8" Jointer w/Spiral Cufferhead!

Versatile parallelogram
table adjustmenf system!
• Motor: 3 HP, 220V, t
single-phase, TEFC
• Precision ground
cast iron tables
• Total table size: 8" x 76%"
__• __1. Infeed table size: 8" x 43%"
• 4 row spiral cutterhead I
• Cutterhead speed: 5350 RPM
• Max. rabbeting depth: W
• Deluxe cast iran fence size:
35"L x 1lf.''W x 5"H
• Approx. shipping weight: 597 Ibs. INCLUPES
r.. L ,-" d 11 ble FREE SAFETY .. '
...,tra ong ..uee a PUSH BLOCKS
G0490X & Extra Tall Fence
INTRODUCTORY PRICE $1075
00
WI!
• Motor: 3 HP, 220V, single-phose or
5 HP, 220Vl440V', 3-phase
• Precision ground cost iron table
• Table size w/extension: 27" x 753f."
• Max. depth of cut:
30/16" @90', 2W' @45'
• Arbor: %"
• 52' rip capacity
• Approx. shipping
weight: 514 Ibs.
See it on
Page 23 of the
2008 Catalog.
•440V OPERAOON RfllUIRfS
PURCHASE OF AIlOO1ONAl
COMPONEfITS. C.II.l CUST.
SEIMCE fOR MORE INfO.
G0651 3 HP, singl&phase
INTRODUCTORY PRICE $1695
00
"
G0652 5 HP, 3-phase Includes 10" Blad'.,
INTRODUCTORY PRICE $1695
00
andsi.de& rear ItIKUBl
extensIon tables!
",,}-A 'I\:- 10" Heavy-Duty Cabinet
Table Saws w/Riving Knife
'f' Perfect for cuffing panels and wide stock!
INCLum
fREESAfErY
PUSII8LOCKS
Baudlel Fold
In For Added
Safety
G0609
ONLY $1595
00
2 HP Cyclone Dust Collector
• Motor 2 HP, 220V,
single-phase, TEFC
Closs T,
• Amps: 12.5
• Intake hole size: 7'
• Impeller: 13'h' steel
• Suction capacity:
1354 CFM@2.5"SP
• Max. static pressure: .......lIIl,...
10.4"
Filter surface area:
96 sq. ft.
• Filter: 0.2-2 micron
• Collection drum: steel,
35 gallons
• Approx. shipping
weight: 359 Ibs.
NEW! NOISE REDUCING KIT
Ha166 ONLY s39"
G0440 ONLY $745
00
12" X 83W'
Parallelogram Jointer
• Motor: 3 HP, 220V, single-phose
• Precision ground cast iron table
size: 12%" x 83W
• Cutterhead knives: (4) 12" x VB" 1%4'
• Cutterhead dia.: 3%"
• Cutterhead speed: 4950 RPM
• Max.depth of cut: VB"
• Max. rabbeting
capacity: %'
• Approx. _-_.1
shipping
wt: 1059 Ibs.
Includes
miter gauge
& fence wi
hold-down
springs
17" Heavy-Duty Bandsaw
GG51J • Motor: 2 HP, 11 OV/220V,
single-phose, TEFC
• Precision ground cast
iron table size: 17" sq.
• Table tilt: 10' L, 45' R
• Max. cutting height: 12"
• 2 blade speeds: 1700 &
3500 FPM
• Blade size: 131 W' L(lfa" -1'W)
• Euro-style roller disc blade guides
• Sealed & permanently lubricated
bearings
• Approx. shipping weight: .342Ibs.
3 HP Shaper
• Motor: 3 HP, 220V, single-phase,
w/reversing switch
• Precision ground cast iron table
• Table with standard wing attached:
30W x 28'!4'
• Spindle travel: 3'
• 3 interchangeable
spindles: 1/:,",
%"& l'
• Spindle openings
on table: 1%',2%',
4'&5W
• Spindle speeds:
7000 & 10,000 RPM
• Apprax. shipping
weight: 357 Ibs.
Inclades Fence, Miter Gauge
Quick Change Blade Releasel
MAPE IN Tensioner & W' Blade
ISO 900 t fACfORY!
G0513 $750
00
_
MAPEIN
ISO 9001
FACTORY!
-. mfII
G0444Z (right-tilt)
ONLY $625
00
G0576 (lett-tilt)
ONLY $675
00
10" Table Saws w/Casf Ifon Wings
• Motor: 2 HP, 11 OVl220V, single-phose
• Precision ground cast iron table size
w/wings: 27" x 39 %"
• Arbor: %"
• 3VB" capacity @ 90'
• 2lfs' capacity @ 45'
• 30" rip capacity
• SHOP FOX" Aluma-Classic
N
Fence
• Approx. shipping weight: 298 Ibs.
Foot Operated Built-in
Mobile Base Provides
Versatile Positioning
15" Planer w/Spiral Cufferhead
• Motor: 3 HP, 220V, single-phase
• Precision ground cast iron tables &extension Wings
• Table size: 15" x 20' ."
• Max. cutting height: 8' ••
• Feed rate: 16 & 30 FPM /'/'; •
• Cutterhead speed:
5000 RPM
• 2 speed gearbox
• Magnetic safety switch
• Heavy-duty cast iron
construction
• Approx. shipping
weight: 675 Ibs.

o
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Q)
-
G _
,52
American Woodworker MAY 2008 1
#135, MAY 2008
Plant Stand
2 screws=l great project.
Greene & Greene Mailbox
Make large box joints
using mating templates.
Do-It-AII-Combo Brush
and Drum Sander
Interchangeable heads do the trick.
Shaving Horse
An age-old tool goes modern.
21 Drum SanderTips
Master a most versatile machine.
Natural Bench
Turn inexpensive slabwood
into a stunning seat.
Adirondack Love Seat
Cutting, drilling and screwing
are all it takes.
Torben Helshoj
One man's winding path from
cabinetmaker's apprentice to
manufacturer of high-end tools.
36
62
70
56
52
44
50
Features
34
... ~
<.>:;::--
- ~
_-0'-
... --
- ..
-I>J=G_
o;--:!:
~ ~
~ - ~
- - ~
~ ~ ~
Departments
6
Question &Answer
Calculate board feet with a lumber rule,
repair damaged veneer and enlarge a
photo to take. accurate measurements.
10
WorkshopTips
Improve a miter saw's dust collection,
build a sled for cutting inlay, micro-
adjust your router table and modify a
handscrew to hold round stock.
14
Tool Nut
28
Discover a 1960's plow plane and a
printer's cabinet saw with a sliding table.
16
School News
The New England Association
ofWoodworki ngTeachers
100 instructors learn from each other.
20
Well-Equipped Shop
Ridgid miter saw stand, Milwaukee 12-
volt Sub-Compact Drill, JDS 3 HP Dust
Force Dust Collector, Laguna Platinum
Series Jointer/Planers, large Excalibur
Scroll Saw, Irwin Parallel Jaw Clamps,
Veritas Plow. Plane and Black and
Decker Li-Ion light-duty tools.
28
Turning Wood
Heirloom Awl
Heat-u-eating steel is part of the deal.
73
BuildYour Skills
lVIultipurpose Sliding Fence
5 problems solved by a
single tablesaw accessory.
86
My Shop
Air ForceWoodshop
12,000 people share one fine shop.
88
Oops!
Spray adhesive makes a lousy finish.
2 American Woodworker MAY 2008
10" WET GRINDER KIT
-
90 RPM
Ideal for
wood turners,
wood workers &
knife makers!
OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES
T10023 Accessory Kit #1
Includes fixtures for sharpening
small knives, large knives, scissors
and axes. Made in Asia.
T1 0024 Accessory Kit #2
Includes astone dresser and fixtures
for sharpening scrapers, screwdrivers
and hollow chisels. Made in Asia.
T1 0025 Jig fur Sharpening
16" Planer Blades
Sharpens planer and jointer blades
up to 16" long.' Made in Germany.
Made in Germany, this 90 RPM Wet Grinder with leather stropping wheel
will sharpen just about any cutting tool to arazor sharp edge in no time
at all. It is so versatile and simple to use, you'll wonder why you ever
put up with dull edges before. Add the optional accessories
for even greater sharpening convenience.
SPECIFICATIONS:
220 grit grinding wheel is
_
specially made for wet grinding
• 90 RPM wheel speed
• Grinding wheel size: 10" dia. x 2" wide
Water bath keeps tools cool while sharpening
• Leather stropping wheel size: 8" dia. x 1W' wide
Standardequipment includes
a universal jig, angle guide
andpolishing/honing paste.
""'-I'}<J<A .'-
: 0-0-10-----,
'f ""1", 10" WET GRINDER KIT
AMAZING INTRODUCTORY PRICE
MADE IN GERMANY
$169
95
MODEL T10023 Accessory Kit #1 forTl00l0 Grinder
MODEL T1 0024 Accessory Kit #2 for Tl 001 0 Grinder
MODEL T10025 Jig for Sharpening 16" Planer Blades
EDITOR.S LETTER
Rough Cuts with a Fine Edge
As a kid, one of my first woodworking proj-
ects was an ox yoke. That's right, an ox yoke. It
wasn't because I lived on a farm; in fact, it had
nothing do to with farming or oxen. My inspi-
ration came from Foxfire 2, an interesting book
my older brother had given me. It's still in print
and is now part of a twelve-book series about
the people of Southern Appalachia and their culture. The books
cover topics as diverse as banjo-making to beekeeping and weav-
ing to ox yoke-making.
I showed the ox yoke-making section to my dad. He said, "Go
for it." Most of our property was covered with a hardwood forest,
which meant I had access to plenty of free timber. So I grabbed
an ax and headed for the woods.
The article specified poplar as a good wood to use. I found a
nice tree that was about twelve inches in diameter and started
chopping. The ax was sharp and its fine edge made the rough cut-
ting a pleasure. The next day, I used the ax to hew the log into a
beam. The day after that, I sketched the yoke's profile onto the
beam and started shaping. There wasn't anything fine about my
hacking, but it was a lot of fun. It was also about that time that my
dad appeared and handed me a drawknife, saying, "Here, try
this." He'd been to an auction that day, and when the drawknife
came up for bids, he'd bought it. The drawknife was old, but it
was in great condition. The blade was sharp, so I put it to work,
and discovered how having the right tool for the job improves
both the quality of your work and your enjoyment of the process.
Mter shaping the yoke, I made the curved neck bows by bend-
ing a couple of saplings around a large tree, tying the ends togeth-
er and waiting for a few days. The yoke never saw action on the
necks of real oxen, but it did grace a wall in my parents' living
room for many years.
If you'd like to try your hand at "rough cutting with a fine
edge," check out Tom Donahey's shaving horse on page 62 or
Greg Wood's slabwood bench on page 52.
Keep the shavings flying,
RandyJohnson
!johnson@americanwoodworker.com
4 American Woodworker MAY 2008
AMERICAN
WOODWORKERe
EDITORIAL
Editor Randy Johnson
Senior Editor Tom Caspar
Associate Editors TimJolmson
Dave Mtmkittrick
Contributing Editors Alan Lacer
Seth Keller
SlIwat Phruksawan
Office AdminiSlrator ShellyJacobsen
ART & DESIGN
Creative Director Vern Johnson
Photographer Jasoo Zentner
Category President/Publisher Roger Case
Associate Publisher/
National Sales Manager James Ford
Vice Presidcm/Production Derek W. Corson
Production Manager Dominic M. Taormina
Ad Production Coordinator Kristin N. Beaudoin
Systems Engineer Denise Donnarumma
Circulation Steve Pippin
Susan Sidler
ADVERTISING SALES
1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180, MN 55121
CHlCAGOJames Ford (219) 462-7211
Oassified Advertising, The McNeill Group. Inc.
Classified Manager, Don Serfass (215) 321-9662. e.XL 30
NEW TRACK MEDIA LLC
Chief E.xecutive Officer StephenJ. Kent
Executive Vice Presidem/CFO Mark F. Arnett
Vice Presidenl/
Publishing DirecLOr Joel P. Toner
Issue #135. American 'Woodworker®, lSSN 1074-9152,
SPS 738-710 Published bimonthly, except monthly
October and November by AW Media LLC, 90 Sherman St.,
Camblidge, MA 02140. Periodicals postage paid at
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Track \Iedia LLC. All rights reserved.
Al'1'It7U.an share in1onnation about )'ou with rep-
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Subscriptions
American Woodworker Subscriber Service
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Article Index
A five year index is available online at
www.americanwoodworker.com.
Copies of Past Articles
Photocopies are available for $3 each. Write
or call: American Woodworker Reprint Center,
P.O. Box 83695. Stillwater, MN 55083-0695,
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QUE S T ION & A N S W E R hyTOl1J Caspat'
- ¢
",- -
":0\-::::::
- 6-

....
.- ••W
6_;:;::;


Lumber Rule
Q
My local yardman uses a lumber rule to tally board feet.
How does it work?
A
Let's start with an example. The lumber rule shown at left has four'series of
numbers, or scales, on each side. On this side, you'll find the numbers 12, 10,
14 and 16 down near the rule's handle. Each of these numbers corresponds to a
board's length. (The other side of the rule has scales for boards that are 9, 11, 13 and
15-ft. long.)
Let's say that the board in the photo is 12 ft. long. To calculate board feet (bd. ft.),
you place the rule across the board and look at the "12" scale. ote the number 6 at
the board's edge. If the board is 1 in. thick, it contains 6 bd. ft. of lumber. Let's say the
board is 16 ft. long and 1 in. thick. Then you look at the "16" scale and read 8 bd. ft.
OK, you get the general idea. A board foot is a unit of volume. One board foot is
equivalent to a board 1 in. thick by 12 in. wide by 12 in. long. In order to calculate bd.
ft., you have to know a board's thickness, width, and length. A yardman uses a lumber
rule to measure all three dimensions, then uses the numbers printed on the rule to cal-
culate the board's volume. A lumber rule is just a manual calculatOl:
First, the yardman measures a board's length. He knows that the rule is exactly 3 ft.
long. He flips the rule end-for-end down the board and counts the number of flips.
Four flips equals a board 12 ft. long, for example.
Second, he measures the board's width. The yardman chooses which side of the rule
to use, depending on the board's length, and lays the rule across the board with its
hook pulled tight against one edge. Then he reads the bd. ft. number on the appro-
priate scale, as we did above. If the board is shorter tlun the scales on tlle rule, he has
to improvise. Let's say a board is 8 ft. long. In tllis case, he uses the 16 ft. scale, then
the number ofbd. ft. in half. Some lumber rules have scales for shorter boards
on them.
Third, the yardman measures the board's thickness. He uses a scale at the rule's
hook end which measures tllickness to the nearest 1/4 in. If the board is 1 in. thick
(4/4 stock, or four quarters of an inch), he's all set. The length scale directly gives the
number of bd. ft. If the board is thicker, he performs a mental calculation using a mul-
tiplier. For example, if the board is 2 in. thick (8/4 stock), he multiplies the number
ofbd. ft. by two. If it's 1-1/2 in. thick (6/4 stock), he multiplies by 1-1/2.
MAY 2008
QUESTION & ANSWER
BATTERY CHARGER DAMAGES VENEER?
Q
The veneer on top of my ply-
wood tool box is bubbled and
split. I usually store my cord-
less drill charger there. Could
it have caused this damage?
A Yes, the heat from the charger has
probably caused the plywood's
glue to fail. Water causes this kind of dam-
age, too, particularly wet glasses and mugs.
You can repair delaminated plywood by
re-gluing it. If the veneer has bubbled, but
not split, slice into it with a thin knife to
create a narrow opening. Slip the glue in
with a .003-in. or so automotive feeler
gauge (it can bend without breaking). Push
the glue in quite far, then cover the spot
with a piece of notebook paper to soak up
the glue that squeezes out. Place a block on
the spot to spread out pressure, then
clamp. When the glue is dry, remove any
stuck paper by dampening it with water.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 7
o
z
Ol.
e
i:3
lI:f 1 micron canister filter
-/ 6
H
inlet with two 4" adapter
e; Turn cleaning handle to remove
dust from the inside of the canister
"f 1.5 HP Thermal overload
protected motor

W[tD, 1 m[((qMil_njs.te(s.
1: (i)A, QQ;
-'
-" , micron canister filters
-,.; 8" inlet with three 4" adapter
-..- 3 HP Thermal overload
protected motor
-.' Air-Flow adjustment knob to
distribute dust between bags

WiJh 1Mi(fQ.n
-; Great for portable dust collection!
·.1250CFM!
-/ 1 micron bag filter
·,f 42 gallon collection capacity
The
!?ltwer MQrl}
·o2500CFM!
-.i 84 gallon collection capacity
-", 1micron bag filters
-/ Great for portable or central
system dust collection!
For more Information
visit our website at:

-, Washable Electrostatic pre-filter
.", Remote control with speed and timer functions
-", Top rated air filtration unit for over 10 years!
QUESTION & ANSWER
SCALING A PHOTO
Source
Dick Blick, (800) 828-4548, www.dickblick.com. Architectural scale, #55409-1001, $4.50.
Proportional scale, #55473-1005, $3.50.
How can I make a scale to get measurements
from a photo?
A
One of the easiest ways is to
use a copying machine. Enlarge
the photo so that you can use a triangular
architect's scale and you're all set This method isn't perfect, but it's much
better than guessing! Photos that are taken head-on work best, because
there's less distortion. It also helps if you know some major dimensions,
such as length and width. (If they aren't given, just take a good guess.)
Let's walk through an example to see how this works using a postcard
photo of a classic Limbert table. First, we pick one major dimension. Let's
use the table's height, which is given on the postcard as 29-in. Next, meas-
ure the actual height of the table in the photo: 3-5/16 in.
Draw a line that's 29-in. long using the 1/4 in. = 1 ft. scale on the archi-
tect's rule. Measure this line with the regular inch scale: it's 7-1/4 in. long.
Now figure out by what percentage to enlarge the photo. You want to
stretch a line that's 3-5/16 in. long to one that's 7-1/4 in. long, so you
need to know how much to multiply 3-5/16 to get 7-1/4. You can use a cal-
culator, but the easiest way is to use a round proportional scale. You sim-
ply rotate a wheel on this scale to get the answer, which is 220%.
Conversion of fractions to decimals and back isn't necessary. (Architect's
scales and proportional scales are available at office supply stores.)
ext, enlarge the photo 220% and check the major dimension. You
may have to go up or down a few percentage points and make another
copy for the table's height to come out right. Once you've made an accu-
rate enlargement, you can use the architect's scale to quickly measure
parts and details, such as this table's leg, which is 4-in. wide (see inset).
Q
8 American Woodworker MAY 2008
Cutting-Edge Versatility
Our selection of interchangeable bevel-up blades
allows you to use anyone of our Veritas® bevel-up
planes for avariety of planing tasks, even on
the most difficult woods, making them highly
versatile workshop tools.
While each of the planes shown here has an adjustable mouth
and a12°bed angle, their bevel-up configuration lets you vary the·
cutting angle' as needed by altering the blade bevel angle. Having an
extra blade of agiven bevel angle simplifies this process and eliminates the
time-consuming work of regrinding back to alower bevel angle when required.
Veritas® Bevel-Up
Planes
Low-Angle Jack
05P34.01
Bevel-Up Smoother
05P36.01
Low-Angle Smooth
05P25.01
Low-Angle Block 05P22.01
(with optional knob and tote)
Convert the low-angle block plane into a#3
smoothing plane by adding optional hardwood grips. Patent pending.
Choice of Cutting Angle
The three blade bevels we offer (25°, 38°and 50°) are ideal
starting points, but can be changed to meet aparticular task.
Blades are lapped and made of either A2 or 01 tool steel.
Atoothed blade for working difficutt
grain (especially knots)
is also available.
Used for end grain - no tearing
25°bevel + 12°bed angle =
37" effective cutting angle
York pitch smoothing -
Type I chip - starting angle
38°bevel + 12°bed angle =
50°effective cutting angle
High-angle cutting - Type II
chip - tear-out minimized
50°bevel + 12°bed angle =
62°effective cutting angle
30
YEARS
OF INNOVAJ1ON IN TllOLI
tLeeValley
Our Veritas® planes are well designed, built to last,
comfortable to handle, andmade in Canada.
For more detailed information on these planes and blades, or to request 1-800-683-8170
our free 300-page woodworking tools catalog, call or visit us online. www.leevalley.com
iLeeValley&vet<ltas®
WIDE-MoUTH DUST COLLECTION
OUR READERS
The dust collection port on my sliding miter saw missed a lot of sawdust, so I added an additional port
mounted directly behind the blade. The port is a piece of 3-in. ABS pipe that's cut at 45 degrees to cre-
ate a wide mouth. The pipe is shaped to fit behind the saw's swiveling table, so it doesn't interfere with
the table's operation. The port fits into a 3-in.-to-2-in. reducer and a wye-fitting connects hoses from both
ports to my dust collection system. A strap anchored by one of the blade-tilt scale screws fastens the port
to the saw. Now, instead of missing 90 percent of the dust, my saw captures almost all of it.
Perham Rogers
Terrific Tips Win Terrific Tools!
Send your best original workshop tips. We pay $100 for
every tip we publish (and send along a classy American
Woodworker shirt). In addition, we'll feature one terrific tip
in each issue. The winner receives a 12" Leigh Super Jig
with VRS (Vacuum and Router Support), a $294 value.
LEI H.
10 American Woodworker MAY 2008
E-mail your tip to
workshoptips@americanwoodworker.com
or send it to
American Woodworker Workshop Tips
1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180
Eagan, MN 55121.
Submissions can't be retUITled and become
our property upon acceptance and payment.
We may edit submissions and use them in all
print and electronic media. One shirt per
contributor, offer good only while supplies last.
WORKSHOP TIPS
CUTTING SLED
FOR INLAY STRIPS
This sled allows me to cut the lI8-in.-
wide strips of veneer that I often use for
inlays. I can cut strips all day without
having to measure or reposition the
saw's fence. The sled consists ofa 13-in.
by 24-in. piece of 1/2-in. MDF with a
hardwood runner attached to the bot-
tom. Battens and a fence are glued to
the top. The fence is parallel to a saw
kerf that runs the length of the sled.
After attaching the runner and the
1/2-in.-thick battens, I made a cut with
the blade height set at S/8-in., to create
the kerf without sawing through the
battens. Then I attached the fence 1/8-
in. from the kerf.
To use the sled, I set the blade at 5/8-
in. and install the sled's runner in the
miter slot. I position a piece of veneer
flush against the fence, secure it with a
3/4-in. MDF cover and make the cut.
Jennifer Hammill
12 American Woodworker MAY 2008
WORKSHOP TIPS
MICRO-ADJUST
FOR ROUTER
TABLE FENCE
Mter building the router
table described in your March
2003 issue, I added this simple
micro-adjust fixture to the
fence. It consists of two blocks.
One has a T-bolt and locks in
the table's T-track; the other
has a threaded insert and is fas-
tened to the fence. A knob-
head bolt connects the two
blocks. This bolt mounts on the
table-mounted block, where it
fits through a hole in an L-
bracket. A semi-tightened lock
nut (the kind with a nylon sleeve) holds the bolt in position, but allows it to spin freely. The L-bracket must
be free to rotate on the base, so it's attached with only one screw.
To engage the micro-adjust, thread the knob-head bolt into the insert in the fence-mounted block. Slide
the fence-and the attached micro-adjust-into position. Tighten the lock knob on the opposite end of the
fence and the T-bolt on the table block. Now, turning the bolt moves the fence in or out by tiny increments.
When the fence is positioned exactly where you want it, tighten its second lock knob and you're ready to rout.
Don Decker
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k. I Address
:City State ZIP _
r "'" :E-mail, _
neut;on®.neuton. Dept.61353X
lU,fUUI.I.'f 8lUATUI powU: I!.QU1PMe:NT_ : 75 Meigs Road, Vergennes, Vermont 05491
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Notches sawn into a
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F. O. Kratz
STABILIZE HARD-
To-HoLD PARTS
American Woodworker MAY 2008 13
TOOLS OUR READERS LOVE
ANOTHER SIDE TO THE 60's
Back in the late 1960's, the folks who made Record tools in Sheffield,
England, redesigned their classic 044 plow plane (or plough plane, as they
spelled it). It's a tool used for making grooves by hand, and it's hard to imag-
ine why Record bothered to redesign it, with everything going electric back
then. The 044 was pretty good to begin with-why spend the time and money
to make it better?
Speaking on behalf of all hand tool nuts, I'm glad they did. The redesigned
model, the 044C, is very comfortable to hold, easy to adjust, and has a han-
dle that's virtually unbreakable. I love the way it looks. It comes with a
set of 10 cutters (four of them metric, no less). I couldn't find one
on eBay, so I turned to a tool dealer in Scotland, Inchmartine
Tool Bazaar (www.toolbazaar.co.uk). They had one in its
original box for about $125, including shipping.
I also found a ton of information about
this plow plane, and all other Record
planes, in a venerable old book, .
"Planecraft," by C.W. Hampton. He wrote
this manOal in 1934, and it's been updated
and republished many times. Now I've got
my sights on a Record 050C, a combination
plow plane from the same era that can also cut
beads and dados. Leads, anyone?
David Lane
Editor's note: See page 24 for a new version
of this plane, by Lee Valley
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Are you a Tool Nut, :::; You'll get the
Charge AL aerospace aluminum multi-tool if we publish your story. .;1
Send your tale to toolnut@americanwoodworker.com, Or mail it to
American Woodworker, 1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180,
Eagan, MN 55121. Please include digital photos of your tool jfpos-
sible. For more on the Charge AL, visit www.Ieatherman.com
LEATHERMAN®
This wonderful 8-in. saw, equipped with a precision sliding table, was
designed to cut metal type to length. Years ago, you'd find Hammond
Gliders in newspaper shops across the country, but computers have ren-
dered them obsolete. The company that made them, Hammond
Machinery Builders of Kalamazoo, Michigan, recommends that these saws
not be used for general woodworking (OSHA issues about guarding the
blade, no doubt), but I only use my Glider to precisely crosscut small
pieces of wood for segmented turnings. I use the table as it is for square
cuts; for angled cuts, I build Jigs. It complements, but certainly doesn't
replace, my regular tablesaw.
As you can see in the photo, a cam-actuated pushrod, Just left of the
blade, squeezes the workpiece against the saw's fence on the sliding
table. There's a lead screw, originally calibrated in picas (a unit of measure-
ment used in publishing) for adjusting the fence's stop. The saw
was originally powered by a three-phase motor, which I've replaced.
The blade requires a special set of holes to mount on the arbor, so I
turned to Forrest Tools, a sawblade manufacturer, for help. I first heard
about this amazing machine from Doug Sigler, of the Rochester Institute of
Technology and the Penland School of Crafts. Thanks, Doug!
Keith W Johnson
THE HAMMOND GLIDER TRIM-O-SAW
14 American Woodworker MAY 2008
THE NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION
OF WOODWORKING TEACHERS
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Bryan Conklin (standing, in
black) leads NEAWT members
in a discussion of shop safety.
Teachers (NEAWT) represents an assortment of middle
school, high school, college and adult education wood-
working programs located throughout New England.
The association currently includes about one hundred
teachers (representing more than sixty schools and near-
ly 10,000 wObdshop students) and fifteen industry associ-
ates. Membership is open to any individual or group
interested in woodworking education.
NEAWT's primary goal is to nurture woodshop pro-
grams by sharing ideas related to curriculum,
resources, professional development, student opportu-
nities and employment opportunities. Currently, the
group meets twice a year, in the spring and fall.
NEAWT members travel from shop to shop for meet-
ings. The host organizes the agenda, gives a tour of
their shop and fields questions about their program.
Each meeting also includes a business meeting, open
discussion and a presentation by one or more mem-
bers. This format showcases the diversity of the group.
Members may share a successful class project, teach a
new woodworking technique or present methods
they've developed to successfully market their wood-
shop program.
Between meetings, members communicate frequent-
ly bye-mail or through online forums such as
Woodcraft's Teachers Network (www.woodwork-
ingteachers.com). Smaller groups within the associa-
tion meet independently as well.
Woodshop Instructors Discover
Strength in Numbers
by TimJohnson
I
n the late 1990s,Jack Grube's woodshop program
at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, New Hampshire
was successful-well equipped, generously funded
and fully enrolled. But as a dedicated teacher, Jack
wanted to make it better. So he visited other school
woodshop programs in New England, to see what they
had to offer. Jack discovered some great teachers and
interesting programs, but each visit reinforced his
awareness of a nearly universal condition: Woodshop
teachers worked in relative isolation; few of the teach-
ers Jack visited were familiar with other programs.
During the same period,jack's involvement with the
Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers had made him
aware of the benefits of networking with other wood-
workers. So without much thought, he invited about a
dozen woodshop teachers to gIeet, for the purpose of
sharing projects and woodshop program ideas. Word
spread and over fifty teachers and individuals interest-
ed in woodworking education attended that first meet-
ing, which was held in November of 2001. .
According toJack, "The enthusiasm at that meeting
confirmed this was the right idea: Teachers were excit-
ed to be able to 'talk shop' with other teachers."
Today, the NewEngland Association ofWoodworking
16 American Woodworker MAY 2008
••
KEEP IT SIMPLE
Jack designed a simple organizational structure, so
one person could manage all the details. Membership
requests and meeting announcements are made by e-
mail, so there's no secretary. No dues are collected, so
there's no treasurer. Programming is left to the host of
each meeting, so there's no program coordinator.
A six-member board was established in 2003 to eval-
uate member suggestions relative to the association's
goals and resources. Once the board approves a sug-
gestion, its implementation is up to association mem-
bers-the organization's success truly depends on
their active participation.
NEAWT pres-
ents annual
awards for
Program of the
Year and
Teacher of the
Year. Phil Carle
(at left) and Bill
McKay were
honored in
2006. Jack
Grube,
NEAWT's
founder, swept
both awards in
Meetings often include hands-oJl instruction to help
members improve their teaching skills. Following his
presentation on bowl turning, Graham Oakes (at left)
goes one-on-one with Steve Schultz.
A DYNAMIC ORGANIZATION
NEAWT's mission has grown with its membership.
Its annual ''Teacher of the Year" and "Program of the
Year" awards, presented to recognize outstanding
achievements by members, are now widely publicized
to communities and school districts as part of
NEAWT's effort to increase public awareness 'of the
value of all woodshop programs.
Important, difficult issues are being addressed.
Bryan Conklin, current NEAWT director and
Engineering and Design Instructor at Hull High
School (MA), focused last fall's meeting on shop safe-
ty. The discussion centered on how NEAWT could
help to establish comprehensive safe operating proce-
dures as the cornerstone of every member's wood-
shop curriculum. It was decided that the association
would approve, and members would employ, stan-
dardized safety instruction and tests for every wood-
working machine, with perfect scores being required
before students are allowed to operate each machine.
How the instruction and tests are incorporated into
the curriculum is left to individual teachers. For
example, one teacher may tailor a project to teach
safe operation of a single machine; another may intro-
duce new machines as a project-and the student-
. progresses. The primary goals are to minimize shop
accidents and increase the credibility of each mem-
ber's curriculum with regards to safety, by incorporat-
ing peer-approved procedures.
Relationships established with industry groups pro-
vide NEAWT members with a broad range of curricu-
lum materials and student outreach programs.
Industry associate members include Woodcraft
Supply, the Technology Education Association of
Masssachusetts, the New England Association of
Technology Teachers, the Furniture Society, the
Architectural .Woodwork Institute, the Temperate
Forest Foundation, Partnering Industry & Education,
the American Association of Woodturners, the Guild
of New Hampshire Woodworkers, the Granite State
Woodturners, Mount Wachusett Community College
and the ew England Student Woodworking Design
Competition.
For information on starting a woodshop teachers'
association in your area, contact Jack Grube at
jgrube@comcast.net. For information on implement-
ing shop safety standards, contact Bryan Conklin at
bryan.raggamuffindesigns@gmail.com.
Tell us about a dynamic woodworking school or vibrant teaching program. What makes it work? Point out notable teaching
strategies and student accomplishments. Explain how the program excites students about woodworking and tell us how it helps
them develop woodworking skills. Whether the program operates in a public school. community center or a private workshop, we
want to hear about its success. E-mail yourstorytoschoolnews@americanwoodworker.com.
18 American Woodworker MAY 2008
THE W E L L- E QUI P P E D S HOP
VERSATILE MITER SAW STAND
Ridgid's Miter Saw Utility Vehicle (M8-UV, available at Home Depot stores) offers a great solution for wood-
workers who don't have room to permanently mount their miter saw. The M8-UV securely holds almost any
miter saw, including sliders, at a comfortable working height and folds compactly in less than a minute for stor-
age or transporting to a job site. A wide stance makes the MS-UV stable during use; large wheels make for easy
moving. Extension arms with adjustable rollers expand the support length to 9-1/2-ft. The rollers are remov-
able, so you can position them both on one arm to support heavy stock. Each extension arm houses a telescop-
ing support leg. The saw mounts on quick-release brackets that allow sliding the saw laterally on the stand, either
to maximize the available support length or to aid the cart's mobility by lowering its center of gravity. A recessed
work surface keeps pencils, tape measures and other shop paraphernalia handy, with no chance of rolling off.
Source
Ridgid, www.ridgid.com, (866) 539-1710, Miter Saw Utility Vehicle, MS-UV, AC9944, available at Home Depot stores, $179.
A LITTLE GUY WITH A LOT OF PUNCH
Milwaukee's new 2401-22, 12-volt Sub-Compact Driver really packs a
punch. The diminutive, 7-in.-Iong, 2-pound driver easily fits in a pocket or
tool belt. Because it's small, installing tiny hardware screws isn't like pound-
ing a nail with a sledgehammer. At the same time, this driver can deliver 100-
in/lbs. of torque and easily drive 4-in. #10 screws to hang a cabinets on a wall.
Additional features include an LED light to illuminate tight spaces, a built-in
fuel gauge that lets you know how much juice is left in the battery, a variable
speed (0-500 rpm) trigger and a 14-position clutch. The 2401-22 comes with
a soft carrying case, two batteries and a 30-minute charger.
Source:
Milwaukee Tools. www.Milwaukeetool.com. (800) 729-3878, 12-volt Sub-Compact Driver, #2401-22,
$140.
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20 American Woodworker MAY 2008
LAGUNA INTRODUCES
PLATINUM SERIES
JOINTER/PLANERS
Laguna's new Platinum Series makes European-style
machines more affordable for small shops. These
machines are manufactured in Taiwan, and according to
Laguna, use the same high standards as their European-built
machines.
Laguna's Platinum Series combination jointer/planers are
available in two sizes, 12-in. or 10-in. In addition to saving
space, these machines offer a couple of other big advantages.
First,jointing-width capacity matches planing-width capacity, so
you don't have to rip wide boards for jointing before planing
them. Second, you only have one cutterhead to maintain.
According to Laguna, changing from one operation to another takes
about thirty seconds. The jointer tables are fully-adjustable and designed to
remain dead-flat and coplanar following changes of operation. Slots in the
tables near the cutterhead help to reduce noise.
The 12-in. machine shown above features a 60-in.-Iong bed for jointing and a 30-in.-Iong bed for planing. It's
equipped with a four-knife cutterhead, a 3-hp 230-volt motor and weighs in at 760 lbs. The 10-in. machine has a
42-in.jointer bed and a 24-in. planer bed. It comes with a three-knife cutterhead, a 1-1/2-hp 230-volt motor and
weighs 326 Ibs. Spiral cutterheads with indexed carbide-insert cutters are available as additional cost accessories
for both machines.
Source
Laguna Tools, www.lagunatools.com, (800) 234-1976,12" Jointer/Planer, A175005, $2495; 12-in. Spiral Cutterhead w/ carbide inserts, $300; 10-in.
Jointer/Planer, A175003, $1495; lO-in. Spiral Cutterhead w/ carbide inserts, $250.
DUST COLLECTION WITH A TWIST
JDS' latest dust collector brings something new to the single-
stage market, A unique airflow adjustment knob fine-tunes the
airflow into the bag plenum. A twist of the knob controls a baffle
that assures both collector bags receive equal amounts of wood
chips and fill at the same time, The 3hp Dust Force combines a
large l3-in, impeller with an 8-in. diameter inlet to deliver up to
2500 dm of airflow, That's enough to collect from two machines
at once.
The I-micron bag filters are efficient enough to collect the finest
dust-even from drum or wide belt sanders. Optional I-micron can-
isters are also available.
The two plastic collection bags provide 84-gallons of storage
capacity. That means more run time before you have to empty the
co.llector,
Despite its size and heft, this collector is portable and can be
rolled to where it's needed. Or-it can be built into a central col-
lection system,
Source:
JDS Company, www.jdstools.com. (800) 480-7269, JDS 3HP Dust Force, #148528,1-
micron bag filters, $870; l-micron canister filters, $1,110.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 21
WELL-EQUIPPED SHOP
SUPER-SIZED EXCAlIBUR
SCROLL SAW
The new Excalibur EX-30 scroll saw is
finally here. It's identical to the EX-21
except bigger. It boasts a 30-in. throat and
has a large 14-in. x 32-1/2-in. table. A larger
table means better support for your work
and the deep throat gives you more swing
for larger projects. Of course, the EX-21
also has lots to offer with a 21-in. deep
throat and a 13-1/2-in. x 23-1/2-in. table.
Both saws have 2-in.-thick stock capacity
and feature Excalibur's famous parallel link
drive system that keeps the blade moving in
a near-straight up-and-down motion.
Angled cuts are accomplished by tilting
the head (top photo) rather than the table.
If you've ever done a lot of scrolling on a
tilted table, you can imagine how nice it is
to keep the stock flat while cutting.
Excalibur's lifting ar:m feature makes
blade changes and pierced cuts a snap (bot-
tom photo). Power, speed and blade ten-
sion controls are all within 2-in of each
other and right up front where you want
them. Blade changes and adjustments are
all tool-free. The machine's designers have
even thought to include a series of holes in
the base to hold blade storage tubes.
Source:
General International, www.general.ca. EX-30 Scroll Saw,
$900; EX-21 Scrollsaw, $750.
• LOCK • RACK •
TILT- :?\\\,V\1
ADJUSTMENT ""'''>/""10",,,,,,1,,', ' POSITIVE
KNOB STOPS
The tilting head mechanism makes scrolling at an
angle a dream. A large knob on the front of the
machine controls a rack and pinion mechanism for tilt-
ing the saw up to 45-degrees left and right with posi-
tive stops at 22.5-degrees, 30-degrees and 45-degrees.
Release the lock lever and turn the knob to adjust,
The flip-up arm simplifies pierced cuts and blade
changes. Just unlock the lower blade holder, lift the
arm and the blade out of the piece, move to the next
hole, lower the blade, lock it in and go.
22 American Woodworker MAY 2008
NEW PARALLEL JAW CLAMP
Irwin tools has expanded its stable of innovative
clamps with the introduction of the Quick-Grip Parallel
Jaw Clamp. Parallel jaw clamps are favored amongst
woodworkers for clamping boxes, frames and solid
edge glue-ups. The Quick Grip parallel jaw clamps
evenly distribute pressure across 2-in.-wide x 3-3/4-in.-
deepjaws. The resin-coated jaws repel glue and are less
likely to damage your project than steel jaws. The soft,
faceted ProTouch handle really lets you get a grip and
put the pressure on (up to 1,500 pounds). The clamp
IT: also features a removable foot that helps balance the
w
clamps on your bench.
z
Source:
is Irwin Tools, www.irwin.com. Irwin Quick-Grip Parallel Jaw Clamp, 24-in,
#35171, $36; 30-in. (available soon); 48-in., # 2026501, $48.
Order Online!
www.oneido-oir.-co,m
Call TodayforFREE Catalog!
1.8,00.J32.4065
Mode in the USA
Circle No. 27
24 American Woodworker MAY 2008
Tell me how I can train at home for a
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obligation. Choose ONE program only.
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o 145 Home Remodeling & Repair 0 07 Penn Foster High School
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how quickly to complete your coursework.
PLOW PLANE
REVISITED
Here's really good news for all you
hand tool enthusiasts: Lee Valley has
added an updated version of the
Record No. 044 plow plane to their line
of Veritas hand planes. If you've
searched eBay long and hard for a com-
plete 044 (see Tool Nut, page 14), look
no longer. The Veritas plow plane is just
as good-actually, it's better.
A plow plane is used for cutting
grooves and rabbets that go the full
length of a board, as in frame-and-panel
construction or drawer-making. The Veritas is a pleasure to hold and works extremely well, provided you
remember one odd thing about all plow planes: to make a consistent, straight groove, you start the cut at the
far end of a board and work your way backwards.
The plane comes with a 1/4-in. A2 steel blade. (A2 steel holds an edge longer than high-carbon steel
blades.) Four other blades (1/8-, 3/16-, 5/16- and 3/8-in.) are available separately. Like the 044, the Veritas
has an adjustable fence and depth stop, but no nickers to score the wood when cutting dados across the grain
(those came with the Record 050 combination plane). The fence can be set 1-1/2-in. away from a 1/4-in.
blade, while the depth stop can be set to make grooves up to 1/2-in. deep.
Source
Lee Valley, www.leevalley.com. (8001871-8158, Veritas Small Plow Plane, #05P51.01, $199. Additional blades, $16 each.
All learning materials are sent directly to you.
Study online, in print, or a combination of
both. You study independently, but not alone.
Expen instructors and a helpful suppon staff are
just a phone call or an email away.
WE L L- EQUI PPED S HOP
Dept. A2PS38T
925 Oak Street
Scranton, PA 18515-0700
PEN\l FoSTER
CAREER SCHOOL
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American Woodworker MAY 2008 25
Source
Black and Decker, wwwvpxsystem.com, (8001 544-6986, Starter Set VPX1212X, includes 14-volt
Drill/Driver, 2 batteries and dual port charger, $100; Starter Set VPX11 01 X, includes 7-volt Screwdriver, 1 battery and single port charger, $60;
Starter Set VPX1301X, includes 7-volt Cutsaw, 1 battery and single port charger, $60; Starter Set VPX9031X, includes 7-volt screwdriver, 7-volt-
cutsaw, 7-volt flashlight, one battery and single port charger, $100; VPX Add-On Tools: 7-volt Drill/Driver, VPX1201, $35; 7-volt Flashlight,
VPX1401, $20; 7-volt Inflator, VPX1501, $20; 7-volt ACjUSB Power Source, VPX31 01, $20; 14-volt Hand Vac, VPX21 02, $40; 7-volt Battery,
VPX0111, $10, Single Port Charger, VPX031 0, $20; Dual Port Charger, VPX0320, $30.
Black and Decker's new VPX system brings lithi-
um-ion technology to light-duty tools. Li-Ion batter-
ies weigh less than comparable NiCad or NiMH bat-
teries, so VPX tools are compact, light in weight and power-
ful. Also, Li-Ion batteries don't lose their charge during periods of
non-use, which is great for weekend woodworkers.
The VPX system revolves around Black and Decker's compact, recharge-
able 7-volt Li-Ion battery. Most VPX tools use one battery; some of them, like
the 14-volt drilll driver shown at right, use two. Weighing just over 3 lbs., this
drill is well-balanced and comfortable to hold, and it has plenty of power for
woodworking uses. It has a dual-range variable-speed transmission (0-350
rpm and 0-1400 rpm), a keyless 3/S-in. chuck, and a 24-position clutch.
This drill comes packaged with batteries and a charger-it's one of
four VPX starter sets. VPX batteries are interchangeable, so VPX add-on
tools are packaged without batteries-you save money by buying only as
many batteries as you need. Batteries and chargers are also available sep-
arately. According to Black and Decker, the system will expand with
additional tools designed for a wide variety of uses.
POWERFUL LIGHT-DUTY TOOLS
Epilog Laser· 1.888.437.4564 • sales@epiloglaser.com
www.epiloglaser.com/amerww.htm
Epilog Systems Are Easy to Use machines
that work like printers. The laser systems connect to your
computer just like most peripherals using either the USB port
or an Ethernet connection. Set your graphic up on-screen,
print it to the laser system, then press GO. It's that easy!
Expand Your Capabilities using an Epilog laser system.
Customize and sell engraved and cut wood products quickly
and easily - from engraved plaques and cut logos to 3D patterns
and gunstocks, our laser systems provide a wide variety of
additional capabilities to your newor expanding business.
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Starting at $9,995!
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Contact us NOW to receive your free
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Our laser engraving wood workers guide.
~
LASER
WE LL-EQU I PPE D SH OP
DYNAMIC Duo
Dremel's Driver (a cordless screwdriver) and Stylus (a cordless rotary
tool) are now available together in the Dremel Duo Two-Tool Kit. The
set also includes a docking station with a charger for one tool and a
sidecar for the other, 8 tips for the Driver and a 25-piece accessory kit
for the Stylus.
Both tools feature ergonomic design
and 7.2-volt Lithium-Ion batteries. Li-Ion
technology packs power into smaller-size
batteries. As a result, the Driver is the
shortest cordless screwdriver on the
market, according to Dremel, and it
can gently set a No.1 screw as easily as
it drives a No. 10 screw. The Driver
features a variable speed 0-300 rpm
motor and an electronic brake that
quickly stops the bit's rotation when
you release the .trigger, to reduce strip-
ping screw heads.
Dremel says the Stylus can handle most rotary tool tasks with-
out the encumbrance of a flex shaft. You hold the Stylus like a pencil,
for precise control. It's equipped with a nose-mounted switch for one-
hand operation, soft start and variable speed from 5,000-25,000 rpm.
Source
Dremel, www.dremel.com. (800) 437-3635, Dremel Duo Two-Tool Kit, #1130-01, $100.
26 American Woodworker MAY 2008
V i s ~ your nearest WEST SYsTEM
dealer or conlllct
Gougeon IInJthers Inc.
866-937-8797 (toll flee)
westsyslem.com
WEST
SVS'1"EM
Available at these fine dealers: Highland Hardware· Lee Valley Tools· Rockier
Woodworking and Hardware· Woodcraft Supply. Woodworker's Supply
=1--
leighjig6.COm 800-663-8932
Leigh Router Joinery Jigs
G/flex. EPOXY
G/flex is a tough, resilient epoxy, engineered for superior adhesion
to wood-resinous woods, hardwoods, exotic woods, even damp
wood. G/flex is toughened to make structural bonds that absorb
the stresses of expansion and contraction, 'shock and vibration.
And if you are bonding wood to something else, G/flex has
excellent adhesion to metals, plastics, fiberglass, masonry and
other dissimilar materials.
G/flex is available as a versatile,
easily-modified liquid or a convenient
pre-thickened adhesive, both with a
simple 1:1 mix ratio, No mat1er what
the species, G/flex is the solution to
your toughest wood gluing problems.
CORDLESS BRAD NAILER
DeWalt's new DC608 isn't the first cordless
brad nailer, but it is one of the best. The big
advantage of going cordless, of course, is that
you don't need a compressor or gas car-
tridges, and there's no air hose to deal with. The
DC608 employs a mechanical flywheel to drive
nails. Unlike other flywheel-powered nailers that
require a second to ramp up to speed, the DC608
fires instantly every time you pull the trigger, and its
I8-volt battery delivers enough oomph to drive and
set 2-in. brads into all but the hardest hardwoods-
that's plenty of power.
The DC608 accepts I8-gauge brads from 5/8-in.
to 2-in. It has a I2-stop drive-depth adjustment and
a helpful task light. It offers sequential and bump
firing modes and is equipped with a lock switch to
pr,event unintentional firing.
The downsides of going cordless are increased
weight and larger size: The DC608 weighs 7-1/2 lbs.,
over twice as much as most air-powered brad nailers. And like other
cordless nailers, the DC608 is significantly larger than its air-powered
cousins. The DC608K includes the nailer, one I8-volt NiCd battery and a
I-hour charger.
Source
DeWalt, www.dewalt.com. (800) 433-9258, 18 Gauge 2" Cordless Brad Nailer Kit, DC608K, $279.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 27
Call for Entries!

Woodworker's Showcase
Here is your chance to share your best
work with fellow woodworkers across
the country and around the world.
As woodworkers, we love to build things, but we also love
to share our work and the ideas behind them. American
Woodworker Magazine is debuting a new department
called "Woodworker's Showcase." We're looking for
projects that range from practical, everyday pieces to
one-of-a-kind artistic masterpieces.
Here's how to submit your work! We ask that the piece you submit be made pri-
marily of wood by your own two hands. Only high quality photos will be selected for
publication so make sure you put some time and effort into your photograph. Check
out our web page (www.americanwoodworker.com/phototips) for tips on taking
good photographs. Digital photographs are preferred but slides and color negatives
are also acceptable. If you want your slides or negatives back, you must include a stamped, self-
addressed envelope with your submission.
Send your pictures along with a description of the piece that includes the wood(s), joinery and
finish that you used. It seems like every piece has a story behind it - please feel free to share
yours, We look forward to hearing from you.
Send entries to: Showcase@AmericanWoodworker.com or mail to: American
Woodoworker Magazine, 1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180, Eagan, MN 55121.
Cherry
Cabinet
by Dave Munkittrick
River Falls, WI
T URN I NG WOO D h .\LIll L1CCI
Heirloom Awl
Metal and wood are the basic ingredients in most
woodworking tools. As woodworkers, we're familiar
with working wood, but what about metal? Actually,
the level of metal working required to make some
woodworking tools is pretty basic. If you've never
made your own tools, give this project a try. There's
something enormously satisfying about using a tool
you made yourself.
We chose the scratch awl for this article because
it's an everyday tool that's easy to make. Making an
awl will teach you the basic principles of heat-treating
steel and turning a wood handle with a metal ferrule.
28 American Woodworker MAY 2008
Perhaps this project will be the first milestone on
your custom tool-makingjourney.
Note: This project involves metal grinding and
working with an open flame, so be sure to follow
these basic safety guidelines:
• Thoroughly clean the work area of all wood shav-
ings and dust before using the torch or grinding
the steel.
• Keep a fire extinguisher on hand for emergencies.
• If possible, do the heat-treating outside.
• Wear eye protection for all grinding operations.
• Never use motor oil for the heat-treating process.
WHAT YOU WILL NEED:
• Fire extinguisher
• 1/8-in., 3/16-in. or 1/4-in., diameter drill rod in oil
hardening steel
• Propane or Mapp gas torch
• Pint of olive oil and a can to pour it in
• Locking pliers
• 8-in. or 10-in. mill file
• Electric drill
• 10-in. grinding disc (120-grit) mounted on 3/4-in ply-
wood or MDF backing.
•' 2-in. x 2-in. x 4-in. piece of dry hardwood
• Copper plumbing coupling, brass or copper pipe, brass
nut, or brass compression nut for the ferrule material
• Metal can with a lid
• Lathe tools: roughing gouge, detail gouge, parting tool,
and optional skew chisel
• Scroll chuck
." Sandpaper (usually 100-, 150-, 180- and 220-grit)
• Jacobs style chuck for your lathe's tailstock
• A drill bit that's 1/64-in larger than the drill rod
• Epoxy
• Optional: Tempilstik in 450 - 500 degrees range
TURN THE HANDLE
Pick any strOllg hardwood for the handle'; cherry,
hard maple, oak, walnut, hickory, ash, rosewood,
goncalo alves, purpleheart, etc. (Now, aren't you glad
you saved those little pieces of really cool wood?)
Determine the desired diameter and length of the han-
dle. Be sure to allow for the length of the ferrule.
1. Mount the wood into the scroll chuck and create
a cylinder with the roughing gouge.
2. With the parting tool, cut a small cylinder on the
end to" fit the metal ferrule (Photo I). Take care to
achieve a tight fit. The ferrule stock can be a copper
coupling (I/4-in. to I/2-in., depending on the look
you desire), brass nuts, brass or copper pipe. If you're
using a brass nut, simply thread it onto the wood.
3. Shape the handle with the detail gouge or skew
chisel (Photo 2). The possibilities are endless and
depend on the handle style, the size ofyour hands, and
whether the tool is meant for delicate or heavy service.
I seldom make any two the same. Take the opportuni-
ty to add your own fine detailing to distinguish your awl
from production versions. When satisfied with the
1
Round the
handle blank
and fit the fer-
rule on the end.
You can use dif-
ferent materials
for a ferrule; this
one is a solid- I
brass nut with a
tapered end sec-
tion.
2
Rough in the
basic shape
of the handle
with the detail-
ing gouge. The
shape and size
of the handle is
up to you.
3
Turn away
the flats of
the nut and
shape the fer-
rule with a
detailing gouge.
Cutting brass
and copper on
the lathe is simi-
lar to cutting
wood. "However,
take light cuts.
4
0rill the hole
to accept the
steel drill rod.
Use bits 1/64-in.
larger in diame-
ter than the drill
rod to allow
room for the
epoxy.
..
American Woodworker MAY 200829
TURNING WOOD
5
Cut a length
of drill rod
with a hacksaw
for the awl's
steel shaft.
6
Shape a
tapered
point on the
shaft using a
drill and a lathe
mounted abra-
sive disc. With
the drill run-
ning, grind the
point on the
near lower
quadrant of the
spinning disc.
Wear eye pro-
tection!
7
Harden the
shaft by
heating the
pointed half to
an even cherry-
red color. Hold
the shaft in a
pair of locking
pliers.
8
When the
steel is even-
ly bright red
from the point
to the middle,
quickly quench
and stir it in a
can of olive oil.
shape, finish sand to 220-grit.
4. Shape the ferrule with the gouge (Photo 3).
5. Use aJacobs chuck to drill a I-l/2-in. (mini-
mum) deep hole for the steel shaft (Photo 4).
6. Part the handle off the chuck and hand- sand
the end. You can leave the handle unfinished or
use a drying oil.
MAKE THE STEEL SHAFT
The drill rod is annealed, which means it's too
soft for use as an awl. On the other hand, soft steel
is easy to work so we'll leave it that way ~ o r now and
do the hardening later.
7. Cut the drill rod with a hacksaw to the desired
length of the awl shaft (Photo 5). I nonnally use 3-
in. to 6-in. lengths. Choose a length and diameter
that fits the desired look and function of the awl.
8. To shape the point on the business end of the
shaft, first chuck it in a drill. Then, run the drill as
you hold the shaft against a spinning lathe-mount-
ed grinding disc (Photo 6). Run the lathe at low to
medium speed (400 to 800 rpm). Don't try and
put a delicate point on the steel at the stage. It will
just get burned off in the heat-treating process.
And don't worry if you "blue" the steel at this junc-
ture as overheating is only a concern once the steel
is heat-treated.
9. Get the torch and pour some olive oil in a can.
With the shank held in a pair oflocking pliers, fire-
up the torch and apply heat to the steel. Twirl the
rod as if you were slow cooking a marshmallow
(Photo 7). Try for an even, bright cherry-red color
from the middle to the point, then quickly dunk
the hot steel into the olive oil and agitate rapidly
for about 30 seconds (Photo 8).
Note: Never use motor oil for this as it gives off
noxious fumes and can even ignite.
10. Use a mill file to test the shank tip hardness
(Photo 9). If the steel does not pass the file test,
reheat and quench again.
11. Hand-sand the shaft to achieve a clean blight
surface (Photo 10).
12. The second phase of heat-treating is called
tempering. This is where the degree of final hard-
ness is established. Tempering involves reheating
the hardened area to a specific temperature, then
quenching it immediately in water. The higher the
temperature the softer the shaft will be. As the enp
user, you are free to determine the degree of hard-
ness you want in your tool. You may want an awl
that is very hard and can scratch deep lines in hard
wood. The down side is a very hard shaft will have
a brittle point that's prone to breaking. At the
other extreme you can temper the shaft so the
30 American Woodworker MAY 2008

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O
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©Zoysia Farm Nurseries 2008 3617 Old Taneytown Rd.• Taneytown, MD 21787 NOT SHIPPED OUTSIDE USA or into WA or OR.
p------------------------------
I Please send me guaranteed Amalay as checked: Mail 10: Zoysia Farm Nurseries General Offices and Store Dept. 5060 I
I 3617 Old Taneytown Road, Taneytown, MD 21787 I
I price of order here Payment method I
I
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o Check 0 MO
I Shipping &Handling (S&H) 0 MasterCard I
I ENCLOSED TOTAL 0 Visa I
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.. =r:..
TURNING WOOD
g
Testthe
hardness
of the shaft by
running it
along a file.
The hardened
part should
skate off the
file, not bite in.
10
sand the
steel to a
bright, clean
surface with
220-grit paper.
Wash it with
soap and water
to remove oil
residue first.
Il
Temper
the shaft
with a torch
held just below
the heat-treated
area. Keep the
flame there and
rotate the shaft
until the hard-
ened area is a
uniform dark
gold or bronze
color. Then,
quickly quench
it in water.
12
setthe
shaft in
the handle
using a bit of
slow-set epoxy.
Put the epoxy
in the hole with
a toothpick.
Rotate the
shaft a bit as
you push it in
to evenly dis-
tribute the
epoxy.
point won't break but it may bend so easily that the
awl becomes useless. I suggest making a couple of
awls, each tempered to different temperatures to
see what best fits your needs.
The tempered "sweet spot" for my awls is a tem-
perature around 450 to 50O-degrees. There are
three ways to achieve this:
A. Heat the steel slowly with a torch just back of
the hardened area (Photo 11). When the hard-
ened area turns a gold or bronze color, quench
immediately in water to stop the process.
B. Use a temperature-indicating substance such
as Tempilstik. Choose a Tempilstik that fits your
desired heat range. Rub the area around the point
with the wax-like stick. Then, heat the shaft as
described in option A. When the steel reaches the
desired temperature, the Tempilstik will smoke and
liquefy. At this point, quickly quench the shaft in
water.
C. The easiest, but slowest method is to bake the
steel in a conventional oven for about 30 minutes
at 45O-degrees. Be sure to preheat the oven and
place the steel on a cookie sheet. Elevate the steel
with rolled up pieces of aluminum foil so it will
heat evenly. Remove the steel from the oven and let
it cool. There's no need to quench a shaft that's
been cooked in an oven.
WOOD + STEEL = AWL DONE
If you need a sharper point on the awl, place,it
back in the drill and lightly shape the tapered area
on the disc mounted on the lathe (use a finer grit
for this, such as a I50-grit or finer). Do this slowly,
as bluing the point may make the tool too soft for
your purposes.
Mount the steel in the handle (Photo 12). I put
a small amount of epoxy down in the hole, and
then push the handle down over the steel with the
point in a scrap piece of wood. Use the awl for a
while; you may find you want one harder or one
more flexible-you decide based on your temper-
ing temperatures.
Sources:
MSC, www.mscdirect.com (800) 645-7270,
Oil hardening Drill Rod 3-ft., 1/8-in., #06000087, $2; 3/16-in.,
#06000160, $2.50; 1/4-in., #06000160, $3; Tempilstik in 450-
degree temperature, #06831515, $12 each; 10-in. Abrasive Disc
for Steel in 120 grit, #88592480, $4 each.
Home Centers and Hardware Stores, Propane or MAPP gas
torch, locking pliers, brass nuts and copper couplings and epoxy.
32 American Woodworker MAY 2008
- - - - - - _ . _ ~ . _ -
Torben
Helshoj
by RandyJohnson
T
orben Helshoj's passion for
woodworking started when he
was a boy watching the skilled crafts-
men in the boatyards of Denmark.
But his path to becoming an accom-
plished woodworker, tool designer
and co-founder of Laguna Tools
included a number of interesting
detours.
After graduating from high
school, Torben started college as a
mechanical engineering major. But
at age 19, he took a break to do a lit-
tle traveling, and hitchhiked from
Denmark to India. Upon returning,
he decided to pursue a traditional
woodworking apprenticeship.
The first woodworking shop
Torben approached was in the
process of closing down, but
Torben's sincerity impressed the
shop's owner, so he recommended
Torben to a friend who ran one of
the best custom furniture shops in
Denmark. Torben was accepted as
an apprentice; becoming a journey-
man took four years of hard work.
As Torben recalls, "The only tools I
used for the first year and a half were
sandpaper and a broom. When my
fingers got sore I put masking tape on
the tips and kept sanding. But I
learned a lot as an appretice and the
guys I worked with were great.
"Every year I was sent out for six
weeks of specialized training.
Eventually, I was hand-cutting dove-
tails. But even that was an appren-
tice'sjob, because it was so time con-
suming: I was paid 70 cents an hour;
the journeymen were making at
least ten times that amount. But
they treated me very well and I had
the chance to work on some amaz-
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"The only tools I used for
the first year and a half
were sandpaper and
a broom."
ing furniture.
"We worked closely with several
prominent architects and built most-
ly modern Scandinavian-style furni-
ture for wealthy Danes, oil sheiks
and royalty. We'd bandsaw as much
as possible and then hand-sculpt the
rest with rasps and files. We worked
with all kinds of fine hardwoods,
including Cuban mahogany. The
shop had a large inventory of this
fantastic wood up in the attic. Dark
red in color, very dense and stable,
it's one of my favorite woods. We also
used Oregon pine. This wood is
called Douglas fir in the U.S., where
it's commonly used to build houses;
we used it to build fine furniture."
To complete his apprenticeship,
Torben was required to build a final
project and have it judged by the
leaders of the woodworking trade
union. As Torben puts it, "It was a
big deal, and took place at the cen-
ter of Copenhagen. The Queen of
Denmark attended and personally
congratulated the winners.
Torben's finely crafted Brazilian
mahogany desk earned a silver
medal. This was a prestigious honor,
considering gold medals were not
awarded (because "nothing is per-
fect") and it had been twenty years
since the last silver medal was award-
ed in the woodworking category.
After Torben completed his
apprenticeship, the travel bug bit
again and he decided to take a trip
to America. "My big dream was to
sail to America," Torben says,
"because going by boat is the only
proper way to get to there. I went to
Portugal and made arrangements
with the owner of a schooner for pas-
sage to America the following year.
But their schedule changed
and I missed the boat. So I
flew to America and landed
atJFK International instead.
"After spending a couple
weeks on the East Coast, I
drove to California: I had a
business card for a woodworker
in Laguna Beach. He offered me
ajob and before I knew it, a year had
passed. I came as a tourist but ended
up staying!
"The woodworking business was
good, but the shop was modestly
equipped, so we borrowed money
and imported a container of wood-
working equipment from a company
in Denmark. We were only looking
to upgrade our shop, but the compa-
ny was interested in setting up a dis-
tributorship in the US, so pretty
soon we were" building furniture and
selling woodworking equipment.
Both businesses flourished.
"But in the early 90s, the dollar
went soft. That made it tough to prof-
itably import equipment, and my
partner decided to move on to other
pursuits. I didn't set out to become a
woodworking machine importer, but
I wanted to give it one last shot. If it
didn't work, I'd go back to being a
woodworker, as southern California
is a great market for custom wood-
working. By this time I'd met
Catherine, my future wife and busi-
ness partner. She helped me get the
machine business rolling. We decid-
"ed to make a video featuring our
combination machine, to familiarize
American woodworkers with the ben-
efits of its European design. We dis-
tributed the video by mail and busi-
ness started to pick up. Laguna Tools
has continued to grow ever since."
Torben was the first
person in over 20 years
to win the Queen of Denmark's
silver medal for woodworking. The inscription
reads "Woodworking Trade Graduation Test
Committee"on one side and "Effort and Ability
Promotes Wealth and Happiness" on the other.
Torben Helshoj, president of LagunaTools,
inspects a "shipment of new 18-inch Signature
Series bandsaws. Laguna is best known for its
high-quality bandsaws. Torben has spent years
improving their design.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 35
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by Tom Caspar
A
dirondack chairs represent all
that's best about American
design: they're practical, with no unneces-
sary parts; they're accessible, because just
about anyone who can cut wood can make
one; and they're perfectly suited to their set-
ting, the great outdoors.
An Adirondack's low seat and broad arms
invite you to slow down and take it easy. Most
Adirondacks are single chairs, of course. A
two-seater is something special. Sharing the
Adirondack experience with a friend makes
it all the better.
MATERIALS AND TOOLS
This project is built from western red
cedar construction lumber, which is com-
monly available at home centers and lum-
beryards. You'll need two 2x6 boards, 8 ft.
long, and nine pieces of 5/4 lumber-1 in.
thick, 5-1/2 in. wide and 12 ft. long. Dust
from cutting western red cedar can be irritat-
ing, so wear an appropriate dust mask and
work in a well-ventilated shop or outdoors.
Use rust-resistant deck screws to assemble
the project. You'll need about 100 1-1/2-in.
screws and 50 l-l/4-in. screws. You'll also
need two inside-corner braces and 100
screw-hole plugs (see Sources, page 40).
You'll use a tablesaw, bandsaw (or jigsaw),
router table, 3/8-in. roundover bit, 30-
degree chamfer bit, cordless drill and a file
for the project. A miter saw is also handy.
MAKE THE LEGS AND SEAT
1. The love seat sits on three back legs:
two on the sides (AI, Fig. A, page 42) and
one in the center (A2). They're virtually
identical, except for one important detail:
About This Project
Our Adirondack two-seater is based
on one built by Jack Priest as a center-
piece for the deck outside his son's
restaurant, The Tin Fish, overlooking Lake
Calhoun, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Our
design is slightly different from his.
We've changed the arms and their sup-
ports a bit, as well as the back's profile,
but that's what Adirondacks are all about.
Once you've got the basic structure
down, it's easy to customize an
Adirondack any way you want.
1
Begin build-
ing the love
seat by sawing
out the back
legs from a
western red
cedar 2x6.
You'll get the
most accurate
cuts by using a
bandsaw, but
you could use
a jigsaw,
instead.
2
JOinery is
simple: just
screws and glue.
You'll cover
every screw hole
with a plug later
on. As you build
the love seat,
drill holes for the
plugs and screws
simultaneously
with a combina-
tion bit.
3
Assemble the
seat. Fasten the
first four seat slats,
which are made
from 5/4 cedar
boards. Check for
square as you go.
Temporarily add a
slat to space the
legs the correct
distance.
4
screwand
glue together
the front legs. Use
a water-resista nt
glue to assemble
all the parts of the
project.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 37
5
GIUe and
screw the
front legs to the
seat assembly.
Then add the rest
of the seat slats
and the lower
back rail, which
sits in the notches
on the back legs.
Assembly is
much easier if
you work on a
large, flat surface,
such as a door.
6
GIUe the arms
together from
two pieces of 5/4
material. To make a
tight, invisible
joint, first remove
the rounded edges
of this construction
lumber by ripping
the boards on the
tablesaw.
7
Rout a 30-
degree bevel
on the upper
back rail using a
router table. The
love seat's back
slats lean
against this
piece; with an
accurately made
bevel, you'll get
tight, s t r o n ~
joints.
8
Add the arm
and upper
back rail assem-
bly. Stand it on
two supports and
adjust its posi-
tion until the
bevel you routed
is in line with the
lower back rail.
Check this with a
straightedge.
the notch for the lower back rail (A5) is
positioned farther back on the center leg
than on the outer legs (Fig. H). To ensure
that all the legs come out the same, make
one paper pattern based on the measure-
ments given for the outer back leg (AI).
Trace around the pattern on three leg
blanks cut to the same length, omitting the
notches. Then draw the notches directly on
the legs. In addition, set your miter saw to
IS degrees and cut a miter on a scrap piece
of Ix6. Use this piece to draw the angled
lines that indicate the location of the front
legs. Draw these lines on both sides of each
outer leg.
2. Saw the legs (Photo 1). Smooth the
saw cuts with a file or SO-grit sandpaper
wrapped around a block.
3. Make the seat slats (A3). Discard
pieces with large knots-they'll weaken the
slats. Drill holes for screws and plugs in the
ends and middle of all the slats using a 3/S-
in.-dia. combination countersink/counter-
bore bit (Photo 2). Make the plug holes
about I/4-in. deep. Round the top edges of
tlle slats, and all other exposed edges as you
build the project, using a 3/8-in. roundover
bit mounted in a router table.
4. Line up the front edges of all three
legs. Temporarily fasten a slat to the middle
of each leg. Glue and screw the first four
slats (Photo 3).
5. Make the two pieces that comprise each
front leg (BI and B2) from one long board.
Rip the board to remove its rounded edges.
This makes a better-looking joint when you
glue the pieces together. Cut one end of the
blank at 18 degrees, then cut the inner leg to
exact length (Fig. E). Cut the outer leg to
length, then glue and screw together the leg
pieces (Photo 4). Note that the two front legs
are mirror images of each other.
6. Apply glue to the front legs and clamp
them to the back legs. Use the lines you
drew in Step 1 to position the front legs.
Drill holes in the front legs for screws and
plugs, then run in the screws (Photo 5).
7. Make the back seat slat (A4, Fig. F) and
lower back rail (AS, Fig. G). Note that the
inside curve on each end of the lower back
rail consists o(three flat sections, to receive
three back slats. The straighter these sec-
tions are, the stronger your joints will be.
After sawing, use a file to straighten these
cuts, if necessary. Use a file to flatten the,
rail's center straight section, too. Drill holes
for screws and plugs in the back seat slat and
lower back rail, then round over the edges
of both parts with a 3/8-in. router bit. Don't
round over the inner edge of the lower back
rail, where the back slats (Dl, D2) go.
8. Remove the seat slat you temporarily
screwed to the back legs. Glue and screw the
lower back rail in position. Screw the back
seat slat next to it, but don't glue it. Add the
rest of the seat slats. Space them about 1/4-
in. apart. Temporarily clamping some slats
in position makes it easier to space them.
9. Remove the back seat slat.
ADD THE ARM ASSEMBLY
10. Rip two 5/4 pieces for each arm (Cl)
and glue them together (Photo 6). Cut each
blank to length, then saw out the curves
(Fig. J). Sand the gluejoint, then round over
both sides of the arm with a 1/4-in.
roundover bit. Don't round the curved sec-
tion where the arm overlays the back rail.
11. Make the upper back rail (C2). This
piece has three straight sections on either
side (Fig. M), like the lower back rail. Trace
the curves of the arm pieces on the ends of
the rail. Cut out the rail using a bandsaw,
with the table set at 90 degrees, and straight-
en the flat sections with a file. Rout a 30-
degree bevel on the inside edge of the rail
(Photo 7). Leave a 1/8-in.-thick blunt edge
to guide the bit's bearing.
12. Glue and screw the arms to the upper
back rail. Note that the inside edge of each
arm is square to the back rail (Fig. C), and
that the screws go from underneath the back
rail and into the arms (Fig. A).
9
Taper the
back slats
using a jig for
your tablesaw.
Mount toggle
clamps on the
jig to keep your
fingers away
from the blade.
10
spacing
the love
seat's back
slats requires
careful meas-
uring and
marking. Begin
by temporarily
installing the
fou r slats that
define the two
halves of the
back.
11
Fasten
the mid-
dle slats next.
Then install two
slats between
the middle and
outer slats.
Adjust these
slats up or
down to make
the spacing
even.
12
Drawa
curve
across the back
using a shop-
made trammel.
That's just a
stick with a nail
at one end and
a pencil stuck
in a hole on
the other end.
Remove.the
slats and cut
the curve on
each piece.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 39
13. Cut two temporary support
pieces (C3) to hold and level the arm
assembly. Prop the assembly on these
pieces and the front legs (Photo 8).
Once the assembly is correctly posi-
tioned front-to-back and side-to-side
(Fig. D), clamp it to the front legs, so
it can't shift.
FIT THE BACK SLATS
14. Make a set of back slats (D1
40 American Woodworker MAY 2008
and D2). You can rough-cut two slats
from one 5-1/2-in.-wide 5/4 board
using a bandsaw. Build a tapering jig
and cut each slat using the tablesaw
(Photo 9 and Fig. K). The exa,ct
angles on the slat's ends are not
important.
15. Drill screw-and-plug holes in
the lower ends of the outer slats
(Dl). Mark the positions of these
slats on the lower back rail (Fig. B).
13
Rout
grooves
on the ends
and inner
edges of the
corbels, the
wing-shaped
pieces that
support the
love seat's
broad arms.
These grooves
hide metal
braces under
the arms.
14
Fasten
the
corbels to the
legs with
glue and
screws. The
brace allows
you to safely
lift the love
seat by its
arms.
15
0nce
every
part is in place,
glue plugs in
each screw
hole. Cut the
excess with a
flush-cutting
saw.
Clamp the slats in position (the top ends
of the centermost slats touch each other)
and mark locations for the screws that will
go into the upper back rail. Remove the
slats, drill the screw-and-plug holes, then
attach-but don't glue-the slats in place
(Photo 10).
16. Install one of the inner back slats
(D2) midway between the outer back
slats. It should be vertical. Fit the remain-
ing slats (Photo 11). Make the gap
between them about 1/4-in. Mter these
slats are fitted, mark their screw-and-plug
holes and cut off any excess length at the
bottom. Then install the slats with screws,
but don't use glue. Repeat this process on
the other side of the back.
17. Make a trammel and find the cen-
ter point of each half of the back (Fig. L).
Turn the trammel around and draw each
curve (Photo 12).
18. Mark the position of all slats and
remove them. Bandsaw their top ends
and round over all their edges. Glue and
screw the slats back in place. Cut a piece
of paper to fit the gap between the two
back sections. Fold the paper in half and
use it as a pattern to make two pieces
(D3) to fill the gap. Install these pieces.
SUPPORT THE ARMS
19. Connect the arms and legs with
inside corner braces (Fig. A). Use #10 or
#12 pan head screws to install them.
20. Cut two corbel blanks (B3). Rout
stopped grooves on the inside edge of
each blank to accommodate the corner
brace and screw heads (Photo 13). Saw
the corbel's shape (Fig. N) and round
over its outside edges. Make sure each
corbel's top fits tight under the arm. Drill
screw-and-plug holes through the front
legs and screw and glue the corbels to the
front legs (Photo 14).
FINISHING STEPS
21. Install the back seat slat. Glue plugs
in all the screw holes. Cut and sand them
flush.
22. Apply two coats of exterior oil fin-
ish. It's best to do this outside, for good
ventilation. Sit and enjoy!
Sources
Hamilton Marine, www.hamiltonmarine.com. (800)
639-2715,3/8" Dia. Bung Cedar (plugs), #FSW-05-
C, $10 per 100.
Rockier, www.rockler.com. (800) 279-4441, 30-
degree Chamfer router bit, #24805, $34.
C1
D1
FIGURE C
ARM AND BACK RAIL ASSEMBLY
90°
4-518"
FIGURE B SLAT LOCATION
1----7"'''''---19-314''----------1
FIGURE F BACK SEAT SLAT
FIGURE G LOWER BACK RAIL


1-3I4,II A4
RIGHT
81
FIGURE E
FRONT LEG
LEFT
3/8" PLUG
J
....
#8x 1-1/2" FH
(TYP.)
FIGURE A EXPLODED VIEW
6-3/4"
D1
FIGURE H BACK LEGS
83
13-1/4"
3/8"
ROUNDOVER
(TYP.)
FIGURE 0
CROSS SECTION
1------------------- 31-3/8"
42 American Woodworker MAY 2008
5-112"
1-------12-7/16" --------1
78°
1/4"
A2
CENTER
BACK
LEG
Ai
OUTER
BACK
LEG 18°
\

FRONT LEG
1-1/4"
t-----8-7/16" -------1
FIGURE J ARM FIGURE K BACK SLATS AND TAPERING SLED
1/8"
II
I

f---------32" (02) --------------,
2. Draw an arc of the same
radius from the center point.
1. Mark the two outer slats,
then draw an arc from each
mark to find the center point
FIGURE L DRAWING THE BACK'S CURVE
SLAT
NEAREST
ARM
I V
-
,.-
-1 " /
-
-
6-
I
:-

5-5/8"
Ii
L
i=
d
-
,
-

:
1
!
I
I
i

I
--
--

-I-
-f--
'-I-
-l-
I
GLUE
f--I-
JOINT
_l-
I
l-
I
-
i
I
I-
2-1/4" I

!
16-114"
-
\-.. I
2"
RAO.
A
I I I I
Outer back slat
Center slat
Inner back slat
la) Cut 81 and 82 from 30" long blank.
Ib) Glue up from two pieces, 5" and 3" wide.
Ic) Cut two pieces from one 5-1/2" x 28" blank.
Id) Cut two pieces from one 5-1/2" x 32" blank.
GROOVE FOR BRACE
FIGURE N CORBEL
F,GURE M UPPER BACK RAIL
American Woodworker MAY 2008 43
MAXIMIZE
YOUR
DRUM
SANDER'S
POTENTIAL
Drum
Sander
Tips
1 . SKIP THE SCRAPE
Eliminate laborious hand scraping of dried glue: contrary to
popular belief, you can take glue-ups directly to your drum
sander. The secrets are to use a coarse abrasive (24-grit to 60-
grit, depending on the amount of glue and how uneven the glue-
up is) and feed the wood at a skewed angle. Set the sander so
it just hits the elevated gluelines. Take light cuts until 90-percent
of the glue is gone, then switch to a finer grit.
Remember, your drum sander's greatest enemy is excess
heat. This is especially true when you sand off glue. Finer grits
(SO-grit and above) and heavy cuts can generate enough heat to
melt the glue and gum up the abrasive. Skewing the work fur-
ther reduces heat build-up, because it keeps the gluelines mov-
ing across the drum, rather than remaining in one spot on the
abrasive.
2. IT'S OK To SKIP GRITS-
SOMETIMES
It's OK to skip grits below 1DO-grit. However, it's best
to move through finer grits sequentially. It's harder for
these grits to remove the scratches left by an abrasive
that's more than one step coarser.
44 American Woodworker MAY 2008
3. INCREASE BELT LONGEVITY
Get 20 to 30 percent more life from your aluminum
oxide sanding belts by changing the orientation of the grit.
It's easy to do. Simply alternate the end of the belt you
install first. You can accomplish this automatically by
removing the belt from the same side of the drum it was
installed on. That way, what was the trailing end of the belt
gets turned around and bec;omes the starting end.
Switching the abrasive's orientation changes the direction
the abrasive particles hit the wood. This causes the parti-
cles to wear more evenly, so they last longer.
4. START WITH THE RIGHT GRIT
The most common mistake people make is to start
with a grit that's too fine. Here are some good rules of
thumb to follow when choosing a starting grit: For abra-
sive planing or glue-ups, start with a 24-60 grit belt; for
sanding boards from a planer or jointer, start with BO-grit
or finer. If you have to make more than three passes with
your starting grit, you probably started too fine. (The
exception to this is abrasive planing where many passes
with a single coarse grit are sometimes needed to joint
the board flat.)
5. DUST COLLECTION
IS A MUST!
Do not skimp! Removing sanding debris quickly and
efficiently is critical to effective sanding. Make. sure your
machine is getting all the cfm (cubic feet per minute)
called for in the manual. Be wary of inflated cfm rates tout-
ed by some dust collector manufacturers. Sanders are
cfm hogs because they need to pull dust off the spinning
drum before it gets carried around and deposited back on
the material being sanded. Fugitive dust will load belts
faster, reduce sander efficiency and could cause the mate-
rial to slip on the conveyor belt and possibly even kick
back at the operator. If you are getting any residual dust
left on the wood as it emerges from the drum sander, you
need a more powerful dust collector. Note: If your sander
has two 4-in. ports, you will need a 6-in. line to carry the
required cfm to the machine. Divide this6-in. line into two
4-in. lines It's a mistake to divide a single 4-in. or even 5-
in. line in two because it will starve your machine of the
airflow volume it needs.
6. START AT THE RIGHT HEIGHT
Heavy cuts are hard on both your machine and the abra-
sive. The first cut is the hardest to get right. Here's the trick.
Unplug the machine, and slide the board into the sander so
the thickest portion is under the drum. Then lower the drum
as you spin it by hand. Stop when the sandpaper starts to
make contact with the wood. You're good to go. Remember,
it's much better to have a very light first cut then one that
bogs down your machine.
Once you have the initial setting, subsequent adjustments
between passes should be very small, especially with fine
grits. Shoot for cuts that are less than 1/64-in. for fine finish
work and up to 1/B-in. for abrasive planing. Also, keep in mind
stock width; glue ups that approach the machine's capacity
require lighter cuts than a single B-in. board. It's a good prac-
tice to occasionally run the stock through a second time with-
out adjusting the depth. If you still hear the abrasive cutting
on the second pass, the sander was probably set too deep on
the previous pass.
7. CLEAN PAPER WORKS
BETTER AND LASTS LONGER
Use a rubber belt cleaner whenever the dust build-up
on the abrasive can't be swept off with a brush. A loaded
belt will not cut efficiently, because the abrasive particles
are partially buried. Loaded belts build up heat rapidly,
making them prone to scorching the wood. When a
loaded belt hits a pitch pocket or a knot, the excess heat
can melt the pitch and leave a hardened streak of baked-
on sanding debris on the abrasive.
With the dust collection on, hold the cleaning stick
against the spinning drum. The soft rubber scrubs out
the embedded debris. Be sure to sweep off any debris
left on the drum and conveyor belt. Always wear eye
protection when cleaning a belt.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 45
8. CLEAN Up
STUBBORN STREAKS
Use a length of l/4-in. Plexiglas to remove
streaks of fused sanding debris. These
streaks are typically caused by pitch pockets
or knots and can ruin a belt. A rubber abrasive
cleaner won't touch these baked-on rings.
Instead, hold the Plexiglas edge on the
streak. If that doesn't do the trick, try soaking
the belt in mineral spirits or a product like
"Simple Green", overnight. Note: Always
wear eye protection for cleaning operations.
9. CHOOSE THE RIGHT FEED RATE
There's no foolproof formula for calculating optimal feed rates. A
good rule of thumb is this: the coarser the grit, the faster the feed
rate. Slower feed rates yield more drum rpm's per inch and that helps
create the ultra smooth finish you're looking for from the finer grits. If
you start to get some burning on the stock, bump the feed rate up
until the burning stops.
Heavy stock removal with coarse abrasives does not benefit from
a slow fed rate so it makes sense to go as fast as the machine can in
order to get the job done quickly.
When in doubt about the right speed, set the feed rate between
40 and 50 percent for your first pass. This will get you safely in the
ballpark where you can fine-turn the optimal speed for the task at
hand. Finally, listen to your machine: it will tell you if it's working too
hard and you need to slow down.
10. DON'T SKIMP ON ABRASIVES
Use high quality abrasives; you'll avoid all kinds of headaches and in the long run, save money.
Look for a backing material made of cloth, polyester or a combination of the two-cloth will stretch
a bit more than polyester. Avoid paper-backed products; they're too fragile and tear easily.
Besides selecting the correct backing material, you should also select the correct backing
weight. For a drum sander, look for an X, Y or XY weight rating on the back. This weight
range is the best compromise between dura-
bility and flexibility.
Inexpensive abrasives tend to
use lower quality bonding
material (the stuff that holds
the grit to the paper) and
won't last as long. Also, the
grit on inexpensive paper can
be inconsistently sized, which
can cause annoying scratch
marks on an otherwise
smooth surface.
It's best to stick with rep-
utable abrasive brands like
3M, Norton and Klingspor.
46 American Woodworker MAY 2008
11. SAND REALLY THIN BOARDS
It's easy to make your own veneer from resawn boards with a drum sander. Furniture repair shops love this feature because it
allows them to match the thick veneer used on period furniture. S o m ~ drum sanders can sand wood all the way down to 1/32-in.
Note: Drum sanders that use compressible materials such as hook-and-Ioop fasteners, soft backing under the abrasives or a soft
rubber conveyor belt cannot sand this thin.
12. AVOID BURNS
Burn-prone woods like cherry, maple
or pine need special care when sanding
to avoid burn marks on the wood. Try the
new zirconium or ceramic abrasives.
Both abrasives are harder than alu-
minum oxide and run cooler, to help min-
imize burning. This is especially useful
during abrasive planing, when heavy
cuts and coarse grits are more the norm.
As you progress to the finer grits, take
very light cuts.
13. ALWAYS FINISH
WITH AN
ORBITAL SANDER
Don't expect a sanding machine to
give you a surface that's ready for apply-
ing a finish. Always finish the sanding
sequence with an orbital or random-orbit
sander. It's best to back up one grit size
when you start your orbital sanding. So, if
you drum-sand to 180-grit, start your
orbital sanding at 150- or even 120-grit.
14. SKEW THE WORK
FOR BEST RESULTS
Feed the wood through the sander at an angle. This creates an
efficient shearing cut on the wood fibers that generates less heat
than a cut that's parallel with the grain. Less heat means less belt
loading, and that means less burning on your wood or melting of
glue lines.
A 30-degree angle gives the best shearing cut. If the work is too
wide to skew 30 degrees, do what you can; any amount of skew is
better than no skew. Finish with one or two straight-line passes
with your final grit to eliminate any cross grain scratches.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 47
15. SAND Box SIDES
Drum sanders work great for sanding assembled boxes
and drawer sides. People pay a lot of attention to the width
of their machines, but often ignore the depth capacities. In
general, wider machines have larger depth capacities.
16. HOLD THE GAP
When you install a belt, it's important to leave a gap in the
take-up slot at the end, of the drum. The take-up pincher
inside the drum is spring-loaded, so it's always pulling on the
end of the belt. The gap allows the belt to be pulled further
into the drum as it stretches during use. This keeps the belt
tight on the drum. Failure to provide this gap Jocks the belt in
place and renders the take-up pincher ineffective. It's OK to
leave a slight gap or no gap where the belt winds around the
rest of the drum.
48 American Woodworker MAY 2008
17. SAVE YOUR
FINGERPRINTS
Avoid skin abrasions by wearing leather
gloves whenever you handle the abrasives. I
learned this lesson when I first started using a
drum sander. At the end of a job that required
several belt changes, my fingertips were really
sore. On closer inspection I saw that my finger-
prints had been completely abraded away.
A pair of tight fitting leather gloves really
does the trick.
18. JOINT WIDE BOARDS
Use a drum sander to joint boards that are too wide for
your jointer. Unlike a planer, some drum sanders (typical-
ly ones with adjustable pressure rollers) exert very little
downward pressure on the board. That allows them to
take the cup or crown out of a board (Photo A) without a
sled or support. Take light cuts and run the board concave
side down.
If your board has a severe twist (Photo B) use some
hot melt glue to attach skids to keep the board from rock-
ing as it passes through the sander. Once one side is
planed flat, knock off the skids and plane the other side.
HERE ARE SOME OTHER
DUST COLLECTION TIPS:
• Ground your machine to a plumbing run
or a ground screw on an outlet. Sanders
can generate a lot of static electricity that
cause the sanding dust to cling to the
machine and hamper collection.
• Be sure to use at least a 2-micron filter on
your dust collector. Many single stage
collectors come with dust spewing 35-
micron bags.
• Use the least amount of flex-hose possi-
ble for more efficient airflow.
Thanks to Warren Weber of
SuperMax Tools for lending us his
expertise in all things drum sanding.
19. SURFACE FIGURED WOOD
WITHOUT TEAROUT
Run a bookmatched, quartersawn oak panel through your
planer and I can guarantee you'll be dismayed at the nasty
tearout. Try the same thing on a drum sander - perfect
results. You just can't beat a drum sander when it comes to
surfacing figured wood. It does a great job no matter which
way the grain runs.-
20. DECIPHER THE BACK'S
ALPHABET SOUP
It's best to know what you're buying. Most of us
are familiar with the grit number on the back of an
abrasive, but what about all those other numbers
and letters? Manufacturers use proprietary codes
on the back of their abrasives. Some of the codes
can be cracked by visiting their website. For the
Klingspor belts in the photo at left, for exam-
ple, I went to www.klingspor.com/prod-
ucts/MtlAvail.html and found that the CS311
belt is a Y-weight polyester-backed belt, open
coat, resin bond, with aluminum oxide abra-
sive, and is available in 36P- to 180P- grit
sizes.
The CS411 belt is an X-weight cloth-
backed belt with a resin bond and a longer
lasting alumina zirconia abrasive, available
in 24P- to 120P-grit sizes. There's lots
more info on Klingspor's website and on
other manufacturer's websites as well.
21. SAND MULTIPLES
To A UNIFORM SIZE
Drum sanders excel at surfacing to a precise dimension. Face
frame parts can be clamped together and sanded at once. The drum
sander removes all the saw marks and leaves you with parts that are
exactly equal in width.
American Woodworker MAY 200849
The SBI3's dual contour/flat-sand-
ing capability is popular with small shops
that specialize in products such as
moldings, picture frames and musical
instruments
A variable speed lever lets you set the
brush speed from 400 rpm to 1200 rpm.
Variable brush speed combined with variable
conveyor speed allows the operator to set the
optimum brush strokes-per-inch for the task
at hand. The SBI3 is equipped with a 1-3/4-
hp motor that runs on a standard 20-amp,
I20-volt circuit.
Like its larger SuperBrush stablemates,
the SBI3 can be equipped with a number of
different brush heads. The heads most com-
monly used for woodworking include a flat-
ter-style head (Photo 2), an abrasive-impreg-
nated nylon brush head (Photo 3) and a
wire brush head (Photo 4).
Do-It-All
Combo
Brush and
Drum Sander
2
A flatter-style brush
. head has strips of
serrated sandpaper
backed by bristle
brushes. This
brush excels at
sanding profile
or contoured
wood surfaces like
moldings, or frame
and panel doors. The
brush is available with 50-grit
to 400-grit abrasives.
B
rush sanders excel at sanding con-
toured or profiled wood, such as mold-
ings. SuperMax's new I3-in. SuperBrush
(SBI3) has a truly unique feature: an accesso-
ry drum sander head (Photo 1) that allows
you to flat-sand boards, panels and veneers.
The sanding drum is easy to exchange it with
any other head. Just remove four bolts and
the head lifts right out.
3
An abrasive-impregnat-
ed nylon bristle
brush is primarily used to
scuff sand sealer coats on
moldings. This brush practical-
ly eliminates the need for time-
consuming hand-sanding between
coats.
1
The ability to mount
a drum sander
head in the l\
5813 sets it
apart from other
brush sanders.
4
The wire brush head is
used to distress wood
surfaces. It can make new
wood look like weathered
barn wood or like the
boards used in 50uthwest-
style furniture.
Source
SuperMax Tools
(888) 454-3401, www.supermaxtools.com.
SuperBrush 13, SB13, (Includes Nylon Or Wire Brush
Head), $3500;
Flatter-style Brush Head $1100;
Wire or Nylon Brush Head $800;
Drum Sander Head $500.
50 American Woodworker MAY 2008
FREE SHIPPING1 EVERY PRODUCT, EVERY DAY.
SALE PRICE
S45
95
ORDER ITEM#lf63
PLUS:
FREE!
ROUTER
COLLET
EXTENSION
1/2 collet for
1/2" shank bits
• Miter Gauge Included:
Has positive stops at 90°
and 45°, held by a3/4"
wide x318" deep T-slot
Standard &. X-Large
Coping Safety Sleds
Perfect for cross-grain rail cuts
l
No need to make the
router table fence and mitre slot parallel. A500 lb. hold-
ing clamp (XL Sled has two) and special abrasive strip
holds material secure. Glide
the PVC sled along router
fence and cut into the
replaceable backer
block to reduce
tearout. Standard Sled is
4-3/4" x ll-I/2" x3/8".
The XL Sled holds stock
up to 6-1/4"
wide and
measures 9-1/2"
x 18-3/8" x 3/8".
"HEAVYWEIGHT" Router Table &. Fence
WITH FREE COLLET EXTENSION!
At 120 Ibs, this is a BIG boy!
• Large, heavy-duty CAST-IRON top:
(almost 100 lbs.) machined fiat with
lots of work space (26-7/8" x 20")
and removable rings to
allow 3different size
openings (I-1I8",
2-114",3-5/8"). The
cast iron top eliminates
vibration, making the
Heavyweight Table
perfect for your heavy
/ duty 3 HP router.
• Universal Clamping
System: Holds any
router (up to 3-1/2 HP)
without drilling
• Tilt-up Access: Allows
easy access to router
for adjustments
• Power Switch: Conveniently mounted
on front leg with built-in safety key
• Split Fence: Adjustable extruded alumi-
num fence with large 4" dust extraction
port and convenient hold downs
• Sturdy Stand: Splayed steel legs for
extra stability
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Circle No. 22
-
Natural Bench
How To MAKE STRONG JOINTS IN SLABWOOD
When I need wood for a project, my first stop is a small
mill near my shop that specializes in local hardwoods. On
one particular visit I noticed a pile of offcuts sitting out in
the rain. As I pawed through the pile, a slab of white oak
caught my eye. The sawn surface was wet and the grain just
popped. The bark was almost completely gone on the flip
side, leaving a smooth, natural surface that was miraculous-
ly free of damage from chainsaws and harvesting equip-
ment. Turns out the slabs were free for the taking so I took
several slabs back to my shop to dry.
For months I kept wondering what to make with the
slabs. Other than a few wormholes, the grain and natural
edge were quite interesting. The undulating line where the
flatsawn surface met the natural edge of the log intrigued
me. From some angles, the plank's thickness was almost
invisible. Eventually, I decided a bench would be the best
way to retain the natural look of the slab and highlight its
best features. The slab's 14-in. width was wide enough to
provide sufficient stability, and at over 1-1/2-in. thick, it was
52 American Woodworker MAY 2008
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plenty strong. That inherent strength and a unique joint I
came up with allowed me to eliminate the typical stretcher
between the legs and help keep the design as clean and nat-
ural looking as possible.
I still had to figure out how to orient the legs to the slab.
I chose to turn the natural sides of the legs inward. That
kept all of the natural surfaces facing one another.
Leg position was another big decision. I once had a bad
experience with a cantilevered bench like this. There were
three of us on a bench, two got up and guess who ended up
on the floor? The lesson was that there are limits to how far
you can safely cantilever a bench seat. I wanted to avoid the
"teeter-totter" effect I fell victim to. I'm sure there's a for-
mula somewhere for finding the point of stability, but I'm
no engineer, so I used trial and error. I adjusted the legs on
a prototype bench and made some test sittings until I found
a point where the legs were offset enough to look visually
pleasing without making the bench tippy or unstable.
1
The first step is to create a smooth, flat surface on
the roughsawn face of the log. I used a hand plane
and power sanders.
2
Saw the legs from the plank. Then fine-tune the
cuts until each leg stands on its own at 90 degrees.
3
A flap sander quickly removes oxidation and loose
debris from the slab's bark side. Don't try for a per-
fect surface. Just sand smooth to about lBO-grit.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 53
PREP THE SLAB
The first step is to flatten and smooth the sawn face of the
slab (Photo 1). You can use a hand plane to remove milling
marks and any twist or warp. If there's a lot of material to
remove, a handheld power plane is easier. Sand to ISO-grit,
using a random orbit sander. This provides a flat reference
surface and establishes the plank's final thickness.
The next step is to cut the legs off the slab. I turn the
plank flat side down on my radial arm saw to make the cuts.
Due to the curvature of the log's edge you'll have to
approximate a square cut. This first cut doesn't need to be
perfect. Once the legs are removed, fine-tune the cut until
each leg stands square (Photo 2). Next, make a 20-degree
angle cut on either end of the seat blank (Fig. A). If you
don't own a radial arm saw, you can make all these with a
circular saw or jigsaw and a straightedge.
Lightly sand the bark side of the slabs by hand with 100-
grit sandpaper. Sand just enough to remove the oxidation
on the surface and smooth any rough edges. Sand up to
about ISO-grit. Then switch to a flap sander chucked in an
electric drill (Photo 3).
CUT THE JOINTS
Cutting a stepped mortise III a natural edge sounds
daunting. I found a pretty easy way to get the job done
using a simple router jig and some chisels. First, build a sim-
ple jig to bridge the width of the seat plank and provide a
level platform for your router to ride on (Photo 4). Then
layout the location of the legs on the plank with a paper
pattern of the leg's top (Photo 5). Set the jig to remove
most of the wood in the first step of the mortise (Photo 6).
Stop routing short of the natural edge of the mortise and
use a chisel to pare to the pencil line.
Next, tap the leg into the mortise until it bottoms out.
Then calculate how deep the notch must be to bring the
outside edges of the leg flush with the top of the seat
I
I APROX.1/2
i TOTAL LEG
~
APROX.1/2
TOTAL BENCH
THICKNESS
FIGURE A
JOINERY
6
Rout the center portion of the mortise with a top-
bearing flush-trim bit. The stepped ends of the mor-
tise will be finished later. Use the edge of the bridge to
guide the bit along the mortise's straightedge. Move
the bridge slightly to rout the rest of the mortise.
4
BUild a bridge over the seat to rout the mortises.
The bridge acts as a straightedge to guide the cut
and a platform to support the router.
54 American Woodworker MAY 2008
7
The next step in fitting the joint is to cut a corresponding
notch in the leg. With the leg set in the mortise; mark the
notch's length. Then determine the notch's depth by measuring
the gap between the leg and the curved surface.
(Photo 7).
A crosscut sled on a tablesaw
works well to cut the notch (Photo
8). By tapping the leg into the seat
plank once again, you can see where
to begin the second and third steps
of the mortise. Use a chisel to chop
the steps in the seat plank. Return to
the tablesaw and sled to finish the
notches in the leg.
ATTACH THE LEGS
Layout and drill holes in the mortises for the 3/4-in.
dowels. Insert dowel c e n t e ~ s in the holes and tap the leg in
place (inset Photo 9). The centers transfer the hole loca-
tions to the top of the leg. Drill dowel holes in the legs and
the joint is ready to assemble (Photo 9).
Use epoxy to glue the bench together. Epoxy is gap-fill-
ing and slow-setting, perfect for a glue-up like this. First,
glue the dowels into the legs, then the legs in the seat. Tap
the legs in place with a mallet until they bottom out.
Carefully rotate the bench upright and use two cauls and
four clamps to apply clamp pressure (Photo 10). Allow the
epoxy to dry overnight.
Finish sanding the flat portions of the bench to about
220-grit.Apply your favorite finish. I used four coats of Sam
Maloof's Poly/Oil Finish on the flat surfaces to give these
surfaces a satin finish. I used one coat of paste wax on the
natural surfaces to give them a flat finish.
Greg Wood has been a custom studio furniture builder in
Howard Lake, MN for fifteen years. Some of Greg's work
can be viewed on his website, gregwoodfurniture.com, and
at Xylos Gallery in Minneapolis, MN.
8
Cut the stepped notch at the top of each leg using a
tablesaw sled. Secure the leg to the fence with
clamps and wedges. Use your marks to position the
leg and set blade height.
9
Use dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to
the leg. Drill the dowel holes in the leg and glue
them in. Now you're ready for the final glue-up.
1O
GIUe the bench together on a flat surface, so it
sits properly. Use cauls to transfer light clamping
pressure.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 55
56 American Woodworker
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W
e needed a new mailbox, but I couldn't find an
off-the-shelf version that I liked. So I decided to
build my own. AB I've always admired the work of Greene
and Greene, the architect brothers who fused ABian design
with Arts and Crafts style during the early 20th century, I
thought it would be cool to include some of their signature
elements in my mailbox: Pronounced joints with heavily
rounded edges create the structure, stepped profiles accen-
tuate the lid, and faceted pegs add visual interest and over-
all balance. The pegs also hide the screws used to assemble
the box.
I built my box of mahogany-a favorite of the brothers
Greene and a wood perfectly suited for exterior use. White
oak, cyprus or cedar would also be good choices. You'll
need 7 bd. ft. of 4/4 stock; plan to spend about $50. Finish
your box with exterior oil as I did, or leave it unfinished.
Unfinished mahogany turns silver-grey when it's exposed to
the elements.
EXTENDED Box JOINTS
The joints may look exotic, but they're really just box
joints with extended, rounded-over fingers (Fig. A, page
60). The inside corners of the sockets are also rounded, so
they nest perfectly with the rounded fingers. These joints
are easy to make with a router and a router table. You'll
need two templates, a I/4-in. roundover bit and a I/2-in.
flush-trim bit with the bealing mounted above the cutting
flutes (also called a pattern bit, see Sources, page 59).
1. Make both templates from I/2-in. MDF (Fig. B). One
template is used for the back and front pieces (Parts A and
B, Fig. A). The other template is used for the sides (C). The
fingers and sockets on these templates must fit together
snugly. I cut my templates on the bandsaw, using the miter
gauge and the fence to assure straight cuts.
2. Cut the front and back pieces to final dimensions.
Then use ,the front/back template to layout the fingers and
sockets.
3. Cut out the waste between the fingers, using the band-
saw (Photo 1). Don't cut too far into the corners-remem-
ber, they'll be rounded to fit the fingers.
4. Fasten the template with screws or double-faced tape.
If you use screws, mount the templates on the inside face of
each piece, so the holes won't show on your completed
mailbox. Rout the sockets with a I/2-in.-dia. flush-trim bit
(Photo 2). This leaves a I/4-in. radius on the inside cor-
ners. Later, the fmgers will be rounded over at the same
radius, so they'll fit perfectly.
5. Cut the sides to final dimension. Use your I2-in. miter
saw with the blade swiveled 6 degrees to cut the angled
fronts. Attach a stop block to make sure both side pieces are
identically cut. Ifyou don't have a large miter saw, you could
use a bandsaw to make these cuts and gang the pieces
together to sand the edges smooth.
6. Mark, rough-saw and rout fingers and sockets on the
side pieces. Carefully position the template to mark the
1
Start by marking and rough-sawing the sockets. Their inside
corners will be radiused by routing in a later step, so leave
sufficient material.
2
Rout the fingers and sockets using templates and a flush-
trim bit. This template creates fingers at the top and bot-
tom of the front and back pieces. The fingers and sockets are
reversed on the template used to rout the side pieces (below).
3
Carefully position the template on the sides' angled front
edges. The template's fingers and bottom corner must both
be flush.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 57
4
Cut stopped square holes in all the fingers with your mor-
tiser. To assure that the holes are precisely centered, use a
clamped-on indexing block to position the workpiece.
5
Round the fingers and sockets on a router table. First, hold
the piece on edge and rout clockwise around each finger.
Then lay the piece flat and rout full length on both faces.
6
Cut the top of each side piec'e at a 45-degree angle for the
sloping lid. Leave a 3/4-in.-wide flat section on the top.
Clamp on a stop block to assure both pieces are identical.
58 American Woodworker MAY 2008
front fingers (Photo 3). Before you rout these narrow
pieces, add a board of equal behind, to fully sup-
port the template.
7. Cut stopped square holes in all the fingers (Photo 4).
Make sure to cut the holes on opposite faces of the two
sides; otherwise you'll have a pair of left (or right) sides.
8. Drill holes for the screws through the stopped
mortises.
9. Round the fingers and sockets with a 1/4-in.-rad.
roundover bit (Photo 5). When you round the ends of the
fingers, rout clockwise and make several shallow passes, to
minimize tear out.
10. Dry-fit the front, back and sides to check the fit of the
fingers and sockets.
COMPLETE THE Box
11. Cut the sides at a 45-de,gree angle to accommodate
the lid (Photo 6). Use a stop block to guarantee identical
parts.
12. Rout end-to-end grooves in the sides and stopped
grooves in the front and back pieces for the bottom. Cut the
bottom (D) to final dimension, rout a rabbet all around and
drill drainage holes. Dry-fit the box with the bottom
installed, to make sure it fits.
13. Disassemble the box for sanding. Sand the flat sur-
faces up to 220-grit with a random orbit sander. Soften the
rounded-over edges and ends of the fingers and sockets by
hand sanding, so they look organic, r.ather than machined.
14. Assemble the box (Photo 7). Drill pilot holes to make
sure the screws don't break or split the wood. Remember to
install the bottom before you fasten the last piece.
MAKE AND INSTALL THE PEGS
15. Rip a 2-f1. length of 1/4-in. by 1/4-in. stock.
16. Shape the end to form a pyramid with slightly round-
ed sides and a dulled point, by rubbing it on 220-grit sand-
paper adhered to your bench. Use a handsaw to cut each
peg to length. The pegs must be slightly shorter than the
mortises, so they don't bottom out.
17. Add a bit of waterproof glue when you insert each
peg. Then tap it lightly in place (Photo 8). Immediately
remove any squeezed-out glue.
MAKE THE Top AND LID
18. For a good grain match, make the top (E) and lid (F)
from the piece of wood. Rip the top at a 22-1/2-
degree angle. Turn the remaining piece over and adjust the
fence on the tablesaw to cut the lid.
19. Using the tablesaw, cut a centered 1/4-in. by 1-5/16-
in. groove in the front edge of the lid. To make a centered
cut, set the blade 3/16-in. from the fence and make two
passes-rotate the lid 180 degrees to make the second pass.
20. Shape the ends of the top and lid on the router table,
using the 1/4-in.-rad. bit. Be careful not to let
the bearing disengage when you reach the bevels.
21. Rout mortises for the hinges (see Sources, page 59).
The hinges must be positioned slightly lower than normal-
with the barrels partially hidden-so the hinge screws won't
break through the angled lid. The mortises are deeper than
the hinge leaf thickness" to minimize the gap between the
top and lid. You can hand-chop the mortises, or remove
most of the material with a straight bit chucked in a lami-
nate trimmer, and then clean up the corners with a chisel.
22. Install the hinges, so you can check the gap and their
operation. Brass screws break easily, so drill pilot holes
before installing them. Remove the hinges for the next step.
23. Mark the handle profile onto the lid (Fig. D). This
stepped profile, with its elongated S-shaped curves, is com-
monly called a "cloud lift." Cut the profile on the bandsaw
and smooth the faces by sanding.
24. Plane the spline blank(G) to fit the groove you've cut
in the lid.
25. Install the spline and transfer the cloud lift profile,
using a washer with a liS-in. rim to create the 3/I6-in. lip
(Photo 9).
26. Remove the spline, cut the profile on the bandsaw
and sand the sawn edge smooth. Install the spline to make
sure the profiles are complementary. Then remove the
spline again, for final shaping.
27. Round over both edges of the lid's cloud lift profile
on the router table, with the I/4-in.-rad. roundover bit low-
ered I/I6-in. During this process, the bit's bearing will ride
the edge on the opposite side of the groove.
2S. Create a half-round edge on the spline's cloud lift
profile by sanding or filing, or both.
29. Glue in the spline, using clamps to make sure it seats
completely in the groove.
30. Mark and mortise stopped square holes on the lid
and top and drill shank holes for screws (in the top, only).
31. Attach the hinges. Center the top/lid assembly on the.
box and fasten it with screws. Sand the edges of the top and
lid while they're attached, to smooth the transition between
the two parts. Then remove the lid for final sanding.
32. Install the remaining pegs: two in the top and three
. in the lid.
FINAL DETAILS
33. Apply an exterior grade finish to accentuate the
wood's color. Exterior oil finishes are easy to apply, but they
must be renewed annually. Spar varnish lasts longer, but it
takes longer to apply and must be removed and replaced if
it's allowed to deteriorate.
34. Re-attach the lid when the finish is dry.
35. The top and fingers extend beyond the back of the
box, so install spacers (J) to facilitate mounting it. Drill
mounting holes through the back and the top spacer. Then
mount the mailbox with fasteners appropriate for the exte-
rjor walls of your house.
Sources
Rockier, www.rockler.com. (800) 279-4441, Roundover Bit with Bearing,
, 1(4"radius, 1(2" shank, #91309, $20; Pattern Flush Trim Router Bit, 1(2"
diameter, 1" flute length, 1(4" Shank, #80021, $19.
Woodcraft, wwwwoodcraft.com, (800) 225-1153, Drawn Brass Broad
Cabinet Hinges, 2" x 1-1(8", #16032, $13.
Brass wood screws are available at hardware stores and home centers.
7
Assemble the box one corner at a time. Square the joint
and clamp the parts firmly. A squarely-milled 4x4 makes
this easy. Pre-drill, then install the screws.
8
Set the pegs with the tap of a hammer. Use a washer to
guarantee they protrude uniformly.
9
Use a washer to create a complementary profile when you
trace the lid's handle onto the spline blank. The groove for
the spline was cut in the lid earlier, before the handle profile
was sawn.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 59
FIGURE A EXPLODED VIEW
CUTTING LIST Overall Dimensions: 6" Dx 11-1/2" Hx 15" W
I
10-1/2"
1
22-112°:
1/4" x
1-5/16"
DADO
114" ROUNDOVER
(TYPo)
2 3/8" x 1-1/2" x 10"
2 5/8" x 10-1/2" x 5-1/2"
1 1/2" x 3-1/8" x 13"
1 5/8" x 2" x 15"
1 5/8" x 10-1/2" x 14-1/2"
1 5/8" x7-1/2" x14-1/2"
1 1/4" x 1-1/2" x 15-1/4"
1 5/8" x5-7/8" x 15"
21 1/4" x 1/4" x 1/4"
at 0 Dimensions
FIGURE B ROUTING TEMPLATES
F
c
J
E
H
D
B
G
A
15" ------------
Part
1/4" x 5/16" D
GROOVE (TYP.)
4·7/8"
, ,
.. .... _.. _.... _.. .... _, .. .,_..,...._.,..,. .. .. __ __.. _.. _.,.J::::::;:::::::L-, ..
FIGURE D LID DIMENSIONS
11-1/2" I 2"
3/32" x 9/16" x 2"
MORTISE (TYPo)
o
F

G EDGE
11116"
#4 x 1"
Iil"I BRASS F.H.
liU SCREW (TYPo)

,
I
114" x 114"
TONGUE
22-112° I
BEVELS:
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FIGURE C SIDE DIMENSIONS
I 5-112" I
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60 American Woodworker MAY 2008
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ACKTOOLS
Circle No. 154
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EXPERT CRAFTSMAN
TOM DONAHEY SHARES HIS
PLANS FOR AN ESSENTIAL TOOL
TO WORK GREEN WOOD.
by Tom Caspar
Few woodworking experiences are as sweet as working wood that's
just been split from a recently felled tree. Green wood is much easier
to shape with hand tools than wood that's been dried. It has a pungent
odor and soft texture that make it all the more pleasurable to handle.
Simple utilitarian items, such as chairs, benches, rakes and so on, have
long been made from green wood. All you need are a few basic tools
and one essential device for holding the work: a shaving horse.
I've always wanted to build a shaving horse. When I started thinking
about how to make one I turned to Drew Langsner, an expert in green
woodworking (that's Drew, at left). Drew has been an inspiring instruc-
tor of the craft for over thirty years, and runs Country Workshops, a
school in North Carolina (see Country Workshops, page 66). Drew
introduced me to Tom Donahey, who makes shaving horses for stu-
dents at the school and also sells them on the school's website.
Tom has created an elegant design. "When I got into green wood-
working, I already had a shaving horse," Tom said. "It was the old style,
big and clunky. I took a class from Brian Boggs, the well-known chair-
maker from Berea, Kentucky, and he had brought along his own shav-
ing horse. It was much better than mine. With Brian's permission, I
took photos of that horse, went home, and studied its construction."
Brian had developed a new feature: an adjustable, ratcheting work
support (see photo at right). Drew suggested a futher change: use a
treadle instead of the traditional cross bar for applying foot pressure.
"It's much more comfortable," he said. Tom built a few horses, with
Brian's permission, and started refining the design. Over the years,
Tom has built more than 100 horses and streamlined their production.
Tom has graciously allowed us to publish his design.
How THIS SHAVING
HORSE WORKS
A shaving horse is a workbench, vise and
chair all rolled into one. It's plimarily used
to work green wood with a drawknife,
which cuts on the pull stroke, or a spoke-
shave, which you can push or pull. The
design of this shaving horse is rather unusu-
al, mixing traditional elements and modern
engineering. Here's how it works:
To set up the horse, place your'work-
piece on the work support. Then, raise the
work support up to the clampingjaw, which
is free to rotate. The work support will click
into one of eight different height positions,
to accommodate thick or thin work. It's
locked by a pivot that engages a series of
ratchets on the work support's column. To
clamp your workpiece, push the treadle for-
ward with your foot. This swings the lever
arms, squeezing the clamping jaw against
the workpiece.
All that sounds quite complicated, but this
shaving horse is as easy to operate as stepping
on the brake in your car. It only takes a few
seconds to release tlle clamping pressure on
a workpiece, reposition it, and go back to
making those glorious, huge curls.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 63
64 American Woodworker MAY 200B
1
All of the p ~ r t s
for this shav-
ing horse can be
cut from southern
yellow pine con-
struction lumber.
It's a durable,
strong wood
that's relatively
inexpensive, but
you could substi-
tute many other
hardwoods, such
as maple or oak.
2
Cut both back
legs from one
long blank. Adjust
your miter saw to a
15-15 compound
angle, then place
the blank to the left
of the blade and
cut the right end.
Slide the piece
over to cut the
middle, then cut
the left end.
3
Stand the
two back legs
together as a
mating pair, then
layout the same
cut on each leg,
going in oppo-
site directions.
4
Turn over the
legs and
bandsaw them.
This is a simple,
straight cut, with
the table set at
90 degrees. It
looks odd from
this angle
because the end
of the leg is a
compound miter.
CHOOSE YOUR WOOD
You can make this shaving horse out of any.
strong wood, such as oak, ash, hard maple or
Douglas fir. Tom Donahey uses southern yel-
low pine construction lumber because it's eco-
nomical, strong and relatively lightweight.
He's figured out a way to get virtually all the
parts of a shaving horse from one 10 ft.-long
2xl0 (Photo 1, left, and Fig. L, page 69). Tom
selects clear, straight-grained stock for maxi-
mum strength.
Southern yellow pine isn't his top choice
for the horse's ratcheting mechanism, howev-
er. These pieces take a lot of stress, so he uses
hard maple for the pivot piece (K) and
sycamore for the ratchet (F). Any wood that's
hard to split is suitable for these pieces,
though. A wood that's hard to dent, such as
maple or white oak, is preferable for the rotat-
ing jaw (L), which clamps down on a work-
piece.
You'll need a small amount of 3/4-in. Baltic
birch plywood for the work support (Q), seat
(R), treadle (S) and treadle cleat (T).
START WITH THE BACK LEGS
1. If you're making the horse from a 2xlO,
it into three pieces: 4 ft., 4 ft. and 2 ft. long
(Fig. L). As with any project, parts are easier
to mill andjoin if the wood is flat and straight.
If you use southern yellow pine construction
lumber, chances are that it's neither flat nor
straight. Run these pieces through a planer or
drum sander before making any further cuts.
It's OK if they end up less than 1-1/2-in.
thick, as specified in the cutting list (page 69),
as long as they're all the same thickness.
2. Layout and cut all the solid-wood pieces
to size. The back legs (C) require special
attention. It's a good idea to make a couple
practice ones first to get the hang of it. Make
both legs from one blank (Photo 2). On your
5
Glue the offcut onto the opposite side of
the leg it came from, and you're all set.
miter saw, tilt the blade to 15 degrees and
rotate the table to 15 degrees (Fig. D). Make
three cuts at this setting to obtain both legs.
3. Stand both of the legs together and orient
them so they make a matched pair (Photo 3).
In order to make the legs splay out and rake
back, you'll saw off a wedge-shaped piece from
one side of a leg and glue it back to the oppo-
site side. The cutting is easy-it's the layout
that's hard. Draw the wedge all around the left
leg, as shown in Fig. D, then draw the right leg
as a mirror image.
4. Saw the legs (Photo 4). It's fast using a
bandsaw, but you could also use a handsaw. If
you orient each leg so that its angled top end
leans forward, all you have to do to make the
cut using a bandsaw is to follow the one line on
the board's top edge. There's no need to tilt
the bandsaw table, even though the layout
lines seem to call for it. It's a 90-degree cut.
5. If the wedge-shaped cutoffs cup or distort,
sand them until they're flat. Glue the pieces to
the opposite sides of the legs they came from
(Photo 5). To prevent the pieces from slipping
when you clamp, nail some short brads into
one piece and clip off their heads near the sur-
face. Press the pieces together by hand, to
drive in the brads, before applying clamps.
DRILL HOLES
6. Temporarily screw the two rails (A)
together. If your stock is a full 1-1/2-in. thick,
plan on drilling shallow holes on both rails to
accommodate washers for the bolts that hold
on the front leg (B, Fig. B). Without these
holes, the bolts will be too short to fully thread
through the nuts (although you could use
longer bolts and skip the washer holes). Lay
out these washer holes on both rails and drill
them before drilling the smaller dia. bolt-holes
completely through the rails. If, after planing,
your stock is 1-3/8-in. thick or so, you can omit
the large dia. washer holes. Layout and drill all
the 1/2-in. holes for bolts and 5/8-in. holes
for dowels all the way through both rails
(Photo 6).
7. Separate the rails, then clamp each back
leg to the appropliate rail and drill through
the leg, using the holes in the rail as a guide
(Photo 7). Use the same method to drill holes
through the rear spacer (M) and front leg.
Temporarily assemble the horse and test the fit
of the backup bar (H) between the rails. Glue
the backup together (H, J, Fig. F), clamp it to
one rail, and drill the dowel holes through it.
Use a drill press to make the 3/8-in. bolt hole
6
The main
body of the
shaving horse
is composed of
two rails run-
ning side-by-
side.
Temporarily
screw these
boards togeth-
er, then drill
holes for the
leg-mounti ng
bolts and other
parts.
7
separate the
boards, then
use the holes as
guides. Drill
through the rails
and into the legs
to complete the
leg-mounting
holes. This horse
is easy to disas-
semble and store
when not in use,
as all the parts
just bolt together.
8
After attaching
the rear legs,
install the "back-
up" piece with
large dowels, but
no glue. This part
prevents the work
support from tip-
ping forward when
you apply clamp-
ing pressure.
g
lnstall a
wedge-shaped
pivot piece behind
the backup. It
rotates on a
dowel passing
through the rails;
an elastic cord
provides spring
tension, allowing
the pivot to click
into the ratchets
on the work sup-
port column.
Ame,ican Woodworker MAY 2008 65
Country Workshops
There's a special home for woodworkers nestled in the moun-
tains of Western North Carolina. Here, in a secluded hardwood
cove just off th\=l Appalachian Trail, master craftsman Drew
Langsner has offered intimate classes on working green wood
at his school, Country Workshops, since 1978. It's an inspiring
environment for woodworkers of all levels.
At Country Workshops, you'll find yourself splitting out proj-
ect parts from a recently felled oak log, sitting at a shaving
horse learning to use a drawknife and spokeshave, or crouching
in front of a hot steambox ready to pull out parts for bending.
Typical classes include ladderback chairmaking, making a post-
and-rung rocking chair (see the class photo, below, with instruc-
torTom Donahey), carving bowls and spoons, American
Windsor chairmaking, Japanese woodworking, and woodwork-
ing for women. For more information about class schedules and
tuition fees, visit www.countryworkshops.org.
66 American Woodworker MAY 2008
that passes through all three pieces of the
back-up.
8. Rout a 5116-in.-wide chamfer on all the
exposed edges of the rails and legs.
BEGIN ASSEMBLY
9. Support the rails with boxes or blocks
and assemble the rear end of the horse.
Install the backup (Photo 8). Note that it's
not glued, so you may remove it later for
modifications, if necessary.
10. Make the pivot (K and Fig. E). It
should be 1/8-in. thinner than the front leg
and rear spacer, so it may swing freely. Drill
its hole using the drill press. The pivot is
spring-loaded with an elastic shock or
bungee cord so that it will automatically tip
forward into the ratchets (Photo 9). Attach
a 6-in.-long cord halfway up the pivot's front
face using a large electrician's staple. Place
the pivot between the rails and pound in the
dowel on which it rotates. Clamp the pivot
in a horizontal position. Grip the free end
of the cord and stretch it back underneath
the pivot an extra inch or so to some point
on the underside of one rail. Mark the
point, then release the cord and remove the
dowel and pivot. Fasten the other end of the
cord to the rail, then re-install the pivot.
Make sure the pivot rotates easily; you may
have to sand the middle of its dowel to
achieve the proper fit.
MAKE THE LEVER ARMS
11. Drill holes in the levers (D) and notch
their bottom ends to receive the treadle sup-
port (N). Chamfer all four sides of both
levers. Note that the distance between the
levers is about 1/4-in. greater than the width
of the horse's body, so the levers are free to
swing without binding. In addition, note
that the length of the rotating jaw is about
I / ~ i n . shorter than the distance between
the levers, so it, too, is free to'swing. Glue a
piece of thick leather to' one side of the
rotating jaw to help it grip a workpiece. The
rotating jaw may be placed in one of three
positions; install it in the upper position for
now. You may move it later, as needed, with-
out taking the horse apart. The treadle (S)
slides in between the treadle support (N)
and the treadle cleats (T). To fasten the
treadle in place, just use a loose-fitting
duplex head nail in a pre-drilled hole or a
screw (Fig. A). This arrangement makes the
treadle easy to remove.
12. Bolt together the lever arm assembly.
There are two washers that act as spacers
between the lever arms and the backup. To
install these washers, tape them to the inside
faces of the lever arm assembly. Slide the
assembly over the horse's front end (Photo
10). Install the bolt through the levers and
backup, then remove the tape. Bolt on the
horse's front leg.
BUILD THE WORK SUPPORT
13. Glue together the ratchet bar (E) and
ratchet (F). Plane them 1116 to 1I8-in. thin-
ner than the space between the horse's rails.
Test the fit of this assembly between the
horse's rails. It should easily slide up and
down. Layout the ratchets (Fig. G) and cut
them on the bandsaw (Photo 11).
14. Screw and glue the ratchet cheeks (G)
to the ratchet bar. Glue and screw the lower
part of the work support to this assembly.
Saw a v-shaped notch in the upper half of
the work support, then glue and screw it to
the lower half. The notch will help hold
rounded workpieces.
15. To install the work support, tilt the
lever arm assembly forward. Push down on
the pivot's back end and slide the support
down between the horse's rails (Photo 12).
When you release the pivot, it will spring
into one of the ratchets and secure the work
support in position.
ADD THE SEAT
16. Build the seat using plywood, foam
rubber and leather or other durable uphol-
stery material. Make the c l e ~ t (P) 1/16-in.
thinner than the distance between the rails,
so the seat is free to slide back and forth.
You're ready to make shavings!
DESIGN ALTERNATIVES
These plans are easy to modify to suit
your needs or style of work. The seat is
about 20-in. high, so you may want to
change the length of the legs ifyou're tall or
short.
Tom Donahey' uses bolts and dowels to
fasten together the major parts of the horse,
which allows the user to take it apart for
storage, transportation, modification or
maintenance. Alternatively, you could glue
the parts together for a classier look, but
that would limit your options for making
modifications.
1O
Install
the
lever-arm
assembly. It
swings on a
bolt that pass-
es through the
backup piece.
There's a wash-
er between
each lever arm
and the back-
up, so the arms
will swing free.
Tape these
washers in
place before-
11
Saw ratch-
ets on the
column that
holds the work
support. It's
made from two
pieces glued
together. Use a
hardwood that's
hard to split, such
as sycamore or
hard maple, for
the piece that
receives the
ratchets.
12
Assemble
the work
support, then
install it by tipping
back the spring-
loaded pivot piece.
13
when all is
assembled,
add the seat. It's
not fastened
down, but slides
between the
horse's rails. This
way, you can easi-
ly adjust the seat's
position to a com-
fortable distance
from your work-
piece.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 67
SELF-
LOCKING
NUT (TYP.)
5/16" J
CHAMFER
(TYP.)
DUPLEX
HEAD NAIL
A
1/2" x 5"
MACHINE
BOLT (TYP.)
5/16" x 3·1/2"

(TYP.)
3/4" DENSE
FOAM RUBBER
5/8" x 4-3/8" ,/
DOWEL
3/8" x
MACHINE
BOLT (TYP.)
FIGURE A EXPLODED VIEW
1-1/4" DIA. COUNTERBORE,
1/8" DEEP (TYP.) ////
......... ',... '
FIGURE B RAIL
1
-------18"'-------------1
, 17"
1---- 9-3/8"-----!
FIGURE C FRONT LEG
1) CUTTHETOP END
AT A 15°BEVEL
AND 15°MITER.
2) LAY OUT AND CUT
A WEDGE-SHAPED
PIECE.
3) GLUE THE PIECE
BACKONTHE
LEG'S OPPOSITE
SIDE.
c
20-1/4"
WASTE
FIGURE D BACK LEG
15°
B 22-1/2"
/"
"
2"
-$--
1-1/2"
-$--
-$-
11 "
FIGURE H LEVER
D
3ri'..-$--t------L
DIA.
(TYP.)
1-1I2"IINj
1/2" CHAMFER)
E
~
2-112" #8 F.H.
SCREW (TYP.)
FIGURE G WORK SUPPORT
H
FIGURE F BACKUP
FIGURE E PIVOT
1----- 6"-----1
5/8" DIA.
HOLES
FROM
RAIL
FIGURE J TREADLE FIGURE K SEAT
s
FIGURE L CUTIING DIAGRAM
24"
E
N
~ 0.",,11 0",,,",", 5< L, >TW,33'!TT
Part Name Otv. Th x W x L
Solid Wood
A Rail 2 1-1/2" x 5-1/2" x 48"
B Front leo 1 1-1/2" x 4" x 22-1/2"
C Back leo 2 1-1/2" x 4" x 20-1/4"
0 Lever 2 1-1/2" x 2-1/2" x 32"
E Ratchet bar 1 1-3/8" x 2-3/4" x 16"
F Ratchet 1 1-3/8" x 3/4" x 16" (a)
G Ratchet cheek 2 1-1/2" x 3-1/2" x 3-1/2"
H Backuo bar 1 1-1/2" x 2-1/2" x 8-1/2"
J Backup cheek 2 1-1/2" x 2-1/2" x 3"
K Pivot 1 1-3/8" x 3-1/2" x 6" (b)
L Rotating jaw 1 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 4-1/2" (cl
M Rear spacer 1 1-1/2" x 3-1/2" x 5-1/2"
N Treadle support 1 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 7-5/8"
P Seat cleat 1 1-7/16" x 1-3/4"x6"
Plvvvood
Q Work support 2 3/4" x 4-1/2" x 11-1/2"
R Seat 1 3/4" x 10" x 16"
S Treadle 1 3/4". x 9" x 12"
T Treadle cleat 2 3/4" x 2-1/2" x 3"
Hardware
Front leg bolts 2 1/2" x 5" with 2 SAE washers and a nut
Rear leo bolts 2 1/2" x 8" with 2 SAE washers and a nut
Lever arm and iaw bolts 2 3/8" x 8-1/2" with 4washers and a nut
Treadle support lag bolts 2 5/16" x 3-1/2" with 2washers
Backup and pivot dowels 3 5/8" x 4-3/8"
Shock cord 1 3/8" x 6"
B
(a) Hard maple or sycamore
(b) Hard maple
(c) Hard maple or white oak
American Woodworker MAY 2008 69
70 American Woodworker MAY 2008
Mission
ant
by Dave Munkittrick
H
ere's a great project for displaying house-
plants and adding a little charm to any cor-
ner of your house. The tripod leg design is rock-
steady, even on a tiled or uneven floor. The
wide bottom shelf can hold a large potted
plant and anchors tlle stand botl1 visually and
physically. The open top shelf can handle a vari-
ety of plant or pot shapes and sizes.
This stand is made witl1 riftsawn white oak.
The oak fits tl1e stand's quasi-Mission style and tl1e
straight riftsawn grain emphasizes the vertical thrust
of tl1e long tapered legs.
Don't let the angles scare you; tl1is stand is easy to
build. First glue up blanks for the top and bottom
shelf (A and B, Fig. A, page 71). Take care to keep
the joint flush during glue-up. Use a belt or orbital
sander to sand the blanks smooth. Cut tl1e leg
blanks (C) to size, but leave them rectangular for
now. Next, head to the tablesaw and cut the angled
dados on the leg blanks (Photos 1 and 2).
Note: The photos show a right-tilt saw. For a left-
tilt saw, the fence positions are just tl1e opposite.
Install a crosscut blade and cut tl1e 8-degree bevel
on tl1e bottom of each leg. Taper tl1e legs on tl1e
bandsaw (Photo 3). Then, head to tl1e router table
and rout a 22-1/2-degree chamfer around tl1e two
long inside edges and tl1e top of each leg. You'll
need to use tl1e fence for tl1is step instead of tl1e bit's
bearing, because of tl1e dados in tl1e legs.
Finally, layout and cut tl1e two shelves (Photo 4).
Assemble tl1e stand and pre-drill shank and pilot
holes for the screws. Secure witl1 panhead screws
and finish with polyuretl1ane varnish to protect the
stand from overzealous watering.
2
Move the fence over to the left side of the blade to cut the
top dado. Set the fence 1-1/2-in. from the blade for this cut.
4
Cut the tri;ngular shelves using a miter gauge set to 60-
degrees. Nip off the two small corners on a miter saw.
1
Cut the bottom dado with the blade tilted at 8-degrees
and the fence set at 7-in.
3
Taper the legs on a bandsaw. If you use a tapering jig,
remember to double the angle when you cut the second
taper. If you saw the tapers freehand, clean the edges with a
. hand plane or on the jointer.
14-9/16"
1
c
4-3/4"
,
,
4-
31
1"/\
, ,
,/ \\
l------ 5" =.....i
3 5" x 30-3/4" ,
1 8-1/4" x 12"
1 14-9/16" x 21-1/4"
21-1/4"
Overall Dimensions: 56"l x 17' Wx 33-1/2" T
Qt. ThxWxL
22-112
0
CHAMFER
--"'- ...
CUTTING LIST
B
c
A
Part
FIGURE A EXPLODED VIEW
FIGURE B
SHELF DIMENSIONS
~ ~ ­
l #6 x 1-112"
ROUND
HEAD
SCREW
American Woodworker MAY 2008 71
AMEmfAN
WOODWORKER.
Invites You to
Share Your Talent
You know the rewards and frustrations of designing, building
and finishing a project. Here's your chance to help others
build their skills. Tell us what you've learned and we'll put it
in print (some conditions apply). For more information on
submitting your stories for publication, email us at
stories@americanwoodworker.com.
Here's what we're looking for:
• WoodworkingTips, Tricks and Jigs
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Send us yours!
• Project andTechnique Stories
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Show it off in our Woodworkers' Showcase.
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Show others how you make things work
in a big or small space.
Visit www.americanwoodworker.com
for more great tips, techniques and
project stories. While there, sign up for our
FREE American Woodworker Extra e-newsletter.
BUll D YOU R SKill S by Phruba\\an
Multipurp·ose
Sliding
Fence
Tenons, Raised Panels,
Splines, NarrowRips,
Resawing-This Tablesaw
Fence Does It All!
TALL
(FENCE
:r:
u
<I:
co
a:
:r:
a
a:
'"
z
<I:
a:
LL
Z
a

a:
t;:;
:::J
--'
=!
The old saying, "necessity is the mother of inven-
tion" is certainly true when it comes to woodwork-
ing jigs and techniques. The "necessity" for my
multipurpose fence came in the form of a
humidor I recently built (see, "Asian Inspired
Humidor," AW #134, March, 2008, p. 76). I first
built the sliding tall fence to cut slots for the dec-
orative splines in that project. Then I added the
hold-downs to cut the raised panels for the humi-
dor lid. With a few more modifications, I was able
to use my new sliding fence to safely resaw padauk
& Spanish cedar used for the box liners.
The final result is the Multipurpose Sliding
Fence featured in this article. The fence acts like a
sled and safely holds the stock through the cut as it
slides along my saw's stock fence. For operations
requiring a fixed tall fence, like cutting grooves in
plywood edges, the multipurpose fence can be
locked down so it doesn't slide.
SIZING YOUR FENCE
The cut list gives specs for a tall fence that fits
over my Ryobi BT3100's existing fence. Since each
tablesaw is different, you must first determine the
proper dimensions for the sled parts (B and C, Fig.
A, p.75) based on your saw's fence. The sled fits
over the rip fence and needs to be as snug as possi-
1
Build the tall fence to fit over your tablesaw's fence.
The fit should be snug but still allow the fence to
slide easily.
2
AddT-nuts, knobs, and bolts to lock down the fence
when you make grooves or mount featherboards.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 73
Bl!JIED
ble yet slide smoothly. Keep in mind that the length of
the fence dictates the length of the stock you can resaw.
That said, a fence that is too long can be awkward to han-
dle. Play around with the length and shoot for a compro-
mise between capacity and ease of use on your saw.
BUILD THE BASIC FENCE
1. Determine the best dimensions for your fence and
cut the fence and sled pieces (A, B & C) accordingly.
Assemble the fence and give it a test ride (Photo 1). If
necessary, shim the fence so it is perfectly square with
the saw table.
2. Drill two holes on the backside of the sled side (B).
Install T-nuts (Photo' 2). I used a pair of shop-made
wood knobs with a carriage bolt glued through the cen-
ter for the locks.
3. Layout the 45-degree reference lines for the miter
spline fences on the face of the tall fence (Photo 3).
4. Cut two pieces of T-Track about 8-in. long and set
them into the face of the tall fence (Photo 4).
BUILD THE SPLlNE-
CUTTING CRADLE
5. Cut the sacrificial fences (H, J) and bases (K). The
back sacrificial fence is slightly longer so it almost
touches the tablesaw top. The shorter front fence is
held up above the tablesaw surface to allow for adjust-
ments to the saw blade and rip fence.
6. Attach the sacrificial fences to their bases with
screws only so the fences can easily be changed.
7. Temporarily secure the spline supports to the
fence with screws (Photo 5).
8. Mark the hole locations for the T-track knobs.
Remove the supports and drill holes for the knobs a bit
oversize. This will make it easier to adjust and remove the
supports.
9. Reinstall and align the supports on the 45-degree
marks. Drill holes for an alignment dowel (Photo 6).
10. Remove the supports and glue dowels into the
bases (Photo 7).
RESAW AND THIN STRIP
RIP ACCESSORY
11. Attach the resaw hold-down side (D) to the bot-
tom (E). Lay the hold-down across the tall fence and
mark the center of the T-track. Drill two slightly over-
sized holes on the side for th.e T-track knobs.
12. Cut the sacrificial piece (F) and drill counter bore
holes and through' pilot holes along its center for the
screws (Fig. A).
13. Attach the sacrificial piece to the bottom of the
hold-down base with brass screws. If your sawblade does
hit a screw - brass will be much more forgiving.
Note: Eventually, the sacrificial piece will get worn
out. You can remove it from the base and plane or rip it
74 American Woodworker MAY 2008
to get a fresb surface. This can be done several times
provided it leaves enough material to avoid cutting
into the brass screws.
14. Drawa red line on the side of the sacrificial fence
to indicate where the screw heads start (Photo 8).
15. Add the hold-down "heel" (G, and Photo 9).
Make sure the bottom of the heel is about 1/4-in. lower
than the bottom of the sacrificial piece. Also, ifyou use
solid wood, make sure the grain runs vertically.
3
To make the cradle for cutting spline slots, layout
45-degree reference lines on the fence. Use them to
position the stock supports.
4
Rout stopped dadoes in the face to house theT-
track. Use a chisel to square the ends.
5
Align the spline supports on the 45-degree refer-
ence lines on the fence. Temporarily secure them
with screws. Mark the hole locations for the T-track
knobs on each support's base, then remove the sup-
ports and drill the holes.
Sources
Rockier, www.rockler.com. (800) 279-4441, 2-Hold Down Clamps,
#21912, $6 each; 2-foot-long, 1/2-in.-deep Aluminum T-Track,
#21739, $8; 2- Five-Star Knobs 1/4"-20, #23804, $2 each; 2- 1/4"-20
T-Slot Bolts, #37295, $6 per pack of five; 1/4"-20 Teenuts, #26054,
$2 per pack of 8.
Part Name Qt Th x Wx L
A Tall fence 1 3/4" x10" x20" (Aj
B Sled side 1 3/4" x 2-7/8" x 20" (A)
C Sled to 1 3/4" x 1-9/16" x 20" (Aj
D Hold-down 1 3/4" x3" x 20"
side
E Hold down - 1 Ply 3/4" x 2" x20"
bottom
F Hold-down Scrap 1-1/2" x 2" x20"
sacrificial ieee
G Hold-down heel Sera 3/8" x 2" x2-1/4"
H Front miter Ply 3/4" x 2-1/4" x 12-1/2"
s line fence
J Rear miter Ply 3/4" x 2-1/4" x 13"
s line fence
K Miter spline 2 Ply 3/4" x 2" x 11-1/4"
base
(A) The actual dimensions should be adjusted to fit the size of
the tablesaw's depth and the rip fence.
E
F
3/8" x 1"
COUNTER
BORE

BRASS SCREW
FIGURE A
EXPLODED VIEW
FENCE
_ FACE
CUTTING LIST
BUILD YOUR SKILLS
Overall Oimensions: 20" W x 5" 0 x 10" H
6
Reattach miter spline supports along the 45-degree
lines using T-track bolts and knobs. Drill a hole for
an alignment dowel through the support's base and
halfway into the face of the tall fence.
8
The hold-down is used for ripping and resawing
small parts. Draw a warning line along the hold-
down's sacrificial base to indicate where the screws are
set in the counterbored holes below.
7
GIUe dowels into the alignment holes so they pro-
trude about 3/8-in. The dowels help to quickly align
the spline-cutting supports on the fence.
9
Add a sacrificial heel at the back of the hold-down.
The heel pushes the stock through the cut and pre-
vents kickbacks. If you use solid wood for the heel,
make sure the grain orientation is vertical, as shown.
American Woodworker- MAY 2008 75
BUILD YOUR SKILlS
USING THE SLIDING FENCE
Large panel stock can be clamped directly to
the tall fence. With small stock, clamps can't
always reach so it's best to use hold-downs
on the T-track.
. ~
Use the stock clamped onto the support to
adjust the blade height and fence position
for each cut.
Use a square to set the rear support at 90-
degrees. Then layout the tenon on your
stock and clamp it onto the support.
CUT TENONS
CUT RAISED PANELS
Set the saw's fence for the desired spline slot
position. Then set the blade height for the
desired slot depth.
To cut spline slots, first attach the spline sup-
ports. Slide the bolt in the T-track and insert
the dowel into the predrilled hole. Align the
fence to the guidelines on the face of the
fence and tighten the T-track knob.
~ .
~ ..
Clamp your project in the cradle created by
the two supports and you're ready to cut
spline slots.
CUT SPLINE SLOTS
76 American Woodworker MAY 2008
~ Non-Bleed Sprayguns
~ High-Efficiency Aircap
~ Exciting New Models
~ Standard or Quiet Turbines
~ Industrial-rated
BUILD YOUR SKILLS
THIN RIPS
To cut thin strips, set the saw fence for the
desired strip thickness. Set the blade a little high-
er than the stock to be cut. Note: Use 'a zero
clearance throat plate to prevent offcuts from
jamming between the blade and the throat plate.
. ~
STOCK
- ~
~ " ..
~
Attach the hold-down to the tall fence and
lower it onto your stock. Tighten the knobs
and you're ready to rip. Note:The stock
needs to be wider than the hold down so it
can be held against the fence as the cut is
made.
CUT DADOES/RABBETS
RESAW NARROW STOCK
The setup for resawing is identical to ripping
thin strips. If the stock is taller than your saw
blade, make one cut, then flip the board end
for end and cut again. Place a featherboard
in front of the blade, to hold the stock
against the multipurpose fence, and a zero-
clearance throat plate.
CUT GROOVES
To cut a groove on the edge of a long, wide
board, lock the tall fence to the rip fence.
Then, adjust the blade height and fence posi-
tion and start grooving. Use featherboards
for additional stability.
The tall fence can also be used as a base for vertical
featherboards. Use this setup to guarantee a uniform
depth on dadoes and rabbets. Simply clamp the tall
fence to the saw's fence and add two featherboards
using the same bolts and knobs as for the hold-
downs.
78 American Woodworker MAY 2008
RipsawAttachment lets you gang
rie with power feed in a fraction
of the time.
ADD OUR ROIlffR
STAnON AND SHAPf=-........
MULnpu SIDES PER PASSI
Add a Woodmaster Router Station to
your Woodmaster Molder/Planer and
you'll shape multiple sides of.your
workpiece with each pass.
cut T&G Aooring, paneling, and more!
Quick-Change Molding Head lets you
create custom molding from any stock.
Choose from over 500 patterns!
Power-Feed Drum Sander saves
hours of tedious hand sanding.
Speeds production, improves qualify.
Commercial-Duty Thickness Planer
features infinite{y variable feed rate. You
choose the right speed for your project.
• Shape multiple
sides per pass!
• Choose from
500+ PaHerns!
• RISK FRII
30-Day
rrial Offer!

Planes • Sands • Saws
Now, turn a $5.00 rough board into $75.00
worth of high-dollor molding in just minutes.
Moke over 500 standard patterns, curved
molding, tongue & groove, picture frame stock,
any custom design. QUICKLY CONVERTS from
Molder/Planer to Drum Sander or power-feed
Multi-Blade Ripsaw. Made in U.S.A. 5-Year Warranty.
Choose from 12", 1B" or 25" models.
Variable Feed Makes 'lte Differencel
Just a twist of the dial adjusts the Woodmaster from 70 to over 1,000 cuts
per inch. Produces a glass-smooth finish on tricky grain patterns no other planer
can handle. Plenty of American-made "muscle" to handle money-saving,
"straight-from-the-sawmill" lumber. Ideal for high-value curved molding.
"Our two families make a good living"
- Their business runs on 5 replaced i
ust
4 bearings,
Woodmaster Molder/Planers 4 springs, and 2 washers.
" That's it - they don't
My partner and I own 5 Woodmaster Planers. break If you have i
ust
the
One's set up for planing, one for curved Woodmaster and a table
molding, and the others for molding. saw, you could make a
do a lot of custo.m woodworkmg and living making molding.
mtllwork manufactUring. Our two families are
They don't break. making a good living."
Our 718 paid for itself in 3 months. We've run
over a million lineal feet through it and we've

WOOO\VORKER FREE PRODUCT INFORMATION
BITS, BLADES & CUTTING TOOLS
AMANA TOOL Amana Tool - Offers the broadest
range of industrial grade carbide cutting tools
in the industry. Immediate delivery of router bits,
spiral/CNC bits, saw blades, panel saw blades,
coring bits, shaper heads, etc. For more informa-
tion, call 800-445-0077 or visit www.amanatool.
com. Circle 2.
FEIN POWER TOOLS For over 130 years Fein
has researched and developed better solutions
to take the place of time consuming manual labor.
Superior quality is in every tool we make. For
more information, call 800-441-9878 or visit www.
feinus.com. Circle 47.
FREUD, INC. Freud Router Bits - This 84-page,
full-color catalog includes detailed information on
Freud's extensive selection of high quality router
bits and sets. For more information, call 800-334-
4107 or visit www.freudtools.com. Circle 12.
G&G INDUSTRIES, INC Saw-Jaw makes saw
blade changes more hassle-free than ever. It
securely holds blades while they are being
installed or removed. Available from many fine
dealers. For more information, call 800-998-2423
or visit www.saw-jaw.com. Circle 147.
SUFFOLK MACHINERY We manufacture Swed-
ish silicone steel low tension bandsaw blades. All
teeth are milled. Blades from 1/8" thru 2" wide. For
more information call, 800-234-7297 or visit www.
suffolkmachinery.com. Circle 160.
TIMBER WOLF BANDS Timber Wolf Saw Blades,
Low Tension, Swedish Silicon Steel, Available 1/8'
thru 2". For more information visit www.suffolkma-
chinery.com. Circle 173.
CATALOGS
GRIZZLY Free color catalog of over 12,000
woodworking and metalworking machines, tools
and accessories all at incredible prices! For more
information, call 800-523-4777 or visit www.griz·
zly.com. Circle 14.
JET EQUIPMENT ANDTOOLS JET family brands
Performax, Powermatic and JET machinery cata-
log provides complete information with available
accessories. Circle 17.
LEE VALLEY The Lee Valley Hardware catalog
features over 250 pages of cabinet hardware in a
wide variety of styles and finishes. The Lee Valley
and Veritas Woodworking Tools catalog provides
a large selection of quality and hard-to-find hand
tools, woodworking supplies and power tool ac-
cessories. For more information, call 800-871-8158
or visit WWW.leevalley.com. Circle 9.
LOWE'S WOODWORKERS FREE Membership in
Lowe's Woodworkers! Sign up and you'll receive
The Woodpost - seasonal newsletters via U.S.
Mail. project plans, advice from experts, and much
more. Go to www.lowes.com or www.ameriean-
woodworker.com to sign up! Circle 46.
M.L. CONDON CO. Handy catalog featuring full
color photographs of 40 woods, a complete list-
ing of available species and sizes, and selected
moulding profiles. Circle 171.
PACKARD WOODWORKS Specializes in prod-
ucts for Woodturners. Our 88-page catalog has
penmaking supplies, tools, books, videos and
much more. For more information call, 800-683-
8876 or visit www.packardwoodworks.com.
Circle 148.
RIKON POWER TOOLS FREE CATALOG Contact
RIKON Power Tools for a free catalog at catalogre-
quest@rikontools.com, 877-884-5167 or visit www.
rikontools.com. Circle 52.
GENERAL TOOLS AND INSTRUMENTS
POCK'IT JIG KITS for easy pocket hole joinery.
DOWL SIMP'L KITS for easy doweling joinery.
JOINT'R CLAMP KITS for jointerless joinery and
easy STRAIGHTLINE RIPPING of crooked boards.
Our credo: "Keep it simple, easy to use, low cost,
and WORKS EVERY TIME." Circle 44.
WOODCRAFT SUPPLY CO.RP. Our free catalog
features over 6,000 woodworking tools, books,
lumber, and hardware. Same day shipping and an
unconditional guarantee. Circle 165.
DUST COLLECTION
JDS COMPANY - AIR FILTRATION JDS offers
quality air filtration units for all size shops. Our
new, Model-ER, is equipped with an LCD remote
control with speed and timer functions - for larger
areas our Models 8-12, 10-16, and 2400 are avail-
able. "Put the Force to Work in Your Shop". Our
new 1.5 H.P. dust collector is the perfect addition
to our award winning line of filtration units - power-
ful (1250 CFM) portable and ready to work for you!
For more information, call 800-480-7269 or visit
www.thejdscompany.com. Circle 18.
ONEIDA AIR SYSTEMS Provides cost effec-
tive, state-of-the-art dust collection techhology ta
woodworking shops. We design and
industrial grade dust collection systems, 1.5 hp
to 20 hp and will provide an engineered ductwork
diagram along with a complete parts list- For more
information, visit www.oneida-air.com.lj:::!rcle 27.
PENN STATE INDUSTRIES Award-winning dust
collection. Air cleaners, dust collectors, cyclone
systems, hose, connectors, adapters, hoods,
remote switches, etc. 40-page free catalog. For
more information, call 800-377-7297 or visit www.
pennstateind.com. Circle 28
HANDTOOLS
BRIDGE CITYTOOLS WORKS Serving wood-
workers worldwide for over 24 years. Hand planes,
chisels, Japanese saws, squares and many more
essential tools for the serious woodworker. For
more information call 800-253-3332 or visit us at
www.bridgecitytools.com Circle 104.
COOKS SAW Get Into Wood! Increase profits by
cutting your own lumber with an Accu-Trac por-
table sawmill. Free catalog, demonstration video
also available. For more information, call 800-473-
4804 or visit www.cookssaw.com. Circle 114.
LEE VALLEY Our annual full-line Woodworking
Tools catalog, now over 250 pages, displays a
large selection of quality and hard-to-find hand
tools, woodworking supplies, and power tool ac-
cessories. For more information, call 800-871-8158
or visit www.leevalley.com. Circle 21.
LUMBER
GROFF & GROFF LUMBER Supplier of premium
grade domestic and imported lumbers. 4/4
through 16/4 thickness. Kiln dried. No orders too
large or too small. Shipping anywhere. For more
information call 800-342-0001 or email wood4u@
epix.net. Circle 125.
MISCELLANEOUS
HENRY REPEATING ARMS Affordable selection
of rifles from a legendary gun maker. Call for FREE
catalog: 718-499-5600 or visit www.henry-guns.
com. Write HRAC, Dept. AW, 110 8th St., Brooklyn,
NY 11215. Circle 42.
RECHARGEABLE BATTERY RECYCLING COR-
PORATION You can help protect our environment
by recycling the rechargeable batteries found in
your cordless power tools. To find a participating
drop-off location visit www.caIl2recycle.org or call
toll-free 877-2-RECYCLE. Circle 49.
VILLAGE ORIGINALS INC. U.S. distributor of
Seiko battery clock movements and all acces-
sories. For more information, call 800-899-1314 or
visit www.villageseiko.com. Circle 162.
ZOYSIA Want a better lawn? Start with great grass
- Zoysia Farm Nurseries, saving customers time,
work and money since 1952. For more informa-
tion call 410-756-2311 or visit www.zoysiafarms.
com/mag. Circle 48.
POWER TOOLS
CRAFTSMAN TOOLS Available at Sears and
Sears Hardware Stores; or call 800-377-7414 to
order your free copy of the "Craftsman Power and
Hand Tool" catalog. visit us on the web at www.
sears.com/craftsman. Circle 7.
DELTA MACHINERY Manufactures the world's
most complete line of woodworking machinery
and accessories for use in home workshops and
construction trades. For more information, call
800-438-2486 or visit www.deltamachinery.com.
Circle 8.
FEIN POWER TOOLS For over 130 years Fein
has researched and developed better solutions
to take the place of time consuming manual labor.
Superior quality is in every tool we make. For
more information, call 800-441-9878 or visit www.
feinus.com. Circle 11.
LAGUNATOOLS Laguna Tools imports quality
European woodworking machines, many of which
are designed for the American woodworker.
We feature an extensive range of combination
machines, award-winning bandsaws, lathes,
table saws, jointers, planers. Find out how we are
taking the woodworking industry by storm with our
innovative designs that will help you make the best
cut every time. Or learn more about our patented
Resaw King blade and Laguna Guide system that
makes cutting on a bandsaw a delight. Call today
800-234-1976 for our FREE demonstration video
(DVD's available on some machines), or visit our
website at www.lagunatools.com. Circle 20.
NORWOOD INDUSTRIES INC. Sawmill $4,690. All
new Super Lumbermate 2000, larger capacities,
more options. Manufacturers of sawmills, edgers
and skidders. Call 800-661-7746 ext. 348 or visit
www.norwoodindustries.com. Circle 144.
PORTER-CABLE Receive a free 128-page
catalog featuring Porter-Cable's full offering of
power tools, air nailers and staplers, compressors,
and related accessories. For more information, call
800-465-TOOL or visit www.porter-cable.com
Circle 29.
WOODWORKING SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES
RIKON P-OWER TOOLS RIKON manufactures
a variety of stationary woodworking power tools.
Listening to our customers' needs and expecta-
tions helps RIKON to provide the best product
for the woodworker. RIKON strives to not only
have excellent quality products but outstanding
customer service and satisfaction. RIKON prod-
ucts are designed by woodworkers and customer
feedback and include: Bandsaws, Drill Presses,
Jointers, Sanders, Table Saw and Lathes. For
more information, call 877-884-5167 or visit www.
rikontools.com. Circle 52.
RYOBITOOLS Ryobi's 18V Super Combo Kit
comes with a drill, circular saw, reciprocating saw
and flashlight ...all for just $199. For more informa-
tion contact us at 800-525-2579 or visit www.
ryobitools.com. Circle 32
TRADESMAN Where Great Projects Begin! Intro-
ducing our newest line of innovative Bench Power
Tools and Pneumatics. Our products provide qual-
ity performance and features at an exceptional
value. For more information call 800-243-5114 or
visit www.tradesman-rexon.com. Circle 43.
STEEL CITYTOOL WORKS Not the new kids on
the block
l
We are using our 250 years of experi-
ence to bring you tools with meaningful features.
a fair price, and the longest warranty in the
business. For more information, call 615-225-9001.
Circle 50.
. WOODMASTER TOOLS - DRUM SANDER See
why Woodmaster's 26", 38' & 50' Drum Sanders
are rated #1 by independent experts. Free report
For more information, call 800-821-6651 or visit
W\!'lw.woodmastertools.com. Circle 38.
WOODMASTER TOOLS - PLANER Sae how you
can quickly turn $5 rough soc into 75 worth of
molding with a Woodmaster Molder/Planerl
Sanderl Saw. Free facts. For more informa ion, call
800-821-6651 or visit www.woodmastertools.
com.
Circle 39.
WOODSTOCK INTERNATIONAL, INC. Shop
Fox Woodworking Machines offer industrial level
quality, proprietary features, and very affordable
prices. Ask about them at your local woodworking
supplier. For more information, call 800-840-8420
or visit www.shopfox.biz. Circle 37.
ADJUSTABLE CLAMP COMPANY The Adjust-
able Clamp Company has been manufacturing
quality
hand tools and accessories for almost 100 years.
Jorgensen, Pony and Adjustable products have
been preferred worldwide by fine woodworkers,
shop experts, professionals and do-it-yourselfers
since 1903. For more information, visit our website
www.adjustableclamp.com. Circle 1.
THE CRAFTSMAN GALLERY The Craftsman
Gallery - Demonstrates and supplies WoodRat
joinery machines and accessories throughout the
USA and Canada. Develops products that en-
hance WoodRat capabilities. For more information
visit www.chipsfly.com. Circle 115.
EPOXYHEADS EpoxyHeads brand resin,
hardener and additives are the tools you need to
build or fix just about anything in your home neatly
and permanently. EpoxyHeads epoxy adheres to
wood, tile, masonry, plastic and more. For more
information, call 866-376-9948 or visit www.
epoxyheads.com. Circle 10.
GORILLA GLUE The Toughest Glue on Planet
Earth"". Gorilla Brand Premium Glue is the finest
glue available for bonding wood, stone, metal ce-
ramics, plastics, and more. Incredibly strong and
100% waterproof. For more information, call 800-
966-3458 or visit www.gorillaglue.com. Circle 15.
JDS COMPANY - ACCU-MITER The Accu-Miter is
the ultimate professional miter gauge. Built to last
through years of serious work, demanding crafts-
men love the precision, accuracy and convenient
features. Tapered shotpin mechanism assures
dead-on accuracy. Adjustable bar provides
perfect fit to your saw. Telescoping inner fence
and micro adjusting flipstop makes cross cutting a
breeze. For more information, call 800-480-7269 or
visit www.thejdscompany.com.
Circle 19.
LEIGH INDUSTRIES Leigh offers router joinery
jigs, including the D4 Dovetail Jig, which cuts
Through, Half-blind and Sliding dovetails up to 1"
thick. They also make jigs for mortise & tenons, fin-
ger joints and Isoloc™ joints. For more information,
call 800-663-8932 or visit www.leighjigs.com.
L1GNOMAT Lignomat offers two lines of hardwood
moisture meters, with and without pins. Ask about
o u ~ free brochure to find out which instrument best
suits your needs. For more information, call 800-
227-2105. Circle 134.
MLCS MLCS offers a huge selection of carbide-
tipped router bits and boxed sets, raised panel
door sets, shaper cutters, solid carbide bits,
Forstner bits, plus our unique line of clamps, tools,
& supplies. Free shipping and excellent quality
guaranteed I Visit www.mlcswoodworking.com or
call toll-free 800-533-9298. Circle 22.
OSBORNE WOOD PRODUCTS, INC. Manufactur-
ers of stock and custom wood parts such as table
legs, tapered legs, balusters, newel posts made
from alder, cherry, maple and oak. Free catalog.
For more information, call 800-849-8876 or visit
www.osbornewood.com. Circle 146.
PENN STATE INDUSTRIES Penn State Industries
offers quality woodworking equipment and sup-
plies. For a FREE catalog visit us on the web at
www.pennstateind.com or call toll-free 1-800-
377-7297 Circle 28.
ROCKLER Rocker is the #1 resource for hinges,
slides and other hard-to-find hardware. We feature
an exclusive line of jigs, shop tables for band
saws, drill presses, routers as well as exotic and
domestic hardwoods. For more information, call
800-403-9736 or visit www.rockler.com. Circle
151. .
TITEBOND III ULTIMATE WOOD GLUE Titebond
III offers superior bond strength, longer open as-
sembly time and a lower application temperature.
Waterproof and cleans up with water. It passes
the stringent ANSI/HPVA Type I water-resistance
specification. The best choice for interior and
exterior wood-to-wood applications. Franklin Inter-
national, Inc Circle 16.
WOODWORKERS SOURCE Over 25 years of
experience supplying woodworkers more than 100
woods from around the world - lumber, turning
stock, and veneers. Quantitydiscounts, worldwide
shipping and guaranteed satisfaction. Compre-
hensive website includes detailed information on
each wood and provides for ordering exotic and
domestic hardwood online. For more information
call us at1-800-423-2450, Extn. 110 or visit www.
woodworkerssource.com. Circle 168.
Get your FREE product information faster online! Visit
www.americanwoodworker.com.Click on "Free Product Information."
GROFF &GROFF LUMBER, INC.
OVER 70 DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED SPECIES
Custom-Made Flooring
Curly Cherry 4/4 10 16/4 • Birdseye & Tiger Maple
Mahogany 30"+ • Premium Walnut & Cherry
=- Matching flitches, 5/4 to 8/4 1 wide
os::::. KJ2· Lumber, Nationwide & International Shipping
\3V No Order Too Large or Too Smafl
email: wood4u@epix.netgrofRumber@epix.net
(717) 284-0001 800-342-0001 FAX (717) 284·2400
MOISTURE METER
mini-lignoEJD
Moisture meters can help avoid
frustrating moisture problems such as
shrinking, warping, failed gluelines and
loose joints. The EJD is agreat meter at
an affordable price for any cabinetmaker
or woodworker.
Mill boards, _ ..... and buildIng log.
Appointad "BEST BUY" in G6r sA Hir (SwedIsh Do I Younell mapzIno)
1·707·562·2099 WWl¥.granbe!g.com
TURNING SqUARES
THE SIZE OF THIS AD OR LARGER.
CUT YOUR
OWN
8 models to
choose from...
Call for pricing
SAVE
THROUGH
APRIL 30, 2008
M
WOODWORKER'S
ARKETPLACE
To advertise in
THE MARKETPLACE
or Classified sections,
call 215,321,9662 ext 29
f\sp..\N noW
se a f\p..Z.O . our 72
, ' world pu
rch
:
e
will world's
round the t 01 and talog 01. OOIS. Or
sub-
Ka
ve
I'''' worK. d will " 30010r a
better Qua h, Iling, an send $. our CatalOg. I
S
IN cuts b'J pu ore accurate scriptIOn to
a: leaner, m tor ALL . ies ,,,vited.
give. a c 11 the time. Best handsaw oealel ''''lUll oept 02
cut In ha The
THE JAPAN • www.japanwoodworker.com
•••1731 Clement Ave. - Alameda, CA 94501 -1-800-537-7820•••'"
Band Saw Blades
TIMBER WOLF'"
call: Suffolk Machinery 800-234-7297
Free Catalog - www.suffolkmachinery.com
L- ...;;.. .;....---IOL.- ....I
82 AMERICAN WOODWORKER & MAY 2008
FREE
with every order
• Organza hatbox

sachet
• Do Not Disturb sign
• Personalized
gilt card
MJDSIZED 1600 with
basic HYDRAULICS!
4 Models '0 Choose:
from Hobby '0 Super·Pro

-_'" L "S' u <' _-
www.Toolmarts.com
1-800-735-8665
£.cL Miter Saw Stands
BST07
• lightweight aluminum 5-112 fI beam extends to
supPOrt up to 16fl:ofmaterlal $119.
99
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t $99.99
Dust Collector 1 HP
IIM:1IlIIDY Mobile Tabletop 1735A
• Thll unit hilS a 4¥inlake
;yr _, "'="'" '. Air suction capaCity of approx. 500 CFM
: $109.99
Panasonic Factory Reconditioned
15.6V Cordless Drm & Driver Kit
Model _ : EY6432NQKW
Power. 390 in. lOs. of IOrt!ue
) Clutch: g...,st in. Ibs, 18 stages
) Chua:: 112" heavy·duty keyless
J Speed. low 65-450 rpm, HIgh 200-1450 rpm
Newproduct available for $179
99
Panasonic Factory Reconditioned
12V Cordless Impact Driver
Model _ : EY6506NQKW
t length: 6·118"
t Speed: 0-2800 rpm
• 66110. fbI>. of torque
t High capacity battery of 3.0 Ah Ni·MH
Panasonic
12V Cordless Drill & Driver Kit
Model # : EY640SFQKW
• Length: 8-3/16"
• 293 In. lbs, of torque
) Chuck: heavy-duty keyless
• Standatcf capacity battery of 2,OAh Ni-Cd

23 Gauge Headleu Mlcro Pin Nailer
Indudlng Exlra Driver,
0' Ring Kit, Swivel Adaptet
&. Ahwninum cartying Case
$ 59.
99
Pins lfZ'.5I8", 3f04;", 1",1-3116"
2000lpk $3.991pk
m Mother's Day is May 11th
+ Overnight Delivery Guaranteed! N
i
'--- --'0
To advertise in
THE MARKETPLACE
or Classified sections, call 215--321--9662 ext 29
AMERICAN WOODWORKER'" MAY 2008 83
The 8' x 15' Endless
Pool® fits into existing
spaces such as basements,
garages, decks and patios. No
crowded pools, no heavy chlorine, no flip-turns.
Already own a pool? Ask about the FASTLANE'
by £MIen
Call for a FREE DVD or Video:
800.233.0741 ext. 5855
.www.endlesspools.com/5855
200 EDutton Mill Road
ENDLESS POOLS Aston, PA 19014
Ile nme!
ate Jour
• Dwooden
eear (Io(k!
ed just the pattern?
r the complete kit?
lid it YOUR way!

fpatterns
104
ear-clocks.com
GOOD HOPE HARDWOODS
'Where Fine Woodworking Begins'
Specializing In:
• Lumber kits for all your
woodworking projects
• Matched sets of custom cut lumber
for the advanced woodworker.
• Wide slabs for your slab table tops.
• 4/4-24/4 for all of your lumber needs.
1627 New London Rd. Landenberg PA 19350
Phone 610-274-8842/Fax 610-255-3677
STEVE WALL LUMBER co.
Quality Hardwoods and WoodworKing machinery For
The Craftsman and Educationall.slitutions
Ash 4/4 select $2.60 $ 94.00
Basswood .. .. 414 Select $ 1.95 $ 80.00
Biroh... . .. 4/4 Select $3.55 $ 108.00
ButtemuI 4/4 1C $2.95 .. $ 88.00
Cherry .. .. 4/4 Select $4.90 $ 117.00
Hickory .. Pecan 414 Select $3.00 $ 100.00
Mahogany (Genuine) 414 Select $4.70 UPS $112.00
Maple (Hard) 4/4 Select $ 3.45 .. _... .. $ 108.00
Maple (SoIl) 414 Select $2.50 'SIl'EC
f
A
1
"S" $ 88.00
Poplar 414 Select $ 1.80 . .r. II ,r. .. $ 78.00
Red Oak 4/4 select $ 2.70 $ 96.00
Walnut 4/4 Select $4.90 $115.00
WMe Oak 4/4 Select $ 2.70 $ 96.00
Cedar(AromaticRed) .. 4I4 1C+Btr.$1.80 $ 7B.00
Cypress 4/4 Select $2.80 $ 90.00
While Pine 414 F.G. $1.25 $ 70.00
Yellow Pine 414 Clear $ 2.30 $ 82.00
Above prices are for 100' Above prices are 20 bd. ft.
quantities of kilndried rough bundtes of clear kilndried ium-
lumber sold by theBd. Ft. FOB ber3"·10"wide·
Mayodan, NC. Can for quan· domwidths &I
titydisCQunts.Othersizesand 2sJdesorrough. PS
grades available. prepaid in the Continental U.S.
SEE OUR CATALOG ON THE WEB!
OLIVER MACHINERY DEALER
HARDWOOD PLYWOOD
CUSTOM RAISED PANEL DOORS
CUSTOM PLANK HRDWD FLOORING
THIN CRAFTWOOD
EXOTIC
Send $1.00 For Lumber Catalog
Prices Subject to Change Withoul Notice
Introdudory Rates Available!
Reserve your advertising space for the
upcoming Junefluly '08
Featuring:
the Perfect Worksho12
Contact Colin Santucci for details at 800--394--5157
ext 29 or csantucci@mcneill--group.com.
84 AMERICAN WOODWORKER .... MAY 2008
ASerious Panel Saw
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Only $29.00. Order ar www.fmeboxes.com
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AMERICAN WOODWORKER'" MAY 2008 85
The Offutt Air Force Base woodshop is located
in the historic Martin B o ~ b e r Building.
Lt Jon
Sward builds furniture during off-duty
. ' n to all ser-
hours. Military woodshops are ope
vicemen and women.
86 American Woodworker MAY 2008
WHERE OUR READERS LIVE
Air Force Woodshop
I share my workshop with about 12,000 others. It's the mil-
itary woodshop at Offutt Air Force Base (AFB), near Omaha,
Nebraska. Military woodshops exist on large bases and posts
around the world. They're open to all military personnel
(including dependents and retirees) on a pay-per-use basis.
Offutt AFB is home of the "Fightin' 55th" Wing and
STRATCOM (Strategic Command). The Offutt woodshop
occupies part of the basement in the "bomber building," in
which Martin B-17, .13-26 and B-29 bombers were manufac-
tured during WWII. In another building across the runway,
the Enola Gay and Bockscar B-29 bombers were prepared
for their historic missions over Japan.
The Offutt woodshop has spacious work stations and
duplicates of every major stationary tool. Routers, sanders,
and other portable tools can be signed out for use in the
shop. The shop has a separate finishing room and an
extensive library of woodworking books and magazines.
Large stocks of lumber and plywood are maintained and
offered for sale.
When my wife and.1 were first married, we couldn't
afford to buy any furniture. So as a young airman, I spent
every evening at the base woodshop. We slept on the
floor until I made a bed, sat on the floor until I made a
couch and so on. We've been married for more than
twenty-five years now, and I still build most of our furni-
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ture. I also yolunteer as a teacher at the base woodshop.
The Offutt hop attracts many young airmen who are new
to woodworking, so we offer classes on basic woodworking
and tool use. Completing a shop safety class is required. More
advanced classes include cabinetmaking and woodturning.
Military items are popular projects, of course (plaques, flag
boxes, shadow boxes for retirements, squadron coin holders,
etc.). The largest item buill here was a houseboat, which
almost didn't make it through the wide-open bay door!
One certain thing- about the military is that we move-
often! And when we move, things get broken. When I was
stationed in Germany, we offered furniture and antique
repair through the woodshop, and it was a thriving business.
We're planning to add furniture repair to our services at
Offutt in the near future, because making the woodshop
monetarily self-sufficient is one of our primary goals.
Jeff Bruce
Offutt APB, Nebraska
Tell us about your shop!
Send us photos of your shop, a layout drawing and a description of what makes your shop interesting. Tell us what you make in it and what makes
your shop important to you. If "My Shop" features your shop, you'll receive $100.
E-mail your entry to myshop@americanwoodworker.com with digital photos attached. Or mail your description with prints or digital
photos on a disc to My Shop, American Woodworker, 1285 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 180, Eagan, MN 55121. Please include your phone
number. Submissions cannot be returned and become our property on acceptance and payment. We may edit submissions and use them
in all print and electronic media.
American Woodworker MAY 2008 87
Free E-Nevvsletter
QuIck Tips
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Tool Give A'lNay
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vvvvvv.americanvvoodvvorker.com
AMERICANextra
WOODWORKER
Here's vvhat you'll get:
• quick tips
• skill-building and technique articles
• shop-improvement ideas
• free project plans
• tool news and buying advice
CRAZY MISTAKES WOODWORKERS MAKE
EGG-OH!
My fiancee and I
planned an April wed-
ding. To celebrate
our marriage, I decid-
ed to turn a very spe-
cial Easter egg on my
lathe. In addition to
segmented rings of
maple and ebony, this egg
would have a laminated
band that matched our
wedding colors. Tiny bells
placed inside the egg's hol-
low center would mimic
wedding bells whenever
my bride-to-be shook it.
This egg took forever to make, but I enjoyed
every minute. I chose spray-on urethane for the fin-
ish and polished the surface with fine sandpaper
after each coat. The egg looked absolutely gor-
geous-until I sprayed on the final coat. This time
the finish looked milky white, and it was tacky-real-
ly tacky. I was mystified until I looked at the can, and
then I nearly fainted. I'd used spray adhesive
instead of urethane! Both cans were the same
color-I'd grabbed the wrong one and hadn't both-
ered to check the label. Doh! Fortunately, I was able
to remove the adhesive by scrubbing the egg with
mineral spirits and fine steel wool.
Jack Welch
STAR STRUCK
Even though I had very little woodworking experience, I managed to get
hired by a local cabinetmaker. One of my first jobs was to help him install
new kitchen cabinets at a customer's house.
My employer asked me to mount drawer slides on all the drawers. I had
mounted slides before, so I felt reasonably confident-until the homeowner
pulled out his video camera and pointed it directly at me. I tried to look cool
and collected as I installed tlie first pair of slides. But the camera's bright
light completely unnerved me, especially when I noticed that I had mount-
ed the slides at the top of the drawer, instead of the bottom. Ack! Although
my stomach was churning, I smiled confidently into the camera and reached
for the next drawer.
Fortunately, the customer turned the camera-and his attention-to my
employer. I furtively removed the slides from the first drawer and mounted
them the correct way. Then I quickly learned how to use wood putty.
Philip Gebbia
88 American Woodworker MAY 2008
~ ..
Make your woodwork-
ing mistakes pay! Send us
your most memorable "What
was I thinking?" blunders.
You'll receive $100 for each
one we print E-mail to
oops@americanwoodwork-
er.com or send to AW Oops!,
American Woodworker,
1285 Corporate Center Drive,
Suite180, Eagan, MN 55121.
Submissions can't be returned
and become our property
upon acceptance and pay-
ment We may edit submis-
sions and use them in all print
and electronic media.
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