Lesson 2 Let’s meet the others – Handout

1. Write/ say simple sentences using the following words: who, what, when, how, where: e.g. What is your name? Who is she? - …………………………………………………………… -……………………………………………………………. -……………………………………………………………. -……………………………………………………………. -……………………………………………………………. Short dialogues (speaking activity):  Introductions e.g.: A. Hello! My name is Diane. What is your name? B. Mike A. Where are you from, Mike? B. I am from Paris. Where are you from? A. I am from London. B. Are you British? A. Yes, I am. Are you French? B. Yes, I am.  Hello and goodbyes e.g. – Hello Peter! How are you? - Fine, thank you! How are you? - I’m fine, thank you! – Goodbye, Janet. See you tomorrow! - Bye Peter. Have a nice day! - Thank you, you too. Make similar dialogues (pair work). 2.

Greetings Mr. / Misses Ms. / Miss Good morning! Good afternoon! Good evening! Hello!!! Hi!!! How are you? I am fine. / Mister Mrs. thank you! How is going? Nice to meet you! .Word List.

How to Greet someone in Britain The Handshake A handshake is the most common form of greeting among the English and British people and is customary when you are introduced to somebody new. How do you do? – How do you do? 'How are you?' is a question and the most common and polite response is " I am fine thank you and you?" How are you? – I am fine thank you and you? Nice to meet you – Nice to meet you too. How's you? .Fine thanks. Formal greetings The usual formal greeting is a 'How do you do?' and a firm handshake. The Kiss It is only when you meet friends. Good Morning / Good Afternoon / Good Evening Informal greetings Hi . that you would kiss the cheek of the opposite sex. ‘How do you do?’ is a greeting not a question and the correct response is to repeat ‘How do you do?' You say this when shaking hands with someone. You? .Hi or hello Morning / Afternoon / Evening ( We drop the word 'Good' in informal situations). Pleased to meet you – Pleased to meet you too. whom you haven't seen for a long time. In Britain one kiss is generally enough. (Often said whilst shaking hands) Delighted to meet you– Delighted to meet you too. but with a lighter touch between men and women.

HOW TO GREET SOMEONE IN KOREA • physical aspect. If you are meeting someone for the first time. nationality etc. Then. Koreans tend to be curious about foreigners. "Submissiveness to authority . say the greeting. When accepting a gift from an elder.Thank you / thanks / cheers We sometime say 'cheers' instead of thank you. elders. Remember to bow when saying hello. Respect for elders is crucial. You may hear 'cheers' said instead of 'good bye'.parents. Whatever the older person says. .One must always. It's a cultural thing that everyone who lives there has to learn. Do not bow too slowly nor to quickly. and superiors" -. You will find that in Korea age is an important factor in a relationship. It is expected that a young person gives up their seat on a bus or train for an elder. Think of the Korean bow as a substitute to waving. you are not obliged to follow it. it is custom for the older person to pay for the meal. although some youth do not see it as necessary. of course. They will also look out for the younger person and share their knowledge. so satisfy their curiousity. However. keep both legs straight and together. put both arms stiffly by your side. keep your back straight and bend from the waist. goes! While the whole concept is a strict Korean rule. you would be regarded as a polite and well-mannered person if you did. Upon entering a Korean home. use two hands. remove your shoes. yet if you are conversing with a friend you can abbreviate the greeting to simply "an nyung". what we are really saying is 'thanks and bye'. The upside to this concept is that when you go out to eat with someone. lift yourself back up. when greeting an elder. and again when saying goodbye. it is a good idea to give a detailed introduction about yourself. • • • • • • Use two hands when shaking hands with an elder. While bowing. Keep the head down and do not look at the elder. Koreans also tend to use an informal version of the language when talking to well known friends or younger people. "An nyung hah sae yo" is used when speaking to an elder. Tell them about your job.this phrase originated back to the teachings of Confucius in 14th century and is still regarded as an important custom.

so I am a Korean. e. .COUNTRIES and NATIONALITIES - Korea → Korean Japan → Japanese China → Chinese Russia → Russian America → American France → French Britain → British Poland → Polish Greece → Greek Italy → Italian Spain → Spanish Portugal → Portuguese Bulgaria → Bulgarian Australia → Australian Germany → German Romania → Romanian etc.g.Word List. I live in Korea.

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