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CPPAMO

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Welcome to the eighth Cultural Pluralism in the Performing Arts Movement Ontario (CPPAMO) newsletter. This is a regular digest that will introduce you to, and keep you updated on CPPAMOs initiatives, and act as a portal to relevant research in the field of pluralism in the arts, innovative artists, and links to interesting talks about pluralism in the arts. The newsletter is intended to be your go-to resource for information on cultural pluralism in the arts. You have received this e-mail because you are a member of the CPPAMO listserv. Please let others who share our professional and artistic interests know about this listserv and encourage them to subscribe by sending an e-mail to cppamo@gmail.com. The listserv is moderated and is for sending out newsletters and CPPAMO updates. You may unsubscribe at any time. For more information, you can look us up here: http://cppamo.wordpress.com Facebook: search CPPAMO Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cppamo Newsletter Contents What is CPPAMO? Round:About COPA & CPPAMO at Culture Days CPPAMO at CAPACOA Update on Audience Building Workshop Research into Cultural Pluralism Future Events Who We Are Contact Us

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What is CPPAMO? Cultural Pluralism in Performing Arts Movement Ontario (CPPAMO) is a movement of Aboriginal and ethno-racial artists working with presenters to empower the performing arts communities of Ontario. CPPAMO seeks to open opportunities for Aboriginal and ethno-racial performers to engage with presenters across Ontario and to enable presenters to develop constructive relationships with Aboriginal and ethno-racial performers. CPPAMO is supported by Aboriginal and ethno-racial artists who are involved in theatre, music, dance and literary arts. They are members of CPPAMOs Roundtable and include representatives of Sampradaya Dance, Nathaniel Dett Chorale, Little Pear Garden Theatre Collective, Centre for Indigenous Theatre, Kaha:wi Dance, Sparrow in the Room, b-current, why not theatre, urban arts and backforward collective, Teyya Peya Productions, Culture Days, Canada Council Stand Firm members, Obsidian Theatre, the Collective of Black Artists, CanAsian Dance and others. With the involvement of artists from these organizations, CPPAMO is working with Community Cultural Impresarios (CCI) and its members to build their capacities, cultural competencies and understanding of pluralism in performing arts so that CCI and its members engage performers

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CPPAMO

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from these communities and, thereby, enable audiences across Ontario to access artistic expressions from diverse communities on a regular basis. CPPAMO gratefully acknowledges the funding support it has received for its activities from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus and the Ontario Ministry of Culture Round:About COPA & CPPAMO at Culture Days The Coalition of Performing Artists (COPA) and CPPAMO presented an evening of performances by ten local multiethnic artists as part of the Culture Days celebration in Kitchener. The event was held on September 24th at the Conrad Centre for the Performing Arts, programmed by The MT Space and Neruda Productions. It featured storytelling as a major form of intercultural interaction highlighted in the Waterloo Region and involved local musicians, theatre and performance artists from many cultures who presented unique stories in unique styles representing the regeneration of performance practices and intercultural fusion taking place in Waterloo Region. This event featured such performers as: Janice Lee, Foyo Juma, Pryam Paul, Brian Voll. Nicolas Vargas, Miroki Tong, Heather Marjaury, Rain I CL Chan, Veronica Diaz and Kathryn Lennon. Over 80 people attended this cabaret style event!

CPPAMO at CAPACOA After a successful first Town Hall on Pluralism in Performing Arts at the University of Toronto at the beginning of the year, and a well-received second session as part of the Magnetic Norths Industry Series, CPPAMO is proud to present its third Town Hall on Sunday, November 7 th 2010 at the Canadian Arts Presenting Associations 23rd annual conference, Culture of Collaboration (Nov. 5-8) at the Westin, Ottawa. The schedule for this session is as follows: 1:30 pm: Greetings charles c. smith 1:45 pm: Dance Performance Collective of Black Artists (COBA) 1:55 pm: Keynote Speech George Elliot Clarke 2:55 pm: Dance Performance Ipsita Nova 3:15 pm: Health Break 3:30 pm: Panel Presentations Sandra Laronde, Shahin Sayadi, Jeanne Holmes 4:45 pm: Dance Performance Kaha:wi Dance Theatre 5:05 pm: Closing Comments charles c. smith Notes on the presenters: The Collective of Black Artists (COBA) presents Traditional West African dance, music and folklore; Caribbean Indigenous Folk dance, music and rituals in their purest forms possible for

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the theatrical stage. COBA was founded in 1993 by Junia Mason, Charmaine Headley, BaKari E. Lindsay and Mosa Neshama. Under the leadership of artistic co-founders BaKari E. Lindsay and Charmaine Headley for the past 14 years, the driving force behind the Collective has been the creation and production of works that reflect Africanist social themes and perspectives of movement. Using storytelling, music and drama interwoven with dance, COBA is able to share life wisdom with audiences and future generations. They will perform an excerpt from Djembefola (Choreographer: BaKari Segun Lindsay, Performers: BaKari Segun Lindsay, Ndere Ade Nimon Headley-Lindsay, Music: Baba Toure and Ndere Ade Nimon HeadleyLindsay, Costumes: BaKari Segun Lindsay). George Elliot Clarke is a poet, playwright, literary critic and the E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature at the University of Toronto. He was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia in 1960, a seventh-generation Canadian of African-American and Mikmaq Amerindian heritage. As a writer Clarke has published in a variety of genres: verse collections, Saltwater Spirituals and Deeper Blues (1983), and Lush Dreams, Blue Exile (1994), a verse-novel, Whylah Falls (1990 & 2000), two verse plays, Whylah Falls: The Play (1999 & 2000), and Beatrice Chancy (1999). His opera Beatrice Chancy, with music by James Rolfe, has had four stage productions and a broadcast on CBC television. This powerful opera about slavery in the Nova Scotia of the early 1800s won great reviews and enthusiastic audiences. He wrote the screenplay for the feature film, One Heart Broken Into Song. The verse play, Whylah Falls, was staged in Venice in Italian (2002). Clarke continues to publish poetry with Provenal Songs (1993 & 1997), Gold Indigoes (2000), Blue (2001) and Illuminated Verse (2005). His Execution Poems (2001) won the Governor Generals Award for Poetry. Clarke has been instrumental in promoting the work of writers of African descent, especially those of Nova Scotia. In 2002 he published, Odysseys Home: Mapping African-Canadian Literature. See the bibliography for a list which includes his poetry, edited books, criticism in postcolonial literature and other academic publications. Established in 2008, Ipsita Nova Dance Projects is led by dancer and choreographer Nova Bhattacharya, who brings her classical bharatanatyam training into the world of contemporary dance with elegance and authority. Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Bhattacharya has developed an intriguing body of work - ranging from full length classical recitals to powerful contemporary solos and duets - that showcases todays bharatantayam and Canadian contemporary dance with a South Asian sensibility. Nova Bhattacharya has been acclaimed as one of Canadas most captivating dance artists. She has trained with some of bharatanatyams most esteemed teachers including Menaka Thakkar, Kalanidhi Narayan and Kitappa Pillai. Her development in contemporary dance has been informed by her ongoing work with Peggy Baker, Sasha Ivanochko and Louis Laberge-Ct and in butoh by Yumiko Yoshioka and Denise Fujiwara. Eager to explore the scope for innovation within the Bharatanatyam form and seeking to create works that utilize classical vocabulary in a contemporary aesthetic, Bhattacharya began choreographing in 1997. Bhattacharyas artistry is a reflection of her classical training and present- day aesthetic, her work is formally rigorous and displays an eloquence that goes beyond pure movement. Sandra Laronde Founder and Artistic Director of Red Sky, Sandra Laronde is an awardwinning director, producer, choreographer, actor and dancer. Currently, she is also the Director of Indigenous Arts at The Banff Centre, a globally respected arts and cultural institution. She divides her time between Banff, Alberta and Toronto, Ontario. Sandra is originally from the

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Teme-Augama-Anishnaabe (People of the Deep Water) in Temagami, northern Ontario. In 2004, she was one of 225 Canadians chosen to participate in the Governor-General's Canadian Leadership program, which celebrates promising leaders who are making a significant impact on Canada. In the same year, Sandra was also the recipient of Toronto City Council's 2004 Aboriginal Affairs Award for her contribution towards improving the quality of life for the Aboriginal community of Toronto. She is also listed in the Canada's Who's Who that features notable living Canadians. Shahin Sayadi is the founder and Artistic Director of Halifax's Onelight Theatre. Shahin, along with the Onelight team, has also hosted several Conferences that explored cultural diversity and the arts in Canada. The Canadian Theatre Identity Crisis: Challenging Eurocentricity Through Aboriginal Myth and Ritual (2005) and Prismatic (2008) which looked at the experiences of culturally diverse artists who live and work outside of Canada's major urban centres. October 10-17 Onelight Theatre is hosting Prismatic 2010, a national multi-art festival and conference in venues across Halifax. Shahin is actively involved in local and national arts organizations, including the PACT (Professional Association of Canadian Theatres) Board of Directors, the Ad Hoc Assembly an organization of Canada's Aboriginal and culturally diverse theatre companies, and the Legacy Centre for the Arts in Halifax, NS. Jeanne Holmes was recently appointed to the position of Producing Director of Dancemakers and the Centre for Creation. During her tenure at Harbourfront Centre Holmes was responsible for the dance programming in the World Stage international performance series, the coordination of NextSteps a series that showcases Canadian-based dance artists and the Artistic Direction of the annual contemporary dance series. Holmes is entering her third year as Chair to the board of directors for the CanDance Network, an association of specialized dance presenting organizations from across Canada, and is President of the Board of Directors for Dusk Dances. During her 20 years of experience in the cultural sector, Holmes has developed an extensive knowledge of the national and international milieu as well as strong ties to the local dance community and continues to demonstrate a strong commitment to the development and presentation of dance and live performance in Canada. Kaha:wi Dance Theatre (pronounced Ga-Ha-Wee) is a an artist based company founded by Artistic Director/choreographer Mohawk Santee Smith. KDT creates professional dance productions and is committed to increasing awareness and understanding of Aboriginal culture through the work of the company. Smith has become known for her successful blend of traditional and contemporary dance elements. Kaha:wi is a profound contemporary Aboriginal dance performance that bridges the gap between contemporary and traditional Iroquoian song and dance without losing the integrity of the cultural content and dance style. Kaha:wi premiered at the Premiere Dance Theatre at the Harbourfront Centre in Toronto 2004. The choreography, music and design for Kaha:wi explores fundamental philosophies of Iroquoian culture such as honouring the cycle of Life, thanksgiving, sacredness of the natural world, rite ceremonies and duality. Choreographically, Kaha:wi draws inspiration from Iroquoian social dances such as the Gada:tro:t (Standing Quiver Dance or Stomp Dance), Ehsga:nye: gae:nase: (New Womens Shuffle Dance), Gayowaga:yoh (Old Mocassin Dance) and the Wa enoti:yo (Stick Dance). Musically, Kaha:wi highlights traditional based songs such as the Dawn Song, Gada:tro:t, naming songs and Ato:wi:se (Womens Chant or Moon Songs).

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For more information about the conference and http://www.capacoa.ca/en/conference/about-the-conference Update on Audience Building Workshop

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registration please visit

The next installment of the audience building workshop will take place on November 23 and will focus on social networking, information sharing and communication styles of Aboriginal and ethno-racial communities. To date, confirmed speakers include: Professor Naida Cadi, Jennifer Green of Soundstreams, Nick Ashewasega of Nation Talk, Andrea Fatona of the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Melanie Fernandez of Harboroufront. The full schedule and registration information will be announced shortly. If you would like to get involved with the workshop, please email cppamo@gmail.com. Research into Cultural Pluralism European Institute for Comparative Cultural Research. Sharing Diversity: National Approaches to Intercultural Dialogue in Europe. March 2008. http://www.interculturaldialogue.eu/web/files/14/en/Sharing_Diversity_Final_Report.pdf The report examines intercultural dialogue and its challenges in areas such as culture, education, sports and youth, and the stakeholders in these fields. It provides several recommendations for implementing intercultural dialogue in European nations and its implications for politics and policy making. UNESCO. UNESCO World Report 2: Investing in Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue. May 2010. http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.phpURL_ID=39896&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html This UNESCO report analyzes cultural diversity and the processes that put it into motion, shows the importance of cultural diversity in the languages, education, community and creativity, and attempts to persuade decision-makers of the importance of investing in cultural diversity. It recognizes the myriad of initiatives that are being undertaken in different countries, their relative success at intercultural dialogue and the challenges of such an undertaking, and identifies cultural diversity as integral to sustainable development and the governance of human rights. Canada Council for the Arts. France Trepanier. Final Report: Aboriginal Arts Administration Forum. September 2008. http://www.canadacouncil.ca/publications_e/research/art_abo/vd128798717021038250.htm This document is a report on the Aboriginal Arts Administration Forum. This two-and-a-half-day forum was hosted by the Aboriginal Leadership and Management Programs at the Banff Centre. It explored the realities of Aboriginal arts administration in Canada and the needs for training and professional development in the field. It explores the challenges and opportunities in Aboriginal arts administration, discusses existing research and approaches in the field, reviews

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best practices in Canada, benefits from the knowledge of senior administrators, explores formulas for training, and formulates recommendations for future action. Australia Council for the Arts. Janet Wells, Magdalena Grubski, Kim Kruger, Daniel Goodfellow. 31 July 2007. Arts Marketing Summit 2007: Strategies for creating diverse audiences. http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/arts_marketing/audience_development/arts_market ing_summit_2007_strategies_for_creating_diverse_audiences A panel of arts marketers present case studies and discuss strategies for reaching diverse audiences, including niche markets. Each identifies strategies that can be transferred to marketplaces of all sizes. TEDTalks: Shereen El Feki: Pop culture in the Arab world http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/shereen_el_feki_pop_culture_in_the_arab_world.html At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist. The hybridized media shows how two civilizations, rather than dividing, can dovetail. Shereen El Feki is a TEDGlobal Fellow who writes on health and social welfare issues in the Arab world. Future Events Ali & Ali: The Deportation Hearings Sept. 28-Oct. 16, Factory Theatre Studio Ali and Ali creators turn their idiosyncratic brand of post-identity satire to the whole new world: the global economy has tanked (sort of), the President of the Worlds middle name is Hussein. In Canada, the G20 debacle puts downtown Toronto under martial law, Canadian citizens are regularly deported to indefinite detention and torture, and five Arab/Muslim men continue to be held without charges and access to the evidence against them. Must be time for Ali and Ali. Created by Camyar Chai, Guillermo Verdecchia and Marcus Youssef. Directed by Guillermo Verdecchia. Performed by Marcus Youssef, Guillermo Verdecchia, Anita Majumdar and Paul Sun-Hyung Lee. http://www.factorytheatre.ca/1011season.htm Radiance Oct. 12-15, Theatre Directs Wychwood Theatre b current opens its 20th anniversary season with its rAiz'n ensemble's graduating piece Radiance by Australian playwright Louis Nowra. Against the spectacular Queensland backdrop of Northern Australia, Radiance tells the story of three half sisters who reunite in their childhood home for their mother's funeral. While they wade through ghosts of the past, discovering lost, painful and sweet memories, they must also forge a bond that can withstand the turbulence of both death and surviving. Directed by ahdri zhina mandiela, featuring the 2007-10 rAiz'n Ensemble. http://www.bcurrent.ca/events.asp#radiance The Merchants of Bollywood Nov. 4-14, Sony Centre for the Performing Arts A theatrical dance spectacular, The Merchants of Bollywood charts the enchanting history of the worlds largest and most prolific film industry, and a dynasty of stars that have lit its way over generations. The Merchants of Bollywood transcends time and is a touching tribute to the

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Bollywood greats of yesterday and the box-office hits of today. With a cast of 40 performers from the Film City of Mumbai, 3,800 lavish costumes and 2,000 pieces of jewellery worth in excess of one million dollars, The Merchants of Bollywood showcases all the glitz, glamour, song, dance and romance that define Bollywood". Inspired by the story of the Merchant family, prominent players in the Hindi film industry since the late 1920s, the production features choreography by multi-award winning Vaibhavi Merchant, granddaughter of Hiralal Merchant, one of the most influential choreographers in Bollywood history. The music is written and arranged by Salim and Sulaiman Merchant (known as Salim-Sulaiman in India) who wrote the music for the films Naach and Dhoom. http://www.sonycentre.ca/Events/Event-Detail.aspx? evtID=48

Who We Are CPPAMO ROUNDTABLE MEMBERS As a resource to plan and coordinate the Town Halls, CPPAMO has set-up a Roundtable comprised of individuals involved in the performing arts from ethno-racial and Aboriginal creation-based arts organizations and those involved in performing venues. The members of the Roundtable are: Anahita Azrahimi, Sparrow in the Room Farwah Gheewala, Education Coordinator, Soulpepper Theatre Denise Fujiwara, Canasian Dance Charmaine Headley, Collective of Black Artists Bakari Eddison Lindsay, Collective of Black Artists Lata Pada, Sampradaya Dance Creations Andrea Baker Helen Yung, Culture Days (national office), Canada Council for the Arts' Stand Firm network Wayne Dowler, Cultural Pluralism in the Arts/University of Toronto Scarborough University of Toronto Scarborough Campus Dan Brambilla, Chief Executive Officer Sony Centre for the Performing Arts Phillip Akin, Obsidian Theatre Mae Maracle, Centre for Indigenous Theatre Brainard Bryden-Taylor, Nathaniel Dett Chorale Emily Chung, Little Pear Garden Theatre Collective Spy Denome-Welch, Aboriginal Playwright Sedina Fiati, Obsidian Theatre Danielle Smith, urban ink productions and backforward collective Ravi Jain, why not theatre Shannon Thunderbird, Teya Peya Productions Santee Smith, Kahawi Dance Menaka Thakker, Menaka Thakkar Dance Company Kevin Ormsby, Kashedance

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Mark Hammond, Sony Centre for Performing Arts

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Contact Information

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charles c. smith Project Lead of CPPAMO Lecturer, Cultural Pluralism and the Arts/University of Toronto Scarborough charlescsmith@sympatico.ca Angela Britto Project Assistant cppamo@gmail.com Facebook: Search CPPAMO Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cppamo Word Press: http://cppamo.wordpress.com Mailing Address: 32 Costain Avenue Toronto, ON M4E 2G6 416-686-3039 cppamo@gmail.com Posting to the listserv is moderated and you may unsubscribe at any time.