You are on page 1of 6

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux

Judo-Ron 69 - Testing Judo Organizational Optimization
The world of judo is swiftly changing and with each day the International Judo Federation is accelerating the paces. Olympic statures and competition acceptance rules are applying pressures upon national and provincial judo associations to respond in accordance with the intended objectives of increasing the visibility of judo events and as an aside, providing for a technically improved judo. For a while, we may have turned away from the impositions but as times go by, we need to face the realities. We must adjust to the governing bodies or extricate ourselves from their leadership. Either choice is difficult as both will profoundly affect the ways we conduct our judo affairs/business. The reality of these pressures is that they are now affecting our general organizational status, the funding mechanisms, the governance and even the leadership structures of our dojo teaching styles. With the new images of a modern judo being fed by several interventions and at different levels, we are now discovering the increasingly complex and demanding issues. In this tumult surrounding us and considering that some of these external artifacts are now changing our judo ethos, we need to review the conduct of our organizations. Are we caught in the vortex of an accelerating change to transform judo or are we heading into a period of progressive changes that will render it an activity of excellence? Can we adequately deal with these accelerating changes and complexities without destroying our learned and present structures? Should we be planning to incorporate all the changes and substantially change the ways we conduct our judo affairs in Canada? Historical build-up We are before a major challenge. Historically, we have been building our judo culture since the early 1900’s and have set up the various structures and mechanisms to teach the philosophy and the techniques of the Kodokan judo. We have been accustomed to manage our sporting activities at the local and regional levels by observing and imitating the role models provided by our Sensei and founding members. Our current structures made up with judo-dojo memberships, regional managers, provincial and national associations’ executives are the products of the contributing members (mudansha and Yudansha) who have volunteered their talents and expressed their consent to ensure that the federation’s management will lead them towards excellence.

Page

1

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux
We built the structure brick by brick; from local dojo in 1900’s to regional and provincial associations in the 1950’s to the current national super structure that is Judo Canada in 1959. The aims and goals of our clientele have matured in the last century. In the early period, we were able to accommodate most of the objectives within our structure with appropriate policies and procedures that recognized the four facets of judo: the physical education, the recreation components, the technical expertise and the competition. Current dilemma Now that we belong to the International judo community, those aims and goals appear to be shaken by those drastic changes emanating from outside the organization and which have a considerable impact on our beliefs, values and sub cultures comprised of: students, instructors, teachers, competitors and managers. The membership at large need to be reassured that their commitment in not in vain, that they belong, have a place to follow their dreams, aspire to their goals and that their accomplishments are recognized not only by peers but by the ensemble of the organization and its leadership. Judo as a sport event, judo as a physical education system, judo as a form of self-defence or judo as a social development are four dimensions that have been intermingled in the past. I think that we are reaching a critical crossroad demanding that we redefine our expectations, consolidate our management-leadership of its activities and confirm our engagement towards our membership. Governance and Funding As a national sport governing body, Judo Canada and its affiliated Provincial Associations must adhere to the General Canadian Sport Policy of June 2012, which was endorsed by the Federal, Provincial and Territorial ministers responsible for Sports, Physical activity and Recreation, including Canada’s Minister of State for Sports (within Heritage Canada). This policy sets out 5 broad objectives which are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Introduction to sport Recreational sport Competitive sport High performance sport Sport for social and economic development

Page

2

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux
These 5 objectives were later introduced as the basic principles promoted by the Federal document known as the Long Term Athlete Development Model (LTADM) which was endorsed by most federations coming under the tutelage of the Federal government. It is accepted that funding support is commensurate with the degree of compliance to this model. At the national level, the governance of Judo Canada is partly influenced by the directives and policies of the Department of Canadian Heritage, Sport Canada who works to advance all accredited sports within the context of Government of Canada priorities. As such, the Department is politically striving to establish Canada’s presence as a leading sport nation at home and abroad thus emphasizing its objectives 3, 4, and 5. Objectives 1 and 2 are intended to entice all Canadians and their communities to enjoy value and celebrate the benefits of active participation and the attainment of excellence in sport. The bulk of the efforts in those two areas are mostly distributed or coordinated at the provincial and municipal government’s levels. Financial aspects are important Our current funding is made up from memberships and from Federal funding apparatus. There are no solid outside financial sources that contribute to its growth. Judo Canada received financial help mainly from diverse Sport Canada funding programs and especially from the high performance sector (Athlete Assistance Program) and some financial help for the organizing committees and the hosting of international sport events as well as partially sponsoring the Canada Winter and summer Games. In 2011-12 Judo Canada received over one million dollars in the high performance area and $45,000 as part of the federal hosting program. The former AAP contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its contribution to improved Canadian judoka performances at major international sporting events, enabling them to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. The Sport Support Program (SSP) is a financial contribution aimed at developing the individual judoka and coaches in order to perform at the highest international levels. The Hosting Program is the third segment for the Government of Canada to assist sport development and aims to augment the visibility and the international profile of Canadian sport organizations. It provides contributions to entities responsible to host the Canada Games and other international sport events in Canada. It is understood that the Toronto Organization Committee for the 2015 Pan Am and Para Pan Games will receive $ 13.5 million for hosting the games.

Page

3

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux
The action plan as an outcome of the financial perspective Partly for the above financial reasons, the Judo Canada governing authorities have taken the sporting dimensions of judo as its primary focus: to promote and support the LTADP and obtaining World level success in international competitions. By providing the base to develop excellent judoka which in turn will become role-models for aspiring competitors, the organization is stimulating the interest and encouraging the general population to participate in all judo activities. To accomplish those goals, the organization will scout around to find suitable candidates who are motivated and capable to commit to a long term training regime. It will try to place as many as possible qualified participants to as many international events as possible. For ensuring both the quality and quantity of representatives, the National Training Centre will ensure the best training platforms for the judokas and will provide for the best supporting entourage of experts and coaches. To upkeep these objectives, the National organization largely depends upon the participation of a sustained and growing number of Provincial membership which needs to be well structured and active in all the interested judo domains be they in the form of developing educational literacy and participation in judo within the recreational or competitive facets. Provincial mandate Amongst the Provincial and Territorial organizations that collaborate towards the attainment of these national goals, lets us have a quick look at the Judo Ontario Mandate.
Within its geographical area of responsibilities, its mission is said to foster, promote and regulate the sport of Judo within the province by arranging, promoting and supervising the training aspects, the tournaments, competitions and judo exhibitions. In keeping with its desire to provide technical excellence, it oversees the development of coaches, officials and instructors through clinics and specialized courses of study. As a regional governing institution, it provides necessary policies and directives, regulations and instructions to its membership to ensure all the programs are accessible and equitable to the community members and that they respect the physical safety measures and the ethical conduct demanded of all participants. The Provincial association provides the necessary overall environmental supervision to ensure that the teachings, practices and objectives of the Kodokan Judo are respected. Like other sisters provincial governing bodies, the association is aiming for a steady growth during the next few years and increasing the diversity of its services to its clientele.

Page

4

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux
The core of the judo structure The core of the Canadian judo structure rests with the DOJO activities and memberships. This is crucial to the survival and expansion of our structure. There, whether judo is practiced in recreational centers, in schools, in private establishments or within municipal complexes, the judo introduction when launched is bond to progress when it is based upon a shared vision and the interaction between players and the Sensei. The fundamental knowledge and skills cannot be transmitted without the proper support and the comprehension of all those implicated in the program delivery. Goals and objectives need to be well established and communicated to ensure the necessary harmony is obtained in the accomplishments. Active participation and growth are fundamentals to the survival of the Dojo. Should the Dojo memberships or the teaching staff feel that they are left out or deprived of the organizational support expected from the Center, there will be minimal or no expansion. It is at the Dojo level, that the 5 national priorities need to addressed. The introduction to judo must provide for the acquisition of fundamentals skills and knowledge while ensuring sufficient options are given for pleasantly moments and playful activities; for developing healthy habits, and offering social interactions and relaxation periods. Similarly, the Dojo must provide constructive paths for would be competitors so that they can build upon the fundamentals, practice within a safe environment, develop tactics and strategies to best use their energy to overcome obstacles as presented in Randori or in other forms of regional combat situations. The judo ethics and values must carve the mental attitude that will guide the judoka in their quest for greater challenges. Although physically isolated from other teaching centers, the Dojo must maintain open communications with all of its memberships, with its immediate staff; other centers of excellence; the local and regional communities; the parents; the local support groups; the social entities who can or have showed interest; the press and telecommunication agencies; the municipal and communities authorities and, the peer groups of professionals who can provide additional opportunities to learn and exchange new values and help motivate the membership. As we mentioned earlier, judo values and structures are constantly changing. Dojo membership cannot afford to be the lone wolf and remain independent of others. The membership cannot operate in silence and remain a silent follower within the pack. The voice of the dojo must be heard and communicated as often as needed to gain proper acceptance by the ensemble of the organization and be party to its decision making. As a center of activity, the dojo has a major role to play to influence the directions we may choose to align the future organizational structure and judo programs in Canada.

Page

5

Zuihitsu-Random Notes about Judo by Ronald Désormeaux
Dojo importance The future champion or the next judo instructor will emerge from the right Dojo structure. This is the birth place where masters are formed after having followed an extensive training period under the guidance of seasoned teachers and where individuals are molded to use energy intelligently and to provide mutual benefits to others. The dojo is the educational milieu preparing the judoka to face the immediate and the future environments. In current critical times, the Dojo’s mission is too important to be left without a proper mission statement endorsed by the federation. Both entities must coordinate their goals and support each other with proper growth plans, revised objectives and communication strategies. It has often been said that no action is to be done without reason. Organizational changes are no exception, they must follow the need to improve, be desired, wanted and obtainable within a reasonable time frame. If all parties can agree on the direction to follow, we can all celebrate our accomplishments.

I wish you all a good summer session. Ronald Désormeaux Judo Teacher, Hart House Dojo, University of Toronto June 2013

Note
This article contains copyright © and is registered with the Electronic Data Bank of the National Archives of Canada. Reproduction for non-commercial purposes is permitted. Should there be a need for additional information, please contact: Ronalddesormeaux@Gmail.com References: Statistics Canada catalogues: No 81-595-MIE 060, 81-595-MIE 2008060, Service Bulletin 63-246X Judo Canada and Judo Ontario Constitution and Mission Statements of the Corporations The Canadian Sport Policy 2012 from the Department of Heritage Canada (Minister of State (Sport))

Page

6