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CPPAMO

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Welcome to the ninth Cultural Pluralism in the Performing Arts Movement Ontario (CPPAMO) newsletter. This is a regular digest that will introduce you to, and keep you updated on CPPAMO’s initiatives, and act as a portal to relevant research in the field of pluralism in the arts, innovative artists, and links to interesting talks about pluralism in the arts. The newsletter is intended to be your go-to resource for information on cultural pluralism in the arts. You have received this e-mail because you are a member of the CPPAMO listserv. Please let others who share our professional and artistic interests know about this listserv and encourage them to subscribe by sending an e-mail to cppamo@gmail.com. The listserv is moderated and is for sending out newsletters and CPPAMO updates. You may unsubscribe at any time.

For more information, you can look us up here: http://cppamo.wordpress.com Facebook: search “CPPAMO” Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cppamo
NEWSLETTER CONTENTS 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) What is CPPAMO? CPPAMO at CAPACOA Third Audience Building Workshop Upcoming Events Who We Are Contact Us

What is CPPAMO?
Cultural Pluralism in Performing Arts Movement Ontario (CPPAMO) is a movement of Aboriginal and ethno-racial artists working with presenters to empower the performing arts communities of Ontario. CPPAMO seeks to open opportunities for Aboriginal and ethno-racial performers to engage with presenters across Ontario and to enable presenters to develop constructive relationships with Aboriginal and ethno-racial performers. CPPAMO is supported by Aboriginal and ethno-racial artists who are involved in theatre, music, dance and literary arts. They are members of CPPAMO’s Roundtable and include representatives of Sampradaya Dance, Nathaniel Dett Chorale, Little Pear Garden Theatre Collective, Centre for Indigenous Theatre, Kaha:wi Dance, Sparrow in the Room, b-current, why not theatre, urban arts and backforward collective, Teyya Peya Productions, Culture Days,

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Canada Council Stand Firm members, Obsidian Theatre, the Collective of Black Artists, CanAsian Dance, Native Earth Performing Arts, Diasporic Dialogues and others. With the involvement of artists from these organizations, CPPAMO is working with Community Cultural Impresarios (CCI) and its members to build their capacities, cultural competencies and understanding of pluralism in performing arts so that CCI and its members engage performers from these communities and, thereby, enable audiences across Ontario to access artistic expressions from diverse communities on a regular basis. CPPAMO gratefully acknowledges the funding support it has received for its activities from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus and the Ontario Ministry of Culture

CPPAMO at CAPACOA
In collaboration with CAPACOA, on Sunday, November 7, CPPAMO presented a program on pluralism at the National Arts Centre. With a keynote address delivered by George Elliot Clarke and performances by the Collective of Black Artists, Ipsita Nova Dance and Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, the program gave evidence to the invaluable work of artists from diverse backgrounds. Following welcoming by Warren Garrett, Executive Director of Community Cultural Impresarios, and then greetings by charles c. smith, CPPAMO Project Lead, COBA performed a compelling duo to open the performances. Entitled “Djembefola”, and choreographed by BaKari Segun Lindsay, with performers BaKari Segun Lindsay, N’dere Ade Nimon Headley-Lindsay and music by Baba Toure and N’dere Ade Nimon Headley-Lindsay. As COBA states, “The Djembe is a Malinke instrument. It is presently one of the most popular drums in North America. To be a Djembefola is to embody the essence of this instrument. Not everyone who plays a Djembe is a Djembefola, because it requires love, passion, and spiritual connection.” Djembefola awakened the stage for George Elliot Clark’s keynote which opened doors to other visions of Canada, particularly African descent and Aboriginal. He examined the legacy of ‘race’ in performing arts, whether on stage or in communities, and how this plays out in the arts today. With poignant reference to current events, e.g., a Halloween contest win for costumes of a Klan member bringing along in a lynch knot a ‘Black-faced’ White man and the burning of a cross on the lawn of an inter-racial couple, Clark found moments to interject the salience of the story on ‘race’ as an integral part of the construction of Canada both in story and fact. Further, based on his own experiences with his operas, Clarke shared stories with what was at times a very intimate understanding of performing arts and the social values they both embed

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and construct, and how this is generally devoid of the experiences and voices of Aboriginal peoples and peoples of colour while, at the same time, often weighing in against the expression of these voices. In responding to a question from an audience member, Clarke closed his comments acknowledging that there has been some change on the stages across Canada but that there is so much further to go. This striking presentation received a very warm and memorable closing as, after taking a few questions, a number of Clarke’s poems were put to song by vocalist Pat Watson accompanied by pianist George Bird. Nova Bhattacharya, Ipsita Nova, then presented “A Calm Abiding”. At times epitomizing the enormity of silence and motionlessness, then calculated sculpture, and then again a frenzied pace balanced by diverse musical accompaniment, Nova’s performance demonstrated quite artfully a hybrid combination of classical bharatanatyam (South Asian classical) and contemporary dance that is clearly in the vanguard of choreographic expression in Canadian dance. This is why Nova has been acclaimed as one of Canada’s most captivating dance artists. She has trained with some of bharatanatyam’s most esteemed teachers including Menaka Thakkar, Kalanidhi Narayan and Kitappa Pillai. Her development in contemporary dance has been informed by her ongoing work with Peggy Baker, Sasha Ivanochko and Louis Laberge-Côté and in butoh by Yumiko Yoshioka and Denise Fujiwara. Described in The Globe & Mail as possessing a style that is "bold and disturbingly direct" Bhattacharya has a compelling and magnetic stage presence, with strong technique and thoughtful characterizations, always eager to explore the scope for innovation within the Bharatanatyam form and seeking to create works that utilize classical vocabulary in a contemporary aesthetic. Her choreography has been characterized as "a contemporary expression of the Bharatanatyam form … and more" (Vancouver Sun) and been commissioned by the Canada Dance Festival, Cahoots Theatre Projects, Dusk Dances, Theatre Direct Canada and Toronto Dance Theatre.Bhattacharya’s artistry is a reflection of her classical training and present- day aesthetic, her work is formally rigorous and displays an eloquence that goes beyond pure movement. Interspersed between the performances, there were two workshops focusing on the relationship between programming and audience development amongst Aboriginal and ethno-racial groups. One workshop was led by Sandra Laronde of Red Sky Performance and the other had copanelists Shahin Sayadi, Artistic Director of One Light Theatre in Halifax, and Jeanne Holmes of Dancemakers in Toronto. These speakers examined the things that work for them in connecting with diverse communities and the importance of programming that speaks to these

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communities, particularly the importance of inclusive representations of their stories and themselves as well as their integral involvement in the creation and control of these stories. Each speaker provided examples based on their experiences across the country in dance and theatre. Sandra Laronde had just come off a whirlwind tour with the Dora Award winning “Tono” which played to appreciating audiences in B.C., Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec, Ontario. She had many insights into the how the vibrancy of her work draws a range of communities as audience and the central position of her Aboriginal heritage within this work and its connection with Indigenous peoples around the world. After a quite honoured time working with dance at Harbourfront, Jeanne Holmes, now of Dancemakers, looked at the importance of being open to artistic expressions that come from diverse artists and putting them on centre stage. To her, this meant having familiarity in the differences in vocabulary of each expression, and its cultural symbols, and the coherence of these symbols in a framework of knowledge, meaning and beauty that comes from elsewhere and must be viewed within that context. The final speaker was Shahin Sayadi whose paper focused on the limited understanding of many theatre personnel, including artistic directors, critics and managers of performance venues, whose values and behaviours as articulated through what is presented on stages remain largely homogenous and, thereby, not open to the works of diverse artists. He challenged the notion that change is evident and spoke to the lack of performance venues run by Aboriginal artists and artists of colour, and that this absence results in these artists having to understand, negotiate and work with managers of venues who do not have a significant understanding of what these artists are offering to put on stage. The program ended with a performance by Kaha:wi Dance Theatre. The cycle of Life unfolds throughout Kaha:wi as a grandmother dies and a new baby is born. The narrative weaves around the lives of three generations of women and the community in which they thrive. Steeped in traditional Iroquoian based song and dance, the contemporary dance production is powerful and captivating. Kaha:wi touches audiences on an emotional, physical and spiritual level. Kaha:wi is powerful due to the cultural weight it demonstrates by being profoundly connected to the richness, integrity and beauty of the Iroquoian people. This performance of Kaha:wi was an excerpt from the longer original production featuring the main scenes of the story. Kaha:wi is a profound contemporary Aboriginal dance performance that bridges the gap between contemporary and traditional Iroquoian song and dance without losing the integrity of the cultural content and dance style. The choreography, music and design for Kaha:wi explores fundamental philosophies of Iroquoian culture such as honouring the cycle

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of Life, thanksgiving, sacredness of the natural world, rite ceremonies and duality. Choreographically, Kaha:wi draws inspiration from Iroquoian social dances such as the Gada:tro:t (Standing Quiver Dance or Stomp Dance), Ehsga:nye: gae:nase: (New Women’s Shuffle Dance), Gayowaga:yoh (Old Mocassin Dance) and the Wa enoti:yo (Stick Dance). Musically, Kaha:wi highlights traditional based songs such as the Dawn Song, Gada:tro:t, naming songs and Ato:wi:se (Women’s Chant or Moon Songs). A report on the Town Hall and workshops will be available in January 2011. If you would like a copy, please contact us. ____________________________________________________________________________

Audience Building Workshop
Following its workshops at CAPACOA, on November 23, 2010 CPPAMO held its third Audience Building Workshop which focused on building partnerships with Aboriginal artists and arts organizations and developing ethno-racial and Aboriginal artists and audiences. Attended by representatives from over 30 organizations, the morning started with an Elder, Grandmother Jacquie Lavelley, opening the workshop. She was greeted with tobacco by CPPAMO Project Lead, charles c. smith, and shared with the participants the wisdom of her peoples and a blessing for the day’s proceedings. Following the Elder, the first panel speaker was Sara Roque, Aboriginal Officer of the Ontario Arts Council, who discussed the history of colonization and important developments in the history of Aboriginal artists. Amongst several historical and contemporary references, she emphasized the important work of Daphne Odjig, and others like her (e.g., Thomson Highway, Alannis Obansawin) whose practice was both advocacy for art created by Aboriginal people and resistance to colonization. Odjig’s efforts paved the road for contemporary Aboriginal artists and Roque emphasized the importance of involving Aboriginal artists from the start, and not as add-ons, to truly integrate Aboriginal culture in programming. The second panel speaker was Melanie Fernandez from the Harbourfront Cultural Centre who made a presentation about Planet IndigenUS, a multi-disciplinary arts festival coordinated through a partnership between Harbourfront and the Woodlands Cultural Centre located on Six Nations. Planet IndigenUS started in 2004 and has grown extensively since then. The festival challenges stereotypes about Indigenous peoples and involves a wide-range of programming, including Ask Me which is a new program that provides opportunities for visitors to ask any question about the cultures of Aboriginal peoples and, in doing so, receiving an education about Indigenous cultures. 5

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The third panel speaker was Jennifer Green, International Director, of Soundstreams. She discussed the need to really listen to each other when working on cross-cultural collaboration and mentioned the example of touring workshops, where performers work for several days in each community and, doing this, establish long lasting relationships and collaborations. According to Green, CPPAMO’s role is to bring people together and to provide information and tools needed to create long lasting and meaningful collaboration. Andrea Fatona, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Ottawa Art Gallery, indicated that the Gallery has been committed to present Aboriginal art for the past seven years through development of long term relationships and that successful collaboration necessitates a long term relationship. She felt that this was particularly important since the OAG is a municipal gallery as well as a national/international gallery. As part of this collaborative effort, the OAG produces catalogues and strives to develop discourse around Aboriginality in relation to Canadian visual discourse. All of the OAG’s exhibition programs are accompanied by educational programming. All exhibition programs accompanied by educational programming. Exhibition-connection – multimedia online site enabling high school teachers and students to explore the sites from the classroom. For example, in 2007 the showing of Oh So Iroquois presented contemporary Iroquois art with a catalogue produced in French, English and Iroquois. This was the OAG’s first time producing in an Aboriginal language. Following this, Burning Cold (2009) brought together both aboriginal and non-aboriginal artists to discuss stereotypes both sides have of each other. In 2009 the Gallery showed Rosalie Favell Works (2009) and Decolonize Me in the Fall of 2011. The OAG is now developing new strategies with public programming in terms of First Nations photography – its history and ways of interrupting that history. In the afternoon session, Professor Nadia Caidi from the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto, made a presentation on information gathering practices of immigrant, ethno-racial and Aboriginal communities. She pointed out that there is limited research available about how immigrants and ethno-racial communities accesses information about arts and culture because most of the data is about employment, education and social and health services. An important trend in information gathering was the reliance on social networks, such as family and friends, and the different ways immigrants search for different information. For example: recreational information is obtained from the community while employment information is obtained both through social networks and newspapers. This workshop provided an inside view on the issues concerning both cultural organizations and immigrant, ethno-racial and Aboriginal communities. Participants appreciated the learning opportunity and expressed hope for a new generation that will build and develop ways to produce and present art from Aboriginal and ethno-racial communities.

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Following the protocols explained by the Elder during the morning opening ceremony, the workshop ended with everyone holding hands and thanking each other for their presence and contributions. ____________________________________________________________________________

UPCOMING EVENTS Save the Date! Please join us on January 19th for this special event… Neighbourhood Arts Network, Creative Mosaics and Access Alliance
Given the increasing diversity of our population, the need for arts and culture programming for children and youth that facilitates intercultural dialogue is clearer than ever! On January 19th a networking session hosted by Creative Mosaics, the Neighbourhood Arts Network and Access Alliance will bring together community and arts organizations to share their thoughts and practices on culturally diverse arts programming. Cian Knights of Creative Mosaics will be discussing key findings from Creative Mosaics: Mentoring in Community Arts and Culture – Needs and Capacity Assessment, Letecia Rose of Harmony Movement will be speaking on the topic of Arts as an Equitable Practice, and DiverseCity Fellow Colin Lacey will share details of the brand new GTArtist Award for community-engaged artists. Join us for a fabulous evening with tasty treats! This free event is taking place from 5:30pm–8:00pm on Wednesday, January 19th at AccessPoint on the Danforth. AccessPoint is located at 3079 Danforth, on the southeast corner of Victoria Park and Danforth. We look forward to seeing you there! Space is limited; please RSVP before January 7th 2011 by contacting skye@torontoarts.org or calling 416.392.6802 x212. ____________________________________________________________________________

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CPPAMO AUDIENCE BUILDING WORKSHOPS – January 28, 2011
As a follow-up to the three previously challenging, inspiring and successful workshops held at Hart House in June, as part of CAPACOA’s CPPAMO session and at the Centre for Social Innovation in November, CPPAMO is planning its next workshop to take place at Markham Theatre at the end of January 2011. This full day session will build on the previous ones and provide an opportunity for presenters and performers to discuss common issues and concerns related to staging performances by Aboriginal and ethno-racial artists. This workshop will involve presentations by: • Ken Coulter (Oakville Theatre), Eric Lariviere (Markham Theatre), Cheryl Ewing (Ontario Contact) and Costin Manu (Rose Theatre) who will discuss what presenters need to do to set up a season's schedule, the criteria and methods they use to select performances and how performers can build a relationship with presenters; to complement this, a number of performers will make presentations on how their companies create their work, the influences (traditional, modern, contemporary) on their work and how it fits into Canadian culture today. Some of these artists include: Sandra Laronde (Red Sky Performance), Lata Pada (Sampradaya Dance Creations), Brainard Blyden-Taylor (Nathaniel Dette Chorale) and Julia Chan (Diasporic Dialogues).

Registration information and a full agenda will be released in early January.

CULTURAL PLURALISM IN THE ARTS (CPA) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS (UTSC)
Following the September 2010 release of Anti-Racism in Education: Missing in Action, edited by charles c. smith and published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative, a speaking engagement with TIFF Artistic Director Cameron Bailey in October and drama and performance workshops with local theatres in November coordinated by Trisha Lamie, the CPA project will be hosting the following events in the winter of 2011. City of Words literary readings series coordinated by Karina Vernon and focusing on pluralism in contemporary Canadian literature; A seminar on audience studies by Cheryl Ewing and Anahita Azrahimi for CCI and CPPAMO and by members of the Scarborough Arts Council’s Creative Mosaics project and Neighbourhood Arts Network; and 8

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wind in the leaves collective interdisciplinary approaches to pluralism in performance with dancers, musicians and visual artists and led by charles c. smith based on his poetry.

More details on each of these are provided below.

City of Words: Reading Scarborough Writing
This reading series is focused around two key questions. How have Scarborough’s unique cultural terrains—at once highly cosmopolitan and yet suburban—helped shape the identities of those who have migrated there? And how has Scarborough shaped its writers and their cultural production? This event, scheduled for the Spring semester of 2011, proposes to bring novelist David Chariandy to read at UTSC. Although currently based in Vancouver, Chariandy grew up in Scarborough, and his novel Soucouyant (2007) is set against the backdrop of the Scarborough bluffs. Nominated for the prestigious Giller Prize as well as the Governor General’s award, it is a significant novel about migrancy, race, family, and the crisis of historical memory that, the novel argues, Scarborough seems to produce. Although an eminently local novelist, Chariandy has yet to read from Soucouyant in Scarborough. This event would bring Chariandy back to his hometown, and to UTSC for the first time. The reading would provide UTSC students an opportunity to connect with an important Canadian writer whose work inscribes the complexities of their own historical and cultural moment. This alternatively-imagined reading series proposes to address the key question about the interrelationship of Scarborough’s cultural geographies, diasporic identity, and writing, by bringing several up-and-coming Scarborough writers to UTSC rather than one “big name” author. Although not yet finalized, the list of possible readers include:  Short-story writer and poet Sabrina Ramnanan; she was born in Toronto to Trinidadian parents and currently lives and works in Scarborough. Her work has appeared in Tok: Diasporic Dialogues (2009) and in the journal Cerulian Rain.  Spoken-word artist and activist poet Sheniz Janmohammed; she was raised in Scarborough and is currently based in Toronto. Her work speaks out against injustices, violence, and such issues as fundamentalism. More information to follow!

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Seminar on Values and Benefits Study And Scarborough Arts Council Creative Mosaics Project – March 2011
CCI has undertaken a three-year study to gather evidence of the impact that participation in the arts has on peoples’ lives and in their communities. Specifically the project reveals the personal benefits that people derive from their participation, and link these values to social [instrumental] public values. It is anticipated that the discoveries of this study will lead to a clearer picture of the personal benefits and public value that the arts have in our province. The project is directed by a Steering Committee consisting of representatives from six communities lead by Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts. In the first year, focus was on development and testing of the information gathering tools. In the second year, efforts expanded to include rolling out of the project to a secondary market. This market included rental clients of the Lead Partners as well as additional communities interested in participating. Simultaneously, an electronic tool was developed with the assistance of TixHub. The University of Waterloo Survey Research Centre has analyzed the raw data and assisted in the development of surveys. The audience members participating in the project attended the performing arts and provide an understanding of the benefits from their viewpoint. This gives us an understanding of the language to be used to entice those inclined but not yet participating. It is understood by all involved that there is a lot more work to be done in the area of understanding those who are not attending. The list of participants in this study include: • • • • • • Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts, Oakville Centre for the Arts, Brock University, St. Catharines Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts, Parry Sound Markham Centre for the Performing Arts, Markham Showplace Performance Centre, Peterborough Alliance for a Grand Community, Waterloo Region: Cambridge Library & Gallery, Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery, Centre In The Square, Grand Philharmonic Choir, KW Art Gallery, KW Symphony, Theatre & Co., and Waterloo Regional Arts Council

A pilot study is now underway with CPPAMO of ethno-racial and Aboriginal audiences.

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Creative Mosaics is a new collaborative project involving seven organizations, has set out to identify and respond to the needs of newcomers and culturally-diverse communities with the goal of developing an intergenerational, youth-focused arts program. Scarborough contains some of the most diverse neighbourhoods in Canada, yet it remains under-served in providing arts and cultural programs, services and opportunities to newcomers, youth and culturallydiverse communities. Creative Mosaics is engaged in a comprehensive community needs and capacity building assessment in order to develop a proposal for an arts program that integrates after-school, mentorship and intergenerational components, providing learning opportunities in the arts and an exploration of diverse cultural identities. The Creative Mosaics collaborative includes Scarborough Arts Council, Catholic Cross-Cultural Services, Children’s Aid Society of Toronto, Kapisanan Philippine Centre for Arts and Culture, Arising Women, Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) and Philippine Advocacy Through Arts and Culture. Creative Mosaics will include engagement with youth, mentors, artists and cultural leaders, organization of community discussions and focus groups, distribution and collection of surveys, outreach, exploration and development of arts program models and writing of the final report.

wind in the leaves – a journeying: improvising bodies, words and music
This will be both interdisciplinary performance and workshop based on improvised music (as recorded) which is currently in development and explores the influence of improvised music on the creation of interdisciplinary art. Based on the poetry of CPPAMO Project lead, charles c. smith, the poems have been arranged with the music of various composers/performers, e.g., Ornette Colemen, Roscoe Mitchell, William Parker and Peter Kowold, Wadada Leo Smith and the trio of Anthony Braxton, Milford Graves and William Parker. The poems are set to the music as is dance, photography, stills and moving image in collaborative performance pieces. Working with charles for these performance pieces are: Robin Styba, Deanna Bowen, and Anahita Azrahimi, photograpy, moving image and video; and choreographers/dancers Olga Barrios of Olga Barrios Contemporary Dance and Kevin Omsby of Kashedance; and guitarist Harvey Weisfeld. wind in the leaves – a journeying provides several ways to both present and engage the artists involved so that the performance pieces reveal various insights into the themes of the poetry as accompanied by the music. This performance presents the inter-disciplinary approach of this project, and how it engages at several intersections, visceral, sensual, emotional, intellectual and spiritual as a multi-textured illustration of the various phases of the presence of persons of African descent in Canada, e.g., enslavement and narratives about 11

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racialization in Canada that are woefully absent in public discourse as well as in Canadian history and forms of cultural expression. The performance pieces capture experiences of the first slave in Canada, the burning down of Montreal by another slave, the influence of freedom fighters who came to Canada with the Underground Railroad, Viola Desmond’s legal challenge to racial segregation in Nova Scotia, police shootings of Black youth, racial profiling, the Black body in a global context and other related stories and events. ___________________________________________________________________________

WHO WE ARE
CPPAMO ROUNDTABLE MEMBERS As a resource to plan and coordinate the Town Halls and workshops, CPPAMO has set-up a Roundtable comprised of individuals involved in the performing arts from ethno-racial and Aboriginal creation-based arts organizations and those involved in performing venues. The members of the Roundtable are:                    Anahita Azrahimi, Sparrow in the Room Farwah Gheewala, Education Coordinator, Soulpepper Theatre Denise Fujiwara, Canasian Dance Charmaine Headley, Collective of Black Artists Bakari Eddison Lindsay, Collective of Black Artists Lata Pada, Sampradaya Dance Creations Andrea Baker, arts administrator and fund raiser Helen Yung, Culture Days (national office), Canada Council for the Arts' Stand Firm network Wayne Dowler, Cultural Pluralism in the Arts/University of Toronto Scarborough University of Toronto Scarborough Campus Dan Brambilla, Chief Executive Officer Sony Centre for the Performing Arts Phillip Akin, Obsidian Theatre Mae Maracle, Centre for Indigenous Theatre Brainard Bryden-Taylor, Nathaniel Dett Chorale Emily Chung, Little Pear Garden Theatre Collective Spy Denome-Welch, Aboriginal Playwright Sedina Fiati, performance artist Danielle Smith, urban ink productions and backforward collective Ravi Jain, why not theatre Shannon Thunderbird, Teya Peya Productions

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       Santee Smith, Kaha’wi Dance Menaka Thakker, Menaka Thakkar Dance Company Kevin Ormsby, Kashedance Mark Hammond, Sony Centre for Performing Arts Yvette Nolan, Native Earth Performing Arts Vivine Scarlett, danceImmersion Julia Chan, Diasporic Dialogues

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Contact Information charles c. smith Project Lead of CPPAMO Lecturer, Cultural Pluralism and the Arts/University of Toronto Scarborough charlescsmith@sympatico.ca Victoria Glizer Project Assistant cppamo@gmail.com Facebook: Search “CPPAMO” Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cppamo Word Press: http://cppamo.wordpress.com Mailing Address: 32 Costain Avenue Toronto, ON M4E 2G6 416-686-3039 cppamo@gmail.com Posting to the listserv is moderated and you may unsubscribe at any time.

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