
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KING SIZE BEDSPREAD - floral, beauti-
ful, like new, $30., SOLD!
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LUGGAGE - Carry-on with wheels,
brand new, Kensington, $30., SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 SOLD!
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
310 Misc. For Sale
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOP LIGHT FIXTURE - unused, flores-
cent, brand Mark Finelite, 48” x 9” x 3”,
white finish, two working bulbs, 14’ cord,
excellent condition, $47., (650)347-5104
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SOLID METAL STAND - 3 tiers, strong,
non skid support, 20” x 30” x 36” tall, has
potential for many uses, $17., (650)347-
5104
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLKSWAGON NEW Beatle hub cap,
3, $70 for All (650)283-0396
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES CLOTHES - Tops & pants (20)
Size S-M, each under $10., SOLD!
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
316 Clothes
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50., SOLD!
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MEN'S PEUGOT 10 speed bike; Good
Condition. $70.00 OBO call: SOLD!
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
SAN MATEO
1056 Patricia Ave.
Friday, May 10th
5 pm - 8 pm
Saturday, May 11th
8 am - 3 pm
Sunday, May 12th
2 pm - 5 pm
Furniture, housewares,
women’s large size clothing,
Cash Only!
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
SEEKING:
Granny Unit /
Guest House /
Studio
Harvard Masters Degree
Graduate
CEO of a Local Start-Up
Responsible, Healthy, Single,
Pet Free, Non-Smoker looking
for a Granny Unit / Guest Home
in San Mateo/Burlingame.
Ready to move in 01 July
2013.
Please e-mail or call me at:
oliverpmj@gmail.com
Phone: 408.234.1572.
Excellent References
available upon request.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC SEVILLE ‘96 - Good engine,
paint & interior, $4000., (650)854-2877
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1800 new, (650)481-
5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining
walls, fences, bricks, roof,
gutters, & drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 914544 Bonded & Insured
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Painting
Craig’s
Painting
Residential
Interior
Exterior
10 years
of Experience
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 553-9653
Lic# 857741
VICTOR’S FENCES
House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)296-8089 or
(650)583-1270
Lic. # 106767
Plumbing
Clean Drains Plumbing
REASONABLE RATES TO
CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
LIVING TRUSTS
$ Promotional Fees $
Plus
Trust Attorney With
Masters In Tax Law For
Tax Trusts & Asset Trusts
Plus
Free Individual Consult
For A Customized Trust
Do Yourself A Big Favor
*****
Ira Harris: 650-342-3777
IHZ-LAW.com
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway,
Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a License
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE
MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Back $40/hr
Open 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Printers
HP PHOTO SMART C7180 - All-in-one
printer, fax, scan, copy, b/w and color.
Wireless, Excellent condition, $75.,
(650) 345-2650
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • May 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
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