Advanced Wastewater Treatment Technology Mechanical Vapor Recompression and Membrane Polishing

Presented to

10th Annual Chemical Management Services Workshop San Francisco, California
John Burke Director of Engineering Services Houghton International

Page 1

Introduction

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What is this new wastewater treatment technology? How does it fit within an existing manufacturing facility? How does each step work, and work together? Cost Comparison Advantages to Chemical Managers Summary

Page 2

Basic Issue With Wastewater Treatment
Manufacturing Facility Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Two Waste By-products Cost Waste- To Water Discharge

Waste Water Treatment System
Aluminum Processing Facility

Both are Regulated

One waste stream becomes two waste streams

Used Oil Sludge

Cost To Haul

Page 3

Advanced Waste Treatment Makes Sense
Manufacturing Facility Wastewater Fluid Recycling System Two commodity Byproducts

Water For Re-use

AWWT

Only one is Regulated

Used Oil One waste stream becomes two commodities For Sale

.
Page 4

Improves environmental image. Oil-like materials can be from mineral. detergents and similar process fluids ƒ Separate the water phase for re-use ƒ Separate the oil-like phase for sale. such as from aluminum metalworking fluids. both internally and externally Page 5 . ƒ Why ? ƒ ƒ ƒ Economic benefits One less regulatory issue to worry about. both water dilutable and not.Design Objective Treat any oil-like liquid. vegetable and animal origin.

Esters. Floor “Dirt” Metals ƒ Iron . Lead. Molybdenum Non-metals ƒ Arsenic. Aluminum. Amides. Suspended / emulsifiable. Selenium Dissolved Solids • Salts (Sodium and Potassium Salts) Dissolved Organics ƒ Amines. Fe. Waxes. and Settleable Solids ƒ Graphite. Surfactants. Fatty Alcohols. Suspended. Zinc. Nickel. Fatty Acids. Detergents. Fatty Acid Soaps (Ca. Glycols. Chrome. Chlorinated Esters and Paraffins Floatable. Animals Oils.What are Some of the Contaminants in Aluminum Metalworking Wastewaters? ƒ Increasing Solubility Page 6 ƒ Hydrocarbon Products (Floatable. Al). Vegetable Oils. Phosphate Esters ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ . Vibratory Debur. Antimicrobials. and Settleable Organics) ƒ Petroleum Oils. Copper. Manganese.

Common Treatment Approaches Chemical treatment Salt Splitting Polymer with / without salt splitting Membrane Separation Ultrafiltration Microfiltration Combined Technologies Chemical / Biological Membrane / Biological Membrane / Biological / Membrane Membrane / Membrane ( UF/RO or UF/NF) Page 7 .

not reduced • High Reject rates Page 8 .Issues With Common Treatment Approaches Chemical • Inflexible on various wastes • Requires skilled Operator • Creates salts within the process Membrane (single) • Membrane sensitive to fouling • Salts and metals pass through membrane Biological • Not every chemical is readily biodegradable • Industry is moving toward bio-stable chemistries Combined Technologies • Issues are generally compounded.

Product Rate to Reject Rate Manufacturing Facility Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Two Waste By-products Waste Water Treatment System Aluminum Processing Facility Product 98% WasteWater Reject 2% Used Oil Sludge Page 9 .

4. Followed by Mechanical Compression of the Distillate Recovery of the Heat into the Boiling Zone Condensing of the Vapor HEAT Compressor Mechanical Vapor Recompression Heat Exchanger HEAT Output (Warm Condensate) HEAT Page 10 . 3. 2.So What is Mechanical Vapor Recompression? 1. Distillation.

Conventional Distillation /Condensation Model Vapor Heat Exchanger Input Boiling Vessel Heat Removed Cold Water IN Warm Water Out Heat Added Heat Removed Output (Warm Condensate) Page 11 .

Conventional Mechanical Vapor Compression Distillation Model Vapor Vapor Compressor More Heat Added Heat Heat Recovered Exchanger Input Boiling Vessel Heat Added Heat Removed Output (Warm Water Condensate) Page 12 .

Current Technology Basic Thermal Evaporation ƒ Purpose: • Concentrate waste by evaporating water using thermal energy Page 13 .

Basic Thermal Evaporation Two forms of energy required to boil water: a. Raise water to boiling ( 212 Degrees F ) Sensible heat ( 1 BTU required to raise one pound of water one degree F) b. Turn water into steam at 212 degrees F ) Latent Heat (960 BTUs required to turn one pound of water at 212 degrees F into steam vapor at 212 degrees F) Page 14 .

Basic Thermal Evaporator Model 960 BTUs/ to turn one pound of water into vapor ALL LATENT HEAT LOST HEAT 50% VAPOR Overall Process Efficiency = 50% Vapor Zone LOST HEAT 50% Wastewater Wastewater .out Page 15 .in HEAT 100% Concentrated Wastewater .

Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Vapor Zone Wastewater Wastewater in HEAT Page 16 .

Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Vapor Zone Wastewater Wastewater in HEAT Page 17 .

Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Vapor Zone Wastewater Blower or Fan (Compressor) More heat added Wastewater in HEAT Page 18 .

Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Blower or Fan (Compressor) More heat added Heat Exchanger #1 Vapor Zone Wastewater Reclaimed Heat (Latent) Condensed Vapor (hot) Wastewater in HEAT Page 19 .

Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Blower or Fan (Compressor) More heat added Heat Exchanger #1 Condensed Vapor (hot) Heat Exchanger #2 Vapor Zone Wastewater Reclaimed Heat (Latent) Wastewater .in Reclaimed Heat (Sensible) HEAT Condensed Vapor out (warm) to Ultrafilter Page 20 .

out Page 21 .in Reclaimed Heat (Sensible) HEAT Condensed Vapor out (warm) to Ultrafilter Concentrated waste Oil / water .Basic Mechanical Vapor Compression Evaporator Model HEAT VAPOR Blower or Fan (Compressor) More heat added Heat Exchanger #1 Condensed Vapor (hot) Heat Exchanger #2 Vapor Zone Wastewater Reclaimed Heat (Latent) Wastewater .

Output (Hot Vapor) VAPOR HEAT Conventional Evaporation HEAT Compressor Mechanical Vapor Recompression Heat Exchanger HEAT 960 BTUs/ to turn one pound of water into vapor HEAT Output (Warm Condensate) 1 BTUs to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit Page 22 .

000 Gallons of Oily Wastewater Conventional Evaporation @ 50 % Efficiency Mechanical Vapor Recompression As Measured 15.Cost Comparison Conventional Evaporation VS.833 BTUs (16.936.2 X less energy) Page 23 . Mechanical Vapor Recompression Energy Required to Treat 1.000 BTUs 920.

Lab Test Evaporation / Condensation Unit Page 24 .

20 Gallon Per Minute Unit Page 25 .

Influent Feed Pump Page 26 .

Primary Heat Exchanger Page 27 .

Secondary Heat Exchanger Page 28 .

Recirculating Pump Page 29 .

Progressive View of Sample Concentration Less than 1% oil 80% oil Page 30 .

Starting Sample Concentrate from MVR 99.7 % Volume Reduction Salable Oil Page 31 .

Storage and flow equalization Emulsified oil. metals. 2. and fine solids separation (Mechanical Vapor Recompression Distillation System) Trace insoluble organic separation ( Ultrafilter System) 3. most soluble organics. Page 32 .Treatment Process Steps 1.

Etc. Evaporative Losses Manufacturing Processes Rolling oils. Chemicals. washers. Industrial Wastewater From Plant Primary Wastewater Storage Mechanical Vapor Recompression System Day Tank MVR Oil Reject Day Tank Ultrafilter U F Day Tank Dilute Oil Reject Tank Tank Used oil .Overall Flow Schematic Return water to Manufacturing Processes Water Virgin Lubes. etc.out Decant water Page 33 .

Flow Schematic Treated Effluent Permeate Wastewater (influent From MVR For Re-use 10 PSI Concentrate Membrane Surface Day Tank Clean Tank 120o F Ultrafilter 45 PSI Feed Pump Pump Page 34 To Oil Reject Tank .Basic Ultrafilter Model .

Ultrafilter 50 Gallons Per Minute Page 35 .

Starting Sample Condensed Distillate From MVR Polished Sample After Ultrafilter Page 36 .

Design Objective Must Meet the The Basic Requirement 1. Does it fit with the Personality of the Organization? ƒ ƒ ƒ All Mechanical System No Chemicals (Defoamer. UF Detergent) Industry Common Components Blowers Pumps Heat Exchangers Automatic Valves Steam Traps Easily Automated Easy to Trouble Shoot Energy Efficient ƒ ƒ ƒ Page 37 .

0 – 7.000 3.5 5.500 – 400 – 10.000 300 15 5 2 1 8.000 – 35.1 < 0.000 _ 5.000 – 3.000 – 10.650 < 10 < 5 < 20 < 20 < 0.System Performance Influent BOD5 COD Oil and Grease TPH TKN TDS TSS Fe Zn Cu Pb Ni pH Page 38 Effluent 200 .8 .01 < 0.000 500 250 200 5.01 < 0.01 7.000 20.400 400 .01 < 0.01 < 0.0 – 8.000 – 6.

05 / kilowatt-hour .00 99 / 1 NOR $ 4.50 WOR+ ATR $ 1.55 Product / Reject Ratio MVR/ UF WOR + ATR $ 0.00 $ 4.50 $ 7.00 $ 5.50 $ 3.00 $ 7.50 Total $ 5.00 $ 10.50 WOR $ 1.00 5.00 WOR $ 5.00 WOR+ ATR $ 5.55 65 / 35 $ $ $ 3.05 Product / Reject Ratio Membrane Methods NOR $ 0.System Performance Operating Cost Comparison Cost ( $ USD) / 1000 US Gallons Method Chemical Methods Chemicals Electricity $ 1.55 70 / 30 4.00 8.00 $ 2.00 $ NOR = No oil recovery WOR= With Oil recovery ATR = Ability To Recycle Water phase back into the process Page 39 Energy cost assumed at $ 0.00 Product / Reject Ratio $ 2.

Page 40 . Easily Automated.Benefits to Chemical Managers Allows the use of more complex metalworking fluids and detergents. Can be applied where water is scarce Can be applied where discharge to local sewer is restricted Can be added on to existing treatment (only MVR required?) Turns oil into a commodity (adds value).

Page 41 .Summary Advantage ƒ One waste stream becomes two commodities. Water For Re-use AWWT Used Oil One waste stream becomes two commodities For Sale .

Cleveland.com .Thank You Contact Information John Burke Houghton International 27181 Euclid Ave. Ohio 44094 USA Office Phone Cell Phone Fax Phone Email Page 42 216-289-3991 216-235-1995 216-235-3991 jburke@houghtonintl.

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