Maritime Knowledge Centre

INFORMATION RESOURCES ON

MARITIME SECURITY AND ISPS CODE
(Last update: 30 April 2013)
Important notice This information resources document is offered by the Maritime Knowledge Centre specifically to assist those who are conducting research in the area of the “International Maritime Security and ISPS Code ”. All users of this document should be aware that the information presented in this document has been compiled from a limited variety of sources, which cannot be guaranteed to reflect the most-up-to-date examination or complete survey of the subject concerned or of the associated issues and possible points of view. You may wish to refer to the Internet major search engines for further research. Furthermore, some of this information is subject to copyright protection and restriction as to distribution or re-circulation. Additionally, while every reasonable effort has been made to focus only on (publicly available) information which is valid and helpful, neither the IMO nor its Maritime Knowledge Centre can accept responsibility for information which is out-of-date, incomplete, biased or otherwise inaccurate, misleading or offensive; and the mention of a reference, item of information, publication, product or service in this document should not be viewed as constituting a validation or endorsement by IMO as to its quality, content, or value. Finally, users who have questions regarding the interpretation and/or implementation of IMO instruments should direct such questions to their National Maritime Administration. The Maritime Knowledge Centre is not in a position to provide copies of any material for copyright reasons but will gladly answer your queries on where to obtain it.

See also: Information Resources on : “Piracy and armed robbery at sea”

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
IMO MATERIAL ON THE WEBSITE ............................................................................................................. 3 IMO DOCUMENTS ........................................................................................................................................... 5 RESOLUTIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 5 CIRCULARS .................................................................................................................................................. 7 CIRCULAR LETTERS ................................................................................................................................ 12 ASSEMBLY ................................................................................................................................................. 12 COUNCIL..................................................................................................................................................... 13 SUB-COMMITTEE ON RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS AND SEARCH AND RESCUE ....................... 15 FACILITATION COMMITTEE .................................................................................................................. 15 SUB-COMMITTEE ON FLAG STATE IMPLEMENTATION ................................................................. 17 INTERSESSIONAL MSC WORKING GROUP ON LONG-RANGE IDENTIFICATION AND TRACKING 17 LEGAL COMMITTEE ................................................................................................................................ 17 1988 SUA CONVENTION AND PROTOCOL .......................................................................................... 18 2005 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE REVISION OF THE SUA TREATIES (10 October 2005) 19 MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE ......................................................................................................... 22 SOLAS CONFERENCE – Diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security (9 – 13 December 2002) .......... 27 SUB-COMMITTEE ON STANDARDS OF TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING ................................. 30 IMO PUBLICATIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 31 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS.................................................................................................................... 33 EUROPEAN UNION ....................................................................................................................................... 42 UNITED NATIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 44 OTHER PUBLICATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 49 VIDEOS ............................................................................................................................................................ 72 USEFUL ADDRESSES ................................................................................................................................... 72 INTERNET RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................... 75 ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS ..................................................................................................................... 77

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IMO MATERIAL ON THE WEBSITE
SeaLibrary Online. MKC Catalogue online Current Awareness Bulletin. This bulletin contains titles and abstracts of articles published in the legal and technical press and is published monthly Maritime Security IMO Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) ISPS Code 2005 Protocol to the SUA Convention IMO/IMO Code of practice on security in ports IMO Global programmes on maritime security Long Range Identification and Tracking IMO adopts guidelines on the use of privately contracted and armed security personnel onboard ships (PCASP) Port and coastal State requirements for Private Armed Guards

IMO News Magazine
For a list of articles in the IMO News Magazines on this subject up to 2007 click here for previous edition.
LRIT – SOLAS amendment enters into force. IMO News Magazine, Issue 1/2008, p. 12 Maritime security. IMO News Magazine, Issue 1/2008, Special Report IMO 60, p.IX Guidance for private maritime security companies agreed by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee . IMO News Magazine, Issue 3/2012, p. 7 Tanzania maritime security surveillance system completed. IMO News Magazine, Issue 4/2012, p. 30

Press Briefings
For Briefings up to December 2007 click here for previous edition.
Enhanced focus on maritime security in IMO Secretariat. IMO announces new appointments. Briefing 03/2007. 8 January 2007. 18 States sign 2005 SUA Protocols. 18 States have signed, subject to ratification, the 2005 SUA Protocols . Briefing 06/2007, 13 February 2007 Milestone agreement reached on co-operation over the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. Beneficiary States and shipping industry pledge support for breakthrough initiative. Briefing 29/2007, 17 September 2007.

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Guidance for private maritime security companies to be developed by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee . 30 April 2010 Supply-chain security on the agenda as Mitropoulos meets top US official. 18 September 2012. over the first day and a half of the Committee’s session (See Briefing 16/2012). 2 October 2007.key decisions made at IMO's Maritime Safety Committee. 16 September 2011. . Briefing 16/2012. A ceremony attended by senior US and Japanese diplomats. Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). Briefing 53/2007.Implementation of LRIT high on agenda at IMO's Maritime Safety Committee. Briefing 42/2007. Briefing 39/2008. The MSC is meeting for its 90th session at IMO Headquarters from 16 to 25 May. Greece supports projects to enhance safety. 22 October 2007. 20 November 2007. A special high-level segment of the MSC saw an intense debate. Briefing 36/2007. Tanzanian Government officials and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the IMO for Maritime Security and Anti-Piracy Programmes. Implementation of LRIT . Intersessional meeting of the Maritime Security and Piracy Working Group of the Maritime Safety Committee. Briefing 02/2011. Greece announces US$1m donation to Straits’ fund. security and environmental protection of vital shipping route through Straits of Malacca and Singapore. 20 December 2007. with some 900 delegates registered from IMO member States and observers from international and non-governmental organizations. Maritime security set for boost with entry into force of 2005 Protocols on suppression of unlawful acts in July 2010. West and Central African states to co-operate in sub-regional Coastguard network. Briefing 47/2011. Tanzania on 17 September 2012 marked the completion of the installation of an integrated radar and automatic identification system (AIS) coastal surveillance system in Tanzania. 90th session. MoU signed by 20 MOWCA States to improve maritime safety. Briefing 33/2007. Briefing 17/2012. MSC 83 meets in Copenhagen.SOLAS amendment enters into force on 1 January 2008 New regulations to take effect at beginning of the year. Interim guidance to private maritime security companies (PMSCs) was agreed by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). on how the international community should deal with issues related to the deployment of privately contracted armed security personnel (PCASP) on board ships and the carriage of arms on board. 13-15 September 2011. Briefing 20/2010. Interim data exchange facility brings long-range ship tracking closer. 28 January 2011 IMO approves further interim guidance on privately contracted armed security personnel. Mr Hartmut Hesse. Long-range identification and tracking of ships . A special high-level segment of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). 16 to 25 May 2012 . Briefing 37/2012. 18 May 2012 Guidance for private maritime security companies agreed by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee. security and environmental protection in the sub-region. with LRIT high on agenda. convened by IMO Secretary-General Koji Sekimizu to discuss policy matters related to arms on board ships in the piracy high risk area. in Dar es Salaam. has requested a working group of the MSC to develop interim guidance for private maritime security companies (PMSCs). when it met at the Organization's London Headquarters for its 90th session from 16 to 25 May 2012. 4 . 12 August 2008. 25 May 2012 Tanzania maritime security surveillance system handed over to the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania.

H. some documents are also available in Arabic. Institute for International Research (IIR) (USA). Containerised cargo security .Papers and Articles by IMO Staff Work undertaken by the International Maritime Organization in an effort to prevent and combat terrorism. IMO maritime security policy : Background paper. 2002 ????? IMO DOCUMENTS NOTE: Except for current meetings' documents and working papers. International Union of Marine Insurance (IUMU). pp 123-138 IMO activities to enhance maritime security by HESSE. New security measures for the international shipping community. Paper delivered in Melbourne. World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI) PS. Presentaion by Hartmut Hesse delivered in Melbourne. Paper presented at the 3rd Intermodal Africa 2005 Tanzania Exhibition and Conference. International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA). Chinese and Russian.2) . Abbreviations: Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO). International Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH). Charalambous. April 2007.case for “joined-up” government. 3-4 February 2005. International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO). World Customs Organisation (WCO). Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA). May 2007. International Association of Classification Societies ( IACS).738 (18) 04/11/1993 Measures to prevent and suppress piracy and armed robbery against ships Measures to prevent unlawful acts which threaten the safety of ships and the safety of their passengers and crew Prevention and suppression of acts of piracy and armed robbery against ships Measures to prevent and suppress piracy and armed robbery against ships 5 . By Hartmut Hesse and N. Comité Maritime International (CMI). 1012 June 2002. By Chris Trelawny. International Harbour Masters Association (IHMA). International Council of Cruise Lines (ICCL).. International Association Of Dry Cargo Shipowners (INTERCARGO). International Federation of Shipmasters’ Association (IFSMA). 683 (17) 06/11/1991 A. October 2004 (Vol. Maritime security : Implementation of the ISPS Code. all IMO Documents issued since 1998 are available in the IMODOCS database in English. By Hartmut Hesse. International Organization for Standardization ( ISO). 584(14) 20/11/1985 A. International Group of P & I Clubs (P & I CLUBS). By Chris Trelawny. International Association of Oil and Gas Producers ( OGP). No. New York.Documents prior to1998 can be obtained on an ad hoc basis provided that they exist in electronic form. International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). Comité International Radio Maritime (CIRM). International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU).International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO). Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators ( SIGTTO). International Association of Drilling Contractors ( IADC). By Chris Trelawny. International Chamber of Shipping (ICS).WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs. Working Papers are not listed below RESOLUTIONS A. French and Spanish. International Labour Office (ILO). 3 Years on : What are the global issues in maritime security. Paper delivered at the IMAREST World Maritime Technology Conference held in London on 6 – 10 March 2006. Oil Companies International Maritime Forum (OCIMF). In: Seaport Security Conference. 2 June 2006.545 (XIII) 17/11/1983 A. New Jersey. Dar Es Salaam. International Shipping Federation (ISF).3.G. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). International Parcel Tanker Association (IPTA).

159(78) 21/05/2004 MSC.275(85) 05/12/2008 MSC.196(80) 20/05/2005 MSC. as amended Adoption of amendments to the ISPS Code Adoption of amendments to the format and guidelines for the CSR Adoption of amendments to the STCW Code 1978. 1974.924(22) 22/01/2002 A.147(77) 29/05/2003 MSC.198(80) 20/05/2005 MSC. as amended??? Performance standards and functional requirements for the long-range identification and tracking of ships Arrangements for the timely establishment of the long-range identification and tracking Appointment of the LRIT Coordinator) Operation of the international LRIT data exchange n an interim basis Establishment of a distribution facility for the provision of LRIT information to security forces operating in waters of the Gulf of Aden and the Western Indian Ocean to aid their work in repression of piracy and armed robbery against ships (The Distribution Facility) 6 . as amended Adoption of amendments to the STCW Code 1978.203(81) 18/05/2006 MSC.955(23) 26/02/2004 A. 298(87) – 21/05/2010 Review of measures and procedures to prevent acts of terrorism which threaten the security of passengers and crews and the safety of ships Amendments to the Principles on safe Manning (Resolution A.A.(81) system 19/05/2006 MSC.890(21)) Amendments to the guidelines for the onboard operational use of shipborne automatic identification systems (AIS) Res.276(85) 05/12/2008 MSC.917(22) Format and guidelines for the maintenance of the Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR) Performance standards for a ship security alert system Adoption of the revised performance standards for a ship security alert system Interim guidance on control and compliance measures to enhance maritime security Adoption of the IMO unique company and registered owner identification number scheme Adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.209(81) 18/05/2006 MSC.959(23) 05/12/2003 MSC 136(76) 11/12/2002 MSC. 160(78) 20/05/2004 MSC.956(23) 26/02/2004 A.194(80) 20/05/2005 MSC.210(81) 19/05/2006 MSC 211.

1110 07/06/2004 MSC/Circ.1130 14/12/2004 MSC/Circ.1131 14/12/2004 Matters related to Solas Regulations XI/2/6 and XI-2/7 Guidance relating to the implementation of Solas Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code Shore leave and access to ships under the ISPS Code Guidance to port state control officers on the non-security related elements of the 2002 Solas Amendments Guidance to masters.443 26/09/1986 MSC/Circ. companies and duly authorized officers on the requirements relating to the submission of security-related information prior to the entry of a ship into port Interim guidelines on voluntary self-assessment by Solas contracting governments and by port facilities 7 .1073 10/06/2003 MSC/Circ.1072 26/06/2003 MSC/Circ. 1109/Rev.1112 07/06/2004 MSC/Circ.754 05/07/1996 MSC/Circ.1097 06/06/2003 MSC/Circ. Directives for Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centers (MRCCS) on acts of violence against ships Measures to enhance maritime security interim guidelines for the authorization of recognized security organizations acting on behalf of the administration and/or designated authority of a Contracting government Guidance relating to the implementation of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code Implementation of Solas Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code MSC/Circ.1074 10/06/2003 Measures to prevent unlawful acts against passengers and crews on board ships Passenger ferry security Early implementation of the special measures to enhance maritime security Guidance on provision of ship security alert systems Measures to enhance maritime security.1067 28/02/2003 MSC/Circ.1113 07/06/2004 MSC/Circ.1104 15/01/2004 MSC/Circ.1 False security alerts and distress/security double alerts 14/12/2004 MSC/Circ.CIRCULARS IMO Documents online click here MSC/Circ.1111 07/06/2004 MSC/Circ.1109 07/06/2004 Implementation of Solas Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code to port facilities False security alerts and distress/security double alerts MSC/Circ.1106 29/03/2004 MSC/Circ.

1294/Rev.1217 14/12/2006 MSC. 1188 22/05/2006 MSC.1154 23/05/2005 MSC/Circ.1/Circ.1259/Rev.MSC/Circ.1155 23/05/2005 MSC/Circ.425 20/12/2004 MSC/Circ.1/Circ.1/Circ.4 Long-range identification and tracking system.1/Circ.1/Circ.1/Circ. Technical documentation (Part II) 15/02/2011 MSC. Technical documentation (Part I) 15/02/2011 MSC. manuals and other documents with the IMO ship identification number Guidelines on training and certification for company security officers Guidance on the message priority and the testing of Ship Security Alert Systems Guidance on the access of public authorities.1190 security 30/05/2006 MSC.2 Long-range identification and tracking system. emergency response services and pilots on board ships to which SOLAS XI-2 and the ISPS Code apply Interim Scheme for the compliance of certain cargo ships with the special measures to enhance Maritime Security Guidelines on training and certification for port facility security officers Interim scheme for the compliance of special purpose ships with the special measures to enhance maritime security Guidance on the provision of information for identifying ships when transmitting ship Alerts Guidance on voluntary self-assessment by Solas contracting governments and by port facilities Guidance on voluntary self-assessment by Administrations and for ship security Interim guidance on voluntary self-assessment by Companies and company security officers (CSOs) for ship security Interim LRIT Technical specifications and other matters Guidelines on security-related training and familiarization for shipboard personnel MSC.1/Circ.1/Circ.1/Circ.1189 30/05/2006 MSC.1/Circ.1297 08/12/2008 Guidance to search and rescue services in relation to requesting and receiving LRIT information 8 .1192 30/05/2006 MSC.1235 21/10/2007 Guidance relating to the implementation of Solas Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code Reminder of the obligation to notify flag states when exercising control and compliance measures Marking the ship’s plans.1156 23/05/2005 MSC/Circ.1193 30/05/2006 MSC.1133 14/12/2004 MSC/Circ.1/Circ.1157 23/05/2005 MSC.1142 MEPC/Circ.1219 15/12/2006 MSC.1132 14/12/2004 MSC/Circ.

1405 23/05/2011 MSC.1/Circ.1341 27/05/2010 MSC. companies and duly authorized officers on the requirements relating to the submission of security-related information prior to the entry of a ship into port Guidelines on security-related training and familiarization for port facility personnel Interim guidance to shipowners.1/Circ.2Revised interim recommendations for flag states regarding the use of privately 25/05/2012 contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC.1/Circ.71 27/05/2008 SUA. and shipmasters on the 25/05/2012 use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC. ship operators.1Revised interim recommendations for flag states regarding the use of privately 16/09/2011 contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC.1/Circ.1/Circ.1/Circ.1408 16/09/2011 Interim recommendations for port and coastal states regarding the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC.1443 25/05/2012 Interim guidance to private maritime security companies providing privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC-FAL.1305 09/06/2009 Transitional arrangements and measures for accelerating the completion of the establishment of the LRIT system Revised guidance to masters.1406/Rev. Accession by Belgium Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.1299 08/12/2008 MSC. 1988.1/Circ.1/Circ.1405/Rev.1/Circ.1/Circ.227 06/01/2003 SUA.1/Circ.1 21/10/2007 MSC-FAL. Accession by the Dominican Republic 9 . ship operators.1/Circ.1406 23/05/2011 Interim recommendations for Flag States regarding the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC. 1988.1/Circ.2Revised interim guidance to shipowners.72 09/7/2008 Securing and facilitating international trade Questionnaire information on port and coastal state requirements related to privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships Guidelines for the installation of a shipborne Automatic Identification System (AIS) Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety maritime navigation.2 22/09/2011 SN/Circ.MSC.62 14/04/2005 SUA. Accession by Fiji Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation 1988.1408/Rev.1/Circ.1/Circ.1406/Rev.1Interim recommendations for port and coastal states regarding the use of privately 25/05/2012 contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area MSC. and ship masters on the use of privately contracted armed security personnel (PCASP) on board ships in the high risk area MSC.1/Circ.

71 09/11/2009 SUA.1/Circ. of maritime navigation.78 09/11/2009 SUA.83 26/03/2012 SUA.2/Circ. Accession by Guinea-Bissau Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Accession by Switzerland Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.2/Circ. Accession by Guatemala Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation.76 26/03/2012 SUA. Accession by Latvia 10 .1/Circ. 26/06/2009 SUA.1/Circ.69 01/09/2009 SUA.2/Circ. Jamaica. Accession by Guatemala Idem. Accession by Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Accession by the Islamic Republic of Iran Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation.3/Circ. United Arab Emirates. Saint Eustatius and Saba Idem. Extension by the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Bonaire. Kiribati and Mongolia.3/Circ. Accession by Cotê d’Ivoire Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Ratification by Brazil Idem.7 16/10/2008 SUA.3/Circ.76 01/09/2009 SUA. Ratification by Israel Idem. Moldova.74 09/01/2009 SUA.6 08/09/2008 SUA. Namibia.5 27/05/2008 SUA.75 Navigation. 1988.73 20/11/2008 SUA. Ratification by Spain Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety. Accession by Fiji SUA. Bahrain. Tajikistan. Accession by Nauru.60 25/01/2008 Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation.3/Circ.74 11/05/2011 SUA.SUA.66 08/01/2009 SUA.9 08/12//2009 Idem.1/Circ.64 27/05/2008 SUA. Accession by Fiji Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation .2/Circ.2/Circ. Bahamas. Accession by Cotê d’Ivoire Protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.1/Circ.2 23/04/2008 SUA. Croatia.1/Circ.3/Circ. Ratification by Israel Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Accession by the Government of Niue Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.2/Circ. Accession by Vanuatu Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.2/Circ.

Accession by the Dominican Republic Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.4/Circ.3/Circ. Ratification by Austria Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Accession by Austria Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.3/Circ. Accession by Panama Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.12 07/07/2010 11 .4/Circ.10 04/05/2010 SUA.11 24/06/2010 SUA. Accession by Cotê d’Ivoire Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.4/Circ.4/Circ.3/Circ. Accession by the Dominica Republic Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.4/Circ.4/Circ.3/Circ.8 08/12/2009 SUA.17 26/01/2011 SUA. Entry into force Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Ratification by Spain Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Accession of Fiji Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.3/Circ.3/Circ.3/Circ.19 28/03/2011 Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.15 22/07/2010 SUA.14 26/01/2011 SUA.9 10/03/2010 SUA. Accession by Algeria.4 28/05/2008 SUA. Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.10 10/03/2010 SUA.4/Circ.11 04/05/2010 SUA.3/Circ. (SUA PROT 2005).13 07/07/2010 SUA. Accession of Latvia Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Accession by Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the Continental shelf.SUA.3/Circ.1 23/04/2008 SUA. Acceptance for the European part of the Netherlands and the Caribbean part of the Netherlands by the Kingdom of the Netherlands Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Accession by Algeria Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Entry into force.18 28/02/2011 SUA. Acession by Saint Vincent and the Grenadines SUA.21 26/03/2012 SUA. Ratification by Turkey Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.3/Circ. 16 12/10/2010 SUA.3/Circ.12 24/06/2010 SUA. Ratification by Bulgaria Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.

1 on communication of a single national contact point Kuala Lumpur Meeting on the Straits of Malacca and Singapore: Enhancing safety.18 26/03/2012 CIRCULAR LETTERS No. 9-11 July 2003) Amendment to Solas chapter XI-2 Special measures to enhance maritime security Information required from SOLAS contracting governments under the provisions of SOLAS regulation XI-2/13 Information required from Solas contracting governments under the provisions of Solas ` regulation XI-2/13. A Seminar organized by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (Annex 2 – The Sasakawa Peace Foundation No. Switzerland.4/Circ.600(15) – IMO ship identification number scheme Implementation of IMO Unique Company and registered owner identification number scheme Intersessional Maritime Security and Piracy Working Group (13 to 15 September 2011) “A new order in maritime security”. 1886/Rev.924(22) on review of measures and procedures to prevent acts of terrorism which threatens the security of passengers and crews and the safety of ships A 23/24 12 . Accession by Algeria Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. 2468 No. ICS.4/Circ. 2554/Rev.14 26/01/2011 SUA.16 28/03/2011 Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. 2507 No. 2720 No.1.4/Circ. security and environmental protection.4/Circ.SUA. 3267 ASSEMBLY 23rd Session (24 November – 5 December 2003) Adopted resolutions A 23/17/2 Consideration of the reports and recommendations of the Maritime Safety Committee. Intercargo and Intertanko Progress report to the Assembly in compliance with resolution A.1 No. 3202 No. Accession by Cotê d’Ivoire SUA.15 28/02/2011 SUA.4/Circ.13 12/10/2010 SUA. Ratification by Bulgaria Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.3 No. Progress towards compliance with the ISPS Code. Note by BIMCO. 18 to 20 September 2006 Implementation of resolution A. 2514 First Meeting of the Joint ILO/IMO Working Group on port security (Geneva. Accession by Panama Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Acceptance for the European part of the Netherlands and the Caribbean part of the Netherlands by the Kingdom of the Netherlands Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression on unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. 2529 No.

Technical assistance aspects. to improve maritime Security) C 90/D Summary of Decisions 22nd Extraordinary Session (21 November 2003) C/ES.A 23/24/Add. (This document provides information on the measures taken by the Secretary-General in response to operative paragraph 5 of resolution A.22/14/1 Work programme and budget prospects for 2003. through the Integrated Technical Co-operation Programme (ITCP). (This document contains.924(22) will be submitted to the Council after the conclusion of MSC 77) C 90/12/Add. to assist Governments.924(22). Technical assistance aspects Summary of decisions 90th Session (16 – 20 June 2003) C 90/12 Progress report to the Assembly in compliance with Resolution A.3 Idem. (b) Report on the 2005 International Conference on the Revision of the SUA Treaties 88th Session C 88/10 C 88/10/Add. in compliance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution A. Technical assistance aspects.924(22). Idem.2 C 88/10/1 C 88/D COUNCIL (10 – 14 June 2002) Prevention and suppression of acts of terrorism against shipping Idem.924(22) on review of measures and procedures to prevent acts of terrorism which threaten the security of passengers and crews and the safety of ships (This document informs the Council that a draft progress report in accordance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution A.1 C 88/10/Add.1 Idem. Outcome of the 87th Session of the Legal Committee 24th Session (21 November – 2 December 2005) Adopted resolutions A 24/15(b) Report on diplomatic conferences. Outcome of the eighty-fourth session of the Legal Committee Idem. The draft progress report on review of measures and procedures to prevent acts of terrorism which threaten the security of passengers and crews and the safety of ships) C 90/12/1 Idem. Note by the Secretariat Idem. Establishment of an International Maritime Security Trust Fund 13 .1 A 23/24/Add.2 A 23/24/Add.924(22) on review of measures and procedures to prevent A. Idem.

23rd Extraordinary Session (17 – 18 November 2005) C/ES.23/11 Report of the 2005 International Conference on the Revision of the SUA Treaties 92nd Session (21 – 25 June 2004) C 92/INF.1 Report on the status of conventions and other multilateral instruments in respect of which the Organization performs functions. Submitted by Egypt. Progress report on the implementation of Solas chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code.3 C 92/D Consideration of the Report of the Maritime Safety Committee. Submitted by the United States Summary of decisions C 106/D 14 . Progress report on the implementation of the special measures to enhance maritime security detailed in Solas chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Submitted by the Secretary-General. Summary of decisions 93rd Session (15 – 19 November 2004) C 93/4/Add. Summary of decisions 102nd Session (29 June – 3 July 2009) C 102/14 Sub-regional meeting to conclude agreements on maritime security. Protection of vital shipping lanes Summary of decisions C 93/15 C 93/D 94th Session (20 – 24 June 2005) C 94/8 C 94/D Protection of vital shipping lanes. piracy and armed robbery against ships for States from the Western Indian Ocean. Measures toward enhancing maritime trade recovery related to the global supply chain system and maritime conveyances. including the 1993 Torremolinos Protocol. Gulf of Aden and Red Sea Areas (Attachment – Code of conduct concerning the repression of piracy and armed robbery against ships in the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden) Summary of decisions C 102/D 106th Session (27 June – 1 July 2011) C 106/22 Supplementary agenda items.

SAFE framework of standards to secure and facilitate global trade approved economic operator guidelines Idem. ISO initiatives for supply chain security and electronic means for clearance of ships (Status update). Website documenting port security best practices for ISPS Code compliance. Submitted by the United States Idem. Improving security and facilitation provisions within IMO instruments taking into account the WCO SAFE framework of standards. Cospas-Sarsat Handbook on distress alert messages for RCCs. Supply chain security Best Practices catalogue. The nature of enhanced security measures to be applied to CTUs in port facilities at security level 2 and 3. Submitted by ISO FAL 34/10/1 FAL 34/10/2 FAL 34/10/3 FAL 34/10/4 FAL 34/10/5 FAL 34/10/6 FAL 34/19 FAL 34/INF. A comparison of WCO’s Guidelines for authorized economic operator with the ISPS Code and the facilitation convention. References for enhancing container security in the maritime domain.6 35th Session (12 – 16 January 2009) FAL 35/17 Report.5 FAL 34/INF. Submitted by Japan Idem. Comments on improving integrated supply chain security within IMO instruments taking into account the WCO SAFE Framework of Standards. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. (Section 9 – Securing and facilitating international trade) 15 . SPOCs and IMO Ship Security competent authorities.7 Satellite Services (Inmarsat and Cospas-Sarsat). Submitted by the United States Idem. Submitted by Canada Report (Section 10 – Securing and facilitating international trade.SUB-COMMITTEE ON RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS AND SEARCH AND RESCUE For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 13th Session (19 – 23 January 2009) COMSAR 13/INF. Submitted by the United States Idem. Submitted by the United States Idem.3 FAL 34/INF. Submitted by the United States Idem.4 FAL 34/INF. Report of the Joint MSC/FAL Working Group on security and facilitation of the movement of closed cargo transport units and of freight containers transported by ships Idem. Interim guidance on the security and facilitation of the movement of containers transported by ships. Submitted by Cospas-Sarsat FACILITATION COMMITTEE For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 34th Session (26 – 30 March 2007) FAL 34/10 Securing and facilitating international trade.) Idem.

Annex 5 – Facilitating shore leave and access to ships. Development of guidance on the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Idem.FAL 35/INF. Submitted by the United States Report. Idem.4 38th Session (8-12 April 2013) FAL 37/7 Ensuring security in and facilitating international trade. Authorized economic operator. Questionnaire on information on port and coastal State requirements related to privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships. Submitted by Canada and the United States Ensuring security in and facilitating international trade. (Section 8 – Ensuring security in and facilitating international trade) Idem. Trade recovery. Submitted by the WCO FAL 37/8/2 FAL 37/8/3 FAL 37/8/4 FAL 37/8/5 FAL 37/8/6 FAL 37/17 FAL 37/INF. Submitted by Brazil. Idem. ISO 28000 Series Standards update. removing unnecessary restrictions imposed by divergences in the implementation of the ISPS Code 37th Session (5 – 9 September 2011) FAL 37/8 FAL 37/8/1 Ensuring security in and facilitating international trade. The necessity of amending the FAL Convention on shore leave. Submitted by the United States Idem. Guidelines on Measures Toward Enhancing Maritime Trade Recovery Related to the Global Supply Chain System and Maritime Conveyances. Development of guidance on the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships.2 Securing and facilitating international trade. Submitted by ISO Idem. Submitted by the Netherlands 36th Session (6 – 10 September 2010) FAL 36/17 Report (Section 8 – Securing and facilitating international trade. Measures toward enhancing maritime trade recovery related to the global supply chain system and maritime conveyances. Development of guidance on the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships. Shore leave and access to ships. FAL 38/7/1 16 . Update on the SAFE framework of standards.

Slovenia. National legal seminar on the implementation of the SUA treaties in Sri Lanka. Portugal. Estonia. France.SUB-COMMITTEE ON FLAG STATE IMPLEMENTATION For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 17th Session (20 – 24 April 2009) FSI 17/3/2 Responsibilities of Governments and measures to encourage flag state compliance. National legal seminar on the implementation of the SUA treaties in Thailand Idem. A report on the implementation of mandatory and non-mandatory rules and regulation to enhance safety and security of navigation and to fight marine pollution. Denmark. Malta. Measures taken to enhance security policies and activities. the United Kingdom. Finland. Germany. Submitted by the Russian Federation MSC/ISWG/LRIT 1/3/1 MSC/ISWG/LRIT 1/3/2 MSC/ISWG/LRIT 1/3/3 MSC/ISWG/LRIT 1/3/4 LEGAL COMMITTEE For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 93rd Session (22 – 26 October 2007) LEG 93/9 Technical co-operation activities related to maritime legislation. Romania. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Sweden. Cyprus. Hungary. Spain. and the European Commission Idem. Czech Republic. Italy. Report. Lithuania. Bulgaria. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Report. Luxembourg. Latvia. Proposal on application of provision for the reception of information from ships navigating within a distance from a coastal state. FSI 17/3/3 FSI 17/20 INTERSESSIONAL MSC WORKING GROUP ON LONG-RANGE IDENTIFICATION AND TRACKING MSC/ISWG/LRIT 1/3 Development of the draft Solas amendments on long-range identification and tracking. the Netherlands. Poland. Slovakia. Draft SOLAS regulation on LRIT. Inclusion of LRIT regulation in SOLAS chapter V. Submitted by Australia and Canada Idem. Ireland. Norway. Submitted by Austria. LEG 93/9/1 LEG 93/13 94th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 17 . Responsibilities of Governments and measures to encourage flag state compliance. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Belgium.

1/2/4 LEG/SUA/WG. Submitted the United States Idem.95th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 96th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 97th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 98th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 99th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 100th Session (No documents issued on the subject) 1988 SUA CONVENTION AND PROTOCOL Legal Committee Working Group on the Review of the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Submitted by Japan Idem.1/2/3 LEG/SUA/WG. Submitted by France. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol. Proposed revisions to the proposed Protocol to the SUA Convention from the LEG 88 SUA Work Group (Annex 1). Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol. Submitted by Mexico. and Its Protocol of 1988 Relating to Fixed Platforms Located on the Continental Shelf 1st Session (12 – 16 July 2004) LEG/SUA/WG. Submitted by the United States Idem. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol.1/2/1 LEG/SUA/WG. Comments on Annex 1 as circulated by e-mail by the Co-ordinator of the Correspondence Group on 10 June 2004. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol (Annex 1). Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol NonProliferation Offences. 1988. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol. and its Protocol of 1988 relating to Fixed Platforms Located on the Continental Shelf (SUA Convention and Protocol). Comments from the Japanese Delegation to the SUA Working Group on the “environmental damage” – Article 1. paragraph 1(e). US delegation’s proposed revisions to the proposed Protocol to the USA Convention (Annex 1) Submitted by the United States Review of the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Idem. LEG/SUA/WG. Complements to the “Boarding! Section. Comments on US delegation’s proposed revisions to the proposed Protocol to the SUA Convention (Annex 1) Submitted by Brazil Idem. Submitted by Brazil.1/2 Idem. 1988.1/2/8 18 . Idem. Suggested amendment to article 8bis 8b (Safeguards).1/2/2 LEG/SUA/WG.1/2/5 LEG/SUA/WG.1/2/6 LEG/SUA/WG.

LEG/SUA/WG. Proposal on the political offence exception and entry into force provisions. Submitted by ICS. 1988 (1988 SUA Convention) Idem. and on the report by the Chairperson of the Working Group.2/2/1 LEG/SUA/WG.15/1/1 LEG/CONF 15/2 LEG/CONF. Submitted by Pakistan Idem. Prepared by the Legal Committee of the Organization and edited by the Secretariat Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Submitted by Brazil Report of the Working Group LEG/SUA/WG.2/2/2 LEG/SUA/WG. Comments on the revised draft of the proposed Protocol (Annex 1) and the consolidated draft of the SUA Convention incorporating the proposed Protocol (Annex 2).15/2/1 LEG/CONF.15/4 LEG/CONF. and draft article 7 in the Annex. draft article 4.2/3/1 LEG/SUA/WG. Provisional Rules of Procedures Idem.1/3 2nd Session (31 January – 4 February 2005) LEG/SUA/WG. Prepared by the Legal Committee of the Organization and edited by the Secretariat Organization of the work of the conference including the establishment of other committees.2/2/3 Review of the draft Protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.15/5 LEG/CONF. 1988 and a draft protocol to the protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed Platforms located on the continental shelf. Draft amendments to the SUA Convention and SUA Protocol. ISF and ICFTU Idem.15/3 Agenda for the Conference Agenda adopted by the Conference Adoption of the rules of procedures.1/2/10 LEG/SUA/WG.2/3 LEG/SUA/WG.2/4 2005 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE REVISION OF THE SUA TREATIES (10 OCTOBER 2005) LEG/CONF. draft article 2. as necessary Consideration of: A draft protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.15/1 LEG/CONF. Idem. Comments on the draft preamble. Report of the Working Group LEG/SUA/WG. Idem.1/2/9 Idem.15/6 19 . Rules of procedure adopted by the Conference Consideration of a draft protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. 1988 LEG/CONF.

Comments on the protection afforded to the shipping industry. 1988 and a draft protocol to the protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. Statement by India Idem. non-proliferation and boarding provisions.15/14 LEG/CONF. 1988. Suggestions regarding the preamble and article 8bis. Submitted by China Consideration of the reports of the Committees.15/9 LEG/CONF.LEG/CONF.15/18 LEG/CONF 15/19 LEG/CONF 15/20 20 . 1988 and a draft protocol to the protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed Platforms located on the continental shelf.1 Consideration of: A draft protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. 1988 Consideration of: A draft Protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.15/13 LEG/CONF.15/11 LEG/CONF. Statement by Pakistan LEG/CONF. Submitted by Philippines Consideration of a draft protocol to the convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Submitted by South Africa Idem. Submitted by the United States Idem. 1988. Statement of the delegation of the Russian Federation on subparagraph 1(b) (iv) of the article 3bis of the Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation of 1988 Idem and Consideration of a draft Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful acts Against the Safety of Fixed Platforms located on the Continental Shelf. 1988. 1988.15/16 LEG/CONF. Corrigendum Idem. 1988. 1988 and a draft protocol to the protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed Platforms located on the continental shelf. Submitted by India Idem. Proposed amendments to article 10 of the protocol to the SUA Convention. Submitted by Romania Idem.15/12/Corr. Report of the Credentials Committee Report of the Credentials Committee Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. 1988.15/10 LEG/CONF. Submitted by the United States and ICFTU Consideration of: A draft protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.15/17/Rev.15/7 LEG/CONF.15/15 LEG/CONF. 1988.1 LEG/CONF. Submitted by Cuba Consideration of: A draft protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. China Consideration of a draft protocol to the Convention for suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. Comments on counter-terrorism. Corrigendum Consideration of a draft protocol to the Convention for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation.1 LEG/CONF.15/12 LEG/CONF.15/6/Corr. Submitted by Hong Kong.15/8 LEG/CONF. 1988 and a draft protocol to the protocol for the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed Platforms located on the continental shelf.

15/CW/4 21 . Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Fixed Platforms located on the Continental Shelf.15/CW/2/Add. Final Act of the International Conference on the Revision of the SUA Treaties.m.LEG/CONF 15/21 Adoption of the Final Act and any instruments. Monday.E. Agreed by the Committee of the Whole Consideration of reports of Committees.15/INF.R.2 LEG/CONF. Secretary-General – International Maritime Organization. Text adopted by the Conference Idem.m.E. 14 October 2005 LEG/CONF.2 Opening statement by Mr.1 LEG/CONF.3 LEG/CONF. Secretary-General – International Maritime Organization. recommendations and resolutions resulting from the work of the Conference.4 LEG/CONF. Agreed by the Committee of the Whole.15/CW/3 LEG/CONF.15/INF.1 LEG/CONF 15/RD/2 Record of decisions of the first plenary meeting. E. Agreed by the Committee of the Whole. Record of decisions of the second Plenary Meeting. E.15/INF. 14 October 2005 9:30 a. Report of the Committee of the Whole LEG/CONF. Mitropoulos.15/CW/2 Provisional agenda for the Committee of the Whole Agenda Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Information papers LEG/CONF. Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Mitropoulos. Giancarlo Aragona. Agreed by the Committee of the Whole Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.15/RD/1/REV. 10 October 2005 Presidential address at the opening of the Conference by H. Text adopted by the Conference Idem. Text adopted by the Conference LEG/CONF 15/22 LEG/CONF 15/23 Records of decisions of the Plenary LEG/CONF. to 12:15 p.15/CW/2/Add. Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Mr. Friday.15/INF. Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. Ambassador of the Republic of Italy Closing statement by the President following the adoption of the Protocols by the Conference Closing statement by Mr.5 Committee of the Whole LEG/CONF 15/CW/1 LEG/CONF 15/CW/1/1 LEG/CONF.

15/DC/1 Consideration of a draft Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation : Texts examined and approved by the Drafting Committee Consideration of a draft Protocol 2005 to the Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Fixed Platforms located on the continental shelf. Idem. Submitted by the UK as co-ordinator of the Correspondence Group Idem. Report of the Joint MSC/FAL Working Group on Security and facilitation of the movement of closed cargo transport units and of freight containers transported by ships.3 LEG/CONF. Decisions of other IMO bodies.15/CW/RD.2 LEG/CONF. Texts examined and approved by the Drafting Committee Draft Final Act of the International Conference on the revision of the SUA Convention.1 MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 83rd Session (3 – 12 October 2007) MSC 83/4 MSC 83/4/Add. Submitted by CLIA Idem.15/DC/4 LEG/CONF 15/WP.5/Rev.15/DC/2 LEG/CONF. First Meeting Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole. Second Meeting Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole.1 LEG/CONF.15/CW/RD. Access of public authorities.Records of decisions of the Committee of the Whole LEG/CONF. Third Meeting Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole.15/CW/RD.15/DC/3 LEG/CONF.4 Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole. Outcome of FAL 34 Idem.1 Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole.15/CW/RD.15/DC/3/Rev.1 MSC 83/4/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. Outcome of STW 38 Idem. Security arrangements for ships which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Fourth Meeting LEG/CONF. Submitted by Australia MSC 83/4/2 MSC 83/4/3 MSC 83/4/4 22 . Fifth Meeting.15/CW/RD.1 LEG/CONF. Correspondence group on security aspects of the operation of ships which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter X1-s and the ISPS Code. Text examined and approved by the Drafting Committee Idem Consideration of the reports of the Committees : Report of the Drafting Committee Draft Final Act of the International Conference on the revision of the SUA Treaties LEG/CONF. Drafting Committee LEG/CONF. emergency response services and pilots on board ships to which SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code apply.

Submitted by Turkey Idem. Nairobi. Port facility audits. Program to enhance administrative and operational capacity of the Abuja Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control.16 MSC 83/INF. Proposed amendments to MSC/Circ. Submitted by the Abuja MoU Secretariat. Sierra Leone and South Africa Any other business. 29-31 October 2007 Idem. Correspondence group on security aspects of the operation of ships which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Angola.7 MSC 83/INF. Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS). Periodical report on model courses Idem. Date of implementation of the LRIT System.11 Measures to enhance maritime security. The Harbour Craft Transponder System (HARTS) in the Port of Singapore. Report of the Maritime Safety Committee on its 83rd Session (Section 4 – Measures to Enhance maritime security. Abuja MoU Strategy 2010. Technical cooperation activities relating to maritime safety. Fifth special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee with International. : Technical co-operation on domestic ferry safety Idem.1097. Method of operation and maintenance of the International LRIT Data Exchange and the International LRIT Data Centre.17 84th Session (7 – 16 May 2008) MSC 84/4 Measures to enhance maritime security. Enhancement of the security of ships other than those already covered by SOLAS chapter-XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Submitted by the United States MSC 83/INF. security and facilitation of maritime traffic Idem. Ghana.MSC 83/6/8 MSC 83/6/9 LRIT-related matters. Submitted by IACS Idem. Submitted by Canada MSC 84/4/1 MSC 84/4/2 MSC 84/4/3 23 . Nigeria. Section 17 – Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. National supplement security arrangements. Submitted by the United Kingdom as co-ordinator of the Correspondence Group MSC 83/17 MSC 83/17/1 MSC 83/17/2 MSC 83/17/3 MSC 83/27 MSC 83/28 MSC 83/INF. Kenya. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Guinea. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Submitted by Singapore Idem. Regional and Sub-Regional Organizations. Senegal. Annex 37 – Resolution MSC. Congo. Submitted by the United States Measures to enhance maritime security.254(83) – Adoption of amendments to the performance standards and functional requirements for the longrange identification and tracking of ships) Measures to enhance maritime security. Commerce and Transport) message for security-related information. Development of an EDIFACT (Electronic Data Interchange for Administration.

Slovenia. Slovakia. Germany. Hungary. Bulgaria. security and facilitation of maritime traffic Idem. the United Kingdom and the United States Idem. Ireland.1097.1192 and MSC. Submitted by IACS Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Norway. Latvia. Annex 11 .MSC 84/4/4 Idem.276(85) – Operation of the international LRIT data exchange an interim basis) MSC 85/4/2 MSC 85/4/3 MSC 85/14/2 MSC 85/26 86th Session (27 May – 5 June 2009) MSC 86/4/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. Spectrum requirements and potential frequency bands suitable to support ship and port security and enhanced maritime safety systems Idem. Section 14 – Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security.262(84) – Revised performance standards and functional requirements for the long-range identification and tracking (LRIT) of ships. Estonia. Spain. Romania. Greece. Submitted by ISO Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Iceland. the Netherlands. Submitted by Austria. Proposed revised amendments to MSC/Circ. United Kingdom and the European Commission ISO maritime and supply chain security standards (Update). A brief report on how the ISPS Code has been implemented – measures taken to enhance security policies and activities. MSC 84/4/5 MSC 84/18 MSC 84/18/2 MSC 84/24 MSC 84/INF. Poland. Malta. Submitted by Japan. The United Nations open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and Law of the Sea focusing issues on maritime security and safety. Italy. Annex 9 – Resolution MSC. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Annex 10 – Establishment of the International LRIT Data Exchange on an interim basis) Relations with other organizations. Finland. Annex 10 – Resolution MSC. Belgium.Resolution MSC. Cyprus. Czech Republic. Development of model legislation on maritime security.1/Circ. Lithuania. ITU World Radiocomunications Conference 2011.1/Circ. France.1194. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran. Luxembourg. Periodical report on model courses Report of the Maritime Safety Committee on its 85th Session (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security. Technical cooperation activities relating to maritime safety.275(85) – Appointment of the LRIT Coordinator). Sweden. Portugal. Technical co-operation on domestic ferry safety Report of the Maritime Safety Committee on its 84th Session (Section 4 – Measures to Enhance maritime security. Matters outstanding from MSC 84 Idem. Report of the Correspondence Group on security arrangements for vessels which do not fall within the scope of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code.2 85th Session (26 November – 5 December 2008) MSC 85/4 MSC 85/4/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. MSC 86/4/2 24 . Results of the experience gained from the use of MSC. Denmark.

Slovenia. Greece. Latvia. Luxembourg. Submitted by Belgium. Report of the Third Latin American Forum on maritime and port security. The Czech Republic. Spain. Ireland. Luxembourg. Estonia. Submitted by Colombia Idem. Lithuania. Poland.6 87th session (12 . Slovakia. Malta. Section 16 – Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Finland. France. the United Kingdom and the European Commission LRIT-Relate matters. Poland. Submitted by Belgium. Sweden and the Untied Kingdom Technical assistance Sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Development since MSC 87 Idem. (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security. Slovenia. Periodical report on model courses Report. Portugal. Status of technical co-operation activities relating to maritime safety. Annex 15 – Resolution MSC. Guidelines on security-related training and familiarization for shore-based personnel.21 May 2010) MSC 84/4/Add. Italy. Greece. Submitted by Canada 25 . Bulgaria. the Netherlands. Issue of continuous synopsis record. Estonia. Bulgaria. the Netherlands. Portugal. Luxembourg.MSC 86/4/3 MSC 86/4/4 MSC 86/4/5 Idem. Submitted by Singapore Idem. ISO Maritime and supply chain security standards (Update). Romania. Poland. Submitted by the Islamic Republic of Iran Idem. Cyprus. the Netherlands. Portugal. A brief summary of some failures identified during ISPS Code verification. Submitted by Austria. Germany. Latvia. Hungary. Submitted by Canada Report of the Maritime Safety Committee on its 86th Session (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security. security and facilitation of maritime traffic (March to December 2009) Idem. Finland. Iceland. Belgium. Guidance on port facility security audits. Long-range identification and tracking of ships (LRIT). Finland. the United Kingdom and the European Commission MSC 87/4/2 MSC 87/4/3 Idem. Annex 6 – Principles and guidelines relating to the review and audit of the performance of LRIT data centres and the international data exchange) Measures to enhance maritime security.1 MSC 87/4/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. Sweden. Issue of continuous synopsis record.(87) – Establishment of a distribution facility for the provision of LRIT information to security forces operating in waters of the Gulf of Aden and the Western Indian Ocean to aid their work in repression of piracy and armed robbery against ships (The Distribution Facility) MSC 87/16 MSC 87/16/1 MSC 87/26 88th Session (24 November – 3 December 2010) MSC 88/4 MSC 88/4/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. Submitted by ISO MSC 86/6/4 MSC 86/26 MSC 86/INF. Norway. Germany. Lithuania. Malta. Development since MSC 86 Idem. Italy. Denmark. Bulgaria. Germany. Best practices for clearance programmes on international and domestic transportation. Spain. Iceland. Norway.

Operational issues regarding BMP v3 guidance on SSAS alert routeing to UKMTO and the availability of related commercial services. Outcome of the 36th session of the Facilitation Committee Idem. Enhancement of the security of ships other than those already covered by SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Section 14 – Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security) Idem. Need for updating the information provided in the GISIS Maritime Security Module Idem. A brief report related application and implementation of the ISPS Code including measures taken to enhance maritime security. ports and ships. Submitted by the Marshall Islands Idem. Submitted by ISO Report.Measures to enhance maritime security. Submitted by IHO Measures to enhance maritime security : Maritime security manual : Guidance fr port facilities. (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security) MSC 88/4/4 MSC 88/INF. Enhancement to the ISPS Code. Outcome of FAL 37 and Communication of information to the Organization Idem Australia’s implementation of the ISPS Code.7 MSC 88/26 89th Session (11 – 20 May 2011) MSC 89/4 Measures to enhance maritime security.13 Report. ISO 28000 Series Standards update. Periodical report on model courses MSC 89/4/1 MSC 89/4/2 MSC 89/4/3 MSC 89/4/4 MSC 89/14 MSC 89/14/1 MSC 89/25 MSC 89/INF. Submitted by Australia Report. (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security.10 MSC 89/INF. Consideration of periodical survey to Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). Submitted by Republic of Korea Idem. Submitted by the Republican of Korea Idem. (Section 4 . Submitted by Canada Idem. Section 16 – Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security) MSC 90/4/1 MSC 90/28 26 . Report of the Correspondence Group on the Maritime Security Manual Idem. security and facilitation of maritime traffic (October 2010 to march 211) Idem. Technical activities undertaken by IHO in coordination with IMO.MSC 88/4/2 MSC 88/4/3 Idem. Submitted by Canada 90th Session (16-25 May 2012) MSC 90/4 Measures to enhance maritime security. Submitted by the United States Technical Assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security. Status of technical co-operation activities relating to maritime safety.

Section 14 – Technical cooperation activities relating to maritime safety and security) MSC 91/14/1 MSC 91/22 92nd Session (12 – 21 June 2013) MSC 92/15 Technical Co-operation activities relating to maritime safety and security.5/4/1/Rev. Sweden.1 SOLAS/CONF.5/4/Rev. IMO Conference on maritime security : Statement by J. IPTA. Continuous synopsis record. Workshop on APEC manual of maritime security drills and exercises for port facilities. (Section 4 – Measures to enhance maritime security. Intertanko and SIGTTO Idem. Note by the Chairman of the Intersessional MSC Working Group on Maritime Security (ISWG) Consideration of the draft amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. Status of activities implemented from January to December 2012.5/7 SOLAS/CONF. Periodical report of model courses. Submitted by Singapore MSC 92/15/1 MSC 92/15/2 SOLAS CONFERENCE – DIPLOMATIC CONFERENCE ON MARITIME SECURITY (9 – 13 DECEMBER 2002) SOLAS/CONF. Idem.C.5/9 27 .91st Session (26 – 30 November 2012) MSC 91/4 Measures to enhance maritime security. Marshall Islands. Idem. Submitted by ICS.S. International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) SOLAS/CONF. Draft Conference resolutions. Prevention and suppression of acts of terrorism against shipping. recommendations and other related matters. ICCL and SIGTTO Idem. Ship identification number. BIMCO. Proposed addition to chapter XI (-1) of Solas. the Netherlands. the maritime security module of GISIS and the IMO guide to maritime security and the ISPS Code. Panama. Proposed text of Part B of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code : Submitted by Denmark. Intertanko.2 SOLAS/CONF. Prevention and suppression of acts of terrorism against shipping. Note by the Chairman of the Intersessional MSC Working Group on Maritime Security (ISWG) and the Secretariat Consideration of draft resolutions.1 SOLAS/CONF. 1974. Harrocks Secretary General. the United Kingdom and the United States Idem. Proposed text of Part A of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.5/4/2 SOLAS/CONF. Submitted by ICS. Draft Chapter XI-2 of Solas 74 and the proposed text of the ISPS Code. Periodical report on model courses. Idem. Information provided pursuant to Solas regulation XI-2/13. Singapore. Idem. Report. IPTA.5/5/Rev. Finland.5/8 SOLAS/CONF. Proposed addition to chapter XI (-1) of Solas.5/4 Consideration of the draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code : Proposed text of the ISPS Code Idem.

Submitted by the United Kingdom Consideration of the draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code: Introduction . Consideration of transport and security issues related to the multimodal transport of dangerous goods by the United Nations Sub-Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UN-SCETDG) at its twenty-second session from 2 to 6 December 2002.5/26 28 .5/14 SOLAS/CONF.5/23 SOLAS/CONF.5/15 SOLAS/CONF. Panama.5/18 SOLAS/CONF. 1974 and International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code : Submitted by Canada Idem. Submitted by the United Kingdom and IPTA Idem. Submitted by France. recommendations and other related matters : Training for maritime and port protection security (Physical security and prevention of drug trafficking) : Submitted by Colombia Idem. Comments and proposals on draft regulation XI-2/7 regarding alternative security arrangements. Singapore and the United States Consideration of the draft amendments to the International Convention for the safety of Life at sea.872(20) : Updating of maritime security and port protection measures : Submitted by Colombia Idem.5/16 SOLAS/CONF.5/22 SOLAS/CONF.5/13 SOLAS/CONF. Marshall Islands.4 – Interim Certificates : Submitted by Canada. Liberia.SOLAS/CONF. Submitted by Canada. Proposal to amend regulation XI-2/8 (Communication information). Norway. Guidance to regulation XI-2/7ter. 1974 : Submitted by Liberia Idem. the Republic of Korea.5/10 SOLAS/CONF. Proposed additional test for section B/4. Consolidated port departures and arrivals date form : Submitted by Colombia Consideration of the draft amendments to the International Convention for the safety of Life at sea.5/25 SOLAS/CONF. United Kingdom and the United States Consideration of the draft amendments to the International Convention for the safety of Life at sea.5/11/Rev.5/24 SOLAS/CONF. Germany.1 Idem.5/21 SOLAS/CONF. Consideration of the draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code: Part A. Submitted by Germany SOLAS/CONF. Finalization of amendments to SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code Attacks on ships. Submitted by Denmark.5/17 SOLAS/CONF. 1974 and International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code :Proposed amendments to Chapter XI-2 Regulations and Part A of the International Code for Ship and Port Facility Security : Submitted by Canada.5/12 SOLAS/CONF.5/19 SOLAS/CONF. Submitted by Australia and Canada Idem. Equivalence of port facilities. Submitted by Germany and The Netherlands Idem. Revision of resolution A.5/20 SOLAS/CONF. Croatia. Norway and Sweden Consideration of draft resolutions. Section 19. Germany and the United Kingdom Idem and International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code : Draft Chapter XI-2 of Solas 74 and the Proposed text of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code: Submitted by Japan Idem. Proposed amendments to document Idem.

5/34 SOLAS/CONF.4 SOLAS/CONF. recommendations and other related matters. Security risks resulting from demonstration and actions against ships.2 SOLAS/CONF. recommendations and related matters. (French only) Statement by the Delegation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Statement by J.5/INF. William A.3 SOLAS/CONF. Department of Transportation Speech of Ms.5/30 SOLAS/CONF. recommendations and related matters.9 29 .5 SOLAS/CONF.6 SOLAS/CONF.1. Consideration and adoption of the International Ship and Port Security (ISPS) Code.5/31 SOLAS/CONF.8 SOLAS/CONF. Collins. Proposals to amend provisions of the ISPS Code : Submitted by Norway Consideration of draft resolutions. As adopted by the Conference. Amendments agreed by the plenary. S. 9 décembre 2002.38 of document SOLAS/CONF. Commandant of the United States Coast Guard. Conference resolution 2 (ISPS Code) and related amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention and Conference resolutions 3 to 11.: Policy statement by ICC: Submitted by ICC Opening address by the Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization. Sally Paxton. Submitted by Cyprus and Malta Adoption of the Final Act and any instruments. ILO to the IMO Diplomatic Conference on maritime security Déclaration de la delegation française relative à l’attentat sur le pétrolier “Limburg”.5/27 Idem. Horrocks Secretary General.5/INF. Submitted by the United States Idem. C. 4.5/INF.5/INF.5/32 SOLAS/CONF. Submitted by the ILO Idem. Amendments to the provisions in International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code related to the Declaration of Security (DoS).5/INF. O’Neil Address by Admiral Thomas H. text adopted by the Conference Consideration and adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. Final Act of the Conference of contracting governments to SOLAS. Proposed draft Conference Resolution. As adopted by the Conference Consideration of draft resolutions. Information on the work of the ILO.5/INF. Consideration and adoption of the resolutions.5/INF. As adopted by the Conference Idem. Draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and draft resolutions. Mr.5/INF. 1974. Part B of the ISPS Code : Proposal to replace the current paragraphs 4.36bis.5/28 SOLAS/CONF.5/4/1/Rev. 1974.5/33 SOLAS/CONF.5/29 SOLAS/CONF.7 SOLAS/CONF. recommendations and other related matters.37 and 4. Executive Director. International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) SOLAS/CONF.SOLAS/CONF. Conference resolution 1 and related amendments to the 1974 Solas Convention. recommendations and resolutions resulting from the work of the Conference. Social Dialogue Sector. offshore installations and port facilities.Submitted by the United Kingdom Idem.

Submitted by the Drafting Committee Consideration of the draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.5/DC/1 SOLAS/CONF. Text of Part B of the proposed draft of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code (to constitute attachment 2 to the Final Act of the Conference). Consideration of the draft amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW). maritime Transport. Outcome of MSC 81 Idem.5/CC/1 SOLAS/CONF. 1974. 1978. European Commission (EC) Report of the Credentials Committee. Annex 2 – Preliminary text of the draft amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training.10 SOLAS/CONF. Draft Conference resolution 2 and the proposed draft International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code (to constitute attachment 2 to the Final Act of the Conference). as amended (to constitute attachment 1 to the Final Act of the Conference).11 Statement by Prefecto General Juan Jose Beltriti. Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole : First Meeting Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole : Second and third meetings Record of decisions of the Committee of the Whole : Fourth and fifth meetings. Fotis Karamitsos director. Submitted by the Drafting Committee SOLAS/CONF.Draft Conference resolution 1 and the proposed draft amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.SOLAS/CONF.5/CW/RD/2 SOLAS/CONF.5/CW/RD/1 SOLAS/CONF.5/DC/2/Add. as amended (Security-related issues) TW 38/17 30 . Submitted by the Drafting Committee SOLAS/CONF. Amendments to the STCW Convention and the STCW Code to introduce security familiarization for all seafarers and training for seafarers with security-related duties and consequential amendments to the ISPS Code. 1974. Commandant of the Argentine Coast Guard Statement by Mr. Submitted by the Drafting Committee SOLAS/CONF.5/INF.5/INF. 1974.5/DC/4 SUB-COMMITTEE ON STANDARDS OF TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING For documents prior to 2007 click here for previous edition 38th Session (22 – 26 January 2007) STW 38/6 STW 38/6/1 Measures to enhance maritime security. Submitted by the United States Report (Section 6 – Measures to enhance maritime security.5/DC/2 SOLAS/CONF. Draft Final Act of the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. recommendations and resolutions resulting from the work of the Conference.5/DC/3 Consideration of the draft resolutions and recommendations and related matters Submitted by the Drafting Committee Adoption of the Final Act and any instruments.5/CW/RD/3 SOLAS/CONF.1 Idem.

C. International Ship and Port Facility Security Code and Solas amendments 2002 2003 edition. local administrations and the shipping and port industries to detect security threats and take preventive measures against security incidents affecting ships or port facilities used in international trade and to establish relevant roles and responsibilities at the national and international level. E : English. (Chapter XI-2 – Special measures to enhance maritime security) 31 . 2012 edition (IMO-IA116E) PS. Guide to maritime security and ISPS Code.S. SOLAS. Government agencies. Language(s): E. 2003 edition (IMO-I117E).STW 39th Session (3 – 7 March 2008) No documents issued on the subject 40th Session (2 – 6 February 2009) STW 40/14 Report (Section 9 – Measures to enhance maritime security) 41st Session (11 -15 January 2010) STW 41/16 Report (Section 9 – Measures to enhance maritime security) 42nd Session (24 – 28 January 2011) No documents issued on the subject 43rd Session (30 April – 4 May 2012) STW 43/3/2 Validation of model training courses. 1974. STW 43/3/3 IMO PUBLICATIONS Abbreviations : A : Arabic. The ISPS Code was adopted by a Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. Idem. Model Courses – Ship Security Officer. Consolidated edition 2009. among other things. to establish an international framework for co-operation between Contracting Governments. C : Chinese. R : Russian. S. S: Spanish All documents pertaining to the Conference and leading to the Conference are available in the Maritime Knowledge Centre (E/F/S) ISPS Code. The ISPS Code will become mandatory on 1 July 2004. The Code aims. A. These objectives are to be achieved by the designation of appropriate personnel on each ship. convened in London from 9 to 13 December 2002. in each port facility and in each ship owning company to make assessments and to put into effect the security plans that will be approved for each ship and port facility. Also available on virtual edition (E. R (IMO-I116E) . (IM0-IE110E). Language(s): E. F. S Solas amendments 2001 and 2002. F : French. Model Courses – Security awareness training for seafarers with designated security duties and security awareness training for all seafarers. This new title does not supersede the ISPS Code 2003 edition but aims to assist SOLAS Contracting Governments in relation to the provisions of Solas chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code.F) and on CD-ROM. F.

IMO. (2005 SUA Convention. Certified True Copy* signed on 7 February 2006.S. namely: ..F.F.Early implementation of long-range ships' identification and tracking. 2006 Language(s): E. (IMO-462E).Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (SUA). 2006 Language(s): E.S. port facilities. IMO. 1988 edition. Resolution 11 . International Conference on the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation (Rome 1988).R Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation.S Final Act of the Conference of contracting governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea. and the consolidated text of the 2005 SUA Fixed Platforms Protocol. International Conference on the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation (Rome 1988). Resolution 4 .Establishment of appropriate measures to enhance the security of ships.F. Resolution 9 . IMO.F. by Captain Herman Gómez – Lead IMO Maritime Security Consultant & Mr. Resolution 7 .C. Resolution 8 . London.A.R Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf. (Resolution MSC 194(80)) Language(s): E. 2006 Language(s): E. Entry into force: 1 March 1992 Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation. 1974 done at London on 13 December 2002: Certified True Copy* signed on 21 March 2003. Language(s): E.Early implementation of the special measures to enhance maritime security. 2005. Alejandro Bakoczy – IMO Maritime Security Consultant. Certified True Copy signed on 8 June 2006. 2003 32 . 2006. 1974) : Certified True Copy* signed on 21 March 2003. 2006 edition (IMO-I172E). 2003 : Language(s): E. This publication reproduces the texts of the original 1988 SUA Convention and Protocol. Certified True Copy* signed on 7 February 2006. Language(s) : E. C. Language(s): E.Enhancement of security in co-operation with the World Customs Organization.Enhancement of security in co-operation with the International Lab our Organization. IMO. (2005 SUA Fixed Platforms Protocol). Nassau. IMO. 15-19 September 2003. Resolution 5 Promotion of technical co-operation assistance. Language(s): E (IMO-IA462E). London.R Report on the IMO regional Seminar/Workshop on maritime security for the Caribbean Region . Resolution 6 .S Contains: The Conference adopted the following Resolutions: Resolution 3 .R Final Act of the International Conference on the revision of the SUA Treaties. IMO. London. the two protocols adopted by that Conference. mobile offshore drilling units on location and fixed and floating platforms not covered by chapter XI-2 of the 1974 Solas Convention. F. London. Bahamas. 1974 (Resolution 1 of the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.A. Certified True Copy* signed on 7 February 2006.Further work by the International Maritime Organization pertaining to the enhancement of maritime security.A. (SUA PROT) : Adoption: Rome. 2006. London.Human element-related aspects and shore leave for seafarers SUA Convention. 1988 .F. Resolution 10 . 10 March 1988.Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Fixed Platforms Located on the Continental Shelf. 2006 Language(s): E. S.C. IMO. 2003.C. as we as the consolidated text of the 2005 SUA Convention.S.C.R Protocol of 2005 of the Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against Safety of fixed platforms located on the continental shelf.A.A.F.C. 2006 edition.S. London. 2005. IMO. London. (IMO-I173E) 2002 Amendments to the Annex to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.S. London. R This publication contains the text of the Final Act of the Conference as well as the texts of the two treaty instruments adopted by the Conference. 2004 and 2005.F. A. the Final Act of the 2005 Conference. Certified True Copy signed on 8 June 2006. S Solas amendments 2006.Solas amendments 2003.Future amendments to chapters XI-1 and XI2 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention on special measures to enhance maritime safety and security respectively.

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Speech by Dr. 18 March 2003 Maritime policy : European Union legislation and objectives for sea transport. UNITED NATIONS United Nations Action Against Terrorism United Nations Conventions on Terrorism. Commission Regulation (EC) No. 10 April 2008. 27 July 2003.container security and relates matters.2003/0089(COD)) (5 November 2003). (COM(2003) 229 Final (2003/0089(COD)). Brussels. pp 510. Brussels. Brussels. Commission Staff Working Document for the Council Shipping Working Party. European Commission. 30 September 2004. European parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee on the role of customs in the integrated management of external borders. Energy and Transport DG. pp 25-29 Commission Regulation (EC) No. 2003. L 98. Joe Borg. In: Official Journal of the European Union. 324/2008 of 9 April 2008 laying down procedures for conducting Commission inspections in the field of maritime security. (SEC(2007) 559). Commission of the European Communities. 24 April 2006. Report of the proposal for a European Parliament and Council regulation on enhancing ship and port facility security (COM(2003)229 . 884/2005 of 10 June 2005 laying down procedures for conducting Commission inspections in the field of maritime security. Brussels 2 May 2003. 16 July 2007. 9 February 2006. Brussels. ((COM(2003) 452 Final) (2003/0167 (COD)) European Commission Representation in Ireland .C5-0218/2003 . IMO-European Community position to be adopted by the Council on maritime security issues for the 80 th session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 80) meeting in London from 11 to 20 October 2005. (11855/07) (SEC(2007) 1032). Communication from the Commission to the Council. pp 3233. Brussels. (United Nations Conventions deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations) 44 .Customs: Commission welcomes Council authorisation to negotiate with US on transport security co-operation. L 148. (2004/634/EC). In: Official Journal of the European Union. Brussels : European Parliament. Communication from the Commission to the Council. the European Parliament. 24 April 2005 Commission Staff Working Document for the Council Shipping Working Party.(FINAL A5-0385/2003 Joint statement of the US Customs and border protection and the European Commission : 25 June 2003. Commission Staff Working document for the Council Shipping Working Party IMO – European Community submission to be adopted by the Council on the use of LRIT for other purposes than security for the 83rd session of the Maritime Safety Committee meeting in Copenhagen from 3 to 12 October 2007. (SEC(2005) 586). Proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on enhancing ship and port facility security. IMO-European Community position to be adopted by the Council on maritime security issues for the 81 st session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 81) meeting in London from 10 to 19 May 2006. L 304. 11 June 2005. In: Official Journal of the European Union. 2002 (ISBN 92-894-3400-7) An overview of the developments underway towards a Maritime Policy for the European Union. the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on enhancing maritime transport security.

UN. sweeping frameworks for mutual legal assistance. United Nations WebPages on UN action against terrorism which lists the Conventions on Terrorism French. “Prevention of terrorist movement and effective border security”. regional and subregional organizations.Maritime security : ISPS Code implementation. 215. 2004. UNCTAD. (Kenya). law-enforcement cooperation and technical assistance and training. (ISBN 92-1-133631-7) General Assembly Resolutions A/RES/49/60 (09/12/1994) Measures to eliminate international terrorism (Declaration on measures to 45 . United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee. extradition.) United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL) . Chinese. No. UN. (Document No.United Nations Treaties Against Terrorism United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime UNCTAD – Container security : Major initiatives and related international development. United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention web site International instruments related to the prevention and suppression of international terrorism. National laws and regulations on the prevention and suppression of international terrorism : Part I. 2002 (ST/LEG/SER. Nairobi. Geneva : UNCTAD. costs and related financing : Report by the UNCTAD secretariat. A/57/273 (6 August 2002) UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library Resource Page on International Terrorism Fifth special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee with international. These include the creation of domestic criminal offences to combat the problem. New York. Spanish) (Arabic.Protección marítima y portuaria en sudamérica : La situación a mediados del 2004 In: Boletín FAL. concluded at the 10th session of the Ad Hoc Committee established by the General Assembly to deal with this problem.Best Practices United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocols. (The Convention represents a major step forward in the fight against transnational organized crime and signifies the recognition of UN Member States that this is a serious and growing problem that can only be solved through close international cooperation.(UNCTAD/SDTE/TLB/2005/4) United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee (CTC). (UNCTAD/SDTE/TLB/2004/1).(UNCTAD/SDTE/TLB/2007/1) .B/22) (ISBN : 92-1-033085-4).B/23 & ST/LEG/SER. New York : UN. New York : UN. 2006. 29 – 31 October 2007. 2005 (ST/LEG/SER. 2007. Part II. July 2004. and the adoption of new. is a legally binding instrument committing States that ratify it to taking a series of measures against transnational organized crime. New York. 2001. Additional information on the United Nations Conventions against terrorism. New York.Maritime security : Elements of an analytical framework for compliance measurement and risk assessment. Russian. The Convention. Language(s): spa.B/24) (ISBN 92-1-033093-5) Report of the Policy Working Group on the United Nations and Terrorism. .

eliminate international terrorism. 1994) A/RES/50/53 (11/12/1995) A/RES/51/210 (17/12/1996) . Measures to eliminate international terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism (Declaration to supplement The 1994 Declaration) A/RES/52/165 (15/12/1997) A/RES/54/110 (09/12/1999) Measures to eliminate international terrorism A/RES/53/108 (08/12/1998)Measures to eliminate international terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism A/RES/55/158 (12/12/2000) A/RES/56/1 (12/09/2001 A/RES/56/24T (29/11/2001) Measures to eliminate international terrorism Condemnation of terrorist attacks in the United States Multilateral cooperation in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation and global efforts against terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism Human rights and terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering Terrorism Measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction Measures to eliminate international terrorism Strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance in promoting the implementation of the universal conventions and protocols related to terrorism within the framework of the activities of the Centre for International Crime Prevention Human rights and terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism A/RES/56/88 (12/12/2001) A/RES/56/160 (13/02/2002) A/RES/57/27 (15/01/2003) A/RES/57/83 (09/01/2003) A/RES/57/219 (27/02/2003) A/RES/58/48 (08/01/2004) A/RES/58/81 (08/01/2004) A/RES/58/136 (26/01/2004) A/RES/58/174 (10/03/2004) A/RES/58/187 (22/03/2004) A/RES/59/46 (16/12/2004) A/RES/59/153 (20/12/2004) Measures to eliminate international terrorism Strengthening international cooperation and technical assistance in promoting the implementation of the universal conventions and protocols related to terrorism within the framework of the activities of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 46 .

A/RES/59/191 (10/03/2005) A/RES/59/195 (22/03/2005) A/RES/59/290 (15/04/2005) A/RES/60/43 (06/01/2006) A/RES/60/73 (11/01/2006) A/RES/60/158 (28/02/2006) Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Human rights and terrorism International Convention for the suppression of acts of nuclear terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism Preventing the risk of radiological terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism The United Nations global counter-terrorism strategy Measures eliminate international terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to terrorism The United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy Measures to eliminate international terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Measures to eliminate international terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to terrorism Institutionalization of the counter-terrorism implementation task force Measures to eliminate international terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism Technical assistance for implementing the international conventions and protocols related to counter-terrorism A/RES/60/288 (20/09/2006) A/RES/61/40 (18/12/2006) A/RES/61/171 (01/03/2007) A/RES/62/71 (08/01/2008) A/RES/62/159 (11/03/2008) A/RES/62/172 (20/03/2008) A/RES/62/272 (15/09/2008) A/RES/63/129 (15/01/2009) A/RES/63/185 (03/03/2009) A/RES/64/118 (15/01/2010) A/RES/64/168 (22/01/2010) A/RES/64/177 (24/03/2010) A/RES/64/235 (14/01/2010 A/RES/65/34 (10/01/2011) A/RES/65/221 (2011) A/RES/66/171 (30/03/2012) A/RES/66/178 (2012) 47 .

Security Council Resolutions Resolution 1269 (1999) On the responsibility of the Security Council in the maintenance of international peace and security Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts High-level meeting of the Security Council : Combating terrorism Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Resolution 1368 (2001) Resolution 1373 (2001) Resolution 1377 (2001) Resolution 1438 (2002) Resolution 1440 (2002) Resolution 1450 (2002) Resolution 1452 (2002) Resolution 1455 (2003) Resolution 1456 (2003) Resolution 1465 (2003) Resolution 1526 (2004) Resolution 1530 (2004) Resolution 1535 (2004) Resolution 1611 (2005) Resolution 1617 (2005) Resolution 1618 (2005) Resolution 1735 (2006) Resolution 1787 (2007) Resolution 1805 (2008) Resolution 1822 (2008) Resolution 1904 (2009) Resolution 1963 (2010) Resolution 1988 (2011) Resolution 1989 (2011) Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts Threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts 48 .

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An Informal Special Sitting on improved security of seafarers’ identity documents .Convention concerning seafarers' national identity documents. Geneva.Provisional guidelines . ILO.Maritime security : A joint responsibility.ICS Model Ship Security Plan. Marisec Publications 2003. Convention 185.Seafarers’ identity documents Convention (revised). ICS. 2001 .Seafarers’ identity documents Convention (revised). 17 October 2002.Provisional guidelines . . ILO Seafarers’ Identity Documents Biometric Testing Campaign Report Part I. The current 1958 instrument has been ratified by 61 ILO member States representing 60. 2002 (SSSID/2002/1) .ICS Reference Document: Flag state rules and requirements on arms and private armed guards on board vessels. ILO. INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF SHIPPING (ICS) – Guidance for shipowners. pp 938-940 . Report VII(1). ILO. (ISBN 92-2-116838-7) . 2004. 185. London. Language(s): E. ICS.INSTITUTE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL SECURITY (IAGS) – Maritime terrorism : A new challenge for NATO. 2011 INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE (ILO) / INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION (IMO) – Security in ports : ILO and IMO code of practice. London. 2002. 91 st Session 2003. (With CD-ROM). (ILO Convention 185.Maritime Security. 185 was adopted to replace the Convention on Seafarers' Identity Documents No. 2003 (ISBN 92-2-112885-7) . ILO. ILO. London : IGP&I. Geneva. 2011 INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF P&I CLUBS (IGP&I) .Maritime security : Are you ready for July 2004? ISPS checklist. 2003 (No. . ILO.F.7 per cent of the world fleet) . (Convention No.S (ISBN 92-2-1183394-4) Geneva.Seafarers’ identity documents convention (Revised). ICS.use of armed guards on board Norwegian ships : Recent amendments to the Norwegian regulations. 108 (1958 ). 1985.F. 24 January 2005. (SSSID/2002/2) 59 . 2004 (92-2-115286-3) Language(s): E. 2003.Second Informal Special Sitting on improved security of seafarers’ identity documents . Geneva. . To assist shipping companies prepare ship security plans that comply with the IMO International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code). Geneva. 2001 . ship operators and masters on the protection of ships from terrorism and sabotage. Geneva : ILO. London. . International labour Conference. In: International Labour Organization (ILO) International labour conventions and recommendations 1919-1981. 185).Improved security of seafarers’ identification. will be effective as soon as two countries have ratified it. 2003. 2006. Geneva. 25 June 2002. The new Convention.Maritime security : Guidance for ship operators on the International Maritime Organization(IMO) International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.) . No.ISPS Code implementation notes on industry feedback report . Adopted on 19 June 2003. 2003. London.S INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION (ILO) . London : ICS.

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P. MARITIME SECURITY INSTITUTE FOR THE AMERICAS. (ISBN 2913-596-35-5) MARITIME AND COASTGUARD AGENCY (MCA) (UK) – Requirements for maritime security training – Port facility security officers. 2006 (ISBN 0-89940-763-0) MANEFEE. pp 19-25 LIGHTBURN. pp 441-478 MARIONNET. No. – Sûreté maritime et portuaire. Vol. pp 35-37. University of Texas.CAPT. Boca Raton (Florida. Press Release on April 7th. 2004. – International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. Taylor & Francis. DVD. 1996 MARITIME TRAINING SERVICES ./Bateman. Miami (Florida) : Port of Miami. Nos 7/8. In: Nordquist. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. . February 2003 . P. London. BIMCO. pp. . Maritime Training Services. 2003.Port of Miami Seaport security. Taylor & Francis./ Lehr. In: Maritime Policy and Management. Vol. Seattle (WA). 37. JOHNSON SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS – Port and supply-chain security initiatives in the United States and abroad. S. No. 2009.P. P. (Eds) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security.LANTZ. USA). P. Chapter 37 – International maritime and port security LEHR. In: Herbert-Burns. Leiden. USA). pp. 2004 LEGAL INFORMATION INSTITUTE (ILL) – United States Code : Title 46 ./ Lehr. 32 minutes.Security drills: Nine steps to success. 2006.A. 2008. 3. Redhill. S.and Appendix to Title 46. LYNDON B. – Container tracking and security markets: Current status. Routledge. (Ed. Boca Raton (Florida. (MIN 151 (M). MARTIN. 2003. ship security officers and company security officers. 2009. 159-168 62 . – Security in the maritime sector of the liquefied natural gas industry. In: The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) – BIMCO Review 2004. (Eds) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security. Lloyd’s Register/Fairplay. Abingdon (Oxon).Lloyd’s register takes the initiative on maritime security : ISPS Practical pack. 2. 2007. – Maritime security: an update of key issues./Bateman. M. France. R. Rennes. 2008 MARLOW. P. Southampton. Vol. actors.A terrorist attack : The Limburg story. Maritime Security. pp 667-676.Shipping .) – Violence at sea: Piracy in the age of global terrorism. M. (ISBN 1-901290-42-5) LLOYD’S REGISTER OF SHIPPING – International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) : Practical pack. S. P. In: The Journal of Ocean Technology. – Marine terrorism: Locations. 7. Vade-mecum ISPS. MCA. Informer. 55-72 LEHR. Bagsvaerd. – Security issues dominate Canada’s maritime agenda. R. June 2003. – An overview of piracy in the first decade of the 21st Century.H. P. (Eds) et al – Legal challenges in maritime security. 4. In: Herbert-Burns. and capabilities. I. Lloyd’s Register of Shipping. July-August 2006 MARITIME SECURITY BULLETIN – Report on our container shipping security conference in Rotterdam. Port security handbook 2004. (ISBN 978-0-415-95320-7) LIARD. In: ISO Focus (The magazine of the International Organization for Standardization). 2003. Austin. P. 2009.J.B.

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– Maritime terrorism – A survey and bibliography. F. – The implementation of the ISPS Code (from the point of view of an RSO –Recognised Security Organisations. Vol. Boca Raton (Florida. Taylor & Francis. – ISPS Code and modern piracy. In: Terrorism Monitor. Escuela de Derecho. 2007. A. No. O. Final Report. Dordrecht. Panama. – U. D. Informa Maritime and Transport. 1990 (ISBN : 0-7923-0734-8) ROTHERDAM MARITIME GROUP – Study on maritime security financing.Implementación del código internacional para la protección de los buques y de las instalaciones portuarias (Código PBIP) / International Ship and Port Facilities Code (ISPS Code). Wydra Institute of Shipping and Aviation Research.Impact of maritime security and other regulations on ship safety . – A time bomb for global trade : Maritime-related terrorism in an age of weapons of mass destruction.Study on maritime security financing : Final Report. P. S. Paper presented at the NATSHIP 07 – National Shipping Industry Conference. Universidad de Panamá./Bateman. 2004. 3-12 RICHARDS BUTLER INTERNATIONAL LAW FIRM – Shipping – Client Alert : International Code for the Security of Ships and of Port Facilities – The ISPS Code. R. . M. Institute of South East Asian Studies. 4/Issue 7. pp 46-52 66 . 13 April 2005. London. A./Bateman.V. R. ZNet. 1997 (IMO Doc. In: USCG . pp. Boca Raton (Florida. M. enacts measure for maritime security. /ROACH. (ISBN 981-230-246-8) ROMI-LEVIN. M. Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Políticas. 1994 (ISBN : 0-7190-4368-9) QUAS.S. Vol. RAHMAN. In : Lloyd’s List Events. pp 1-3 RAYMOND. 2005. 2009. 60/No. (Eds) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security. USA).. 6 April 2006. V. – Security in the maritime domain and its evolution since 9/11. L. SAFAHANI. RUSSEL. 8-9 December 2003). January 2004./ Lehr.Maritime security and peacekeeping : A framework for United Nations operations. 39-54 RAMRAJ. 2009. P. – Maritime terrorism in Southeast Asia: Potential scenario. 2007 RUIZ CHAPERÓN. USA). The Netherlands : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Vol.D. . K.2. pp 18-23. / HOR. 12-13 December 2007. Thesis. In: HerbertBurns. 4. In: HerbertBurns. pp. . University of Haifa. London : IMO.48700) ROSENBERG. RICHARDSON. 2003.(TREN/05/ST/S07.Proceedings of the Marine Safety Council. 2005. (Eds) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security.POTOMAC DECLARATION: Towards enhanced ocean security into the third millennium / Submitted by the Advisory Committee on Protection of the Sea. 2005 (ISSN 1565-1959) RONZITTI. .3) POULIN. framework for global maritime security from 9/11 to the 1000-ship navy. April-June 2003. Manchester : Manchester University Press. S. Cambridge./ MORRIEN.Z. LC 19/Inf. The 6th International product and 5th International chemical tanker conference (London.S.Z. 2009. Maritime homeland security. (Eds) – Global anti-terrorism law and policy. Singapore. M. In: The Journal of Ocean Technology. Taylor & Francis. C. C. R. – Dire straits : Competing security priorities on the South China Sea. C. S. PUGH./ Lehr. Cambridge University Press. N. (Ed) .Maritime terrorism and international law. 2005 (ISBN 0-521-85125-4) RAYMOND. – Evolving U. 2.

pp. R. 2012 SHAHBAZIAN. S. J.Standards for Private Maritime Security Company (PMSC) accreditation. Wit Press. 2010. F. 1998 (ISBN : 0-10-542897-3). – Human systems integration to enhance maritime domain awareness for port/harbour security.A new order in maritime security . / MEJIA. STATIONERY OFFICE (IRELAND) – Maritime Security Bill 2004 (Ireland). pp 74-75. Shipping Australia Ltd. 2011 . pp 82-83. London : Stationery Office Ltd. . 2010 (Briefing Document 1/2010) . E.Merchant Shipping and Maritime Security Act 1997. 75. 2011 (Briefing Document 08/2011) . In: Herbert-Burns. Stationery Office.Guide to: Signing the international code of conduct for private security service contractors. M. An act to give effect to the United Nations Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful acts against the safety of marine navigation.K. Dublin. Vol.U. (Eds) – Maritime security in Southeast Asia. . P. In: Maritime security and MET. and to the Protocol for the Suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of fixed platforms.Defining terrorism in international law. London : SAMI. In: Guan. pp 3-13.C.. 2004.SASAKAWA PEACE FOUNDATION (SPF) . Maritime homeland security. D. Boca Raton (Florida. 2006 (ISBN 0-19-929597-2) SECURITY ASSOCIATION FOR THE MARITIME INDUSTRY (SAMI) . In: Shipping in Australia : The SAL Annual Review of Shipping 2004-2005.) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security. G. 2007. Oxford. Vol. 2006. 2012 SAUL. London : SAMI. Abingdon. In: Shipping in Australia : The SAL Annual Review of Shipping 2004-2005. NATO Science for peace and security programme. – The Automatic Identification System and port security. Routledge./ Lehr. / Skogan. R.Proceedings of the Marine Safety Council. (Eds. / ROGOVA. 277-286 SPADI. Fundación par alas Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior (FRIDE). In: USCG . – Potential consequences of imprecise security assessments. IOS Press. A. (Oxon). J. USA). SOLLOSI. – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s evolving role in maritime security operations. 67 . – Southeast Asian SLOCS and security options.The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers. done at Rome on 10 March 1988. Oxford University Press. 60/No.Seminar (15 May 2012 : London) . In: Nordic Journal of International Law. Washington.Q. Shipping Australia Ltd./Bateman.K. February 2006. 2005.K. 2004 SJAASTAD. 2004 – Maritime security and the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. done at Rome on that date. located on the Continental Shelf. (ISBN 0-75575259-7) STATIONERY OFFICE (UK) . – Bolstering the proliferation security initiative at sea: A comparative analysis of ship-boarding as a bilateral and multilateral implementing mechanism. C.Use of armed guards on board Norwegian ships. / MUKHERJEE. Southampton. (ISBN 978-1-60750-620-1) SCHRÖDER. Sydney. Taylor & Francis.. P. 2009.M. Tokyo : Sasakawa Peace . London : SAMI. B – Defining “Terrorism” to Protect human rights.C. J.2. Working Paper 20. April-June 2003. pp 75-84 SHIPPING AUSTRALIA LTD . pp 36-41 SNODDON. Sydney. Madrid. pp 249-278.Experience with the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code.

(Oxon). July/August 2006. Select Publishing et al.C. London : Book Production Consultants Plc. J. Taylor & Francis. J. H. strengthening. Violence at sea : A review of terrorism. Singapore. In: The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO). Paris : ICC Publishing S. – Containerized cargo security : A case for international standards. 2009. and countermeasures to prevent terrorism. M. In: Parritt. In: Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) . BIMCO Review 2005. Book Production Consultants Plc. In: Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) .A.S. Stockholm. pp. 2009. 2009. pp 322-325 . 4556 TIMLEN. 2005. S.233-252 TUERK. 2012 (ISBN 978-91-7223-483-3) TILL.) et al – Legal challenges in maritime security. / PALMA. P. pp 70-76 TSAMENYI. M.A. 299-306 STRUIJS. M. In: Herbert-Burns.K. security and piracy. J. P. 2003. S. Jure Förlag AB. pp 272-275 STRYKEN. T. C. port security. (Eds. / PALMA. 3.K.The broadening scope of maritime security. / Skogan. W.A. 2009. – Setting. Boca Raton (Florida. pp. S.) – Maritime security in Southeast Asia. (Oxon). 2007. (ISBN 978-1-84311-767-4) TIBERG. – The US regional maritime security initiative and US grand strategy in Southeast Asia. In: Ho. S. pp 134-145 TALLEY./ Lehr. 2008. (Eds. . BIMCO Review 2005. Routledge. B. Abingdon. 1990 (ISBN : 0-10-543190-7) STAV.) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security. Boca Raton (Florida.H.. Maritime security : A common commitment.K. London. B. Abingdon. – Combating terrorism at sea : The suppression of unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation. G. (Eds. Routledge.K. In: Guan.B. – Maritime strategic overview of the Asia-Pacific Region. / WIDLUND. In: The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO). BIMCO Review 2001. pp 162-174 STRUBBS./Bateman. London. 2007.. pp 25-28. / Skogan. C. – The European Commission’s policy for maritime transport security enforcement. London : Book Production Consultants Plc. pp 182-183 TRELAWNY. J. (Eds. In: Herbert-Burns./ SCHOFIELD. 1986. BIMCO Review 2002.) – Realising safe and secure seas for all : International Maritime Security Conference 2009. USA). In: ISO Focus (The magazine of the International Organization for Standardization). In: Guan. M. acts of war and piracy. . USA). Boca Raton (Florida. . M. R. R. – Maritime safety. / TRUVER. C.) – Maritime security in Southeast Asia. 2008./ Lehr. In: Herbert-Burns. (Ed./ Lehr. H./Bateman. – Long-range identification and tracking systems fro vessels: Legal and technical issues. P. Taranto (Italy).) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security.H.The quest for safer seas and harbours : BIMCO's international role on maritime security policy. 2002. USA). – International legal regulatory framework for seafarers and maritime security post 9/11. M.) – Lloyd’s MIU handbook of maritime security. R. Taylor & Francis. – ISPS Code introduces – but port security is only in its infancy.K.Aviation and Maritime Security Act 1990. Vol. pp 131-142 STØLSVIK. C-M. and enforcing standards for U. – Maritime and port security legislation : Swedish statutes in English translation. C. P. Leiden. pp 41-80 68 . pp 244-247 . TRESTOUR.A. Taylor & Francis. pp. In: Fondazione Marittima Ammiraglio Michelagnoli. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.Practical measures to be taken by ports and ships' crews to prevent an attack and to minimise the risk when an attack occurs.Security – not just an owner’s problem. 215-232 TSAMENYI. Book Production Consultants Plc. . C. Nos 7/8. Informa Law. (Eds. G. London. London : HMSO. In: Nordquist./Bateman. pp. – Flags of convenience as a complicating factor in combating crime at sea. (Eds.

Guidelines for port security committees. 68.Overview of facility security regulations. Vol. . In: Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO). 2000 . 2011 UNITED STATES COAST GUARD (USCG) . No. 2002. The Interim Final Regulations on Passenger Vessel and Facility Security. Vol. July 2003. 1 July 2003. In: Federal Register. 2002.S.Security guidelines for vessels. Washington. pp 39353-39368 -The Coastguard and Maritime security.Facility security. : USCG.National plan to achieve maritime domain awareness for the national strategy for maritime security. pp 39240-39284 . ports. By Bruce Stubbs: Joint Force Quarterly (A Professional Military Journal) .TVEDT. Stroudgate Plc. 1 July 2003.Port security : A national planning guide. D.C. .Security For Passenger Vessels And Passenger Terminals . Washington. No.International perspective on maritime security. No.Outer continental shelf facility security.C. USCG. – Security issues. but further actions needed to secure the maritime energy supply. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE (GAO) .C.Maritime strategy for homeland security. October 2005.C. No. pp 39292-39315 UNITED STATES CUSTOMS SERVICE . pp 39284-39292 .Abstracts on maritime security. Marine Port Authority/Terminal Operators 69 . 68. . Vol. pp 39338-39353 . Washington. Autumn 2000 .Overview of area maritime security regulations. : USCG. D. July 2003.(Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular No. 126.Vessel security. 33 CRF Part 105. No.Maritime security: Progress made.(Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular 902. In: Federal Register. Vol.Automatic identification system : Vessel carriage requirement. 1 July 2003. .) . In: Federal register. . Clarifications issued 3 October. 68. In: Federal Register. 1 July 2003. 1 July 2003..C. BIMCO Review 1998.Implementation of national maritime security initiatives. O. D. 126. . 126. Vol.Recommended security guidelines for facilities. (First in a Series) . In: Federal Register. 126.S.Passenger Vessel Security Regulations. pp 83-84. D.C : USCG. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE . pp 39315-39338. 68. 126. 68.C-TPAT for U. 1 July 2003.Area maritime security. Vol. Washington. 1997. 126. 1999. No. D. London. : GAO. 68. (Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular No.. D.4 – NVIC 11-02 – 13 January 2003). 11-02) (COMDTPUB B16700. Washington.C. 1002. . Washington. 33CRF Part 103. : USCG. 2002 (Coast Guard Publication 3-01) . In: Federal register. and port security plans required for U.

– Maritime security : Training. N. 2009. WADE. London.(GAO-08-141) . B. Documents address new counterterrorism.. – African maritime security : A time for good order at sea. Wit Press. . VASSILEV.C.Sea carrier security recommendations for C-TPAT -Sea carrier instructions for C-TPAT . D. ' UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF STATES .International Conference Amends Maritime Treaties on Unlawful Acts. Washington.Joint statement of the US Customs and border protection and the European Commission : 25 June 2003. GAO. drills and exercises (inherent value). J. In: World Network of Maritime Institutes (WNMI) – The Academic – November 2003. BIMCO Review 2005. – Securing the Sulu Sea. non-proliferation offences. 2002. carriers and/or automated NVOCCs must submit a cargo declaration 24 hours before cargo is laden aboard the vessel at a foreign port. pp 121-132. 2007 (ISBN 978-1-84113-610-3) VREŸ. : GAO. WNMI. D. pp 139-147 WALDRON. (Admiral) – Regional maritime security and safety engagements: An Indian perspective. 2002 – Maritime Security : Better planning needed to help ensure an effective port security assessment program.Required documentation : Sea carrier – C-TPAT Agreement to voluntarily participate . pp 265-269 70 . 24 August 2011 (GAO-11-883T) VALENCIA. 2010. / DYER. Washington. Policy Forum Online. 2004 VERMA. VON TIGERSTROM. Prospects and problems. Southampton. Hart Publishing. 79-82. Book Production Consultants Plc. September 2004. 2007. Vol. L. D. Select Publishing et al. 2/No. M. A. J. and challenges.Maritime security : Progress made. V. In: Ho. In: Maritime security and MET. In: The Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO). . UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE (GAO) Container security : Current efforts to detect nuclear materials. new initiatives. 2005.V. Effective December 2.C. 10th July 2008.C. pp 38-46. – Port security in the United States after 1 July 2004. pp..Maritime security : Federal efforts needed to address challenges in preventing and responding to terrorist attacks on energy commodity tankers.Human security and international law. In: Australian Journal of Maritime and Ocean Affairs. Ostend. Washington.Customs’ Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) fact sheet and frequently asked questions .Container Security Initiative (CSI) Fact Sheet . 27 October 2005.24-hours rule.J. (Ed.. . Singapore. – ISPS Code and identification of the risks and threats to the Bulgarian ports and the civil ships sailing in the Black sea. F.Required documentation : Sea carrier – C-TPAT supply chain security profile questionnaire . but further actions needed to secure the maritime energy supply.) – Realising safe and secure seas for all : International Maritime Security Conference 2009.Container Security Initiative (CSI) . 4.

WCO safe framework of standards. 2009 (ISBN 978-0-7546-7727-7) African 71 . 2010. In: Secretariat of the Pacific Community Seminar on ship/port interface and trade facilitation . (Eds) et al – Legal challenges in maritime security.S. Southampton. (Eds. . ports : (USCG-2001-11865) : 19 August 2002.F. – Maritime security vis-à-vis fair treatment of seafarers : A conundrum in the development of international maritime law.Improving security for international liner shipping.) – Serving the rule of international law – Essays in honour of Professor David Joseph Attard. (Admiral) – regional maritime security and safety engagements: A US perspective. (Ed. By Mr Kunio Mikuriya.A. (Ed. pp 45-59 WARSASH MARITIME ACADEMY – Ship security awareness : Training handbook. Deputy Secretary-General. United States Naval Institute. 2009. Keynote speech delivered at the Ministerial Conference on International Transport Security.S Coast Guard in the matter of : Notification of arrival in U. Select Publishing et al. S. . London. J. F. Appendix XIX . R. 2005. June 2006. 75-78. J. WILLARD.) – Realising safe and secure seas for all : International Maritime Security Conference 2009. WISSWALL. (Vice-Admiral) – Maritime strategy in an age of blood and belief.M. In: Gutiérrez. Singapore. Government’s efforts to secure America-s commerce. 2002 WU. .WALDRON.. Maritime security : A common commitment.Memorandum of understanding on co-operation between the World Customs Organization (WCO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO). / ZOU. JR.Fiji Islands (27-31 October 2003 : Suva). .H. S.K.W. pp. JR. Suva : The Secretariat of the Pacific Community. 2008. 2005 (ISBN : 0-86587-971-0) WALL. K.Maritime security handbook : Implementing the new U.) . – Measures of maritime security adopted by United Kingdom. Taranto (Italy). 2010. In: Nordquist. Warsah Maritime Academy. Lanham (MA) : Government Institutes. N.L. Tokyo.Maritime security. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. / DYER. 2002 . Routledge. WINNEFELD. 2003. pp 3-40 WORLD CUSTOMS ORGANIZATION (WCO) . authorized economic operator guidelines. initiatives and regulations. Japan. A.Comments of the World Shipping Council before the Department of Transportation U.. pp 453-464 WAMBUA. Leiden. In: Ho. Farnham : Ashgate Publishing Ltd.Resolution of the Customs Co-operation Council on the framework of standards to secure and facilitate global trade. In: Security Review Vol. . In: Fondazione Marittima Ammiraglio Michelagnoli. 2006 WHITE HOUSE – The National strategy for maritime security. P. F. September 2005.Summary of port and maritime security bill (S1214) : 15 November 2002.Maritime security in the South China Sea : Regional implications and international cooperation.S. 2006. R. 12-13 January 2006. 2002 . M.Customs’ Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) – Liner shipping industry provides impressive support for U. July 2008. 18/Issue 3.Enhancing regional maritime cooperation in Africa: The planned end state. pp 305-314 WOLFRUM. – Fighting terrorism at sea: Options and limitations under international law.M.S. WCO WORLD SHIPPING COUNCIL .

Training of ships' personnel in security responsibilities. G. / ASYALI. pp 129-138 ZOK. pp 169-177 YOUNG. . The entire package provides critical guidance to the Ship Security Officer (SSO).2.Proceedings of the Marine Safety Council. d. M. stowaways) SCIA. MARITIME TRATINING SERVICES – Security now: Ship security officer guide to ISPS. 2010. Tel : +45 44444500 Fax : +45 44444450 Security (piracy. 2. Each of the 4 programs in the Security NOW! Series looks at an important element in the security planning process. (ISPS Code) . pp 51-60 ZHAO. threat assessments and possible defensive measures is crucial amongst the policies that have to be considered. Amsterdam. In: Maritime security and MET. Copenhagen. B-100 – Brussels Belgium Tel. In: Shahbazian. IOS Press. pp 78-81 VIDEOS VIDEOTEL MARITIME INTERNATIONAL – Shipboard security. MOU Tel. Wit Press. Maritime homeland security. E. / Rogova. Smart card technology in the maritime transportation industry. drug smuggling.. April-June 2003. Bagsvaerd. Southampton. ZEC.: +45 4436 6860 European Sea Ports Association (ESPO) Avenue Michel-Ange 68. J.YILMAZEL. Et al – Ports security organization and functionality – Implementation of the ISPS Code in medium and small countries. A training course for the ship security officer. Vol. 2005. 60/No. 24. Denmark. et al – Examining and promoting ISPS Code training for Chinese seafarers. In: USCG .Balancing maritime security and freedom of navigation on the high seas: A study of the multilateral negotiation process in action. In: University of Queensland Law Journal. C. DK-2880. In: Maritime security and MET. X. No.M. 2005. Southampton.: +32 2 736 3463 ICC International Maritime Bureau Maritime House 1 Linton Road Barking IG11 8HG United Kingdom Tel. E. 2005. Videotel is harnessing its considerable resources and expertise to help you meet your responsibilities in an efficient and cost-effective way. Vol.: +44 20 8591 3000 72 . (Eds) – Human systems integration to enhance maritime domain awareness for port/harbour security. USEFUL ADDRESSES Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) Bagsvaerdvej 161. Wit Press. – An analysis of port state control inspections related to the ISPS Code.

: +44 20 7976 0660 International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) PO Box 5804 Majorstua 0308 Oslo Norway Tel.: +1 604 945 6320 International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) 6th Floor 36 Broadway London SW1H 0BH United Kingdom Tel.ICC International Maritime Bureau Piracy Reporting Center at Kuala Lumpur 16.: +65 6778 0955 International Association of Airport and Seaport Police (IAASP) Office of the Secretariat 111.: +47 22 122640 UK Office The Baltic Exchangfe 38 St. North Tower New Pier Takeshiba 1-11-1 Kaigan Minato-ku Tokyo 105-0022 Japan 73 .03A Wisma Nusantara Jalan Punchak 50250 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Tel : +60 3 238 5769 Fax : +60 3 2101 0014 Anti Piracy Helpline Numbers Tel + 603 238 5763 Institute of South East Asian Studies 30 Heng Mui Terrace Pasir Panjang Singapore 119614 Tel. British Columbia V3E 3J7 Canada Tel. Mary Axe London EC3A United Kingdom Tel.: +44 207 369 1649 International Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH) 5th Floor. B3-1410 Parkway Boulevard Coquitlam.

International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) 38 St.: +44 207 417 8400 International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) 5 Boulevard du Roi Albert II. Bte 1 Brussels . quai Charles de Gaulle 69006 Lyon France Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Seafarer’s Training and Certification Branch Spring Place 105 Commercial Road Southampton SO15 1EG United Kingdom Tel. Mary Axe London EC3A 8BH United Kingdom Tel. WA 98102 USA United States Tel. E.467.: +44 207 403 2733 Interpol General Secretariat 200..: +1 410 586 9200 Maritime Training Services 2633 Eastlake Ave.: +44 (23) 8032 9231 Maritime Security Council Scientist’s Cliffs Port Republic Maryland 20676-2600 United States Tel.: +1 206. : +32 02 224 0211 International Chamber of Shipping Limited (ICS) Carthusian Court 12 Carthusian Street London EC1M 6EB United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 7417 8844 International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) ITF House 49-60 Borough Road London SE1 1DS United Kingdom Tel. #302 Seattle.8458 Norwegian Shipwoners’ Association PO Box 1452 Vika NO-0116 Oslo Tel.: +47 22 40 1500 74 .B-1210 Belgium Tel.

Coalition for Secure Ports (USA) – Proposal to improve port security Department of Immigration and Citizenship (Australia).Directive Proposal on enhancing port security..: +44 20 7439 6301 INTERNET RESOURCES American Association of Ports Authorities (AAPA) – Increase security funding vital to protect US ports. Criticism of Port Security Grant Program ‘misses the mark. – Response of ESPO to the Draft report of the European Parliament. March 2006. Maritime Crew Visa. 14 March 2004. Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) – Maritime security Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) – General and ISPS Chittagong Port Authority (Bangladesh) – ISPS Code. Suite 790 Arlington. VA 22203-1804 United States of America Videotel Marine International Ramillies House 1/2 Ramillies Street London W1V 1DF United Kingdon Tel.United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention (ODCCP) Vienna International Centre PO Box 500 A-1400 Vienna Austria Tel.: +43 1 260600 Proceedings Magazine United States Coast Guard National Maritime Centre 4200 Wilson Blvd. Directive Proposal on enhancing port security Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) – The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s efforts to protect the nation’s seaports. ICC Commercial Crime Services ICS ISPS Code Checklist 75 . Electronic Private Information Center (EPIC) Counter-terrorism bills and proposals EU NAVFOR European Sea Ports Organization (ESPO) . Position of ESPO.

The Library of Congress (USA) – Terrorism – General sites on terrorism. 2004. Maritime and Coastguard Agency (UK) .Maritime Security Branch Maritime Security Bulletin : News. Essential documents and links.NATO is conducting anti terrorism operation Active Endeavour in the Mediterranean. Lloyd’s Register ClassDirect Live – SeeThreat –SeeThreat is a web service from the Lloyd’s Register Group that continually scans the news networks and provides you with specific maritime security information so that you can make critical security decisions cost-effectively. Operation Unified Protectors Arms Embargo .Maritime Security Level : What is the law for the security of ships and port facilities? And Table of the port facilities with approved security plans Ministry of Transport of the Russian Federation Maritime Security Service. NATO is conducting this operation UNIFIED PROTECTOR in a determined but very progressive way and intends to minimize the disturbances caused to legitimate merchant shipping PlanetData – The security news network.International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) : Maritime Security International Association of Maritime Security Professionals (IAMSP) International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH) – Port security International Council of Cruise Lines (ICCL) International Crisis Group International Labour Organization : Maritime and port security International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINS) – Hazardous sea. 13 December 2005 Operation Active Endeavour .Supported by the NATO Shipping Centre (NSC). International Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH) 76 . Conferences. Maritime security Political Terrorism Database : Geographic areas “Port security”. magazine. The operation is aimed at protecting Merchant vessels against attacks by terrorists. April 1. Maritime Sector Vulnerable to Devastating Terrorist Attacks. SeeThreat filters this information for the locations and threat levels you choose. Maritime Security Centre – Horn of Africa MSC (HOA) f Maritime Security Council Ministry of Land Infrastructure and Transport (Japan) . NATO Shipping Centre New Zealand Maritime Security Overview – Maritime Security Act The ongoing threat to cruise ships : STRATFOR.

Up-to-date information on news and events affecting port conditions. pp 125-141 77 . ne nécessite ni financement ni commando suicide. pp 42-55 NICHOLAS A. pp 16-21 TIM LYNCH. all of which are searchable by port. 'Legal considerations in the implementation of long-range identification and tracking systems for vessels' . dit-il.S.Implications for environmental law in the USA and abroad' ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND LAW. March 2007 (Vol. security and environmental protection of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore' . MARY ANN PALMA.Le cauchemar du pétrolier transformé en Kuala Lumpur de l'envoyé spécial du Monde. N. ROBINSON. afin de le forcer à enclencher le pilotage automatique dans la direction choisie. 'Terrorism's unintended casualties . explique Noël Chong.37.2-3) . No. Preventing and Combating Terrorism United States Maritime Security Expo United States Mission to the European Union  Response to terrorism  Container Security Initiative / Port Security World Customs Organization – Security and facilitation of the international supply chain. as well as risk indicators at country level with analyses of internal and external threats – provides details of port and terminal facilities worldwide. SURTIMAR .13. placer votre arme sur la tempe du pilote.Sea-Sentinel. country and region. 2007. 'Canadian maritime security: from the Navy on patrol to the police on the beat' .1) .152) . pp 287-332 JOSHUA HO. ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS LEGAL PERIODICALS For a list of articles up to December 2007 click here for previous edition KLEIN.Implications for environmental law in the USA and abroad' ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND LAW.Littoral state meetings on enhancing the safety.Sûreté Navale Maritime & Portuaire . Nos.THE JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW. Jan/Feb 2007 (No. Department States – Country reports on terrorism 2004 United States – State Department. March 2007 (Vol. "Vous n'avez pas besoin de fonds mais seulement de courage pour monter à bord. Provides information needed to comply with the ISPS Code and enables to evaluate quickly potential risks to vessel or cargo. Terrorism Research Centre. ROBINSON. Une telle "bombe à retardement".37.MARITIME STUDIES. Jan/Feb 2007 (Vol. pp 22-26 PROFESSOR MARTIN TSAMENYI. pp 125-141 NICHOLAS A. In: Denver Journal of International Law and Policy Vol. . responsable régional du Bureau maritime international (BMI). Jan/Feb 2007 (No. 'The International Maritime Organisation .2-3) .MARITIME STUDIES. enfermer l'équipage et quitter le bateau".The right of visit and the 2005 Protocol on the suppression of unlawful acts against the safety o maritime navigation. 35/No.152) . 2. Nos. 'Terrorism's unintended casualties . Inc United Kingdom Department for Transport – Maritime Security United States Coast Guard Port Security Directorate U.

pp 6-13 Maritime terrorism: The threat from small vessels'. arms." . " . . C.J.empirical findings on financial implications for port facilities'.MARITIME STUDIES.Cruising with Terrorism: Jurisdictional Challenges to The Control of Terrorism in The Cruising Industry.Terror on the high seas : The trade and development implications of U. In: Brooklyn Law Review Vol. pp 485-499 LOBSINGER. 2007.2) .156) . T. narcotics and consumer goods in the Straits of Malacca. Winter 2007. November/December 2007 (No. 34 No. which came into force on 1 July 2004. November/December 2007 (No. Summer 2007 (Vol.J. Winter 2007.also sometimes referred to as private Military Companies.MARITIME STUDIES. Incremented counter-terrorist policies are not able to provide the required level of security.MARITIME STUDIES. Winter 2007." .157) . pp 1-13 The role of private security companies in securing the Malacca Strait'. September/October 2007 (No. These companies offer services in addition to security provided by the littoral states and their government agencies.MARITIME STUDIES. 2007. . an increasing number of Private Security Companies (PSCs .5) . This paper explores the role of private companies in securing vessels. July/August 2007 (No. pp 24-27 'Milestone agreement reached on Cooperation over the Straits of Malacca and Singapore'. October 2007 (Vol. "In the past few years.31. A. pp 7-423 DR REGINA ASARIOTIS. September/October 2007 (No. Two high profile cases are demanding conflicting policies in managing the nation's security. " .MARITIME STUDIES. "To address the maritime security issue.3) .STUART KAYE. May/June 2007 (Vol. Trafficking in the Strait of Malacca'. 'International measures to protect oil platforms. . PMCs) has emerged and is offering and conducting maritime security services in the Malacca Strait. in which the littoral States of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore can work together with the international maritime community to enhance navigational safety.157) . pp 277-312 FLORESTAL.THE JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW.Heightened security: The need to incorporate Articles 2bis(1)(A) and 8BIS(5)(E) of the 2005 draft SUA Protocol into Part VII of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea . May/June 2007 (No. After a decade of neglect." . the IMO Diplomatic Conference adopted in December 2002 the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.Post-9/11 Security in Post-WWII World: The Question of Compatibility of Maritime Security Efforts with Trade Rules and International Law. . in large part due to the country's role in Afghanistan. The European Union fully agreed with its contents.TULANE MARITIME LAW JOURNAL. Canada is beginning to invest in its military forces. 72/Part 2.MARITIME POLICY AND MANAGEMENT. E. No. pp 107-136 78 . TULANE MARITIME LAW JOURNAL. pp 61-130 BUZAWA. Challenges confronting Canada in Maritime Security: An Interview with Rear Admiral Roger Girouard (Canadian Forces. has been formally agreed. M. Ret'd). 725/2004 transposes in Community Law the associated rules. "A new framework.A. "A terrorist attack on a merchant ship or port containing a 'high consequence' cargo would have untold human and economic consequences to Australia. pp 14-22 Maritime security in the European Union . Regulation (EC) No. HASSIBA BENAMARA. A. ports and offshore energy installations in the Malacca Strait and suggests that current national regulation and oversight of PSCs operating in this area is insufficient and needs improvement. These threats include the trafficking of humans. pp 181-202 MARCOPOULOS. 'The costs of implementing the ISPS Code' . TULANE MARITIME LAW JOURNAL. pp 33-34 LYNCH.Flags of Terror: An Argument for Rethinking Maritime Security Policy Regarding Flags of Convenience. national security measures. Non-traditional threats posed by non-state actors have always been a major concern to Malaysia as they will invariably impact on Malaysia's national interests." . 16/Part 1. pipelines and submarine cables from attack' .154) . "Canada's National Security infrastructure has had to adjust to new realities in a post 9/11 world. pp 206-208 LLEW RUSSELL.156) . "The threat to maritime security in the Strait of Malacca includes nontraditional security issues that have an impact on the development and stability of a nation and even mankind.D.155) . Ret'd)'. 'Australia looks at the possibility of an alternative cargo reporting regime' . In: Pacific Rim Law and Policy Journal Vol. security and environmental protection in the Straits. S. The failure to regulate or monitor the small vessels that would probably be involved in an attack requires recognition and action. . No. Challenges confronting Canada in Maritime Security: An Interview with Rear Admiral Roger Girouard (Canadian Forces.MARITIME STUDIES. TULANE MARITIME LAW JOURNAL.13. pp 385-447 HARRIGNTON.S. pp 1-5 PERMAL.

pp 315-333. pp 737-751 Maritime Policy and KIM. "The IMO Maritime Safety Committee Resolution MSC 202(81) on Adoption of Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea 1974. a group of 10 armed men boarded the 46..14 Issue 2). J. which was held in Singapore on 1-3 june 2007. May/June 2008 (pp 27-29) FREVOLA.China's maritime security policy in the Indian Ocean: Assessment and implication for Korea. entered into force on 1 January 2008. and NOLAN.XU KE. Professor Sudarsono's speech reflected the new development of Indonesian maritime security policy. and thus the extent to which this rule has been applied over the last period following the decision in Winter Storm Shipping has led to the frequent employment of Rule E(7)(s) of the Supplemental Rules as the only equivalent countermeasure. pp 573-593 GIBSON. M / PARK.MARITIME STUDIES. OCEAN DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNATIONAL LAW.D. pp 49-68 TECHNICAL/TRADE PERIODICALS “Please note that the list below only reflects the articles published in the last 12 months. Indiana's poet Laureate.Building the global maritime security network : A multinational legal structure to combat transnational threats. 3/Issue 1. March – April 2008 (Vol. Its statement 79 . 2008. B.491dwt product tanker NS Spirit about 30nm off Lagos. M. / SMITH. "'Veins of goodness." MARITIME STUDIES. ‘Maritime security and maritime law in Australia’. it only tells half the story about these complex dwelling places and their communities. pp 260-263 PEPPETTI. C. 18/Issue 3. 2. P-J. – A strategic perspective on security and naval issues in the South China Sea. His speech covered three issues: the dominance of the United States in maritime security cooperation. "Indonesian Defense Minister Professor Juwono Sudarsono called for stronger cooperation in maritime security with China and Japan in his speech at the sixth Shangri-la Dialogue.158) . “The recognition of Rule B of the Supplemental Rules as an extraordinary remedy in relation to maritime attachments. love and grace / Intertwine through sacred space' (Joyce Brinkman).158) . The Indonesian New Maritime Security Proposal'. N. In: Management Vol. M. In: International Journal of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Vol. In: Naval Law Review.” THE JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW. J.J. H. / TSAMENYI. . 2009. C. pp 74-156 GERMOND. particularly those initiated by the IMO and the World Customs Organisation which address maritime security. and considers how Australia has implemented these international regimes. KAPPATOU. 41. A complete list is available on request. pp 162-179 KHALID. Ch.Re-thinking European security interests and the ESDP: Explaining the EU's antipiracy operation. However. RAHMAN. the stronger roles of China and Japan in maritime security issues. 37/Part 7. In: 2009. . owner Novoship reported. Vol.14 Issue 3). BATEMAN. A. May/J une 2008 (Vol. . M. S. pp 33-34 BORDAHANDY. . Early on 22 November. . In: Contemporary Security Policy Vol." MARITIME STUDIES. Dec 2010. Jun 2011. H. and the notion of comprehensive security. in one of which a seafarer was shot. January/February 2008 (No.” INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW. To the romantics.Maritime security and international law in Africa. “ This article reviews the major international initiatives. pp 25-26 LRIT Regulation is now in force'.” 2011 Wave of attacks hits shipping off Nigeria “Nigeria’s offshore oil industry suffered a series of armed attacks towards the end of the year.E. 'Protecting port cities and communities from security threats'. the sublime phrase conjured by Joyce Brinkman. 30/No. The LRIT regulation was introduced to SOLAS in May 2006 as a mandatory requirement for SOLAS ships and mobile offshore drilling units. which establishes SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19-1 on long-range identification and tracking of ships (LRIT). is aptly descriptive of port cities and coastal communities.Maritime policy in the Indo-Pacific region : Ship vulnerability issues. ‘Rule E(7) counter-security in the US – a new trend in Rule B maritime attachments’." . 2010. January/February 2008 (No. and FORREST. pp 60-70 African Security Review Vol.

p 2 Biometric identity card system mired in delays .999 dwt Dominia was en route from Ghent to Lagos at the time of the incident. following ballistic tests. Millenia Maritime has confirmed media reports that a criminal gang had boarded the ship in the early hours of Tuesday. Some shipowners have called for guards to join ships at Port Louis." LLOYD’S LIST. 27 January 2011. The crew managed to hide themselves in a shelter. is applied by trained technicians and can be done in about 48 hours. 27 January 2011. 27 January 2011.By David Osler "Biometric identification for seafarers has been on shipping’s regulatory agenda ever since September 11.By Roger Hailey "West coast port Bristol . The public and private sectors should work together to turn the recommendations into workable solutions.By Julian Macqueen "A report commissioned by the Dutch government has recommended that accredited armed guards should be allowed on board vulnerable Dutch-flagged ships. The 2009 -built. use of violence and the way incidents are recorded. dubbed Water Dragon Clear Composite. The report identifies a range of issues. 19 January 2011. 39. All that such a system is being asked to do is to convert fingerprints into a biometric template which will then be encoded into a bar code on the seafarer’s identity document. “Our recommendations are an expression of the principle. such as rules of engagement. p 4 Slow steaming offsets security toll "The steep cost of placing armed guards on board ships running through the Gulf of Aden can be partially offset by the savings made by operating at a slower speed. which they claimed included providing information before the shipper was in possession of it. But it appears in retrospect that getting agreement in principle was the easy bit. However. p 26 Shippers blast Brussels over box security . 31 January 2011. At the time of writing. p 7 80 . when the US fast -tracked it through the International Labour Organisation with no votes against. he told Lloyd’s List. who thought the 2002 International Ship and Port Facility Security code would prove the definitive regulations on security. p 13 Seafarers seized in robbery off Nigeria are set free . secretary of the committee of Peace and Security at the Advisory Council on International Affairs.” said Mark Waanders. abducting three men in the process and heading towards the shore in one of the vessel’s lifeboats. It is unclear whether a ransom has been paid. it added.By Gavin van Marle "Shippers serving Europe have criticised the European Union’s new container security regulations introduced at the beginning of the month as having caused confusion among carriers and their customers." FAIRPLAY. Under EU Regulation 1875/2006. laden with 39. 13 January 2011. according to UK company Idarat Protection. A spokesperson for the UK’s Department for Transport confirmed: “Bristol is the only ‘pilot’ port to be designated under the Port Security Regulations 2009. January 2011.’” SAFETY AT SEA INTERNATIONAL. “The remaining UK ports at which the regulations will apply will be designated in two tranches." LLOYD’S LIST. since January 1 all container shipping lines bringing goods into the customs area of the EU have been required to lodge an entry summary declaration (ENS) with the customs authority of the destination EU port at least 24 hours before the cargo is loaded at the non-European port." LLOYD’S LIST. Mauritius or Sri Lanka on westbound voyages and in Suez or Djibouti on the eastbound route and stay on board for about five days." LLOYD’S LIST. colloquially known as ILO 185. known as an SID.currently planning a 1. Thus all seafarers will be issued with a unique personal identification proof that can be used all over the world. reports from shipper bodies suggested some lines have extended that time-frame to as much as five days before loading. Since the pirates left the vessel no attempts to attack the tanker again have been registered.is leading the way on port security. which produced the report. The mariners where returned yesterday and all 22 crew members were safe and well. p 2 Dutch report finds ships need armed guards .By David Osler "Three Filipino seafarers taken hostage earlier this week after a robbery on board a combination tanker off the coast of Nigeria were freed on Wednesday. Planned completion for the first tranche is end of 2012 and the second at the end of 2013. just 18 nations had signed up to Seafarers’ Identity Documents Conven tion (Revised) 2003. 28 January 2011. being the only UK maritime facility so far to have met the requirements of the Port Security Regulations 2009." FAIRPLAY.noted: ‘The intruders opened fire with automatic weapons. according to a statement from the vessel’s Greek managers. p 20 Protection of a higher calibre "A film that can be applied to the inside of ships’ windows will make them bullet proof.” Port of Bristol Co chief executive Simon Bird echoes the thoughts of many in the UK ports industry. 2001. according to Anglo-Eastern Ship Management managing director Ashok Prasad. The protective system.5m teu container terminal . p 2 Bristol is leading the way in Port Security Regulations 2009 . either during a normal port call or by a riding crew." LLOYD’S LIST.175 cu m of unleaded gasoline.

with one pleading guilty against legal advice to avoid delaying his ship. under conditions that are somewhat vague. Reid said. which administers the waters on the east side of the Rock and had granted clearance for them to be there." FAIRPLAY. 21 February 2011. which is leading the project." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Côte d’Ivoire and Comoros added to terror-risk list .000 boxes destined for the US. p 2 Spain threat to merchant ships off Gibraltar . Instead. but it should nonetheless be considered as a potential hazard in Egyptian waters. “Pirates really don’t like it when al-Shabaab moves in and tries to horn in on the business and get some sort of cut." LLOYD’S LIST. His advice follows the detention of four ships in recent weeks and charges laid against the respective masters. describing “occasional marriages of convenience” as well as turf wars between the two over money received through ransom payments made by shipowners. p 2 Bremerhaven presses on with scanning .The 100% clause was enacted into law in August 2007. known as the SAFE Port Act." LLOYD’S LIST.By John Drake "With political turmoil in Egypt and neighbouring countries. with all that entails. told Fairplay. preparations are going ahead in the port of Bremerhaven for a 100% box-scanning system. The preliminary reaction from industry is that the concession will not benefit foreign seafarers. the Department of Homeland Security has announced.By Brian Reyes "A Spanish warship sailed into British waters on the east side of Gibraltar yesterday and attempted to order merchant ships out of the area. 25 February 2011.By Rajesh Joshi "A bill introduced in the US Senate has proposed a broad waiver of the requirement to scan 100% of incoming containers at all foreign ports. 21 April 2011. As a result. I think there’s indirect benefits to each of them by the fact they’re operating in the same space." LLOYD’S LIST.By Michelle Wiese Bockmann "The US State Department has drawn links between al-Qaeda-linked terrorists and Somalian pirates. the volume will grow to 530. with a daily maximum in excess of 2.By Katrin Berkenkopf "Despite the latest developments in the US.By David Osler "The US Coast Guard is to impose additional requirements on vessels entering the US in the case of those that have visited a port in either Côte d’Ivoire or the Comoros Islands in their previous five calls. 11 February 2011. “Al-Shabaab sacrifices some ideological purity by tolerating the existence of piracy as it’s really unIslamic. which is designed to implement the 9/11 Commission’s recommendations. 21 April 2011. p 8 Ships with arms aboard face arrest "Ship operators with vessels going to South Africa with arms on board have been warned they face having the ship detained and the master arrested unless they are in possession of a permit under the Firearms Control Act. According to a briefing note from Inchcape Shipping Services . The research institute ISL. but the provision still made its way into the law because of political expediency.By Rajesh Joshi "US immigration authorities have closed a loophole that so far had prevented foreign maritime workers from acquiring a biometric identification card required for access to restricted port facilities and terminals. A fig leaf in the SAFE Port Act already allows the US Secretary for Homeland Security to grant waivers to individual ports. which were anchored around two miles off the Rock. he will now carry a criminal record with him wherever he sails." LLOYD’S LIST.500 boxes to be handled in the course of one day. drawing a formal protest from Britain and a furious response from the Gibraltar government. said the results of an estimate of costs and economic viability will be available in early 2012. The new arrangements enter force from June 10. sailed from the area shortly after.000. they contacted the Gibraltar Port Authority. p 22 US Senate Bill seeks to waive 100% box scans law . The ships. For 2012.” counter piracy and maritime security co-ordinator Donna L Hopkins told Lloyd’s List. The 68 m long Atalaya. The British military despatched a rapid response rigid-hull inflatable boat to intercept Atalaya. as well as foreign oil rig workers employed on the US Outer Continental Shelf. The possibility of a terrorist attack against a vessel passing through the region may still seem remote.New US visa to benefit foreign ship executives . Alan Reid. “Two radio warnings were issued to confirm that the [Spanish] vessel was in British Gibraltar Territorial Waters and that she should leave immediately. The 9/11 Commission itself had rejected the 100% scanning idea in favour of a risk based approach. with a maximum of 1. given the ever-changing nature of ship fixtures.” said a spokesman for Britain’s Ministry of Defence. p 1 Middle East unrest throws spotlight on risk for tankers . With the trade volume set to expand over the coming years. but instead will be found useful by a small subset of expatriate foreign nationals employed in US offices or on-dock facilities. as part of the Security and Accountability for Every Port Act. which is armed with cannon and heavy machine guns. The potential number of boxes affected by the scanning process has already been calculated.000 boxes in export to the US. p 2 US points to ‘marriages of convenience’ for pirates and terrorists . shipowners need to remain vigilant. ignored the order. which is currently scheduled to take effect from July 2012. but I don’t think there’s deliberate collaboration. 14 April 2011. 5 May 2011. each affected 81 . the ISL forecast anticipates an annual volume of 400.”" LLOYD’S LIST. MD of the South African P&I Club. Yet the time limit to obtain the permit “is totally impractical”.

6 June 2011.By Roger Hailey "Washington is playing down European press reports that the US is to drop 100% scanning of US-bound maritime containers at the foreign port of departure. ensure that access points are guarded." LLOYD’S LIST. attempt to execute a security declaration. If only a single one of these hubs fails. Such a move to extend similar requirements to smaller vessels would bring in a potentially huge number of vessels and small craft and pose a vast administrative and enforcement task.”" LLOYD’S LIST. 24 June 2011. according to news agency AFP. The first step in its Project SecureSeas aims to find out how each EU member is dealing with security issues relating to small vessels and the possibility of creating a computer-based register of non-ISPS vessels. US Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told a Port of Rotterdam press conference on 22 June. we think we are much safer if we used a layered." LLOYD’S LIST. no. which fought a brief war over their geographic borders in 1979. Dr Storey said flare ups between the governments in Beijing and Hanoi over resource-rich waters in the region had been increasing over the past two to three years. The US will no longer press ports of departure for full container scanning prior to entry into its territory. The PricewaterhouseCoopers transportation & logistics survey of 80 executives highlights a “56% probability of attacks” on supply chains and advises companies to plan now to protect their assets.” Ms Napolitano also told a Dutch radio station: “We think there is a much better way to achieve securi ty than 100% scanning. The ISPS Code. 14 June 2011.300 -gt Binh Minh 02 (built 1983). p 2 US backs off 100% box scans "The US now believes in a multilayered approach to hazardous cargo. risk-based approach than the 100% approach.By Craig Eason "Norwegian shipowners have welcomed a clarification from the country’s government on the use of armed guards on their ships. the economic consequences could be enormous after just a short period of time.” She was then asked by the radio journalist: “So there is not going to be 100% scans in the port?” to which Ms Napolitano replied: “Not in the near future. and report those actions to the pertinent USCG Captain of the Port prior to arrival in the US. and affect most economies around the globe.By Gary Dixon "Vietnam and China have gone on the offensive in a row over the sabotage of seismic-survey ships in the South China Sea. The Norwegian government is expected to release new regulations today. And so based on everything else we are doing.ship must implement the International Safety Management code at level two while in either country. The diplomatic episode began in May when Vietnam said Chinese boats had cut cables from PetroVietnam’s 2. p 4 Brussels eyes an extension of ISPS Code . PwC partner and global transportation and logistics industry leader Klaus-Dieter Ruske said: “Today 90% of the worldwide trading volume is concentrating on about 39 gateway regions. on Wednesday: “We believe the so-called 100% requirement is probably not the best way to go. implemented in 2004. Norway clarifies ruling on armed guard use . have since exchanged accusations and restated long-standing claims of sovereignty over maritime territory in the South China Sea. and so the statute contemplates actual amendment. p 2 Napolitano plan to can 100% box scan is lost in translation . The new rules will give owners of 82 . which stepped up the risk of an armed confrontation at sea such as occurred between the two countries in 1974 and 1988. 17 June 2011.By Colum Murphy "As tensions between China and Vietnam increase over maritime territorial disputes in the South China Sea. 21 June 2011. p 2 Shipping dodges fallout in China’s spat with Vietnam . p 26 Attacks on global chokepoints set to rise . Cyber. He added that there was “absolutely no evidence” that the current standoff had impeded freedom of navigation in the South China Sea. covers vessels of more than 500 gt. pirate and terrorist attacks on global supply chains are expected to rise in the next 20 years." TRADEWINDS. at least for now. claiming a Chinese fishing boat used a “cable-cutting device” and became trapped in a network of underwater cables being used by a PetroVietnam -chartered Norwegian vessel.By Roger Hailey "Gateways are ‘Achilles’ heel’ of shipping with dire effect on global economy if just one hit. p 2 Vietnam and China battle over alleged survey-ship sabotage ." LLOYD’S LIST. Europe’s top container hub. Now Vietnam is accusing China of harassing another survey vessel.”" LLOYD’S LIST. US Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano told AFP news agency in Rotterdam. that will strengthen and clarify certain aspects of the country’s existing ship security laws. including leisure craft. after giving a br iefing to the country’s shipowners this week. security experts and shipping industry participants say the impact on conventional shipping is minimal. although experts disagree on the specific threat to shipping’s “Achilles’ heel” of maritime chokepoints. The two countries. 15 June 2011. log all security actions. Norway developed its first rules on ship security in 2007 but they did not deal with the then unknown threat of piracy.By Steve Matthews "The European Commission is considering extending maritime security measures to cover smaller vessels that fall outside the statutory requirements of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. which covers important shipping routes and may hold large oil-and-gas reserves.

Mr Guo expressed a preference for UK security firms that employ former military personnel. But there are signs that the problem is being displaced rather than disappearing." LLOYD’S LIST. “Attacks off Cotonou .”" LLOYD’S LIST. it was inevitable that flag states and the wider shipping industry would require guidance and advice. 13 July 2011. Containerisation was supposed to reduce opportunities for theft. Maritime security risks have thus shifted from Nigeria’s core to its periphery. according to statistics compiled by Bergen Risk Solutions. almost certainly with significant involvement of Nigerian criminals." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST. pp 1-14 Shipping Regulations and Guidance Container security moves a step forward "Cargo theft has been a perennial problem for ship operators.” SEAWAYS." FAIRPLAY SOLUTIONS. “There is significant positive change in Nigeria’s maritime security environment.” said BRS principal Arild Nodland. acknowledging that the government is not in a position to provide armed protection for every ship. said SSA executive director Daniel Tan. have skyrocketed over the last quarter. Jul/Aug 2011.Norway-flagged vessels the procedures they will need to follow if they wish to employ armed security when transiting the Gulf of Aden or any other waters believed to be at risk from piracy. 18 July 2011. one for flag states and one for shipowners and operators. at the Calabar River and the Bakassi Peninsula on the Cameroonian border. subject to certain safeguards. 12 July 2011." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 The route to security regulation – By Steven Jones “The use of armed security guards has increased dramatically recently in the face of increased attacks and violence from pirates. However. 15 July 2011. In: Issue 6. but the exact legal position is not clear. he accepts that companies should be able to decide what level of security they provide on their ships. A PVI spokesman said today that the company had seen a 140% increase in completed transits in the first half of this year. Coscol would use armed guards to defend its vessels. Benin. Foreign Office minister Henry Bellingham has told a parliamentary committee. pp 15-16 Coscol to spend $12m on protection . the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee has now come up with two sets of interim guidance on the use of armed guards. Chief executive Guo Jin said that in situations where sailing through such waters was unavoidable. 11 July 2011. This month alone. p 2 Interim guidance on the use of armed security personnel o board ship . p 2 Singapore shippers call for UN protection force . July 2011. The SAFE Port 83 . pp 10-11 UK poised to water down objections to armed guards . p 2 USA seeks box scan repeal “Supporters of a proposal to exempt containers destined for US ports from a law requiring 100% scanning of boxes are pushing for a fast track to Congressional approval. Following its meeting in May this year.By David Osler "Torm has named Protection Vessels International as its preferred provider of guard services. The value of the contract was not disclosed. July 2011. The SSA said this would help to get the participation of major flag states like Liberia and Panama. which lacked the resources for military deployments themselves." LLOYD’S LIST.By David Osler "Attacks on international shipping in Nigerian waters and off the Bakassi Peninsula were down in the second quarter of 2011. p 2 Fall in Nigerian piracy masks shift in danger zone . which is active in both the tanker and dry bulk sectors. but it remains a major issue of concern. With ever more ship owners/operators taking the difficult decision to ‘go armed’. p 2 Torm hires PVI to place guards on vessels . The news comes after employees at the Danish shipowner. The gover nment’s official position is that using armed guards is discouraged. In practical terms the force would consist of UN troops stationed at way points at which merchant vessels could pick up a protection squad before they navigated the most dangerous areas.By Colum Murphy "Shanghai-listed semi-submersible and multipurpose vessel operator Cosco Shipping (Coscol) will spend $12m this year to protect its vessels from piracy attacks while transiting waters off Somalia. and that doing so puts shipowners and armed guards at risk of legal sanctions. and would be a cheaper solution than extensive naval deployments. According to a local media report. The SSA presented its proposal to the UN’s ninth plenary meeting of the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia in New York on Thursday. were told in an internal announcement that the the company would in future deploy armed guards on ships at risk of pirate attack in the Gulf of Aden. To date the company has foiled one attempt by firing a warning shot when a suspect skiff approached the ship.By James Campbell "The Singapore Shipping Association has proposed the involvement of a dedicated UN force to protect commercial shipping in the Indian Ocean. a security consultancy specialising in theGulf of Guinea. 1 July 2011. with the exception of the country’s most southeasterly corner.By Steve Matthews "The UK government is likely to change its formal stance on British ships employing private armed guards to protect against pirate attacks. according to the British maritime security provider. it has deployed some 230 security operatives on task. Solutions examines the latest attempt to protect cargo in containers.

p 2 Germans step up pressure for armed guards . introduced in the Senate on 14 April by Republican Susan Collins from Maine and Democrat Patty Murray from Washington.By Eric Martin "Anders Behring Breivik’s 1. envisioned after the September 11 attacks in 2001 and commissioned about five years ago. to defend against pirate attacks in the latest sign that international approval of armed guards is becoming the de facto norm. whether armed or unarmed. thereby giving implicit acceptance of their employment on board ships. the government’s national maritime co-ordinator once again rejected the call for federal troops on ships." LLOYD’S LIST. He said Mr Shapiro “wants more focus by [the State Department] to find out what’s happening. p 4 US drops radiation scanning portals . and would become enforceable by July 2012. According to Arthur Bowring. Mr Penning acknowledged that some UK-flagged ships already carry armed guards. July 2011. particularly in the USA and Canada. Although port and cargo security needs have increased since the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the USA.By Rajesh Joshi "A US initiative to equip all ports and border crossings with nuclear radiation-detection portals. p 6 Cross-border security “Security prevention and detection procedures from part of a daily routine at seaports in the Americas and these activities have become more sophisticated and costly in recent years. managing director of the Hong Kong Shipowners’ Association. made public online shortly before the attacks. the US requested the meeting. p 17 A ship is not the place for armed security ‘cowboys’ .Reauthorization Act of 2011.” LLOYD’S LIST. referred to LNG carriers and crude oil tankers as “focused targets” for western European and Scandinavian countries. told a hearing of the homeland security technology sub-committee in the House of Representatives this week that his department “will not seek certification of large -scale deployment” of the Advanced 84 .” PORTS & HARBORS. The UK is among the latest planning to change its laws to permit UK flag ships to carry armed guards. what’s best to do”. 26 July 2011. “Legislation will have to be changed to protect our seafarers around the world." TRADEWINDS. 1 August 2011.By Tom Leander "A senior US official has told Hong Kong (China) shipowners that the US now “insists” that all US-flagged ships carry security personal. police forces and others.By Katrin Berkenkopf "German shipowners are keeping up pressure on the government to support the deployment of sovereign armed forces aboard domestic-flagged vessels. more money is required for everything from personnel and equipment to infrastructure and maintenance. despite another setback. A brief entry in the rambling. 22 July 2011. the International Maritime Organization’s Maritime Safety Committee agreed guidelines o n the use of armed guards for the prevention of piracy.500-page manifesto identifies vessels as “devastating” weapons. He added: “He was given the job to talk to people about what the industry thinks.” he told Lloyd’s List. director of the domestic nuclear detection office at the US Department of Homeland Security. would allow boxes that meet certain standards to bypass the 100% scanning rule. 20 July 2011. 29 July 2011.” PORTS & HARBORS. July 2011. attention has switched to the lengthening list of governments that are moving to regulate the legal position of ships under their flags carrying armed guards. Warren Stern. leaving many ports concerned about the future of federal security funding support.By Steve Matthews "During the current monsoon period in the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean. Increasingly. Breivik has been charged with terrorism crimes following a car bombing in Oslo and shooting on Utoya island that killed 76 people. Norway has recently passed legislation to allow armed security guards on its ships. The comment came in a meeting between Assistant Secretary of State for political and military affairs Andrew Shapiro and members of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association during a visit by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the Chinese territory yesterday. is beginning to decline. trade union. The US is actively encouraging their use and pressure is mounting on other governments such as Germany to follow suit In May. pp 10-11 UK to amend law on armed guards . when pirate attacks off Somalia have reduced. p 2 State Department ‘insists’ on guards for US vessels . federal spending for these measures." LLOYD’S LIST. He said that he understood the reason why companies were doing so and the fact that so far no ships carrying armed guards had been successfully hijacked by pirates. Following the latest meeting with owners. manifesto entitled “2083: A European Declaration of Independence” says LNG vessels and tanker trucks could make more potent targets than “benzene/gasoline vessels” because of a what he described as a significant blast effect. has died a quiet death. he is now open to the idea of private armed forces and has promised to evaluate necessary changes to the law. The man responsible for the deadly shooting and car -bomb attack in Norway last Friday viewed LNG carriers as potential terror targets.By Steve Matthews “UK shipping minister Mike Penning has confirmed that the government intends to introduce legislation to provide a legal framework to allow British ships to carry armed guards.”" LLOYD’S LIST. Breivik’s manifesto. p 1 Atrocity gunman saw LNG carriers as potential targets . However.

” added Mr Bowring. Katrin Berkenkopf and Friederike Krieger "Private security companies are sensing the possibility of profitable business with German owners. said. but say they would still prefer sovereign forces on board their ships.”" LLOYD’S LIST. the issue comes back on the agenda.By Roger Hailey "Almost 10 years after the 9-11 terrorist attacks. p 2 85 . Its publication comes as the IMO Maritime Safety Committee’s Working Group on Maritime Security and Piracy prepares for an intersessional meeting. 19 August 2011. and other smaller-scale technology. President Obama’s administration in Washington has been warned that federal funding cuts could affect the “security capabilities” of many US ports. private guards are only the second -best solution. The warning came from the American Association of Port Authorities.100-dwt Pavit (built 1990) had been drifting on the Indian Ocean for 10 days after its tow broke and was first spotted by local fishermen as it moved toward the shore. p 24 Danes and Dutch differ on armed guard policy . p 34 Hong Kong shipowners targeted by fraudsters . In an email on Friday. “We have checked the backgrounds of some of these individuals and found that their representations are fraudulent. 1 September 2011. which provides armed guards to German shipowners. 8 September 2011. However. it is not as easy and risk-free to deploy private security companies on German-flagged vessels as it is under several other flags including that of Liberia. This part of the Indian coastline is supposed to be much better protected following a seaborne-terrorist attack on the city in 2008 that left 164 dead. Norway or Denmark. It has prepared the document in association with the European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA) based on information provided by ICS members. starting on 12 September.Spectroscopic Portal. the more than 50% funding level cut recommended for Federal Emergency Management Agency’s State and Local Program grants . which also highlighted claims that US Navy special forces ." LLOYD’S LIST.” Max Johns. DHS plans to use hand-held devices called RadSeeker. Danish Shipowner Association director Jan Fritz Hansen said the use of armed guards had become the "standard necessity. 2 September 2011. “But we appreciate that the government is starting to move in this matter." LLOYD’S LIST. The city’s coastal security authorities and Santacruz c oastal police remain baffled as to how the tanker grounded without being noticed by the coastguards. managing director of Munich-based Result Group. as the project is called. p 4 Berlin set to permit private guards on German-flagged vessels .By Craig Eason "Danish shipowners want the European Union to take a more proactive role in the fight against piracy as more of them turn to armed guards to deter attacks. AAPA president and chief executive Kurt Nagle said: “For centuries. the Netherlands is taking a different approach.but whose real aim is fraud.By Patrick Hagen "German owners have welcomed government plans to officially allow private security firms to be active on German-flagged vessels. says Walfried Sauer.” he said. managing director Arthur Bowring said a “number” of members had reported such incidents. The 2.found evidence that the maritime industry is still a key Al-Qaida target for terrorist acts. Whenever there is news about a ship being attacked. secure seaport facilities are critical to protecting our borders and moving goods. 1 August 2011. 15 August 2011. seaports have been a vital part of this nation’s tr ansportation infrastructure. p 2 ICS compiles armed guard guidance "The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has compiled a summary of the policies and rules of a number of flag states detailing their attitude to ships carrying arms and private armed guards. which includes the Port Security Grant Program." LLOYD’S LIST. spokesman for the German shipowners’ association VDR. “For us.By Colum Murphy "Hong Kong Shipowners Association has urged members to exercise caution when dealing with individuals purporting to represent the Chinese government or mainland media ." TRADEWINDS. and safe." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST. and possibly made in an attempt to extort money as so-called ‘donations’ for various causes. “The individuals then ask if they can interview our members for various topical stories. could impact the current security capabilities of many US ports.By Patrick Hagen. “Regrettably. 4 August 2011. The country formed an advisory committee which submitted its recommendations to the government last week on its approach to private security. as physical onboard deterrents and the ongoing naval presence are failing to make a big difference". Instead. p 4 Mumbai caught off guard by giant visitor "A products tanker that washed up on Mumbai’s shores is proving something of an embarrassment to the country’s security authorities. p 5 German owners edge closer to use of onboard armed guards . It has advocated the use of military personnel rather than the private sector to the dismay of owners and unions. To owners frustration. p 2 Warning over US port security funding . red and golden flag.when they killed Osama Bin Laden in his Pakistan hideout ." FAIRPLAY. 12 August 2011. as the countrys government edges towards officially allowing owners to deploy armed mercenaries on ships flying the black. in particular a German one.

was motivated by a desire to act in the best interest of seafarers. 8 September 2011.By David Osler "A shipmanagement trade association is calling on flag states and charterers to allow operators greater freedom to employ armed guards on vessels transiting piracyprone waters. Any decision taken to provide armed guards should be based on a risk assessment of each vessel and should be in accordance with the guidance set out in the Best Management Practices 4 industry standard anti-piracy guidelines. surely the presence of arms on board actually reduces the overall number of pirate attacks. The RAK Carrier was carrying coal to Gujarat but had anchored. InterManager president Alastair Evitt said the campaign.Foul weather or foul play? . Its hull eventually cracked. DHS has indeed made significant strides in protecting the nation. India’s defence minister AK Antony has urged tighter security after two vessels were suspected of being scuttled off its coastline." TRADEWINDS. 16 September 2011. the Japanese are to discuss whether to follow suit. But crucially. is seen as a sign of increasing confidence by pirates to operate in what are considered secure outer harbour areas. Approval in Japan would be the most significant so far as the country has the strictest rules of any national flag regarding the carriage of arms on ships. which he claimed enjoys 90% support from the group's members. apparently drifted undetected into Indian waters from the Arabian Sea. an Indian government official told Fairplay.By Roger Hailey "A decade after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.By Adam Corbett "With one-quarter of Norwegian ships carrying weapons. The captain. sinking it. which travelled 13. chief engineer and owner.By Michael Farlie "Do vessels under flags that condone armed personnel on board attract less attention from pirates? SIR." LLOYD’S LIST. means that nearly one-quarter of Norwegian ships now carry military-style private guards."" p 2 Security boss wants guidelines from ports (Redf. including the 100% scanning of containers in the maritime supply chain. Protection Vessels International president Dom Mee made his call after Somali pirates moved inshore to take the US-owned chemical oil tanker Fairchem Bogey with 21 unprotected Indian crew on board while it was anchored two miles off the Omani port of Salalah. do not attract the attention of pirates? ('Piracy and the armed deterrent'. p6 Calls for flag states to allow guards on ships . have been charged with environmental offences. Panama-flagged products tanker Pavit and bulker RAK Carrier were both abandoned by crew blaming technical failures. the US Government Accountability Office has said that work remains in implementing border security. 2001." LLOYD’S LIST. 9 September 2011. p 22 Shipping singled out in call for boost to US security .By David Osler "Port and coastal states close to Somalia should "facilitate" the passage of armed guards and their weapons on merchant ships at risk of pirate attack. Sources close to discussions at the UN agency's headquarters in London have seized on the wording as an unmistakeable implicit call not to obstruct the increasingly widespread use of vessel protection detachments in the region. Flag states have a wide variety of policies with regard to arming ships. A more liberal policy in Norway." p 2 Japan considers guards on ships . Far from escalating the ferocity of attacks. The GAO stated: "Eight years after its creation and 10 years after September 11. The IMO move comes just days after security professionals expressed frustration at an apparent unilateral decision by Egypt to ban weapons on merchant 86 . Japan’s government is considering a request from the nation’s shipowners to carry armed guards on their ships as an anti-piracy measure. according to a circular agreed last week by the International Maritime Organization. Mr Mee told the South Asian African Regional Ports Security Co-operative conference in the Seychelles: "The recent hijacking in port waters in Oman and other similar attacks serves to remind us of the increasing threat posed to shipowners and operators when they are effectively under the jurisdiction of port state control. The attack on a vessel so close to the port.By Girija Shettar "Abandoned and drifting ships off western India are posing fraud and security concerns.000km from Panama to Oman. Delta Shipping Marine Services. which condone having armed personnel on board. Wednesday August 31). InterManager believes. they should be unhindered by restrictive flag state legislation or charterparty agreements. but has yet to reach its full potential. The Pavit. rather than at sea in international waters. for example. Lloyd's List.IMO) . because of a technical difficulty. p 19 Letter to the Editor: In defence of armed defence . p 2 IMO asks coastal states to 'facilitate' armed guards . Is it not a fact that vessels under the flags of states such as Israel and Russia." FAIRPLAY. 16 September 2011. The wide-ranging report on the work of the Department of Homeland Security shows the scale of the US security efforts for passenger and cargo after the September 2001 attacks by al-Qaeda on New York and Washington.By Roger Hailey "A maritime security company boss has called for port authorities in piracy-prone areas to issue clear guidelines to shipowners and operators to support greater use of on-board armed guards.

Mr Wikborg said: "It took IUMI some time to get to this point. the latest in 38 radiation detection equipment sets deployed in ports worldwide. as the prevailing opinion has been that flag states should deal with this and subsequently discuss and decide through the International Maritime Organization. 29 September 2011. He welcomed a recent announcement by Liberia that its laws now gave it jurisdiction over arrested pirates and their prosecution and incarceration. their use should be backed. although this was not fully proven. the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). p 21 LMA voices concern over IUMI's stance on armed guards . A spokesman for the Dutch shipping company confirmed that the marines will embark the low-freeboard and low-speed Netherlands-flagged vessel in Singapore before setting off for the UAE. p 17 ITF boss backs armed guards "No ship from any flag state that refuses “t o allow military vessel protection detachments on its ships should be chartered by any reputable organisation or company”. IUMI also emphasises it is a matter for the owner but has come to the view that as armed guards appear to be the best way of protecting ships. p 2 Terrorism warning for shipping "A senior British police official. 19 September 2011. and was not something of which the LMA could approve or disapprove. The US contributed $26m for setting up the facility in the Philippines." However.By Jim Mulrenan "The still controversial practice of hiring armed guards to protect ships from pirates has won explicit backing from the International Union of Marine Insurance (IUMI). scanning approximately 50% of global container traffic by 2016. The radiation detection systems are part of the US Department of Energy's Megaports Initiative to stop illegal shipments of nuclear and other radioactive materials passing through international sea ports and land gateways. general secretary of the International Transport Workers Federation (ITF). Speaking earlier this month at a conference in London organised by the International Chamber of Shipping and the International Shipping Federation. p 2 Guarding the seas "Another day. There is a worrying trend round here for waterborne terrorism.By Roger Hailey "Philippines-based ports group ICTSI has implemented the US-government's radiation detection requirement at its Manila International Container Terminal. Piracy has been the biggest safety issue over the past three years for shipmanagers and they are increasingly turning to armed 87 . 26 September 2011. IUMI is usually a pretty conservative organisation but it has gone further than most shipping industry organisations." FAIRPLAY. p 1 Dockwise to use Dutch forces for Indian Ocean transit . p 29 Backing for using armed protection .By Adam Corbett "Managers seem to be all for the use of armed guards with the decision to do so often prompted by seafarers. " LLOYD’S LIST. But opinion is split among flag states and charterers. detective chief inspector with the Counter Terrorism Unit of the UK’s Metropolitan Police. p 5 IUMI gets firmly behind concept of armed guards on vessels ." LLOYD’S LIST. “no flag state that does not agree to detain and prosecute pirates should even be considered”. the issue is likely to recur as terror groups have a proven capacity to adapt and fine-tune operations. although they say it is ultimately a decision for shipowners operating under flags that permit such a response. he outlined proposals to help address piracy. 23 September 2011. Moles pointed to a mysterious and limited attack on the M Star tanker in July 2010. adding. Speaking at the the IUMI meeting in Paris last week. Dockwise will pay an undisclosed amount to the Dutch government for the protection.vessels transiting the Suez Canal. 19 September 2011. another discussion about piracy – and yet another grudging acknowledgement that ICTSI launches box scanning in Manilla . cargoes and crews from being hijacked. responsibility for which was claimed by a group linked to al-Qaeda. said David Cockroft. The US intention is to install radiation detection equipment at 100 ports worldwide." TRADEWINDS. 26 September 2011.By Liz McMahon "Claims by International Union of Marine Insurance chairman Ole Wikborg that IUMI has an "active and well published stand in favour of armed guards" has surprised many who remain committed to a neutral position. flag states and the protection-and-indemnity (P&I) clubs in supporting the armed defence of ships." LLOYD’S LIST. the second time the Breda-based heavylift and specialist transport has used marines from the Netherlands to protect one of its fleet. has warned shipping lines that their operations in the region could be disrupted by increasin gly sophisticated terrorists seeking new economic targets." LLOYD’S LIST. the Lloyd's Market Association and the International Maritime Organization both hold neutral positions and LMA senior executive Neil Roberts said the decision to hire and pay for armed guards was one for the shipowner or asset operator. However. told a recent security conference in Dubai. To back up his case. 29 September 2011. based in the Gulf. a step which they believe highlights the need for common rules on the question.By Roger Hailey "Armed Dutch marines will be on board the specialist semi-submersible vessel Mighty Servant 3 when it makes a 14-day journey through piracy-prone waters from Singapore to the Middle East port of Sharjah. “Al Qaeda already has shown a capability to attack [shipping]." FAIRPLAY. Most industry organisations are neutral on the question of armed guards.” Mark Moles.

48. SAMI recently announced its intention to offer the accreditation and licensing service to security firms but North P&I Club director Mike Salthouse said there was an inherent conflict in an industry association vetting its own members. Security sources confirmed that an unarmed vessel protection detachment was on board. Despite several months with reduced pirate activity off Somalia.By David Osler and Tom Leander “British and US naval forces have today boarded and recaptured a brand new Italian supramax hijacked by Somali pirates on Monday.7 mm heavy machine guns now explicitly authorised are designed to destroy armour-plated vehicles and aircraft up to 1 km away. according to preliminary figures compiled by Lloyd's List Intelligence. Some 11 pirates were detained as a result of the operation. investigation and crisis management company Gray Page to provide the service. Financial director Sebastian Graf von Hardenberg stressed that while the company acknowledges the find and is co-operating with the authorities. 14 October 2011. finally lifting the threat of prosecution for shipowners who have been operating within a legal grey area. and some experts believe that they are operationally inappropriate in dealing with the threat posed by pirates.By David Osler and Craig Eason "Britain is set to drop its formal opposition to the use of private armed guards on board UK-flagged vessels. I would expect that within a year our status will be established." said SAMI founder Peter Cook. The body said accreditations would begin in early November and it is expected that the entire process will take between four to six months. but there are not a lot of security firms out there. and that citadel tactics had been adopted by the crew. in a move that has been greeted with incredulity across the private security sector. pp 42-43 88 . 14 October 2011. 10 October 2011.300-dwt chemical tanker Marida Marguerite (built 2008)." LLOYD’S LIST. He has joined a campaign to have armed guards protecting vulnerable ships and for the industry to bring in regulations on the care of seafarers and their families during and after a hijacking. 3 October 2011. a spokesman for the company has confirmed. which is the main Spanish maritime interest in the Indian Ocean region. SAMI wants to blow away the smoke and mirrors and focus on transparency. UK Foreign Office minister Henry Bellingham confirmed in a speech delivered at the Chamber of Shipping in London on Wednesday that the policy switch would be formally announced shortly. 3 October 2011. The news comes after Italy's defence ministry went one step further and agreed to provide armed forces on Italian ships passing through the Gulf of Aden. the development has once again highlighted the use of merchant vessels for narcotics smuggling. p 1 Venezuela drug bust marks new high in seizures .guards to protect seafarers. p 2 UK U-turn on armed guards lifts threat of prosecution . p 2 Armed guards a must in danger zones to stop pirates striking. However. despite the Security Association for the Maritime Industry offering formal accreditation.224 dwt Jürgen Schulte. in effect reversing previous government advice which "strongly discouraged" armed vessel protection detachments." TRADEWINDS. which has sharply increased in 2011.By David Osler "A Bernhard Schulte -managed bulk carrier and a number of seafarers have been detained in pre-trial custody in Venezuela following the discovery of 478 kg of uncut cocaine on board the 1997-built. The tripod-mounted 12. The ruling is obviously designed primarily to meet the needs of the commercial fishing fleet operating out of the Seychelles. "We need to prove ourselves and I have spoken to a number of people in the Lloyd's market and have had a great deal of encouragement but the message is clear that they are waiting to see what we can do and we welcome the scrutiny. more than 300 seafarers are still being held hostage. ” LLOYD’S LIST. p 36 Spain to permit heavy-calibre machine guns on board ships . says victim of violent Somali bandits . "Most people would welcome SAMI as it is the closest thing we have got to an industry body.By Adam Corbett "Chirag Bahri." LLOYD’S LIST. depending upon the size of the company. 12 October 2011. p 3 SAMI appoints NSI to vet armed security . 13 October 2011.By David Osler "Spain has become the first flag state to approve the use of high-calibre weaponry by non-military vessels at risk from Somali pirates." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST." he said. p 2 UK and US forces free hijacked Montecristo . it believes all of its employees to be innocent and it has hired legal representation to fight their corner. "Insurers want to see a track record and that is a very healthy way of looking at things.By Liz McMahon "The North P&I Club is to take independent action to vet armed maritime security providers on behalf of its members. the Italian foreign ministry has confirmed. has told how he “dreamed of death” during his eight months in captivity living under drug -crazed Somali pirates. a new Seafarers Trust-backed organisation set up to help the victims of piracy. The club has joined forces with specialist maritime intelligence. a former second engineer on the 13. integrity and clarity.By Liz McMahon "The security Association for the Maritime Industry has revealed that the National Security Inspectorate will act as its independent assessor of security organisations. p 3 North P&I poised to vet armed guards . Bahri is supporting Maritime Piracy a Humanitarian Response (MPHRP). "There is not sufficient distance. 30 September 2011." LLOYD’S LIST." TRADEWINDS.

There is a worrying trend round here for waterborne terrorism.500 miles through China and Southeast Asia before meeting the sea in Vietnam.By David Osler "AP Moller-Maersk will make more regular use of armed guards on tankers passing through the Gulf of Aden. told a recent security conference in Dubai." LLOYD’S LIST. 10 November 2011. a discount of 35% would represent a saving of $12. with security industry sources suggesting that it will probably have to be divided between several providers. Renuar master Calixto Caniete. 18 November 2011. has told members that passage of arms and armed guards will now be allowed on the condition that a letter endorsed by the vessel's flag state is submitted to the Suez Canal Authority prior to transit. p 13 China set to launch armed patrols on the Mekong River . apparently after the transport ministry caved into pressure from other Egyptian interests opposed to the move on economic grounds. But despite the increased assurances that armed security gives crews. T in to Thai authorities in the wake of the killings. most famously on boxship Maersk Alabama . It remains unclear which contractor is likely to pick up the work. p 2 Terror threat to ships “A senior British police official based in the Gulf has warned shipping lines that their operations in the region could be disrupted by increasingly sophisticated terroris ts seeking new economic targets.By David Osler "Egypt has reversed the ban on weapons and armed security teams transiting the Suez Canal on merchant ships.250. However. there are "no immediate plans" to extend the policy to containerships. The murders became a public issue in China. p 2 Flexible security training “A US-funded training programme will play a wider role in improving port security thanks to a government-industry alliance. Maersk Tankers chief technical officer Steffen Jacobsen added. The world's largest shipping concern has seen attacks on a number of its ships. With armed guards on board and a K&R policy in place." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST.Maersk to employ armed guards . but has previously employed guards only on an ad hoc basis. it has decided to adopt the step more often. While no insurer was prepared to confirm they were offering such discounts or requiring the use of armed guards when underwriting policies. according to China's state-run Xinhua news agency. pp 28 -29 Egypt reverses Suez weapons ban . and confirmation that the weapons will not be used while the vessel is in Egyptian territorial waters. p 2 Insurers offer discounts for armed guards . some told Lloyd's List they offered some form of discount on the war rate for vessels transiting pirate hotspots.” Mark Moles. p 2 Theft threat calls for a co-ordinated response . which rises in Tibet and twists for 4. But following an assessment of its experiences so far.By Liz McMahon "One significant barrier in combating cargo theft is the lack of co-ordination between jurisdictions and flag states and this can make any investigation and consequent 89 . “Al-Qaeda already has shown a capability to attack shipping. International Transport Workers Federation secretary Jon Whitlow said many crew members were welcoming armed security as they felt more secure in their presence. which need not be in any particular format. there have been calls for more transparency about their use amid growing concerns over an escalation of violence or an incident where an unarmed civilian or seafarer is injured. and Beijing responded with demands for greater safety and security along the river. Mr Whitlow said some flag states needed to be further encouraged to develop standards and rules for the engagement of armed security. 21 October 2011.By Craig Eason "As more owners seek the services of armed security.” PORTS AND HARBORS. The fear was that the ruling could have had an adverse impact on traffic through the key waterway. have a low freeboard. Nov/Dec 2011. The West of England P&I Club.By Tom Leander "In the wake of the murder of 13 Chinese sailors on the Mekong River in Thailand in October. the starting price for a policy is in the region of $35. where the safety of nationals overseas is a sensitive topic. 17 October 2011.000 for a seven-day transit of the Gulf of Aden. For an average vessel valued at $20m. the number of armed guards on board. drawing on information provided by its Egyptian correspondents. The letter.By Liz McMahon and David Osler "A number of kidnap and ransom insurers are demanding the presence of armed guards on vessels transiting the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean before they will provide cover. details of the armed guards' employer. reports John Gallagher. the company has confirmed. November 2011. must state the quantity and type of weapons and ammunition on board." LLOYD’S LIST. detective chief inspector with Counter Terrorism Unit of the UK’s Metropolitan Police . especially on vessels that are slow. 24 October 2011. China will launch armed patrols on the river's upper reaches with its Southeast Asian neighbours." LLOYD’S LIST. in revealing his experiences of being hijacked by pirates told Lloyd's List the pirates that held him captive had told him at one point they would never have continued their attack on his ship had they been fired on themselves. which is one of the country's most important hard currency earners.” SAFETY AT SEA INTERNATIONAL. p 1 Calls for transparency over use of armed protection . but there was an industry-wide belief that crews themselves should never be armed. and others are offering discounts of up to 35% to shipowners employing private security firms for voyages in high-risk areas.

Offshore energy considerations have simmered beneath the surface throughout the region for years amid disputes over undersea resources.By Craig Eason “The port of Fujairah has a ban on vessels coming into its anchorage with riding crews of security guards on board.By Barry Parker "The South China Sea has made news recently due to renewed discussions of maritime security at the now concluded East Asia Summit. 25 November 2011. the European Commission and member states to align and harmonise international and European policies. the market was looking at other areas where differentiation was possible. unlimited response to consultant's fees. majority Philippine-owned. In 2010. writes Liz McMahon. the US will play a larger and long-term role in shaping this region and its future. So says the first EU report on maritime-sector cybersecurity. where US forces have long been based. on Finland's southern coast. was detained at Kotka port en route from Germany to China with missiles and explosives on board." LLOYD’S LIST. Insurers such as Chubb and Brit have become members of CargoNet. Rates of cargo theft and methods for managing it across the world vary dramatically. p 1 Shipping cybersecurity is 'non-existent'. 15 December 2011." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST. by upholding core principles and in close partnership with our allies and friends. wide variances in the discounts and cover being offered by the kidnap and ransom and war risk markets is emerging. Kotka's Mussalo Harbour. According to Freightwatch the areas of highest risk are Mexico and Brazil. 52% of goods travelled on 90 . The report from the European Network & Information Security Agency points out that the maritime sector is critical for European society.By Liz McMahon "A growing number unreported negligent discharges of guns by private maritime security guards has come to light amid calls for greater regulation of the sector. Senior officials from the three countries will meet on December 19 in Washington to debate regional issues that include China. says EU report ." LLOYD’S LIST. A statement from the Finnish police later confirmed that 69 Patriot missiles had been discovered on board. Speaking in Australia before the summit. Regulation of the private maritime security sector was now required urgently. have bubbled upwards earlier this year as Chinese naval forces harassed a seismic vessel working on behalf of UK-based. with $5. p 1 Increase in private security causes diversification . Indonesia. 1 December 2011. Thor Liberty. 22 December 2011. he added. A report into the K&R market by broker FP Marine Risks said while the base K&R product has now become reasonably standardised. especially when flags of convenience come into play. Formed in 2009. India and the US will meet next month to discuss maritime security and strengthening their relations in the Asia-Pacific region. Due to the fact that both the target and thief will be 'passing through' any area where the crime will be committed the consequent investigation and data collection can prove difficult.By Liz McMahon "Japan. Prosecution rates in comparison to crimes reported vary dramatically. p 7 Japan. fed by the Conoco-operated BayuUndan field in the Timor Sea exporting LNG to Japan. in northern Australia. no deductibles.810 gt vessel.” LLOYD’S LIST. India and US to discuss maritime security . who has plans to extend its reach beyond US borders in the coming months. South China Sea. CargoNet helps prevent cargo theft and increases recovery rates through secure and controlled information sharing among theft victims. 25 November 2011.000 limits. Disputes between China and the Philippines. 15 December 2011." said Redfour Security Group chief executive Will McManus. 3. ” LLOYD’S LIST. 30 November 2011. cover for ransom delivery and a "myriad of other extensions being typical now". "There have been loads of negligent discharges that haven't been reported and if insurers knew what was really going on they would pull their finger out and push for regulation. The move comes after Barack Obama became the first US President to attend the East Asia Summit as part of his seven-day tour of the Pacific this month. and law enforcement.p 2 No anchorage for ships with armed guards . p 4 Maritime security tops agenda at East Asia Summit . their business partners." LLOYD’S LIST.By Liz McMahon "Finnish police have launched an investigation after the Isle of Man-flagged general cargo vessel. Concerns about the rising strength of China. was sealed off on Tuesday evening following the discovery of incorrectly stowed military-grade explosives on board the 1994-built. were underscored by President Barack Obama's announcement that US forces would now be deployed at Darwin. Indicative of the shipping/security connection. because currently shipowners are putting their ships and crew at risk.By Liz McMahon "Maritime sector awareness of cybersecurity needs and challenges is low to non-existent.p 11 Missiles discovered on ship in Finland .By Liz McMahon “As the use of armed guards increases across the industry. micro-cap Forum Energy in the Reed Bank. In the US there have been crucial moves to share data through the launch of CargoNet. p 5 Calls for regulation of armed guards as crews put at risk . which urges the International Maritime Organization. Darwin is the site of a liquefied natural gas terminal. held last week in Bali. according to reports in the Japanese press.prosecution extremely difficult. President Obama said: "As a Pacific nation. Harbour master Tamer Masoud told the Middle East Shiptech conference last month that there were a number of restrictions on security crews coming into the port.000.

on the cargo ship Thor Liberty in the Mussalo Harbour in Kotka. and other members of the Thor Liberty crew. The enemy's carrier has been moved to the Sea of Oman because of our drill. The European Network and 91 ." ENISA claimed. As expected. It says stakeholders should agree a common strategy and develop good practice for maritime ICT security systems." LLOYD’S LIST. was for the release of the very large crude carrier Irene SL in April. $13. Marad tells US ships . rather than hiring private security firms' armed guards.By David Osler "US flag ships should comply under protest if the Iranian navy demands to be allowed on board in the months ahead.5m was collected in ransom money in return for 533 seafarers from 27 different vessels." The latest developments come after French foreign minister Alain Juppe repeated accusations that Iran was developing nuclear weapons. according to a new report sponsored by the European Union (EU). citing the current investigation. 22 December 2011. published today. the final three months of 2011 marked a turning point. and Netherlands. including France." LLOYD’S LIST. although analysis from Lloyd's List Intelligence recently demonstrated that most of the IRISL fleet continues to trade with partners including China. In a statement.By Liz McMahon "Finnish police and Customs continue to investigate whether there is a criminal case to answer and have detained two people after finding 69 Patriot missiles and 150 tonnes of nitroguardine. the world's largest exporter. "This continuous increase in dependency upon the maritime transport underlines its vital importance to our society and economy..5% compared to 31. writes Liz McMahon. However. Israel and Italy.By Rory Lamrock "Last year was without doubt a formative year for Somali piracy. is already subject to extensive restrictions. Russia and India. testing a missile in the area and warning US warships to stay away. The Strait of Hormuz is a critical waterway for tankers carrying crude from Saudi Arabia. stated that bodies in the shipping industry wanted states to provide VPD on board commercial vessels. 3 January 2012. But the authorities would not comment on the cargo consignor or consignee. 4 January 2012. "I advise.5m. on suspicion of an offence under the Export and Transit of Defence Supplies Act. The highest ransom payment reported to date. The aircraft carrier USS John C Stennis and another US Navy vessel left the Gulf through the strategic waterway last week after Iran launched a series of military exercises. The drop was partly caused by the onset of the northeastern monsoon in December. recommend and warn [the US] over the return of this carrier to the Persian Gulf because we are not in the habit of warning more than once. Attacks dropped to a 15-month low in December. High-profile incidents such as the hijacking of Fairchem Bogey at anchor outside Salalah. Finland's National Bureau of Investigation said Customs officials apprehended two people on Wednesday evening. in other economic sectors. p 2 Two held as Finland probes arms cache . p 8 EU calls for shipping to get smart on cyber crime .By Liz McMahon "Shipping trade associations have welcomed the UK Foreign Affairs Committee's recommendation that government and industry should investigate whether to use state-managed military "vessel-protection detachments" instead of private maritime-security firms. Iranian general Ataollah Salehi said: "Iran will not repeat its warning." LLOYD’S LIST.By David Osler "Iran has stepped up tensions in the Strait of Hormuz. 6 January 2012. As detention periods stretched. over the course of the year an estimated $128. Germany and Norway are reportedly considering providing them." LLOYDS’ LIST. maritime activity increasingly relies on ICT in order to optimise its operations. The House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee report on Piracy in Somalia." p 2 Evolution of Somali piracy will be closely watched in 2012 . The apparently conciliatory stance comes despite a threat from Iranian vice president Reza Rahimi to shut down the Strait of Hormuz if sanctions are imposed on its crude exports as part of the west's drive to hamper its nuclear programme. Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines. "As. 23 December 2011. attacks were more audacious and violent than ever before. and success rates continued to fall to an average of 9. Spain. p 2 Shipping favours military support .maritime transport. or reports of swarm attacks in the southern Red Sea reminded observers of the seriousness of the threat and the reality of the changing face of pirate tactics. the arson attempts on Pacific Express and Brillante Virtuoso . the United Arab Emirates.." The report advises member states to raise awareness within the maritime industry. so did the average ransom settlement. Officials said they had interviewed the suspects.8% in 2010. already provide VPDs to some of their shipping." the report said. "Some states. labelled fireworks. up from 45% a decade ago. understood to be Ukrainian. but was largely attributable to the increasingly widespread use of private security detachments and adoption of best management practices. They have also seized the Patriot missiles found on the vessel. "VPDs are also being considered for use on World Food Programme shipments rather than providing a dedicated warship as an escort. working with cybersecurity specialists. Kuwait and Iraq. Iran. and for LNG carriers delivering liquefied natural gas from Qatar." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Sabre rattling in the Strait of Hormuz . the US Maritime Administration has ruled in an advisory note.By Adam Corbett "The shipping industry's awareness of the need for "cyber security" is "non-existent" and the sector is vulnerable to attack to its critical information and automated-systems. p 2 Allow Iran to board." The shipping industry has expressed strong preference for state provision of VPDs. the country's major carrier.

By Liz McMahon "The absence of government-led private maritime security regulation has left companies confused and unsure where to invest their time and energy. MSB Group launched on January 1. hijacked 215 miles beyond the Port of Salalah before new year with 18 crew members on board. "that doesn't mean it hasn't happened". However. p 2 Iranian chemical tanker hijacking still unconfirmed ." LLOYD’S LIST.124 dwt chemical carrier Faez said to be in the Gulf of Aden this week. the Philippines has protested to China for intrusion into its waters near Sabina Shoal." LLOYD’S LIST. News of the tanker hijacking came from an Iranian agency linked to the government. defying calls from the parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee and key shipping bodies for state-led military back-up. Industry sources speculate whether the ship is NITC 's 35. 13 January 2012.By Tom Leander "The capture of an unnamed Iranian chemical tanker carrying 30. 17 January 2012. Enrico Ievoli was carrying about 15.6 miles from Palawan and within Philippine maritime jurisdiction. the government has already protested to China's Manila embassy on January 5. the committee called for government engagement with shipping interests to explore whether the industry could pay for VPDs.By Derek Prentis "If a pirate craft opens fire after a warning." LLOYD’S LIST. Now many shipowners require some form of armed protection to comply with even basic P&I insurance requirements. leading many to call for greater clarity. Discussion at national level around onboard armed guards has 92 . p 6 New drive to agree legal use of arms . 6 January 2012. According to an MoD spokesman. an action raising "serious concerns" from the southeast Asian country. according to the spokesman. the guards should be able to return fire. according to the DFA. PMSCs are waiting for an international move. president of Seraph Protection Group. . In its report yesterday. The MoD has not changed that view. 9 January 2012. However. However. It describes itself as "a coalition of likeminded states and private entities who have come together to offer a clearly legal and supported logistical structure". Despite the industry's growing reliance on PMSC in the fight against piracy. The project has completed its pilot project and passed its oversight markers. IAMSP said members of the group had asked for time to prepare their own statements about "their specific participation" in the programme. p 2 Regulate armed guards fast. After power struggles between organisations representing the sector. The committee made its recommendation after the Chamber of Shipping and Nautilus International both expressed a strong preference for state provision of VPDs over private maritime security companies. with China often aggressive in asserting its territorial claims and other countries retaliating by sending patrols into disputed waters. the private maritime security companies industry has boomed.Information Security Agency (Enisa) is urging the maritime industry to put security measures in place as the EU is dependent on shipping for more than 50% of its transport needs." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Letters to the Editor: Guards need rights . when UK Prime Minister David Cameron first decriminalised PMSCs. It follows other reports that US forces rescued a group of Iranian fishermen and captured 15 Somali pirates who had held them for more than a month." TRADEWINDS. 10 January 2012. The US-based International Association of Maritime Security Providers has been providing independent supervision. argues Patrick Linnenbank. The Philippines' Department of Foreign Affairs said China sent a naval ship to accompany two other Chinese vessels at the vicinity of Sabina Shoal on December 11 and 12. deploying British naval or military personnel to protect commercial shipping. Since UK prime minister David Cameron legalised armed guards on board ships late last year. p4 Target standards for armed guards "There’s a lack of clarity around rules for armed guards.By Liz McMahon "The UK's Ministry of Defence will not provide vessel protection detachments to combat piracy in Somalia. an EU Navfor official suggested that the latest report may have mistakenly recycled the case of Enrico Ievoli ." LLOYD’S LIST. It is not yet clear how many private firms and states are involved in MSB." LLOYD’S LIST. As the waters are located 123. 2012. say shipowners .000 tonnes of caustic soda. 11 January 2012. Political tension has been mounting in the South China Sea over the past year. p 39 MoD rejects industry calls for military armed guards .By Liz McMahon "States affected by piracy in Somalia have joined forces with private partners for the first time to tackle black market arms dealing and provide legal and logistical support for private military security companies.By Max Lin "In the latest dispute over the South China Sea's sovereignty. demand for armed guards from shipowners was already growing when this was considered illegal. p3 China and Philippines in dispute over Sabina Shoal . China has said it holds "undisputed sovereignty" over the seas around the Spratly Islands and the Philippines' accusations are "unreasonable". a claim that China denied. there is still no formal set of standards to regulate PMSC activities. 10 January 2012. the ministry considered whether to use military VPDs in a similar way but concluded that this was not an option.000 tonnes of petrochemical products reported on Wednesday by an Iranian news agency remains unconfirmed. EU Navfor said that while it had no confirmation that pirates had seized an Iranian tanker.

ships that called there also then deemed non-compliant. which in effect legitimated the practice. while others. February 2012. 19 January 2012.By iz McMahon "While new UK legislation regulating the movement of weapons will speed things up for London market insurers. “These attacks were an opportunistic move. coverage is insufficient to provide adequate protection. The boom in the use of armed security guards was triggered by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) circular 1406 in May last year.By Adam Corbett "Industry guidance on the use of force is key for the future development of professionalism in marine security. “Those developments included the amnesty for former Niger delta militants. it merely moved elsewhere. p 27 Better data use can cut risks . The licensing regime came into effect on February 23. according to maritime security analysts Dave Sloggett. 19 January 2012." FAIRPLAY. it could put UK-based private maritime security companies at a disadvantage. driven by internal Nigerian developments. but will not be replaced immediately as on previous occasions. 24 January 2012. are lobbying their government for alternatives where they have been banned from using guards. roughly matching the number of active pirates. Benin. The vessel returned home from the Gulf of Aden on 28 November. p 2 Dutch suspend EU Navfor role “The Dutch have suspended their contribution to EU Navfor and NATO until April. such as in Belgium. The TT Club has called for common sense in interpreting and applying the ISPS Code.000 and 3. Subsequently. the Valle Di Cordoba.become heated as piracy incidents continue to increase." LLOYD’S LIST. The report. delivery and transfer of controlled goods between overseas territories. published in December by the US Government ccountability Office (GAO). The consequences of a terrorist attack on a US port could be reduced if the coast guard were to provide more risk assessment training to decision-makers in the field. Members were particularly worried that a breach of security at a port or terminal would make that facility non-compliant and that this could then have a knock-on effect." FAIRPLAY. "On this basis. wherever that ship calls subsequently could also then become contaminated. p 12 Calls for regulation of private security . a jump from 58 attacks a year earlier. with measurable success. and many flag states have started to allow armed security on flagged vessels. The first recorded hijacking of a product tanker off Cotonou. The club said members had raised concerns over how the code would work in practice. IMO guidelines opened the door for private armed security on board commercial vessels.000 security guards. unable to accept other ships without them also becoming contaminated or non-compliant. pp 20-21 New licensing simplifies insurance but could restrict PMSCs . Private security measures are required because. officers at various ports don’t always know how best to use the security information produced after the programme’s data is analysed. Although countries involved in EU Navfor routinely withdraw vessels from service after a fixed tour of duty. These attacks were focused on hijacking product tankers and stealing the cargo of petroleum products through ship-to-ship transfer. Risk Intelligence’s director of consultancy told Fairplay. The Lloyd's Market Association has welcomed the agreement it made with the UK government to speed up the authorisations that it and other London 93 . Last year. a government report has revealed. 27 January 2012. such as in the Netherlands. But this has placed states with a high proportion of national flags under pressure and some owners are considering a change of flag. Nigerian piracy did not decline in 2011. 2012 and covers UK private maritime security companies carrying out business in the UK or those run by UK persons to engage in supply. the Dutch decision signals the impact that economic constraints are having on EU countries’ defence budgets. Calls are growing for the closer monitoring and regulation of armed guards operating in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean as there is no official record of their numbers in the region and the nature of engagements with pirates frequently go unreported. despite the undoubted success of naval protection for commercial vessels.”" FAIRPLAY. 19 January 2012. pp 26-27 Nigerian opportunism "Those behind the illegal trade in stolen fuel cargoes are quick to react to changes in Nigerian government policy. And so on. withdrawing naval supply vessel HNLMS Zuiderkruis. Denmark-based analyst Risk Intelligence recorded 70 attacks against offshore oil and gas and maritime targets in 2011." TRADEWINDS. A number of “guestimates” by security firms and industry bodies put the figure at between 2.By Liz McMahon "Interpreting the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code demands a common-sense approach that focuses on security procedures and not on subsequent contamination." the club warned. according to the TT Club.By John Gallagher "US watchdog report reveals port captains need more training in using anti-risk programme. A UK Foreign Affairs Select Committee (FAC) report into piracy suggests that between 15% and 25% of vessels operating in the region now have armed guards and that roughly 50% are former UK military personnel.” SAFETY AT SEA INTERNATIONAL. 33 attacks against tankers were recorded during 2011 and extended as far as Lomé in Togo. concluded that while the current risk assessment computer program used by the US Coast Guard (USCG) does an exemplary job of training specialists who input data.” Dirk Steffen. p 30 TT Club calls for rational approach to security code . occurred on 24 December 2010. fuel subsidies and political pressure on criminal networks in Nigeria.

PMSCs themselves appear to take an ambivalent view of middlemen that operate. There is scope at the moment."" LLOYD’S LIST. but what about PMSCs?"" LLOYD’S LIST.market underwriters need to insure the international movement of weapons and military equipment used by the United Nations. 5 March 2012. Since 2005 there have been four US House of Representatives hearings and two in the Senate." LLOYD’S LIST.By Liz McMahon "UK shipping minister says transparency on costs is required. BIMCO’s chief officer for contractual and legal affairs.By Liz McMahon "The Security in Complex Environments Group's inaugural conference has been mandated with creating a new set of standards and accreditation for private maritime security companies operating in the UK. dealing with this issue. is taking place at Lancaster House in London today and follows SCEG's appointment as the UK government's industry partner in this area last June. It believes it’s being unfairly targeted. 1 March 2012. Speaking yesterday at the Security in Complex Environments Group conference. or are seeking to operate.By Liz McMahon "The International Maritime Organization has been urged to help develop guidance for private maritime security companies. but recently anti-piracy requirements have led to fast growth in the PMS sector. p 5 Hidden crime . meaning the firm buying the cover needs to demonstrate that it has a sufficient capital base." LLOYD’S LIST." she said. which is really still quite immature. This month the Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) is due to release its own contract. 7 March 2012. p 6 Asian owners call for UN troops to guard ships . In 2010 the Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act (CVSSA) passed into law. which is fully subscribed. 1 March 2012. SCEG director Oona Muirhead said standards and accreditation for PMSCs was a matter of urgency. p 4 IMO urged to develop guidelines for PMSCs . He said that this was a difficult area for many PMSCs as it was indemnity-based cover. It is popularly believed that cruises attract alcohol-related crime among adult passengers. p 29 UK shuns industry-led standards for armed guards . 80% of them based in the UK. Maritime Asset Security and Training director Phillip Cable highlighted the growing pressure to buy blanket block kidnap and ransom insurance. with another this month. told Fairplay. Grant Hunter. While legalities remain a problem in some jurisdictions. The term ‘serious crime’ encompas ses robbery and physical assault but cruise shipping has come under greatest pressure from allegations of brutal sexual assaults.By Girija Shettar "The cruise industry stands accused of trivialising the existence of serious crime on its ships. roughly 200 PMSCs were registered to trade. Mr Penning said that insurance companies must be transparent. before Mr Cameron gave his approval the use of armed guards remained a grey area for shipowners: many that deployed PMSC guards risked invalidating their insurance. Most argue that there is no substitute for shipowners or charterers and PMSCs dealing directly with each other. The event." FAIRPLAY. in this arena. The arrest in India of two Italian armed guards after the fatal shooting of two Indian fishermen (see p22) underscores the importance of armed guard contracts. as it has for shipowners dealing with piracy." FAIRPLAY. Shipping Minister Mike Penning has said that insurers underwriting risks relating to armed guards on board vessels need "a kick up the backside" and warned that he would be investigating further. "However. p 4 Growth of the go-betweens . 1 March 2012.By Liz McMahon "Private maritime security companies have evolved at a startling rate: at the start of the year.By Tom Leander "The Asian Shipowners' Forum has called for a United Nations resolution that would see the international body sponsor and manage armed personnel on board ships 94 . the UK's Department for Transport head of maritime and land transport security Linda Willson said that guidance was being drafted. pp 6-7 Guard contract focuses on regs "BIMCO’s armed guards’ contract to clarify a range of critical regulatory issues. where the industry has gained new legitimacy after prime minister David Cameron endorsed the use of armed guards to combat piracy last year. but how much does it really tell us? Good firms will abide by it. drawn up in consultation with P&I clubs and maritime security companies. but that the next step would be for the IMO to choose to take a role in developing guidance as it has for shipowners. flag states and ports and littoral states. but analysis of reported crime reveals that most accused are crew members and up to 30% of the victims are children. Little progress would have been made without access to accurate statistics of reported crime but access to this data is under threat because of a legal loophole. 7 March 2012. The Guardcon contract will amalgamate the best elements of about 180 contracts held by separate security companies but will have a strong focus on insurance and SOLAS regulations governing a ship’s master’s authority. "There are IMO circulars for shipowners. "Many UK companies are run by ex-servicemen and therefore the levels of professionalism are extremely high and those involved have a good understanding of the risks and liabilities. but who is checking it?" she said. p 2 Penning to investigate armed guard insurance . it is critical that the new system provides no scope for maverick companies." LLOYD’S LIST. 7 March 2012. "The International Code of Conduct is a start for PMSCs. "The issue of ensuring the industry has credible standards has been kicking around for a long time.

p 6 BIMCO launches standard armed guard contract . p 47 Armed guards using floating armouries . The call. which runs the popular St Petersburg-Helsinki route and another linking St Petersburg with Helsinki. which comes into force on April 1. and commits owners to enhanced security measures. follows the group's proposal to Working Group 3 of the Contact Group for Piracy Off Coast of Somalia in Washington on February 28." LLOYD’S LIST. most are deeply confused by competing regulatory systems. Early reactions from PMSCs suggest that while many feel the costs may be reasonable. that from 30 March 2012." LLOYD’S LIST. practices like this have evolved as PMSCs looked to reduce their costs. after an escalating diplomatic row between Italy and India over the two Italian marines who allegedly killed the two Indian fishermen last month. April 2012. Stockholm and Tallinn via Mariehamn. Lloyd's List understands that some 12 floating armouries are stationed in international waters around high-risk areas. after they were designated a high risk area by employers and unions at the International Bargaining Forum. 23 March 2012.By Adam Corbett "Employers and unions at shipping’s largest collective-bargaining negotiating forum have agreed to make the piracy-hit region off the west coast of Africa a highrisk area. including some incidents in which seafarers have been held for ransom. The move comes in response to heightened piracy activity.1m a year. equipment and men offshore to avoid port charges and weapons regulation. It said that the proposed deployment could "serve as a mitigation measure while expecting a much-awaited UN resolution on the root cause of the Somali piracy probl em on land"." FAIRPLAY. the European Union has called for international rules on the use of armed guards on board ships. it recognises that while the industry waits for a permanent long-term solution. One PMSC told Lloyd's List that almost all companies operating in the Gulf of Aden use "flotels" to store weapons. follows a sharp increase in the number of attacks on vessels in West Africa. In February the Finnish Border Guard (FBG) informed St Peter Line. director of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry told SAS. Confusion centres on how the ICOC draft charter relates to the Security in Complex Environments Group's standardisation and accreditation scheme and on which other industry standards and vetting procedures now apply.By David Osler "Seafarers are to get double pay for serving in the territorial waters of Benin and Nigeria. 21 March 2012. they may be permitted if private maritime security companies prove they can fulfil licensing requirements.5m$5." LLOYD’S LIST. The guards from Italian 104. 15 March 2012. 8 March 2012.” SAFETY AT SEA. in apparent emulation of Somali pirate tactics. Now. 15 March 2012." LLOYD’S LIST. all non-EU citizens travelling on its Princess Anastasia ferry (mostly Russians) would be subject to a strict interpretation of the Schengen Rules on border control. BIMCO chief officer legal and contractual affairs Grant Hunter said the shipping association had launched the contract to meet demand from the industry. p 2 95 . 27 March 2012. The incident highlighted the need for set of standards and awareness for local fishermen as to how to avoid placing themselves in danger. taking a lead in giving shipowners and private maritime security companies guidance on employment and use of security guards. Due to a lack of formal regulation for the industry. on merchant vessels." LLOYD’S LIST. in a statement released by ASF on Wednesday. As exclusively reported in TradeWinds last month." LLOYD’S LIST.By Liz McMahon "Despite the legal grey area that surrounds floating armouries. Although BIMCO does not want armed security guards to become an institution on board ships. Steven Jones.255dwt tanker Enrica Lexie shot and killed the men on 15 February after mistaking them for pirates. 21 March 2012. p 2 Schengen Rules under debate "Russia’s St Peter Line has called for changes to border control rules that threaten to seriously damage its passenger trade. The standing also gives crew the right to sign off.By Liz McMahon "BIMCO's Guardcon standard contract for employing security guards on vessels is now live. p 2 Nigeria and Benin deemed high-risk areas for seafarers .sailing through pirate-infested waters.By Liz McMahon "The killing in India of two fishermen mistaken for pirates has reignited the debate about the need for international regulation of armed guards. the employers Joint Negotiating Group and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) have been hol ding discussions under the International Bargaining Forum (IBF) over the inclusion of Benin and Nigeria under its high-risk-area agreements. especially off Benin." TRADEWINDS. armed guards deter pirate attacks. 29 March 2012. p 4 EU demands international regulation for armed guards on ships . The move. He predicted that formal exclusion zones around merchant vessels might be put in place at some point in the future. p 2 Mistaken shooting raises armed guard questions “Two armed ship guards were arrested following the fatal shooting of two Indian fisherman. p 2 Benin and Nigeria coasts labelled high-risk . which is focussed mainly on cargo theft from tankers and robbery.By Liz McMahon "The International Code of Conduct's draft charter for private maritime security companies estimates that accreditation and supervision will cost $3. with or without firearms. p 27 Regulating armed guards could cost up to $5m a year .

5 Standard setting "The decision to employ guards, armed or not, has not been much of a decision for many owners. Safety of their crew has overridden lingering concerns about legal grey areas and insurance, but the overwhelming lack of clarity has nonetheless worried owners, lawyers and security companies alike for some time now. So the emergence of BIMCO's Guardcon, a standard contract for the employment of security guards on vessels, should be welcomed as a positive step forward for all concerned." LLOYD’S LIST, 30 March 2012, p 2 Regulation will raise standards for PMSCs - By Liz McMahon "Shipping has been slow to embrace private maritime security companies but would be in a far worse position without them, according to Protection Vessels International managing director Barry Roche. Mr Roche said that while anti-piracy measures have helped to combat the problem in the Gulf of Aden, the situation would have been far harder to manage without armed guards. "What no one actually talks about is the 40 or so attacks we have repelled," he said. Nevertheless, the PMSC industry must address the lack of a formal regulatory body, Mr Roche said. Many PMSCs were as eager as anyone to have clear guidelines in place." LLOYD’S LIST, 5 April 2012, p 2 PMSCs face up to ever-tightening net of regulation - By Liz McMahon "Armed guards have gained credibility but what impact will calls for accreditation have on this growth business? The International Union of Marine Insurance spoke out publicly at its annual conference in September in support of armed guards. The reason it gave for its decision is one that has become almost a mantra for the industry: no vessel with armed guards has been hijacked." LLOYD’S LIST, 5 April 2012, p 5 ‘No alternatives’ to armed guards on board “Despite concerns arising from the recent Enrica Lexie incident, armed protection on board vessels remains a reality that the shipping industry will have to manage, a conference heard in March. Speaking at the Asia Pacific Maritime conference in Singapore, Simon Bennett, the International Chamber of Shipping’s director of external relations, remarked that many shipowners had decided that they needed to employ guards but said that they were “not a long-term solution” to piracy. “We need proper regulation of guards and resolution of liability issues in the event something goes wrong.” He added.” SAFETY AT SEA, May 2012, p 14 Rival providers seek IMO backing on armed guard rules - By Liz McMahon "As the need to regulate private maritime security becomes increasingly urgent, several bodies have submitted rival proposals seeking support from the International Maritime Organization's Maritime Security Committee, which meets in May. BIMCO chief executive Giles Noakes says the IMO has received several submissions from stakeholders and that most are moving in the same direction, asking how to regulate the industry without going down the legislative route." LLOYD’S LIST, 24 April 2012, p 2 Italy urges India's Supreme Court to free accused marines - By Liz McMahon "As the case against two Italian marines charged with killing two fishermen from on board Enrica Lexie reaches India's Supreme Court, the Italian government has urged the court to free the men. According to reports from India, the Italian ambassador has submitted a petition claiming that the men's detention is illegal and that to try them under Indian law breaches sovereign immunity. This may be one of the first cases of a foreign government asking another country's supreme court to act against one of its own municipal courts. The Italian government argues that Indian law should not apply to this case and that international legislation should take precedence." LLOYD’S LIST, 25 April 2012, p 2 IMO debates rules for armed guards - By Miriam Fahey "The absence of legislation governing the use of armed guards on commercial vessels in high-risk areas has been a thorn in the side of the shipping industry since piracy exploded on to the scene in the mid 2000s. A number of security organisations have created guidelines on the use and deployment of armed guards in the hope that it will eventually become legislation. SAMI (Security Association for the Maritime Industry) revealed its standard to the public on 10 April. This is due for debate at IMO’s MSC90, to be held from 16–25 May. The standard is extremely detailed but an eight-page summary was published on SAMI’s website http://www.seasecurity.org/wp-content/uploads/SAMI-Standard-Executive-Summary.pdf in April." FAIRPLAY, 10 May 2012, pp 28-29 UK proposal likely to be basis for guidance on armed guards - By Adam Corbett "A proposal from the UK government is likely to provide the basis for much-needed interim guidance on the selection of armed guards and rules of engagement against pirate attacks. The UK has made its submission as part of a wide-ranging programme of counterpiracy talks arranged by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) for its upcoming Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) meeting. It comes as reports of video evidence, which appear to show armed guards continuing to shoot at a pirate skiff in retreat, heighten concerns over the conduct of private guards." TRADEWINDS, 11 May 2012, p 46

96

Apathy rules as just eight IMO members respond over armed guards - By Liz McMahon "As the shipping industry looks to the International Maritime Organization to issue guidance next week on maritime security, it has emerged that just eight out of 160 member states have provided details to the IMO about how they approach the issue of armed guards. According to IMO deputy director Chris Trelawny, the organisation contacted all member states last year and asked them to send in details of their regulatory frameworks or the position they took towards deploying armed guards on board vessels. The response has been underwhelming. "People want the IMO to deliver some kind of magic bullet but the situation is extremely difficult," Mr Trelawny said. "I suspect the MSC will increase the number of questions flag states have to ask but I also hope we can do more than that."" LLOYD’S LIST, 14 May 2012, p 2 Concern grows over Guardcon insurance requirements - By Liz McMahon "Clause12 of BIMCO's muchdiscussed standard contract Guardcon "doesn't work", according to Marsh marine practice managing director Nick Roscoe. The clause sets out the insurance requirements for private maritime security companies but also stipulates that the use of firearms or security equipment while on board must not invalidate that insurance. Mr Roscoe asked the panel at the Tradewinds Marine Risk Forum, held in London on May 9-10, how insurers can be expected to cover what could be perceived as an unlawful act in certain jurisdictions and circumstances. Panel member and Ince partner Stephen Askins said the problem had been the "elephant in the room" while Guardcon was being written in consultation with several liability underwriters and said that it had been recognised as a difficulty." LLOYD’S LIST, 15 May 2012, p 2 States seek international response to fight on piracy - By Liz McMahon "The opening session of the International Maritime Organization's first high-level policy debate on the use of armed guards has revealed that member states desire an international response but that differing views may hinder progress. Opening the HLPD, secretary-general Koji Sekimizu said that anecdotal evidence suggested that the number of ships carrying firearms has increased. Naval forces have estimated that around 25% of ships sailing through the high-risk area are now carrying firearms. However, he added that a number of ships might not be declaring their use of private maritime security companies and that this may be happening for various reasons such as a lack of flag-state approval. Mr Sekimizu strongly urged any states that have not yet formally made a decision on armed guards to do so and to make the IMO aware of any conditions that might exist. He also said that coastal states must clarify their policy of disembarkation and the carriage of weapons and ensure they promulgate it widely to industry, governments and the IMO." LLOYD’S LIST, 17 May 2012, p 5 Guardcon's wording is not the problem, say insurers - By Liz McMahon "Insurers have said there are no problems with the wording of Clause 12 of BIMCO's Guardcon standard contract, but have added that there will always be an issue on what can be covered when a criminal act has been committed by an individual. At Tradewinds Marine Risk Forum held in London last week Marsh marine practice managing director Nick Roscoe questioned the panel on Guardcon's Clause 12 and the possible issues surrounding insuring private maritime security companies. In response, the insurers involved in drafting Guardcon have said they will give support in the event of an incident involving armed guards until the criminal act is proved. They explained that, for example, they cannot indemnify murder." LLOYD’S LIST, 17 May 2012, p 5 Armed guard regulation tops the bill at the IMO - By Liz McMahon "The International Maritime Organization secretary-general Koji Sekimizu opened the much anticipated 90th Maritime Safety Committee on Tuesday, stating that he hoped a practical solution could be found to the absence of an international minimum standard for armed guards. While the IMO has previously issued circulars providing guidance on the deployment of private maritime security companies, Mr Sekimizu admitted that these policies are not uniform among member governments or across the international shipping industry. "There are at present no agreed minimum performance standards for PMSCs and ships using such personnel are subject to many diverse legal regimes," he said. I am hopeful that the HLPD [high level policy debate] today will provide the necessary focus on the issue and how the international community might best meet the need for practical solutions." Secretary general Sekimizu also points to need for cruise industry to focus on safety." LLOYD’S LIST, 17 May 2012, p 5 IMO plans to launch global standards for armed guards - By Liz McMahon "The International Maritime Organization Maritime Safety Committee's first high-level policy debate on armed guards has seen members states agree to issue guidance for private maritime security companies and to develop an international set of standards. Both principles will now be considered in more detail by the MSC's working groups but IMO secretary-general Koji Sekimizu said he hoped that "something tangible" would emerge regarding the guidelines at the end of the MSC's 90th meeting next Friday. While the committee recommended that member states should decide their own stance towards PMSCs, Mr Sekimizu said the meeting had generally agreed that there was a need for international guidance to assist policy making. However he said that this decision was not a recommendation or endorsement in a wider context, adding that

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that armed guards "should not be an alternative or replacement for best management practices"." LLOYD’S LIST, 18 May 2012, p 1 A timely intervention "The International Maritime Organization is taking timely and necessary action in launching global standards for maritime security company personnel on commercial ships. The IMO issued guidance on the use of armed guards to shipowners last year. By establishing guidelines for the guards, the organisation must now address the difficult issue of where the master's control and accountability ends and that of the PMSC begins. It will have to decide the rules for the use of force." LLOYD’S LIST, 21 May 2012, p 2 Maritime security firms want to shape IMO regulation - By Liz McMahon "Despite having welcomed the International Maritime Organization's decision to develop guidance and an international standard for the industry, private maritime security companies are demanding the right to be consulted and say they want the shipping industry to fund the process. The IMO's first high-level policy debate on armed guards opened its 90th meeting of the Maritime Safety Committee last week. IMO chairman Koji Sekimizu told a press conference that the debate ended with the decision to develop guidelines and a standard for PMSCs. He said that both would be discussed by working groups meeting this week." LLOYD’S LIST, 22 May 2012, p 2 Standard ideas "The debate surrounding standards for armed guards may be evolving, but the notion that it is progressing towards a solution that will be palatable for all is perhaps a little optimistic. After the International Maritime Organization last week announced its intention to develop a standard and guidelines for the private maritime security industry, its working groups are now no doubt thrashing out wordings, concepts and ideas. Unfortunately, given the different attitudes that exist across the IMO member states, it is difficult to imagine what kind of common ground will be achieved. The European Community Shipowners' Association has called for Brussels to push ahead with developing standards if the IMO stalls in its deliberations." LLOYD’S LIST, 23 May 2012, p 2 BIMCO leads the way with contract for armed guards on ships “At the end of March 2012, BIMCO announced the publication of the GUARDCON standard contract for the employment of security guards on vessels. This new contract has been developed to provide ship owners and Maritime Private Security Companies (MPSCs) with a fair, balanced and clearly worded standard contract to govern the employment and use of security guards, with or without firearms, on board merchant vessels.” BIMCO BULLETIN, April 2012, pp 8-10 PMSCs demand more clarity from port states - By Liz McMahon "Floating armouries unnecessary if port states 'took control'. Private maritime security companies that operate across multiple jurisdictions say they urgently need more clarity from port states, even though they welcome the latest moves by the International Maritime Organization to regulate the industry. Mast chief executive Philip Cable said that while most major flag administrations have now issued clear guidance to shipowners on procedures to allow armed guards to embark on ships under their jurisdictions, "the same cannot be said about port states". At the opening of the IMO's maritime safety committee last week chairman Koji Sekimizu urged flag, coastal and port states to decide a national policy on armed guards and to relay this to governments, the shipping industry and private maritime security providers." LLOYD’S LIST, 24 May 2012, p 2 ISO to develop international standard for armed guards (Ref.IMO)- By Liz McMahon "The International Maritime Organization has tasked the International Standards Organisation with developing the first global standard for private maritime security companies. Speaking last week at an IMO maritime safety committee press conference, secretarygeneral Koji Sekimizu announced the decision to provide guidance and an international standard for PMSCs and said that IMO working groups would discuss the details this week. Lloyd's List now understands that in plenary the IMO working group recommended guidance to PMSCs and passed this to the ISO as its minimum requirement for setting the standard." LLOYD’S LIST, 25 May 2012, p 1 Maritime security ‘new order’ - By Girija Shettar "Japan turns to the aviation industry for ideas on boosting antiterrorism security on vessels. The Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) has proposed improving maritime security by applying practices gleaned from the aviation industry. The SPF, a division of the Nippon Foundation, made the proposals to IMO Secretary General Koji Sekimizu, at the opening of the SPF presentation on the afternoon preceding the IMOMaritime Safety Commission’s 90th session. Presenting the proposals was SPF senior research fellowYurika Ishii, who said aviation security measures have “effectively reduced the number of hijacking and terrorist incidents” and although the two industries are different, “airports and seaports are essentially the same." FAIRPLAY, 24 May 2012, p 36 A new frame of mind for armed guards - By Liz McMahon "Research is underway to identify the main issues relating to the mental health of private maritime security personnel. Professor Neil Greenberg has decided to delve further into this subject. As well as offering independent support for the maritime industry he is conducting some

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By Roger Hailey "Belgium's shipowners have welcomed a decision by their government to push forward legislation allowing the use of armed guards on Belgian flag vessels. p. only two scientific papers have explored the issue of mental health and maritime security. it is somewhat concerning that so little is known about their mental health. even though the policy would appear to run counter to its own accreditation scheme. Current guidance on the use of weapons states that PCASPs should only deploy deadly force as part of a “graduated response plan”.” LLOYD’S LIST. Johan Vande Lanotte. It is likely that the new legislation allowing armed guards will be reviewed as and when required.By Jonathan Boonzaier "Fears have been raised since the piracy issue became a hot topic globally that terrorist groups are. "Given that security contractors are frequently required to carry out a variety of high-risk tasks. The first is a US study that examined a group of security contractors who worked in war zones. distressing work . p 6 Depressing. 7 June 2012. including convoy duties and the close protection of individuals at risk of suffering harm.the latest in a series of maritime security reports . completed an internet-based survey. Andrew Nicholson.to be submitted by August 15. and around 15% were drinking to excess.By Adam Corbett "The Security Association for the Maritime Industry (Sami) is backing a move to certify its members through the International Organisation for Standards (ISO) system. He hopes the results of his study may have important health and commercial implications and may serve as good evidence that the industry is taking the mental health of armed guards seriously. In a statement. 19 June 2012. once these are established.research in this area. with implementation by October this year. p 6 Maritime-security alliance backs ISO move .By Roger Hailey “Brussels is to study the consequences of a terrorist attack on a tanker carrying liquefied natural gas. almost one in three were suffering significant symptoms of psychological distress. The European Commission's mobility and transport directorate has called for tender documents on the study . Consumers and North Sea. About 20% of respondents reported having suffered from depression. KBRV's annual general meeting at the end of May heard from Mr Vande Lanotte that legislation will be laid before Belgium's national parliament in Brussels by the end of June." LLOYD’S LIST. Prof Greenberg noted that only about one in 10 contractors had employer-organised access to psychological help following deployment. In this study. director of maritime at Poole-based business-risk consultancy Drum Cussac. all men and with an average age of 43." he says. While this plays an important role in identifying and warning innocent vessels that don’t have harmful intent. business requirements and management of PMSCs as well the deployment of their personnel. the reality is that circumstances often overtake a graduated response. involved in pirate activity. after a vote of MPs. p 24 EU orders report on tanker security . p 2 Armed guard guidelines launched "A guide covering the use of armed guards onboard vessels at risk from piracy was unveiled on the last day of the IMO’s 90th maritime safety committee (MSC90). Prof Greenberg says the findings proved rather concerning. The guidance recommends on professional certification. operators and crew operating in the HRA piracy affected areas of the Indian Ocean." FAIRPLAY. forcing vessels to go from normal sailing to fighting for their lives in a matter of seconds. pp 24-25 Terrorist involvement is ‘unlikely’ . 1 June 2012. the IMO said: “The ISO is best placed to develop international standards for PMSCs based on IMO guidance. probably on the issue of accreditation. Providers will be expected to obtain professional certification against national and international standards. the IMO’s recommendat ion is that PMSCs establish procedures by which they provide their services to shipowners and operators and that they should comply with all legal requirements. The announcement to shipowners' association KBRV came directly from Belgian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economy. 31 May 2012. oil or chemicals. 28 June 2012. But if and when regulations are developed. Despite this. The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) says its Maritime Safety Committee agreed last week to establish a standard for private maritimesecurity companies (PMSCs) through the ISO. It will take its lead from the International Maritime Organization's recently unveiled first guideline document on the use of armed guards on ships." LLOYD’S LIST. should drive armed security debate "A number of maritime organisations are calling for rigid international standards on the deployment of weapons by private contracted armed security personnel (PCASPs) providing anti-piracy security. including symptoms that strongly suggested post-traumatic stress disorder. does not believe there is any 99 . 79 contractors.By Liz McMahon "According to occupational psychiatrist Professor Neil Greenberg. not tick boxes. This first international guidance for private maritime security companies (PMSC) providing contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the High Risk Area (HRA) addresses concerns that cause enormous anxiety to shipowners. the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Aden. 7 June 2012. it is important they take into account two fundamental concepts of seamanship and security: the speed with which thin gs happen at sea and ‘standoff’ distances. p 86 Belgium offers clarity over use of armed guards ." LLOYD’S LIST. 5 Comment: Reality. On company requirements." FAIRPLAY. 31 May 2012. or may soon become.”" TRADEWINDS.

Somali-based piracy teams continue to attack and seize merchant vessels.000bn tonne miles it is now. The federal export control authority BAFA will be responsible for the certification process. The course.By Liz McMahon "Private maritime security companies can ease the pressure on overstretched international navies by facilitating training programmes for countries such as Somalia." LLOYD’S LIST. Head of the Greenwich Maritime Institute. The virtues of containerised supply chains. p 18 Berlin approves draft law for armed guards . leading to cargoes being cancelled. One indicates it was “rebels taking a pot -shot” at the ship. This will leave a gap and private maritime security is going to play a role in squaring that circle. As piracy costs to global trade hit $12Bn. Pirates are not martyrs fighting for a cause. p 3 Security industry offers to train naval forces . legal trade.”" TRADEWINDS. with west African waters seeing a significant leap in attacks while. calls grow for greater regulation of armed security teams aboard vessels. the volume of trade carried at sea is set to rise by 50% from the 35. the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute found that arms proliferation networks are “increasingly adopting techniques pioneered by drug trafficking organisations th at integrate their logistics operations within the global supply chain through the use of sealed shipping containers”. after the House of Representatives passed the Gauging American Port Security Act sponsored by Democratic California Congresswoman Janice Hahn. nor will there be any in the future. Security is a particularly sensitive issue in Yemen. 3 July 2012. the new rules are not expected to be in place for at least another 12 months. Authorisation will be carried out according to the guidelines of the International Maritime Organization. 12 July 2012." LLOYD’S LIST. 12 July 2012. They are in it for the money. The boxes are carried on board vessels owned by mainstream shipping companies engaged in innocent. "As PMSCs." FAIRPLAY. pp 18-19 Master the unexpected . p 12 Ship details under wraps after incident off Yemen . At the same time the world's navies are set to shrink 30% in terms of ship numbers.By Katrin Berkenkopf "The German government has finally approved the draft law that will ultimately govern the employment of private maritime security companies on board Germanyflagged vessels. In a major report earlier this year. p 6 100 . There has been a lot of concern over disreputable companies. so providing an extra layer of respectability for traffickers to camouflage their activities." LLOYD’S LIST. starts in September and. we wanted to communicate how we could support navies and also offer reassurance that a recognised PMSC standard was imminent.By Lucy Hine "An LNG carrier came under attack off Yemen in early June but details are being kept under wraps. and only the money. in co-operation with the federal border police. their insurers and national governments." LLOYD’S LIST. 13 July 20`12. Prof Bellamy has been instrumental in launching what is claimed to be the first postgraduate degree in maritime security. remaining gaps in port security in the US" and submit a "prioritisation plan" to address these gaps. Mr Summerfield was speaking yesterday at a Royal United Services Institute conference on maritime security with a theme of industry's role in supporting tomorrow's maritime security capacity.By Jon Guy "Insurers increasingly back use of armed security on vessels traversing areas of high piracy risk. p 19 US House passes legislation for ports security review . p 3 Insurers bite bullet on armed guards . there are clear divisions between the maritime industry. They don’t want anyone else to come in and take a slice of the nice little business they’ve got going for themselves. Ms Hahn said: "Ports are a huge piece of our economy and an attack or disruption would have a disastrous impact on American jobs and the economy. and submit to the Congress a report on. according to Mast operational director David Summerfield. piracy attacks still blight the industry. its introduction is timely." he says. The latest figures show that.By Roger Hailey "Arms traffickers are turning to global maritime containers as the means to transport deadly cargo. 24 July 2012. in the Indian Ocean. says Prof Bellamy.By Nicola Good "Ex-soldier.terrorist involvement in piracy. far from decreasing. The legislation requires the US Homeland Security Secretary. which has seen the feedgas pipeline to its Balhaf liquefaction plant hit by militants disrupting supply. “We haven’t seen any established links between the pirates and terrorist organisations. "In the next 20 years." LLOYDS’ LIST. within one year after the Bill becomes law." A main message Mr Summerfield promoted was the potential role PMSCs could play to help international navies that are battling with stretched resources. However. They don’t want the terrorists to get involved. war reporter and hostage launches ground-breaking maritime security degree. Several industry players have referred to the incident but all have proved reluctant to name the vessel involved or explain what happened. which was validated by the University of Greenwich in January." TRADEWINDS. 6 July 2012. 29 June 2012. to "conduct a study of. p 2 Illicit arms traders step up their use of containers .By Rajesh Joshi "Yet another port security law is being readied to join the patchwork of US regimes already in place. speed and efficiency — plus the added bonus of anonymity granted by millions of boxes — are the same ones that make them attractive to illicit traders. 19 July 2012. However.

By Liz McMahon "The maritime security industry is “crying out for standards” and hopes a two-day meeting with the International Standards Organisation and relevant stakeholders will lead to establishing international regulation for armed guards by November. p 12 To the rescue Royal Navy warships protect stricken boxship . making it an easy target for the pirates that continue to menace the region. p 38 Only 50 UK maritime security companies have licences . The courses will be available in September. but saw little alternative as governments (except in a few cases) were not going to provide them with government professionals.By David Osler "Two Royal Navy ships intervened to protect stricken boxship New Delhi Express after it suffered an engine breakdown in the Gulf of Aden last week. Innovation and Skills again raises the question of how many PMSCs are operating outside the law." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Seagull security training gets green light “A comprehensive ship security training package. p 6 Asian owners call for UN protection – By Adam Corbett and Jim Mulrenan “United Nations (UN) governments are ready to consider a proposal from Asian shipowners that vessels operating in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean should be given protection by UN troops. 25 July 2012. they needed to hold an Open Individual Trade Control Licence. 80 of which are based in the UK. the industry was more likely to exacerbate the problem of piracy. told its representatives at the meeting that he would put the proposal to government members for consideration. 30 July 2012. based on their experience. The proposal involves UN troops being deployed on converted merchant ships acting as floating bases. the report has raised the hackles of many private maritime security firms and industry body the Security Association for the Maritime Industry spoke out immediately in defence of its members.By Michael Grey "If security matters — and we are given to understand from the security services professionals who warn us endlessly about the disruptive efforts of violent jihadists. but here again there has been an attempt to do it on the cheap. An ASF spokesperson said: “The ASF hopes that the counter-piracy proposal will be considered seriously and brought to fruition by the entire UN body as soon as possible. p 2 Industry Viewpoint: Security on the cheap . It argued that PMSCs were making every effort to facilitate a regulatory structure." LLOYD’S LIST. ” LLOYD’S LIST. On July 2. rather than contribute to any kind of solution." LLOYD’S LIST.Shooting reignites debate over the rules of engagement . 27 July 2012. The programme fully complies with the Manila Amendments to the STCW Convention and Code. protecting the vessel’s crew and cargo from the threat of attack until it had fixed its engines and continued nort h. 2 August 2012. the warships readied their weapons and maintained a patrol around it for several hours.By Liz McMahon “Last week. Not surprisingly. a leaked report from the UN Monitoring Group on piracy in Somalia was a damning indictment of the private maritime security industry. Seagull has issued more than 10. 27 July 2012. only 50 companies held either licence. who heads the CGCPS. The proposal was put to the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia (CGCPS) by the Asian Shipo wners’ Forum (ASF) at a meeting in London. that it does — then it is surely not something that can be undertaken on the cheap. a new Open General Trade C ontrol Licence was created and PMSCs have been able to apply for this since then. has received Norwegian Maritime Authority (NMA) approval. 30 July 2012. developed by computer based training (CBT) specialist Seagull.By Liz McMahon "A freedom of Information request to the UK government revealing that only 50 private maritime security companies hold any form of licence from the Department of Business. The troops would then board ships before they transit piracy danger zones. 25 July 2012. After hearing a distress call and sailing towards the merchant vessel.”” TRADEWINDS. ” LLOYD’S LIST. Experts were asked to give an account of their experiences in maritime security and piracy and also gave their view on what the ISO standard should achieve. despite the Security Association for the Maritime Industry claiming to have 167 members. with casual labourers hired like deckchair attendants when the sun comes out at the seaside? Most of us believe that one of the prime responsibilities of navies is to provide protection for commercial shipping.000 ship security officer (SSO) certificates since 2003. It claimed that unless the situation changed dramatically and urgently. The ISO meeting was held at Interpol’s headquarters on Thursda y and Friday. and these will 101 . p 1 Maritime security firms hope ISO meeting will accelerate armed guard regulation . The Security in Complex Environments Group has been working with the UK government in developing regulation for armed guards since June last year. p2 Was UN criticism of armed guards justified? . Prior to that." LLOYD’S LIST. The ASF says James Hughes. The shipping industry would have much rather not had to employ private security guards.By Liz McMahon “A controversy involving the mistaken shooting of fishermen that has been likened to the Enrica Lexie case has led industry experts to call for the involvement of all affected parties in regulatory discussions on rules for the use of force. In the aftermath of London’s conference on piracy in Somalia in February.

p 2 Belgium and Italy give the green light to armed guards . Both moves follow Germany’s decision to regulate certification for armed guards last month. p 2 US warns shipping to beware bogus surveillance . p 5 Vessels with armed guards are ‘most vulnerable’ entering port .By Liz McMahon "The West of England P&I Club has become the latest club to formally announce a partnership with an independent armed guard vetting firm.By David Osler "Intelligence sources say suspicious activity may herald ‘more specific interference’.By Liz McMahon “France has handed over sea command of the European Union Naval Force to Italy in the 12th rotation of the EU Naval Force command. the transhipment hub in the Bahamas. 16 August 2012. In one recent case. although it made clear it did not endorse this practice. Global port operator Hutchison has teamed up with the US company Decision Sciences.By Liz McMahon "While some private maritime security companies have welcomed the Security Association for the Maritime Industry’s decision to make accreditation a compulsory part of its membership. bananas and cat litter emit low levels of radiation and the manufacturers of the first passive scanner of its kind have shown that these will not send out false alarms that could cause transport havoc. p 8 Sami forces all members to apply for accreditation . who is based at the operation’s headquarters in Northwood. warns the private maritime security industry. 7 August 2012. p 2 Hutchison takes the lead to test nuclear material scanners . others have questioned its motives. and a further 40 are in the process. developer of a scanner that can detect nuclear or radioactive substances being shipped illegally. The revised STCW introduces more stringent requirements for onboard security training." LLOYD’S LIST. The Belgian government also said it was committed to having a very strict process for approving armed guards. would not be available until July 2013.”" LLOYD’S LIST.” FAIRPLAY SOLUTIONS. 13 August 2012. waiting for armed teams to arrive. 14 August 2012. the Strait of Hormuz and the Middle East Gulf. who embarked new EU flagship ITS San Giusto . Demonstrations took place last week at Freeport Container Port. Several everyday cargoes such as ceramic tiles. PMSCs will only be permitted in the HRA and the approval is currently limited to a period of two years.remain in force until 1 January 2017.By Janet Porter "CAT litter has been used to test equipment designed to detect radioactive materials hidden in a container that could be used to build a dirty bomb. Unknown entities are carrying out surveillance on shipping in the Gulf of Oman.By Liz McMahon "Belgium and Italy have become the latest two European countries to authorise the use of armed guards as a counter-piracy measure. endorsed by the International Maritime Organization. Sami has 167 members and the accreditation programme was launched in February. “As piracy extends south round the coast of Africa from Somalia. with live operations starting this week. Initially.By Liz McMahon "Confusion over weapons transfer in the high-risk area must be addressed as it is only a matter of time before an armed team comes under attack as its arms are bonded or put away. p 5 West of England P&I Club strikes PMSC vetting deal . French Rear-Admiral Jean-Baptiste Dupuis handed over to Italian Rear-Adm Enrico Credendino. 3 August 2012. a vessel was asked for information about its crew complement and master’s name. located just 65 miles from Florida.” LLOYD’S LIST. purportedly by a named vessel that has since been renamed and was in fact operating elsewhere. p 1 102 . Local reports state the decision was prompted by Belgian shipowners. August 2012. The Belgian government has approved the use of private maritime security companies in a measure to protect vessels transiting the high-risk area in the Gulf of Aden. Sami’s decision to change its mem bership rules comes after Lloyd’s List reported that the PMSC certification from the International Organization for Standardisation (ISO). The ONI said that it could not assess at this stage whether the queries originated ashore or from vessels within the region. 8 August 2012. with a particular focus on ensuring that seafarers are properly trained in case of attack by pirates. The club said it had secured preferential terms for Flag Victor to vet potential private maritime security companies against the criteria set out in the International Maritime Organization’s interim guidance to shipowners." LLOYD’S LIST. In a ceremony held on Monday on board French warship FS Marne . 7 August 2012. “We have already seen very daring attacks on ships in the Red Sea when anchored or drifting. ships are threatened as they go into port but this is exactly where private maritime security companies tend to disengage because of port authority rules.” said Redfour security consultant Martin Brown. p 2 France hands EU Navfor baton to Italy . the US Office of Naval Intelligence has warned in a circular. London." LLOYD’S LIST. the IMO accepted that the increased threat to shipping had resulted in the growing use of armed guards." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST. Currently 16 companies have successfully passed through stage one of the Sami programme. but has ruled out the fact that they came from the vessel to which the request was attributed. At its Maritime Safety Committee meeting in May. The ceremony was presided over by EU Naval Force deputy commander Rear-Adm Galtiero Matesi.

thus allows the house to review the situation. “When it comes to weapons training. 21 August 2012. 17 August 2012. EU special representative for the Horn of Africa Alexander Rondos said the operation might need to roll over. new evidence put forward since the industry’s effective legalisation has prompted the house to reconsider.By Liz McMahon "Although the private maritime security industry has grown exponentially over the past year. 21 August 2012. Operation Atalanta’s mandate will come up for review in December 2014.By Nicola Good "Efforts to regulate the private maritime security sector may be under way but there are concerns about whether existing standards of weapons training will prevent a serious incident involving armed guards. where it was scheduled to bunker. Lloyd’ s List understands that PMSCs have been told to rent weapons from this offshore armoury or face a ban on operating out of Sri Lanka. Instead.” says Gray Page head of asset protection Jim Mainstone. Giving evidence. leaving some shipowners frustrated by their governments’ reluctance to embrace armed guards. p 26 UK calls for Operation Atalanta to extend beyond 2014 . according to Bergen Risk Solutions. p 6 Shipmanagers turn to multiple suppliers as demand grows . to reflect the pace of training of Somali security forces and deployment of the national army. Rapid growth within the private maritime security sector means that PMSC recruitment and training standards can vary quite dramatically.” says Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement Group loss prevention safety and quality superintendent Ulrich Ganz.By Liz McMahon "In its previous report on piracy in Somalia. As long as the military cannot provide this. Turning the Tide on Piracy. Innovation and Skills open general trade control licences and will not let PMSCs bring their own weapons into port. 16 August 2012.” TRADEWINDS. the government revised its policy to enable UK-flag ships to use armed guards. the rise of the private maritime security company has not spread evenly across the globe.”" LLOYD’S LIST. although the EU needed to prepare an exit strategy. p 2 Dutch shipowners defy national ban on armed guards .By Liz McMahon "Operation Atalanta must extend beyond 2014 and the UK needs to increase its vessel contribution.PMSCs vow to clean up their act . And while some PMSCs do have their own training facilities. it appears no cargo or fuel oil has been spilled from either vessel. 22 August 2012.By Liz McMahon "Private maritime security companies are being forced offshore in Sri Lanka because its port authorities refuse to recognise UK licences and are telling firms to hire weapons from a local offshore armoury or face a ban on operating there." LLOYD’S LIST. and warned that an all-out transition to private armed security could fuel corruption and violence if not handled properly. The VLCC was fully laden and was sailing between Qatar. we will do so ourselves. published today. and Fujairah. In October 2011. Despite the intensity of the collision. p 2 103 . the House of Lords has urged in its follow-up report on piracy in Somalia and European Union involvement. The Council of Somali Organisations called for Operation Atalanta and the EU’s other missions to extend well beyond 2014. where it loaded at Mesaieed. “This is surprising because most maritime armed guarding companies employ ex-military or ex-law enforcement personnel and they should be fully aware of the requirements and appropriate standards. p 2 House of Lords has a change of heart on armed guards . PMSC growth has been fairly UK-centric. [others] hire guys over the phone and never see them.By Nicola Good "Armed guards come in all shapes and sizes and from diverse backgrounds. The Sri Lanka authorities have refused to accept UK Department of Business. Certified Institute of Shipping of Nigeria rector Okwuashi Favour Alex has written a paper that advocates using commercial armed guards as part of a maritime security strategy." LLOYD’S LIST. Now. LLOYD’S LIST. the quality and thoroughness is generally not as good as most people would expect it to be. “Most PMSCs use ex -military personnel and give them very sophisticated additional role-specific training. 16 August 2012. Building Somalia’s Future. The Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL)-controlled 312. the House of Lords said private security guards should not be placed on commercial shipping as this would increase the risks to ships and crew.”" LLOYD’S LIST. “But we have had a case of a guard whose last job was a disco bouncer and another person who detailed the high point of their security career as protecting a fashion designer during a fiveday visit to Greece. p 6 Sri Lanka pushes security firms to offshore armouries . perhaps to 2018.By Liz McMahon “Industry sources have urged Nigeria’s government to revise its stance on private maritime security. p 1 Clean Hormuz crash provides retention merit – By Adam Corbett “The collision between a Japanese tanker and a US Navy vessel in the Strait of Hormuz over the weekend might provide some clues for the US Maritime Administration (Marad)’s research project into the merits of double hulls. 21 August 2012.”" LLOYD’S LIST. a joint venture established between private Sri Lankan company Avant Garde and the country’s Ministry of Defence has set up an offshore armoury." LLOYD’S LIST. 17 August 2012. p 6 Nigeria urged to rethink its stance on private security . Martin Dorsman from shipowners’ association KVNR told one Dutch newspaper: “No ship sails the coast of Somalia without protection .000-dwt Otowasan (built 2005) hit the US warship USS Porter at 1am on Sunday. however. The follow-up report.

By Karen Thomas "Kenya is central to efforts to drive al-Shabaab militants out of neighbouring Somalia and to stamp out regional piracy. ” LLOYD’S LIST. commissioned by the International Maritime Organization to monitor pirate movements in western Indian Ocean waters. writes Liz McMahon. p 12 Sri Lanka and India strengthen maritime security co-operation . spokesman for Crowley Liner Services. ISO 9001:2008 focuses on quality management systems. size and product provided. where he is expected to say piracy is a burden on global trade that inflicts major losses upon international shipping. regardless of type. he added if they could demonstrate they had learned from their mistakes." LLOYD’S LIST. p 35 Sami criticised for not considering PMSC past . the Indian government has answered questions about piracy-related issues raised by MPs.By Liz McMahon “The detention of Ocean Atlas in Venezuela for nearly two weeks has generated its share of speculative press but it highlights the ever-pressing need for international co-ordination in regulating armed guards. However. The industry has voiced frustration over conflicting or problematic weapons transfer regulations at ports in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean. according to G4S head of maritime security Martin Ewence.” LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Security ‘a burden’ on trade “Security costs have a significant impact on logistics operators.By Liz McMahon "The Security Association for the Maritime Industry faces criticism after it came to light that a private mar itime security company’s history is not vetted during the certification process. met on Monday at the Ministry of Defence in New Delhi. focusing on “maritime issues of mutual concerns” such as piracy and pollution. 23 August 2012.By Liz McMahon "Private maritime security company Ambrey Risk is the first PMSC to gain ISO 9001:2008 status from Lloyd’s Register QualityAssurance. 3 September 2012. 2 First maritime security firm wins ISO certification ." LLOYD’S LIST. India’s MoD said that Sri Lanka’s visit continued efforts by both governments to cement co-operation between their coastguards. However. which operates the ship. said on Monday morning that the ship had been cleared to sail but was still at the Venezuelan port at the time of writing. The meeting followed a string of alleged attacks on Indian fishermen by the Sri Lankan navy which have heightened tensions between the two countries. 12 September 2012. Speaking to Lloyd’s List after a recent trip to Nigeria. The warship is in town under an exchange programme with Mombasa’s piracy information -sharing centre. The International Organisation of Standards’ website states: “All requirements of ISO 9001:2008 are generic and are intended to be applicable to all organisations. Mark Miller. He will address a session at the Maritime Security and Defence conference being held during next week’s SMM exhibition in Hamburg. 29 August 2012. company security officer of box ship operator Hamburg Süd. 23 August 2012. p 2 US vessel set to leave Venezuela after arms charges are dropped . believes Mathias Günther. Venezuela appears to have been resolved. However. That involvement has seen al-Shabaab threaten retribution in Kenya’s waters and on its streets.” FAIRPLAY." LLOYD’S LIST.”" LLOYD’S LIST. Mr Ewence said: “Nigeria is keen to maintain authority over the handling of weaponry. Meanwhile.By Rajesh Joshi “A sticky situation involving the US-flag heavylift ship Ocean Atlas in Maracaibo. Sri Lanka Coast Guard director-general Rear Admiral Ruwan Dias and Vice-Admiral MP Muralidharan. p 2 Kenya moves on up . 31 August 2012. the Indian Minister of Shipping GK Vasan said 43 Indian citizens were being held by Somali pirates. director-general of the Indian Coast Guard. Berthed next to the ferry terminal is the German frigate Bremen. Responding to a request for information. Secure a Ship UK operations and business director Paul Maguire said it was a shame companies that had made mistakes or had been involved in incidents could “get away with it”.By Liz McMahon "The Indian and Sri Lankan coastguards have met to discuss a co-operative approach to maritime security at a time of heightened tension between two nations under pressure to respond to piracy-related issues. 29 August 2012. after local authorities dropped charges relating to alleged arms trafficking after rifles used by the ship to guard against pirates were found on board. p. Nexus Consulting is the private maritime security 104 .Nigerians hold solution to piracy and oil theft . Firms have reported particular difficulties recently in Sri Lanka and the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office is investigating Colombo’s approach to international PMSCs." LLOYD’S LIST. p 1 Collaborative approach welcomed by PMSCs "Private maritime security companies will also welcome the collaborative approach. p 4 Detention highlights need to regulate PMSCs . 22 August 2012. The ISC opened last year. then their history could be deemed a good thing.By Liz McMahon “Whether international PMSCs will ever be able to operate in Nigeria will very much be a Nigerian decision. LRQA said i n a statement that the scope of Ambrey’s certification was designed specifically for provision of maritime security for vessels in the commercial shipping and oil and gas industries.

" LLOYD’S LIST. a director at the Security Association for the Maritime Industry (SAMI). makes for a compelling case for the use of PMSCs. He said if the security team had been armed. 2 November 2012. However. represented by the Security Association for the Maritime Industry. It said the qualifications it vets against are based on BIMCO’s Guardcon. Plans for the floating armoury were first revealed by Lloyd’s List in August and it will now launch operations on October 15. That. The majority of the privately contracted armed security personnel are vetted by the security companies that employ them. to develop a publicly available specification of ISO 28007 based on IMO guidance. aiming to alleviate uncertainty and liability over the most problematic issues with having hired guns on vessels. The industry is waiting with bated breath for the International Organisation for Standardisation’s ISO 28007. despite concerns raised by sections of the maritime industry. However." LLOYD’S LIST. Sri Lanka’s MoD had earlier sought assurances from the UK government on the bona fides of private military and security companies (PMSCs) and accountability for their weapons. 26 September 2012. p 4 Sri Lanka launches floating armoury . 1 November 2012. this time focusing on individual contractors. The MoD said it had made the move due to national security concerns. Although the escalating risk of piracy was forcing armed guards onto everyone’s agenda.” SAFETY AT SEA. several shipowners mooted the idea of using unarmed guards to protect vessels. which.” LLOYD’S LIST. it is hoped. The Armed Contractors’ Register is a free service. including shipping organisations. coupled with the undeniable fact that piracy in the Gulf of Aden has dropped for the first time in five years. flag states. seeing it as a legitimate halfway house in terms of security. France. Steven Jones.By Liz McMahon "Shipowners should think carefully about the consequences of moving from using armed to unarmed guards as the perceived threat of piracy in the Indian Ocean diminishes. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) held a meeting on 26 and 27 July at Interpol’s headquarters in Lyon. p 2 Sri Lanka’s anti-piracy tug of war – By Rohan Gunasekera “The island nation’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) went ahead with a 15 October deadline to shift weapons stored at the naval armoury in Galle to a tug offshore. p 3 PMSC meeting sparks debate “Mixed reactions have followed the first meeting to develop a global standard for private maritime security companies (PMSCs). Diplomatic consultations on the issue have been going on between the British and Sri Lankan governments after private maritime security companies using the island for sea marshal transfers raised concerns over the floating storage concept. causing concern over rising costs and problems with regulation for UK private maritime security companies. the rules have yet to be published because of the complexities surrounding the use of lethal force.By Liz McMahon "A definitive set of seven rules for the use of force is being drafted. The 100 Series Rules have been drawn up by industry stakeholders. PMSCs were still viewed as “gun -toting cowboys operating out of a garden shed” by a majority of the shipping industry. described the meeting as “focused and productive – the first tangible step towards production of ISO 28007”. p 2 Employing unarmed security teams has ‘no benefit’ . the incident would not have escalated to “such dangerous and potentially catastrophic levels”. p 2 105 . at Combating Piracy Week in London last week. It has entrusted the running of the floating armoury to commercial firm Avant Garde Maritime Private. 1 November 2012. private maritime security companies very much operated in what can only be described as a grey area in shipping." LLOYD’S LIST. The rifles stored on board the vessel are the property of Nexus.By Liz McMahon "Prior to the UK’s landmark decision to legalise the use of armed guards on commercial vessels in October last year. 1 November 2012.company employed by Intermarine to provide security services to Ocean Atlas . maritime insurers and the private maritime security industry.By Liz McMahon “The Sri Lankan Ministry of Defence has deployed a floating armoury off the coast of Galle and all land-based naval armouries will cease to operate.By Liz McMahon "Yet another independent company vetting armed guards has entered the market." LLOYD’S LIST.” FAIRPLAY. Martin Nethercot worked as a unarmed guard for security company Redfour on New York Star when it was attacked in February 2011. will provide a clear framework on which both shipowners and private maritime security companies can rely.” LLOYD’S LIST. 12 September 2012. p 2 Newsmaker of the Year: Security Association for the Maritime Industry . There has yet to be an incident formally reported involving the hijack of a vessel with armed guards on board. October 2012. p 21 New entrant joins armed guard vetting market . 27 September 2012. ACR said only users with a full set of required qualifications would be accepted on to the register. While other auditors would be likely to argue that their procedures also take into account individuals employed by the private maritime security company. p 14 Legal fears delay release of rules on use of lethal force . it is likely they would rely on the PMSC’s recordkeeping to verify the status of its staff.

even though that was serving Italian marines as a vessel 106 . Other worries have focused on how rules for the use of force could operate in practice and in particular the transit of weapons. It is fair to say this fear has been fairly unfounded. Around 50 people attended including senior representatives from the commission. even as the draft becomes more established.By Liz McMahon "Although maritime security may improve in West Africa. not least because certain countries have still not said openly whether they deem the practice to be legal or not. envy.By Liz McMahon "The advanced draft of the 100 Series Rules for the Use of Force gives a legal basis for acts of self-defence. Mr Hammond said he submitted an agreed framework document on rules for use of force on behalf of representative industry stakeholders following last month’s RUF Conference at Quadrant Chambers . Completion of the installation was celebrated with a ceremony in Dar es Salaam on 17 September attended by the IMO special representative for maritime security. p 4 PMSC standards "At the end of the month the long-awaited ISO PAS 28007 will be presented to the International Maritime Organization’s Maritime Safety Committee. BIMCO. Nato.By Tom Leander "The main players in the complex business of hiring and deploying armed guards on ships agree that armed guards are the main reason for the decline in successful pirate attacks. they have mixed views of the effectiveness of rules and regulation and disagree on the value-for-money equation when it comes to choosing private maritime security companies. 13 November 2012. November 2012.” PORTS AND HARBORS. Now. this was subsequently accepted by the International Organisation for Standardisation last month. Initially." LLOYD’S LIST. One P&I expert told Lloyd’s List: “The biggest problem is probably that highlighted by Enrica Lexie. However. stakeholders are still finding the issue of insurance a concern. the International Maritime Organization secretariat." LLOYD’S LIST. An international standard relating to guns on commercial vessels was always going to be a gargantuan task. marine insurers and specialist lawyers. Mr Townsend of Lloyd’s Register said there was extensive discussion on the implications for insurance within the standard. In its monthly Niger Delta security briefing. 13 November 2012. Hartmut Hesse. the report said. p 5 Creating a security culture – By Steven Jones “Seafarers have shown a degree of antipathy to the security measures that have been enforced in recent years. its draft standard for private maritime security companies. according to Quadrant Chambers barrister David Hammond. who authored the 100 Series Rules. The intelligence gathered from these raids will support further activit y in coming weeks. p 1 Tanzania implements surveillance system “The first phase of a Tanzanian project to upgrade maritime security and safety in the Mozambique Channel was marked by the implementation of an integrated radar and AIS coastal surveillance system.By Liz McMahon "The International Organization for Standards’ has ended its second meeting on ISO PAS 28007. with many questions yet to be answered about the implications for insurance coverage. This seems to stem mostly from a fear of the added burden that the ISPS Code has brought with it. 16 November 2012. even though many in the industry feared otherwise. November/December 2012.By Liz McMahon "As The International Organisation for Standards stalls on the issue of insurance for private maritime security companies. 6 November 2012. a main concern was that the use of armed guards in piracy high-risk areas would only serve to escalate levels of violence. Having attracted a broad consensus. p 2 Who is liable if lethal force is used wrongly? . disputes over payments and contracts and turf wars between gangs of bunkering thieves — would thwart moves to create and maintain a safe and secure environment." LLOYD’S LIST. pp 7 -9 Draft rules provide ‘legal certainty’ to self-defence ." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 ISO meeting undecided on armed guards insurance . Bergen Risk also warned that “grudge attacks” — caused by personal conflict. the African Maritime Safety and Security Agency.Cartel arrests should boost West Africa maritime security . following the arrest of several people alleged to be significant players in cargo theft cartels. The most pressing issue is the potential for misuse of lethal force. the Security Association for the Maritime Industry. “This is a highly complex subject that needs to be looked at from many angles. liability in key circumstances such as the misuse of lethal force is unclear and yet to be tested. in which a ship’s armed guard kills someone who was not a pirate. The meeting was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels last week. seven months after the body gave the International Standards Organisation the mandate to create it. p 2 Feeling insecure? . there is a real risk that opportunistic operators will fill the void." LLOYD’S LIST. The task for ship operators and Masters is to engage all personnel as everyone must be involved in security processes and understand the benefits.” SEAWAYS. and representatives of the Tanzanian and US governments – the three partners in the scheme. However. the risk management firm said the joint taskforce plans to continue the counter bunkering and illegal refining operations that have significantly disrupted the cartels responsible for these crimes. 7 November 2012.

“Imagine if the case had involved a PMSC. experts discussed Lloyd’s List’s recent survey.By Liz McMahon "The UK Chamber of Shipping is planning to allow private maritime security companies to become members. but only after a rigorous vetting process. was an effective document.deployed detachment. p 2 Industry debates ISO armed guard standard delivered to IMO .” FAIRPLAY.” LLOYD’S LIST. However. UK Chamber of Shipping director of security and commercial Gavin Simmonds said Guardcon was a good. a bank guarantee in excess of $5m for the vessel’s release. ISO’s PMSC standard — ISO PAS 28007 — is the quickest standard to reach public accreditation specification stage. As it happens. “It may be that no PMSCs want to join. p 2 107 . p 23 First armed guard ISO vetting scheduled for March (Ref. p 4 Swedish flag’s hope for armed guard law – By Girija Shettar “Swedish-flagged ships will be legally permitted to carry private maritime security guards (PMSGs) from March 2013 if Sweden’s parliament enacts a proposed new law governing their employment." LLOYD’S LIST. effective document but because it took a long time to create. Mr Dowden said plans were at a formative stage but that not all PMSCs would be able to apply and that admission would probably be based on an interview. 26 November 2012. many of those who participated in the survey may not operate in a piracy high-risk area and therefore considered the issue only hypothetically. The survey found that 38% of respondents had used armed guards. p 2 UK Chamber inches open its doors to PMSCs . concluding that the chamber saw them as a complementary part of the wider picture. this left an interim period in which companies found their own solutions. say industry experts. Speaking at an industry roundtable chaired by Lloyd’s List and held by Protection Vessels International. and the guards had been civilians and there were problems over licences and then it turned out that an owner had not carried out proper due diligence on the guard company including checking the licences. it cannot be closed but whether regulation will make armed guards an institutional part of shipping is open to debate. “We only want the cream of the crop and maybe de facto we will provide a quality kitemark for shipowners. which found that 50% of respondents did not know whether BIMCO’s standard contract for armed guards." LLOYD’S LIST. “The vessel was detained for several months in India and the owners had to post." LLOYD’S LIST.500 declared armed transits had taken place but that the figure was probably under-reported. Swedish-flagged ships are carrying PMSGs but by doing so. arguing that this could help to raise industry standards.” Asked whether any PMSC could apply. the idea that armed guards could become a permanent fixture on ships was acknowledged at a recent Lloyd’s List industry roundtable on maritime security. 27 November 2012. masters. and crew are effectively in breach of the law. UK Chamber of Shipping head of security and commercial Gavin Simmonds acknowledged the debate about armed guards becoming an institution. 26 November 2012. Guardcon. are anxious to institutionalise the costly and potentially dangerous practice of hiring private maritime security companies.500.By Liz McMahon “The International Organisation for Standards’ formal audit process for private maritime security companies will begin in early sp ring and individual audits will take four months to complete. We will certainly recommend our own shipowner members use those organisations we have allowed into the chamber.By Tom Leander "Few in shipping. industry experts have questioned whether an international minimum standard for private maritime security companies is a sufficient measure. lawyers to ld Fairplay.” he said. 27 November 2012. 19 November 2012. Catlin head of asset protection Peter Dobbs said that 14.By Liz McMahon "Now that the door has opened to maritime security." LLOYD’S LIST. p 2 Will regulation make armed guards a fixture on vessels? . Although the debate over regulating armed guards has been lengthy and the vacuum vast. UK Chamber of Shipping director of membership development John Dowden said the organisation had decided provisionally to allow PMSCs to become members. The law will apply to ships that are subject to the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. in which case it won’t be effective but if they do we have internally discussed that there will be a fairly rigorous vetting procedure. with the real total likely to be 16. if any. 29 November 2012. 11 December 2012. managers. said ISO 28007 project leader Robin Townsend.By Liz McMahon "As The International Organisation for Standards delivered its draft standard for armed guards to the International Maritime Organization’s Maritime Safety Committee yesterday. p 2 Short-term fixture . the UK’s Chamber of Shipping is inching towards an acceptance of PMSCs as members. trading outside the European Economic Area." LLOYD’S LIST. after the International Maritime Organization gave ISO its mandate to produce the standard in May. The chamber’s head of membership development said that the group had provisionally decided to allow PMSCs. IMO) . I understand. rather than Italian marines. owners. Speaking at an industry roundtable chaired by Lloyd’s List and held by Protection Vessels Inter national last week. experts discussed the findings of this newspaper’s recent survey on piracy and private maritime security and considered what the future held for the fledgling industry.

3 January 2013.” he said. Mr Noakes said that to be viable they would need to be recognised internationally and that the best vehicle for that was the International Maritime Organization. p 2 Rules for use of force will be published this month . “We know what cargoes are carrying refined products and if there is space in the tanks pirates will target them. 17 January 2013. 17 January 2013. flag states recognised rules for use of force presented to them by individual private maritime security companies and approved them in line with their own laws. at least 20 floating armouries were said to be operating in the Indian Ocean — and doing so in a regulatory void. p 2 BIMCO pulls out of 100 Series rules for use of force . fuelled by a sense of entitlement.” he said. 108 .” Due to the laws in Nigeria.Comment: Insurers must help fix security standards – By Thomas Bennett “Insurers hold the key to the development of firm standards in the maritime security market in 2013. it is going to be violent. Floating armouries are not new. despite the industry calling on governments.By Liz McMahon "The 100 Series rules for use of force will be published this month.By Liz McMahon "Moves to regulate private maritime security companies are making good progress. p 2 UK supports armed guard standard . p 2 How to select your maritime security partner – Advises David Rider “For every good private maritime security company there are several bad ones." LLOYD’S LIST. 10 January 2013. Each security firm has its own rules for use of force. a matter of paramount concern. Mr Davis said it was hard to trust anyone in the area.” FAIRPLAY. Late last year. The problem escalated after Sri Lanka decided to prohibit transit of weapons ashore but endorsed at least one floating armoury. Privately contracted armed security personnel who use lethal force have no legal structure to rely on if their conduct is called into question. Mr Noakes said that in the main." LLOYD’S LIST. And commercial pressure has led to poorly trained two. especially for players that are UK-based. Late last year. managed by private security firm Avant Gard.By Liz McMahon "Insurance broker Marsh has amended its insurance cover for private maritime security companies to address fears that the use of floating armouries may invalidate current insurance policies.” he said. noted too that since 2010 there had been rapid growth in the number of private security companies working on anti-piracy operations at sea. It is often related to non-payment and an agent will have given information under duress. says Security Association for the Maritime Industry founder Peter Cook. 10 January 2013. Piracy has not gone away. PSC1 was developed with land-based security in mind. “If there is storage space in the bunkers. In east and west Africa poor governance has led to untrammelled economic expediency. p 28 Private armed guards would lead to ‘bloodbath’ in West Africa . and particularly that of the UK. according to Gulf of Aden Transit Group chief executive Nick Davis. the Foreign Office’s Minister for Africa. private maritime security companies and shipowners alike have voiced their desire for rules for use of force. The causes of criminality at sea remain undiminished. the vessel will be hijacked for around 48 hours and the operation will have been prearranged with an operating crew for the ship to ship transfer. Equally. Although he supports the concept of standard rules for use of force. Asking the right questions will help single out the good. 16 January 2013. Speaking at an event examining geopolitical threats to maritime security. Many have felt that this leaves them in a vulnerable position. p 21 Insurance market tackles fears on floating armouries . providing an international framework for legal action and trial that offers all parties equal protection and scrutiny. but although these may be sent to flag states they are not generally acknowledged. “The government is therefore also contributing to an international drafting process under the ISO for an equivalent professional standard for PSCs working in the maritime sector. to clarify the matter. the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office said the government would adopt PSC1. “We are concerned over the suggestion that the 100 Series RUF will protect parties in the event of a trial." LLOYD’S LIST.and three-man teams guarding vessels that require four competent guards. However. after the UK government pledged its support for the international standard recently published by the International Organisation for Standards and as pilot projects for certification are about to start. The pirates do not need the [hijacked] crew for anything and if they get in the way. Security firms operating in this region have little option but to use the floating armoury. Mark Simmonds. Along with internationally recognised regulation. BIMCO chief maritime security officer Giles Noakes t old Lloyd’s List that the body had not been consulted on several key areas.By Liz McMahon "BIMCO has asked the Security Association for the Maritime Industry to withdraw its name from the latest version of the 100 Series rules for the use of force as it has several concerns about the document. · The firm should be a signatory of the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Providers (ICoC PSSP) · Look for a company that has been vetted and accredited by a third-party organisation · Explore your chosen company’s corporate governance and insurance levels · Consider wisely the costs versus safety question. some security companies that are struggling to make ends meet tell shipping companies what they want to hear.By Liz McMahon "There is no place for privately contracted armed guards in West Africa and their use would lead to an “absolute bloodbath”." LLOYD’S LIST. but have grown in popularity as security firms grapple with increasingly complex and contradictory regulation from coastal states.” FAIRPLAY. a standard for private security companies working on land in complex and high-risk environments overseas.

“Upon receipt of the application. However." LLOYD’S LIST. provides African states around the 109 . third-party floating armouries are currently not approved under the ECO’s terms. but many will be forced to sacrifice standards to undercut the competition. Clearly some shipowners must think otherwise — unless the decision is driven purely by price. p 2 Maritime security must move away from ‘Band-Aid’ solutions . However. According to broker and risk adviser Marsh. p 7 EU boost Gulf of Guinea security “Following the rise in Gulf of Guinea pirate incidents over the pas t two years. as shipowners fear the liability for any issues will fall into their laps. BIMCO’s membership list could also be rich with new potential leads for PMSCs. 6 February 2013. 29 January 2013. which controls trade and export licensing of military and dual-use goods and regulates use of third-party floating armouries. Why has one shipping association taken the plunge while the other thought better of it? The benefits seem obvious. p 2 At odds over PMSCs "BIMCO is to open its doors to private maritime security companies to become associate members but the UK Chamber of Shipping has decided not to follow suit. 7 February 2013. new counterpiracy products will continue to emerge in the hope of driving attacks down further. despite mulling over the idea last year. 1 February 2013. BIMCO’s website states that private security firms applying for associate membership must obtain ISO 28007 certif ication before they apply for membership. BIMCO chief security officer Giles Noakes acknowledged that some shipowners are using three-man teams and said this was a decision for the company to make. Sri Lanka is one of the strategic points for armed transit in the Indian Ocean. The programme. PMSCs are a clear revenue stream for BIMCO. BIMCO conducted detailed research into visibility on vessels when it drew up the Guardcon guidelines and Mr Noakes said he could not see how fewer than four guards could provide 360-degree visibility. 6 February 2013.000.shipowners can only use armed guards deployed by the military. p 2 Arms and the men . Security firms wishing to join will pay a entrance fee of €2. most likely to be affected are UK PMSCs that breach the UK’s Export Cont rol Order of 2008 (ECO). Startup private maritime security companies will continue to flood the market. One area that interests the MoD’s Centre for Defence Enterprise is knowing how to spot unlawful activity at sea — working out how when piracy or transportation of weapons is taking place when unlawful and lawful craft both look very similar." LLOYD’S LIST.500 ($3. particularly non-lethal and non-destructive means to craft engaged in unlawful activity. GoAGT is one of a number of private maritime security companies that provides unarmed teams in the area. gun running and people smuggling. meaning UK PMSCs using the facilities are likely to be acting unlawfully. with many PMSCs commencing and completing transits at Galle. which stands at €5. the European Union has set up a $6M project to help seven African states in the area increase their maritime security. some will provide a quality service.By Liz McMahon "BIMCO is to offer associate membership to private maritime security companies that achieve the International Standards Organisation’s PAS 28007. the sustainability of the armed guard business model — and novel variations of it. Pirate attacks worldwide dropped by around 30% last year and. It also wants proposals to consider responses to hostile activity at sea. p 2 Armed guards’ insurance threat “A decision to mandate the use of offshore armouries by the Sri Lankan authorities could potentially invalidate UK private military security company (PMSC) insurance coverage and leave them struggling to win business. such as private navies — will be called into question." LLOYD’S LIST. Ultimately." LLOYD’S LIST. developing new tools such as effective training aids that are representative of small arms operations on maritime platforms and can provide the feedback on marksmanship accuracy needed to develop performance. BIMCO will contact the applicant and carry out an internal vetting. 24 January 2013. developing new technology and solutions that provide graduated responses.By Liz McMahon "The UK Ministry of Defence is seeking proof-ofconcept research proposals from industry and academics to improve the security of maritime operations to more effectively combat illegal activities such as piracy.By Liz McMahon "One of the liveliest debates at the fourth Maritime Piracy and Security conference in London focused on whether shipowners need to employ four-man private maritime security teams. 24-25 UK to strengthen its ocean security response . On the one hand. 18 January 2013. The CDE also wishes to focus on small-arms accuracy at sea. On the other.380) and the membership fee for associate members. looking forward. p 2 BIMCO opens its door to armed guards .” FARIPLAY. The centre is part of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory.By Rory Lamrock and Sam Pursch "Private firms must build intelligence networks and engage with naval authorities. membership provides PMSCs with credibility that the industry craves so much.” it said." LLOYD’S LIST. The shipping association said membership would give companies around the world access to the BIMCO website and to its guidance on security-related issues." LLOYD’S LIST. named Critical Maritime Routes in the Gulf of Guinea (CRIMGO).

“I suspect that that is what happened here. Benin and Togo — on vessels deploying armed private security companies in their sovereign waters. The French offshore vessel owner says it would rather stop working if piracy risk mounts.Gulf of Guinea with financial and practical help to establish radar. 1 March 2013. Although some have found ingenious ways to cut overheads. To date. offering employment for offshore support vessels as energy supermajors drill for oil and gas off Nigeria. Shipowners must gain their underwriter’s permission before vessels can enter such waters. However. Angola and other areas.” Risk Intelligence analyst Thomas Horn Hansen said altho ugh the Myre Seadiver charges related to arms smuggling. This has seen two trends emerging — one being to slash team numbers. Strikes. Alongside the boom come the pirates seeking fresh targets. the guards will only load their weapons once the ships are out at sea." LLOYD’S LIST. but this raises new vetting problems. that the goalposts constantly change. the high-risk area is defined as: “Gulf of Guinea. areas or specified places. “I don’t have a feel for whe ther there is appetite to change the law. At the moment. 1 March 2013. This raises the question of whether French offshore vessel giant Bourbon will take the lead and place security guards on board its offshore vessels. 25 February 2013.By Hal Brown "As French offshore vessel specialist Bourbon takes delivery of new vessels to support its expanding global operation. and command and control systems to increase their maritime domain awareness. but on the hull war side it has not yet been thought necessary to extend the joint war-listed areas although it will certainly be a topic at the next JWC meeting in March.” SAFETY AT SEA.By Liz McMahon "A private maritime security company has launched a new service in West Africa. say maritime security experts. March 2013. which immediately exposed them to the risk that someone would take exception and not agree with or take advantage of the situation. p 2 Mixed security teams raise vetting concerns . most have focused on the composition of the security teams they employ. Mr Scott said: “If a PMSC employs guards from India or Sri Lanka it needs to demonstrate that the men have had the same level of vetting and checking as their UK counterparts. Togo and Benin navies. Eos Risk Management does not use local navies. claiming to be the first to offer its own armed teams to clients. instead putting its own men on board vessels." LLOYD’S LIST. Ince & Co partner Stephen Askins said: “The law is that you cannot bring weapons into the territorial waters of Nigeria or other littoral states. “It is perfectly feasible that [the Myre Seadiver crew] declared them. Chief operations manager for the fi rm’s vetting and audit programme Alastair Scott said that although it was a broad generalisation to claim that mixed teams were less efficient than teams entirely comprised of ex-UK marines. The Hull. You get or buy permission from one official and he moves on. Underwriters may amend cover terms before granting permission for vessels to enter the listed area or refuse to grant cover altogether. communications. according to Gray Page. The region is booming for the offshore oil and gas industry.By Liz McMahon "As downward pressure continues to squeeze margins for private maritime security companies. Various factors such as a depressed shipping market and a perceived risk reduction in the Gulf Aden are forcing private maritime security companies to provide a service at an increasingly lower cost. the trend of using mixed-nationality teams is steadily increasing. p7 Private armed guards enter West Africa at their peril . leaving you exposed. Both are controversial because they move away from the model originally touted to shipowners. Other private maritime security companies operate in the region using personnel from the Nigeria. said Eos Risk managing director David Johnson. however. the other being to employ teams of mixed nationalities." LLOYD’S LIST. they might be motivated by the vessel’s seeming provision of escort services off Nigeria. Terrorism and Related Perils Listed Areas were last amended by the Lloyd’s Joint War Committee in March last year. pirates generally target tankers carrying refined products into West Africa.” Lloyd’s Market Association senior executive underwriting Neil Roberts said: “We are watching it." LLOYD’S LIST.By Liz McMahon "If the Myre Seadiver incident proves anything at this point. they did bring a new set of problems. there is the issue of vetting and selection. War. First. I doubt it if people are making money out of it. 11 March 2013. It will be interesting if meetings in Ghana this week address this or whether a regional hub can be created. comprising a UK team leader and three foreign guards paid lower salaries. in a fledgling industry like the private maritime security sector. p 2 Eos launches West Africa private maritime security start-up . However. maritime security experts believe they could branch out to target offshore vessels carrying crew and equipment to and from rigs.By Liz McMahon "The high-risk area in West Africa should extend to include Togo and the Ivory Coast to better reflect increased security concerns. its attention turns to the growing piracy threat off West Africa. 21 February 2013. p 9 Mixed messages "It is not surprising. p 7 Bourbon vows not to deploy armed guards . say shipping and security experts. but only the waters of the Beninese and Nigerian Exclusive Economic Zones north of latitude 3° N." LLOYD’S LIST. “They would need to have a 110 . it is that if you operate a maritime security operation off West Africa you do so at your own peril. p 14 West Africa high-risk area could expand . This aims to allow the company to overcome a ban in many West African countries — including Nigeria.

12 March 2013.” Despite potential huge variations in military training. the Security Association for the Maritime Industry and BIMCO. p 7 Pilot launched for PMSC benchmark . The certification body said it had been approached by a large number of security firms asking to take part in the pilot for the international standard. It is important to compare like for like." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST." LLOYD’S LIST. Sea Marshals previously used a “fairly substantial” mix of former military personnel from the UK and Croati a.” he said. The company said that special arrangements were in place for vessels going to the Niger Delta after an escalation of violent attacks on vessels. p 27 'Idiot Family' suspected of Nigerian Delta attacks – By Adam Corbett “A newly formed and curiously named crime unit operating in the Nigerian Delta is terrorising shipping in the region. Sea Marshals chief executive Thomas Jakobsson said the company scrapped mixed teams more than six months ago. BIMCO is drawing up recommended amendments for Guardcon that PMSCs can apply to the existing contract to make it suitable for West Africa. which recently switched to use all-British military teams. as well as ordinary common sense when using general criminality prevention measures. “We are pleased to now be working with the Cape Verde authorities to ensure safe and effective measures are taken in keeping the seas off West Africa safe. The first licence was awarded by the country’s coastguard following vetting by Cape Verde Maritime Security Services. Nun and Brass rivers.” TRADEWINDS. 11 March 2013. “It is just different and a PMSC would need to demonstrate that training was suitable and appropriate for the task in hand. “We have concluded that actually few amendments are required as Guardcon was drafted with an eye to potentially covering areas of piracy other than Somalia/Indian Ocean. for example. with new recommendations due to be published next month.By Nigel Lowry "Sea Marshals.Criminal Records Bureau check or something comparable such as a letter from their local constabulary. BRS suggests that the new group is behind a string of recent attacks on merchant shipping and offshore and fishing vessels. would not necessarily be wrong. p 32 111 . “As the debate rises among the private maritime security industry over ISO 28007 and the potential for less effective security teams caused by comprising them of mixed nationalities. Mr Scott said the training of an Indian guard. has launched West African operations from its newly established base in the port of St Vincent after becoming the first provider of armed teams to be licensed by Cape Verde. MSS Global managing director Tony Chattin said the process has involve d many stakeholders from the maritime security sector.By Liz McMahon "Using foreign nationals in mixed teams has created a “two-sided industry” and one private maritime security company says it has stopped the practice as a result. also uses three South African ports for embarking teams on transits of the Gulf of Guinea. p 1 Sea Marshals claims first Cape Verde licence . It describes it as “currently the principal and most aggressive group in the Niger Delta”. Accredited certification body MSS Global will supervise the pilot process with Port2Port Maritime Security and Castor Vali Security Risk Management. 22 March 2013. 21 March 2013. more rigorous selection policy." LLOYD’S LIST.” he said. “It was considered that threats would be best countered by means of awareness training for crews and relevant shore-based personnel. ISO PAS 28007. p 2 Denmark rejects security code “Since 11 March.By Liz McMahon "BIMCO is considering how to make its standard Guardcon contract suitable for private maritime security companies operating in West Africa.” he said. including the UK Security in Complex Environments Group. the Cardiff-based maritime security firm. Sea Marshals. we will continue our British-only policy for the foreseeable future. special adviser to the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA). 19 March 2013. 18 March 2013. instead.” said Sea Marshals chief executive Thomas Jakobsson. 13 March 2013. p 4 Mixed security teams create ‘two-sided industry’ . The self-styled “Idiot Family” was formed in December last year and is operating from the Sengana. With the International Group of P&I Clubs.”” FAIRPLAY.By Liz McMahon "The International Organisation for Standardisation is about to launch its certification pilot for private maritime security companies and has chosen two firms to start the process later this month. the aim being to best capture the breadth of market demands so that the certification model developed through the pilot best fits the PMSC market that supports the commercial shipping industry. Ukraine and Serbia. according to fresh analysis from Bergen Risk Solutions (BRS). when it implemented a new. told Fairplay that. “MSS Global has chosen a smaller company and a mid-large company." LLOYD’S LIST. “This will be a quicker process that formally revising G uardcon and we aim to have this task done within a month or so. which was last year given exclusive rights to undertake vetting of private maritime security providers on behalf of the government. cargo and passenger ships of all flags engaged on domestic voyages in Denmark no longer need to be certified. Jakob Lynge. new regulations had been drawn up “based on a security-related risk assessment made by the Center for Terror Analysis at the Danish Security and Intelligence Service. p 2 BIMCO adapts Guardcon contract for West Africa . BIMCO legal and contractual affairs chief Grant Hunter said the organisation had worked for some time to decide what amendments would adapt Guardcon for West Africa.” it said. inspected and approved in accordance with the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code.” Mr Hunter said.

” he said. Initial concerns voiced by BIMCO centred on the 112 . has sold more than 100 copies in its first month and players are working on certification in conjunction wit h certifying bodies for the expected accredited certification. for example. including Nigeria. the first international commercial guidelines for such a purpose.By Li McMahon "Within the next few months.” FAIRPLAY. there is no sign of piracy abating. “They are on board but they have no arms. p 4 Africa faces up to its maritime challenges – By Savahna Nightingale “Maritime and defence officials and industry executives are accelerating collaboration to improve infrastructure and security in Africa. “There is a confused contractual position involved in employing local guards and who." LLOYD’S LIST. 2 April 2013." LLOYD’S LIST. “They are two very different things — which is why ISO PAS 28007 was written as dedicated requirements for PMSCs — although of course one company may be able to fulfil both functions.” Until the Economic Community Of West African States agrees a formal policy. p 23 BIMCO backs international guidance on rules for use of force . 4 April 2013. 2 April 2013. weapons carriage by PMSCs will be allowed. were handed over to the Indian government for investigation but skipped bail after being allowed to return to Italy. very high standards for human rights — especially where they may be responsible for long-term detention of prisoners.. the diplomatic crisis had dee pened.." LLOYD’S LIST. where — at least for the time being — the role for private maritime security companies is far from clear. having resolved its concerns about “presumptive language” in the original draft.” The UK considers all export licences individually against these criteria. p 26 Gulf of Guinea waters open to western armed guards . both for armouries operated on water and for those on land. p 3 International regulation goes live as new standard is launched . security and foreign ministers of the 25 countries of The Economic Communities of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) have met to tackle technical and security problems in the Gulf of Guinea. attention has moved to activity in the Gulf of Guinea. according to PMSC Sea Marshals. Up to this point. whereupon the marines were returned to stand trial on condition that they would not face the death penalty. ISO PAS 28007. In separate developments.By Liz McMahon "BIMCO has decided to back the 100 Series Rules for the Use of Force. due to restriction from several coastal states.By Liz McMahon "As the number of reported piracy incidents dwindles in the Gulf of Aden. has responsibility for their actions — is it the employer or the state?” said Marsh Global Marine Practice managing director Nick Roscoe. p 1 West Africa poses a fresh challenge to security firms .”" LLOYD’S LIST. can cause major repercussions.” Mr Roscoe said. 2 April 2013. weapons carriage by private maritime security companies will be permitted inside territorial waters of all the Economic Community of West African States countries. who had been aboard Naples-registered oil tanker Enrica Lexie. The crisis highlights the grey area of employing armed security in the fight against piracy. p 2 UK government holds fire on floating armouries . to reflect the prevailing circumstances and stated end-use. while the PMSC has adopted an advisory role. As Fairplay went to press. 2 April 2013. and private security firms. The latter vary in quality and consistency. “Governments are correctly focusing on the operations of private security companies that supply armed guards in areas of armed conflict where the local rule of law may have broken down or become difficult to enforce. 28 March 2013. local armed guards on vessels have provided any armed protection. two Italian marines shot dead two Indian fishermen off the coast of southern India after mistaking them for pirates. The 12-mile protection zone actually protects the pirates more than anyone else. A UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office spokesman told Lloyd’s List: “We do not export equipment where there is a clear risk it might be used for internal repression or where it might be diverted to a different end-use or user.Security flashpoints keep liability centre focus – By Gary Li “On 15 February 2012. European and African shippers have held an inaugural summit and defence. I am not convinced anyone has yet worked out a gold-plated solution for West Africa. says Lloyd’s Register ISO 28007 project leader Robin Townsend. India’s supreme court barred Italy’s ambassador from leaving the country. while the former.” FAIRPLAY. as in the Enrica Lexie case. being formal state deployments. This has come in two forms: government legislated contingents of marines. The marines. s ecurity firms operating in the region must stick to a purely advisory role. “In West Africa.By Liz McMahon "The international standard for private maritime security companies. The Italian government then refused to return them to India. but added there seemed to be some confusion between land-based security and maritime anti-piracy requirements. It turns out the situation is now changing and Sea Marshals said within the next few months.By Liz McMahon "The UK government will continue to consider floating armouries on a case-by-case basis. as it was generally thought that Nigeria would never allow PMSCs to operate in its territorial waters. but has yet to issue a trade licence to authorise their use. “Such complex environments require the land-based armed guards to have. This will come as a surprise to many. Mr Townsend said he was very happy to have seen the inauguration and delivery of ISO PAS 28007. ultimately.

and further noted that the cargo information needed “includes details of the real parties behind transactions and goods movements and an adequate description of the goods”.By Janet Porter "Ocean carriers are stepping up pressure on the European Union to rethink some proposals on revised cargo security rules that would be almost impossible to implement in their current form. it remains unclear what data elements will be required. and many other unknowns. shippers and freight forwarders are substantial. “The potential consequences for carriers. 5 April 2013. Local restrictions mean foreign private maritime security companies are unable to operate in territorial waters without employing the services of the local government security forces. p 7 No magic bullet "The debate over armed guards operating in West Africa becomes increasingly more complex. 9 April 2013. Stephenson Harwood’s Alex Davies says in reality. while European Union and International Maritime Organization security initiatives do not have sufficient support from littoral states. says Bergen . shippers and freight forwarders are substantial." LLOYD’S LIST. The 100 Series RUF has now been presented to the International Standards Organisation. The capabilities of such personnel can be unpredictable and there are questions over the viability of insurance and contractual requirements when there are so many unknown quantities. 16 April 2013.” The communication characterised the current system as “not sufficient”." LLOYD’S LIST. for risk management of the movement of goods through international supply chains. according to Bergen Risk Solutions. WSC president and chief executive Christopher Koch sets out the industry’s very real concerns in a guest column commis sioned by Containerisation International that is published below. The potential consequences for carriers. allowing the shipping industry association to lend collaborative support to further development of a document that will now be described as an international model set of maritime rules for the use of force. With so many parties involved. it will make little difference to solving the problem. Bergen notes that the continued acquisition of new." LLOYD’S LIST. While some have argued that a move like this would be a complete game-changer. as well as European institutions. ISO PAS 28007. 9 April 2013. the Council. This is because if it is too expensive for target vessels — small product tankers — to employ armed guards.By Liz McMahon "The Nigerian Navy lacks the capacity to protect the country’s offshore environment effectively. then it does not really matter whether they are legal or not. from where’. to whom. Bergen says the Nigerian Navy has too few major surface units capable of sustained operations. “BIMCO has always supported the concept of a common set of rules for the use of force — but to be viable.” he said. In January.By Christopher Koch "The European Union is currently considering how it will change its advance cargo supply chain security information filing regime." LLOYD’S LIST. through which system the data is to be filed. BIMCO chief maritime security officer Giles Noakes said those concerns had now been resolved.description of the 100 Series RUF as an “international benchmark standard rules for the use of force” that would protect privately contracted armed security personnel in the event of a trial. it adds that progress will be slow. and that the current cargo information provided to European Union customs authorities “does not meet minimum requirements”. A possible solution came with the news from Sea Marshals that the Economic Council of West African States had provisionally agreed to allow foreign PMSCs to operate independently in territorial waters. including Nigeria. “one needs to know ‘who is moving what. they would need to be recognised internationally. That reflects the different interests of 27 member states. which represents 29 global liner companies that transport approximately 130m teu annually. and the European Economic and Social Committee stating that. The EU is now engaged in deliberations about how to change its advance cargo security risk assessment regime. However. for consideration to supplement the recently published international standard for armed guards." LLOYD’S LIST. who will be responsible for filing the information. p 2 Brussels urged to rethink cargo screening rules . p 7 WSC spells out risks of over-complex European freight data demands .” he writes of European efforts to compile more information about ocean cargo in order to improve risk assessment procedures. the European Commission issued a Communication to the European Parliament. p 5 113 . small patrol boats will increase the navy’s capability to confront piracy and maritime crime. p 7 Nigerian Navy cannot protect offshore resources. 8 April 2013. Leading the effort is the World Shipping Council. In its latest report on the Gulf of Guinea.

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