American Business 1. Do the following: a. Explain four features of the free enterprise system in the United States.

Tell its benefits and responsibilities. Describe the difference between freedom and license. Tell how the Scout Oath and Law apply to business and free enterprise. b. Describe the Industrial Revolution: Tell about the major developments that marked the start of the modern industrial era in the United States. Tell about five people who had a great influence on business or industry in the United States. Tell what each did. 2. Do the following: a. Visit a bank. Talk with one of the officers or staff. Chart the organization of the bank. Show its relationship with other banks, business, and industry. b. Explain how changes interest rates, taxes, and government spending affect the flow of money into or out of business and industry. c. Explain how a proprietorship or partnership gets its capital. Discuss and explain four ways a corporation gets its capital. d. Explain the place of profit in business. e. Name five kinds of insurance useful to business. Describe their purposes. 3. Do the following: a. Pick two or more stocks from the financial pages of a newspaper. Request the annual report or prospectus from one of the companies by writing, or visit its Web site (with your parent’s permission) to view the annual report online. Explain how a company’s annual report and prospectus can be used to help you manage your investments. b. Pretend to have bought $1,000 worth of the stocks from the company you wrote to in requirement 3a. Explain how you "bought" the stocks. Tell why you decided to "buy" stock in this company. Keep a weekly record for three months of the market value of your stocks. Show any dividends declared. 4. Do ONE of the following: a. Draw an organizational chart of a typical central labor council. b. Describe automation, union shop, open shop, collective-bargaining agreements, shop steward, business agent, union counselor. c. Explain the part played by four federal or state agencies in labor relations. 5. Run a small business involving a product or service for at least three months. First find out the need for it. For example: a newspaper route, lawn mowing, sales of things you have made or grown. Keep records showing the costs, income, and profit or loss. Report: a. How service, friendliness, hard work, and salesmanship helped build your business. b. The benefits you and others received because you were in business. Comparable 4-H, FFA, or Junior Achievement projects may be used for requirement 5. 6. Do ONE of the following:

a. Make an oral presentation to your Scout troop about an e-commerce company. Tell about the benefits and pitfalls of doing business online, and explain the differences between a retailer and an e-commerce company. In your presentation, explain the similarities a retailer and an e-commerce company might share. b. Choose three products from your local grocery store or mall and tell your merit badge counselor how the packaging could be improved upon so that it has less impact on the environment. c. Gather information from news sources and books about a current business leader. Write a two-page biography about this person or make a short presentation to your counselor. Focus on how this person became a successful business leader. American Heritage 1. Read the Declaration of Independence. Pay close attention to the section that begins with "We hold these truths to be self-evident" and ends with "to provide new Guards for future security." Rewrite that section in your own words, making it as easy to understand as possible. Then share your writing with your merit badge counselor and discuss the importance of the Declaration of Independence. 2. Do TWO of the following: a. Select two individuals from American history, one a political leader (a president, senator, etc.) and the other a private citizen (a writer, religious leader, etc.). Find out about each person's accomplishments and compare the contributions each has made to America's heritage. b. With your counselor's approval, choose an organization that has promoted some type of positive change in American society. Find out why the organization believed this change was necessary and how it helped to accomplish the change. Discuss how this organization is related to events or situations from America's past. c. With your counselor's approval, interview two veterans of the U.S. military. Find out what their experiences were like. Ask the veterans what they believe they accomplished. d. With your counselor's approval, interview three people in your community of different ages and occupations. Ask these people what America means to them, what they think is special about this country, and what American traditions they feel are important to preserve. 3. Do the following: a. Select a topic that is currently in the news. Describe to your counselor what is happening. Explain how today's events are related to or affected by the events and values of America's past. b. For each of the following, describe its adoption, tell about any changes since its adoption, and explain how each one continues to influence Americans today: the flag, the Pledge of Allegiance, the seal, the motto, and the national anthem. c. Research your family's history. Find out how various events and situations in American history affected your family. Share what you find with your counselor. Tell why your family came to America. 4. Do TWO of the following:

a. Explain what is meant by the National Register of Historic Places. Describe how a property becomes eligible for listing. Make a map of your local area, marking the points of historical interest. Tell about any National Register properties in your area. Share the map with your counselor, and describe the historical points you have indicated. b. Research an event of historical importance that took place in or near your area. If possible, visit the place. Tell your counselor about the event and how it affected local history. Describe how the area looked then and what it now looks like. c. Find out when, why, and how your town or neighborhood started, and what ethnic, national, or racial groups played a part. Find out how the area has changed over the past 50 years and try to explain why. d. Take an active part in a program about an event or person in American history. Report to your counselor about the program, the part you took, and the subject. e. Visit a historic trail or walk in your area. After your visit, share with your counselor what you have learned. Discuss the importance of this location and explain why you think it might qualify for National Register listing. 5. Do ONE of the following: a. Watch two motion pictures (with the approval and permission of your counselor and parent) that are set in some period of American history. Describe to your counselor how accurate each film is with regard to the historical events depicted and also with regard to the way the characters are portrayed. b. Read a biography (with your counselor's approval) of someone who has made a contribution to America's heritage. Tell some things you admire about this individual and some things you do not admire. Explain why you think this person has made a positive or a negative contribution to America's heritage. c. Listen to recordings of popular songs from various periods of American history. Share five of these songs with your counselor, and describe how each song reflects the way people felt about the period in which it was popular. If a recording is not available, have a copy of the lyrics available. 6. Discuss with your counselor the career opportunities in American heritage. Pick one that interests you and explain how to prepare for this career. Discuss what education and training are required for this career. American Labor 1. Using resources available to you, learn about working people and workrelated concerns. List and briefly describe or give examples of at least EIGHT concerns of American workers. These may include, but are not limited to, working conditions, workplace safety, hours, wages, seniority, job security, equal opportunity employment and discrimination, guest workers, automation and technologies that replace workers, unemployment, layoffs, outsourcing, and employee benefits such as health care, child care, profit sharing, and retirement benefits.

d. negotiation. or an employee organization. the community. Animal Science . and training such a position requires. Learn about opportunities in the field of labor relations.2. 5. In your presentation. Share the list of issues and concerns you made for requirement 1. and lockouts. strikes. Explain why agreements and compromises are made and how they affect each group in achieving its goals. education. 4. With your counselor's and parent's approval and permission. 6. 7. if applicable. mediation. work stoppages. With your counselor's and parent's approval and permission. its customers. Choose one career in which you are interested and discuss with your counselor the major responsibilities of that position and the qualifications. what they do. argue both sides of the issue. from the local to the national level. c. Choose a labor issue of widespread interest to American workers-an issue in the news currently or known to you from your work on this merit badge. c. arbitration. compared with a cooperative-bargaining style. including union members and nonunion members. Explain the term globalization. a central labor council. its stockholders. 9. first taking management's side. open (nonunion) shops. or in writing. watch a movie that addresses organized labor in the United States. Explain to your counselor what labor unions are. or contact one of these organizations via the Internet. or a computer presentation. b. Draw a diagram showing how the organization is structured. Afterward. Do ONE of the following: a. a scrapbook. Find out what the organization does. collective bargaining. show that you understand the concepts of labor. In your discussion. Develop a time line of significant events in the history of the American labor movement from the 1770s to the present. then presenting labor's or the employee's point of view. Explain what is meant by the adversarial model of labor-management relations. summarize the basic rights and responsibilities of employers and employees. Read a biography (with your counselor's approval) of someone who has made a contribution to the American labor movement. 8. Discuss with your counselor some effects of globalization on the workforce in the United States. grievance procedures. illustrating three major achievements of the American labor movement and how those achievements affect American workers. Explain what contribution this person has made to the American labor movement. Ask the people you communicate with which issues are of greatest interest or concern to them and why. Then do EACH of the following: a. Before your counselor. Prepare an exhibit. 3. b. visit the office or attend a meeting of a local union. and public officials. its employees. management. Explain how this global workforce fits into the economic system of this country. the employees' representatives. and what services they provide to members. union shops. such as a slide show. Discuss with your counselor the different goals that may motivate the owners of a business. discuss the movie with your counselor and explain what you learned.

Chart the amount of each component. Explain the differences in feeds typically used for dairy cows versus those fed to beef cows. 6. Feeding market cattle for harvest 2. Dairying Option e. Tell their principal uses and merits. producing feeder cattle for sale to commercial cattle feeders 3. to include its forage and grain storage facilities. calf. or sketch a corral plan with cutting and loading chutes for handling 50 or more beef cows and their calves at one time. Cow/calf operation.S. Producing purebred cattle for sale as breeding stock to others. 3. Make a chart showing the components in cows' milk or goat's milk. fed. Explain how the differences in structure and function among these four types of digestive tracts affect the nutritional management of these species. dairy cow. Sketch a plan of a feedlot. f. Tell about your findings. d. Include in your discussion nutritional (feeding) concerns. hogs. housing. goat. Explain the practice of crossbreeding and the value of this practice. Tell about the kinds of equipment used for milking and the sanitation standards that must be met for dairy farms. or a poultry flock—and tell how you would properly manage it. g. Make a sketch showing the principal wholesale and retail cuts of beef. bullock. sheep. Tell where the breeds originated. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. b. freemartin. Select one type of animal—beef cow. Explain the major differences in the digestive systems of ruminants. waste control/removal. Explain the importance of setting clear goals for any animal breeding program. Visit a farm or ranch where beef cattle are produced under any of these systems: 1. 2. 5. Tell about U. c. If you cannot visit a cattle ranch or farm. sheep. horses. Talk with the operator to learn how the cattle were handled. weighed. Complete ONE of the following options: Beef Cattle Option a. List five diseases in each of the classifications in requirement 1. and shipped. Tell how and why milk is pasteurized. Define the following terms: bull. Also list five diseases of poultry. and breeding programs if appropriate. beef cattle. view a video from a breed association. and poultry. Tell the basics of each grade in each system. dairy cattle. . Describe the symptoms of each disease and explain how each is contracted and how it could be prevented. 4. disease prevention. Tell how a cow or a goat converts forage and grain into milk. h. horse. Name four breeds of livestock in each of the following classifications: horses. pigs. or hog. or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on beef cattle production. heiferette. Department of Agriculture (USDA) dual grading system of beef. heifer. steer. and loading chute for 30 or more fattening steers. Tell how purebred lines of animals are produced. Explain the requirements for producing Grade A milk. cow.1.

t. Visit a farm or ranch where sheep are raised. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. Identify which breed the ram should be. Do ONE of the following: 1. Then select two breeds that would be appropriate for the production of crossbred market lambs in your region. and mortality. kid. Keep records of feed intake. Discuss the feeding programs for the growth and finishing periods. roan. tobiano. Describe what colic is. Outline in writing the proper feeding programs used from the breeding of a gilt or sow through the weaning of the litter.Define the following terms: bull. Describe some differences between the production of purebred and commercial lambs. l. s. Tell about the recommended USDA grades of pork. discuss the different special uses of each breed. ram. m. ewe. filly. 2. Horse Option k. mustang. w. Make a sketch of a live lamb. Do ONE of the following: i. foal. Tell the basis for each grade. lamb. colt. overo. steer. r. Using the four breeds of horses you chose in requirement 1. gelding. weight gains. draft horse. palomino. If you cannot visit a dairy farm or processing plant. quarter horse. Tell about your findings. Raise a lamb from weaning to market weight. view a video from a breed association. q. medication. v. If you cannot visit a sheep farm or ranch. doe. or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on horses. stallion. Outline the proper feeding of a horse doing light work. heifer. calico. Define the following terms: wether. . Visit a horse farm. Hog Option u. cow. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on sheep. trotter. buck. Make a sketch showing the principal wholesale and retail cuts of pork. Define the history of the horse and the benefits it has brought to people. Explain why the amount and kind of feed will change according to the kind of horse and the work it does. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. Make a sketch of a useful saddle horse barn and exercise yard. Discuss how wools are sorted and graded. Present your records for review by your counselor. and its symptoms Sheep Option p. what can cause it. If you cannot visit a horse farm. vaccination. view a video from a breed or dairy association. or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on dairying. Tell about your findings. o. Define the following terms: mare. n. j. springer. Tell about your findings. view a video from a breed association. pinto. pacer. Visit a dairy farm or a milk processing plant. Show the location of the various wholesale and retail cuts.

and explain why this profession might interest you. Describe the classes of chicken meat. waterers. Present your records for review by your counselor. barrow. Discuss this with your counselor. Visit a commercial avian production facility. temperature controls. Three safety rules when on the shooting line 2. cc. Pick one and find out the education. Visit a farm where hogs are produced. The four whistle commands used on a range and their related verbal commands b. vaccination. weight gains. Manage an egg-producing flock for five months. poult. Keep records of feed intake. automatic lights. aa. State and explain the Range Safety Rules: 1. Define the following terms: gilt. medication. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. or visit a packing plant handling hogs. and other environmental controls are used to protect birds from heat. Raise a feeder pig from weaning to market weight. tom. If you cannot visit a commercial facility. c. eggs sold. Three safety rules when retrieving arrows 3. Find out about three career opportunities in animal science. rooster. medication. and mortality. Keep records of feed purchased. sow. Present your records for review by your counselor. bb. Keep records of feed intake. and bad weather. Tell about your findings. training. or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on hogs. State and explain the general safety rules for archery. feeders.Do ONE of the following: 1. Define the following terms: hen. and mortality. and means of ventilation. and experience required for this profession. boar. z. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. Explain how insulation. capon. Avian Option y. Tell how broilers (fryers) are graded. view a video from a poultry association. chick. x. If you cannot visit a hog production unit or packing plant. Make a sketch of a layer house or broiler house showing nests. Tell about your findings. 2. 7. cold. Explain why overcrowding is dangerous for poultry flocks. weight gains. 3. ventilation. 2. and mortality. Tell about the grading of eggs.  Do the following: . or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on poultry production. vaccination. Tell about your local and state laws for owning and using archery tackle. vaccination. Raise 20 chicks from hatching. roosts. medication. Demonstrate how to safely carry arrows in your hands.1. view a video from a packer or processor. Archery  Do the following: a. Present your records for review by your counselor.

 Explain the following: a. 4. string height (fistmele). arm guards. The differences among field. the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using. earn a Cub or Youth 100score Progression patch. How the National Field Archery Association (NFAA) black-and-white field targets and blue indoor targets are scored f. Do ONE of the following: 1.Using a Recurve Bow or Longbow a. d. Describe three or more different types of arrows. A FITA/NAA indoor* round and make a score of 80 points e. The difference between an end and a round c. Locate and mark with dental floss. and Bowman. make a score of 150. shooting gloves. and barebow. Make a complete arrow from a bare shaft. Demonstrate the proper way to string a recurve bow or longbow. qualify as a Yeoman. How the five-color National Archery Association (NAA) or Federation Internationale de Tir a l'Arc (FITA) target is scored e. An NFAA field round of 4 targets and make a score of 60 points b. The importance of obedience to a range officer or other person in charge of a range b. The elimination system used in Olympic archery competition  Do ONE of the following options: Option A . Show the nine steps of good shooting for the recurve bow or longbow you are shooting. aiming. c. e. Make a bowstring. Explain how to properly care for and store compound bows. 3. Name and Point to the parts of the recurve or longbow you are shooting. e. crimp-on.or NFAA rounds: a. Junior Bowman. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 80 points c. b. Explain how to properly care for and store recurve bows and longbows. or other method. Name the four principle materials for making arrow shafts. Explain the following terms: cast. freestyle. target. Name and point out the parts of an arrow. and quivers. Option B . draw weight. c. b. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 15 yards and using the 10 scoring regions. As a member of the NAA's Junior Olympic Development Program (JOAD).Using a Compound Bow a. . Name and point to the parts of the compound bow you are shooting. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division. A Junior indoor* round I and make a score of 180 points d.  Do the following: a. d. Using a recurve or longbow and arrows with a finger release. mechanical release. b. shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA. and 3-D archery d. c.a. b. NAA. An NFAA indoor* round and make a score of 50 points 2. Explain how to properly care for and store arrows. f. spine. Explain how to proper care for and store tabs.

Do the following: a. e. * The indoor rounds can be shot outdoors if this is more convenient. c. Show the nine steps of good shooting for the compound bow you are shooting. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division. and the Moon. f. the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using. dehydration. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 15 yards and using the 10 scoring regions. An NFAA indoor* round and make a score of 60 points 2. Using a compound bow and arrows with a finger release. 4. 3. shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA.or NFAA rounds: a. Then explain how to safely observe the Sun. c. Explain first aid for injuries or illnesses such as heat and cold reactions. As a member of the NAA's Junior Olympic Development Program (JOAD). NAA. b. help prevent. Demonstrate or explain how these tools are used. Describe the proper care and storage of telescopes and binoculars both at home and in the field. Junior Bowman. and respond to these hazards. Describe the proper clothing and other precautions for safely making observations at night and in cold weather. An NFAA field round of 4 targets and make a score of 70 points b. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in astronomy activities. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 90 points c. at least four of which are in the zodiac. or other method. do each of the following: a. Identify in the sky at least 10 constellations. With the aid of diagrams (or real telescopes if available). and Bowman. Describe the similarities and differences of several types of astronomical telescopes.c. 2. b. crimp-on. Locate and mark with dental floss. make a score of 160. qualify as a Yeoman. and damage to your eyes that could occur during observation. and what you should do to anticipate. Do the following: a. 4. earn a Cub or Youth 100score Progression patch. Explain what light pollution is and how it and air pollution affect astronomy. A FITA/NAA indoor* round I and make a score of 90 points e. 3. objects near the Sun. Explain the purposes of at least three instruments used with astronomical telescopes. Do ONE of the following: 1. A Junior 900 round and make a score of 200 points d. mitigate. Explain why it is necessary to have the string on a compound bow replaced at an archery shop. d. bites and stings. d. Astronomy 1. Explain why binoculars and telescopes are important astronomical tools. .

Make two sketches of the Big Dipper. and find each on a star chart or in a guidebook. do ONE of the following: a. a scrapbook. . its relationship to other stars. In one sketch. one blue star. and buildings. Include landmarks on the horizon such as hills. c. Celestial objects you observed. and the Moon at the times of lunar and solar eclipses. 8. 6. Identify at least one red star. Do the following: a.5. first-quarter. Explain the meaning of these colors. c. Plan and participate in a three-hour observation session that includes using binoculars or a telescope. full. Review your log or notebook with your counselor afterward. Earth. Submit a written report. for four days in a row. and other resources. and at the times of new. c. Identify at least eight conspicuous stars. In both sketches. Describe the composition of the Sun. Describe the motion of the planets across the sky. Explain the changes you observe. 7. List the factors that keep the Moon in orbit around Earth. Telescopes and instruments being used 4. d. b. b. Visit a planetarium or astronomical observatory. five of which are of magnitude 1 or brighter. and last-quarter phases of the Moon. Define sunspots and describe some of the effects they may have on solar radiation. b. books. Activities occurring there 2. then compile this information in the form of a chart or table. With the aid of diagrams. c. Prepare an observing log or notebook. d. b. charts. Do the following: a. Sketch the phase and the daily position of the Moon at the same hour and place. Do the following: a. show the Big Dipper's orientation in the early evening sky. or a video presentation afterward to your counselor that includes the following information: 1. Sketch the face of the moon and indicate at least five seas and five craters. Explain what we see when we look at the Milky Way. d. List the celestial objects you want to observe. trees. b. show the North Star and the horizon. Record the date and time each sketch was made. and some effects of its radiation on Earth's weather and communications. Show your plan. find out when each of the five most visible planets that you identified in requirement 5a will be observable in the evening sky during the next 12 months. show its position several hours later. list the names of the five most visible planets. In another sketch. Label these landmarks. Exhibits and displays you saw 3. Observe a planet and describe what you saw. explain the relative positions of the Sun. With your counselor's approval and guidance. Using the Internet (with your parent's permission). and log or notebook to your counselor before making your observations. and one yellow star (other than the Sun). and explain why. Explain which ones can appear in phases similar to lunar phases and which ones cannot.

Show all positions on a star chart or map. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter during athletics activities. Do the following: a. and the appropriate clothing for the season and the locale. or a comet. dehydration. label each image and include the date and time it was taken. Do the following: a.c. and heat reactions. Organize a chart for this activity and monitor your progress during this time. and what you should do to anticipate.and how the use of tobacco products. discuss with your counselor the progress you have made during training and competition and how your development has affected you mentally and physically. Explain to your counselor what an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete. . one of which is the activity you chose for requirement 3. including sprains. Discuss with your counselor what courses might be useful for such a career. d. especially during training . alcohol. Personally take a series of photographs or digital images of the movement of the Moon. strains. b. Give the rules for two athletic activities. b. 4. Use binoculars or a telescope to show and explain celestial objects to the group. With guidance from your counselor. In your visual display. Pick the one in which you are most interested and explain how to prepare for such a career. Select an athletic activity to participate in for one season (or four months). blisters. contusions. abrasions. Plan and host a star party for your Scout troop or other group such as your class at school. Athletics 1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in athletics events. and other harmful substances can negatively affect your health and performance in athletic activities c. 2. mitigate. and respond to these hazards. Discuss the importance of warming up and cooling down. Help an astronomy club in your community hold a star party that is open to the public. establish a personal training program suited to the activity you have chosen. List at least three different career opportunities in astronomy. Explain to the counselor the equipment necessary to participate in this activity. a planet. The importance of the physical exam b. a meteor. c. Show your display at school or at a troop meeting. The importance of maintaining a healthy diet 3. help prevent. e. Then do the following: a. 9. Explain the changes you observed. c. b. Explain the following: a. The importance of maintaining good health habits. At the end of the season. an asteroid. d.

d. Discuss the traits and importance of good sportsmanship. Tell what role sportsmanship plays in both individual and group athletic activities. 5. Complete the activities in FOUR of the following groups and show improvement over a three-month period. o Group 1: Sprinting a. 100-meter dash b. 200-meter dash o Group 2: Long-Distance Running a. 3k run b. 5k run o Group 3: Long Jump OR High Jump a. Running long jump OR running high jump (best of three tries) b. Standing long jump OR standing high jump (best of three tries) o Group 4: Swimming a. 100-meter swim b. 200-meter swim o Group 5: Pull-Ups AND Push-Ups a. Pull-ups in two minutes b. Push-ups in two minutes o Group 6: Baseball Throw a. Baseball throw for accuracy, 10 throws b. Baseball throw for distance, five throws (total distance) o Group 7: Basketball Shooting a. Baskeball shot for accuracy, 10 free-throw shots b. Basketball throw for skill and agility, the following shots as shown on the diagram in the pamphlet 1. Left-side layup 2. Right-side layup 3. Left side of hoop, along the key line 4. Right side of hoop, along the key line 5. Where key line and free-throw line meet, left side 6. Where key line and free-throw line meet, right side 7. Top of the key 8. Anywhere along the three-point line. o Group 8: Football Kick OR Soccer Kick a. Goals from the 10-yard line, eight kicks b. Football kick or soccer kick for distance, five kicks (total distance) o Group 9: Weight Training a. Chest/bench press, two sets of 15 repetitions each b. Leg curls, two sets of 15 repetitions each 2. Do the following a. Prepare plans for conducting a sports meet or field day that includes 10 activities, at least five of which must come from the groups mentioned in requirement 5. Outline the duties of each official needed and list the equipment the meet will require. b. With your parent's and counselor's approval, serve as an official or volunteer at a sports meet to observe officials in action. Tell your

counselor about your responsibilities at the meet and discuss what you learned. Automotive Maintenance NOTE: Access to an automobile or truck (with an owners manual) is needed to meet some of the requirements for this merit badge. 1. Discuss with your counselor the safety equipment, tools, and clothing used while checking or repairing a motor vehicle. Use this equipment, tools, and/or clothing (when needed or called for) in meeting the requirements for this merit badge. 2. General Maintenance, Safety, and Registration Do the following: a. Review the maintenance chart in the owner's manual. Explain the requirements and time limits. b. Demonstrate how to check the following: 1. Brake Fluid 2. Engine Oil 3. Coolant 4. Power steering fluid 5. Windshield washer fluid 6. Transmission fluid 7. Battery fluid (if possible) and condition of the battery terminals. c. Locate the fuse boxes; determine the size of fuses. Demonstrate the proper replacement of burned-out fuses. d. Demonstrate how to check the condition and tension of belts and hoses. e. Check the lighting in the vehicle, including instrument, warning, and exterior bulbs. f. Locate and check the air filter. g. Explain the purpose, importance, and limitations of safety belts and passive restraints. h. Find out the requirements for the state inspection in your state, including how often a vehicle needs to be inspected. i. Explain the importance of registering a vehicle and find out the annual registration fee for renewing your family car's registration. 3. Dashboard Do the following: a. Explain the function of the fuel gauge, speedometer, tachometer, oil pressure, and engine temperature gauge. Point out each one on the instrument cluster. b. Explain the symbols that light up on the dashboard and the difference between the yellow and red symbols. Explain each of the indicators on the dashboard, using the owner's manual, if necessary. 4. Tires Do the following: a. Explain the difference between tire manufacturer's and vehicle manufacturer's specifications and show where to find them. b. Demonstrate how to check pressure and properly inflate a tire. Check the spare tire and make sure it is ready for use.

c. Explain why wheel alignment is important to the life of a tire. Explain camber, caster, and toe-in adjustments on wheel alignment. d. Explain the purpose of the lateral-wear bar indicator. e. Explain how to dispose of old tires in accordance with local laws and regulations. 5. Engine Do the following: a. Explain how an internal combustion engine operates. Tell the differences between gasoline and diesel engines. Explain how a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle is powered. b. Explain the purpose of engine oil. Explain the API service code, the SAE number, and the viscosity rating. c. Explain where to find the recommended oil type and the amount of oil to be used in the vehicle's engine. 6. Cooling system Do the following: a. Explain the need for coolant in the cooling system. b. Explain how to flush and change the engine coolant in the vehicle , and how to properly dispose of the used coolant. 7. Fuel system Do the following: a. Explain how the air and fuel systems work together and why it is necessary to have an air filter and fuel filter. b. Explain how a how a fuel injection system works and how an on-board computer works with the fuel injection system. 8. Ignition and electrical systems Do the following: a. Diagram and explain the parts of the electrical system. b. Explain the cylinder engine sequence. c. Explain the purpose of the spark gap. d. Demonstrate how to change the spark plugs in any internal combustion engine (lawn mower, dirt bike, motorcycle). e. Demonstrate how to safely connect jumper cables to your car battery. 9. Drive Train Do the following: a. Diagram the drive train and explain the different parts. b. Explain the difference between automatic and standard transmissions. c. Explain the types of automatic transmission fluid. d. Explain the types of lubricants used in a standard transmission and in the differential. e. Explain the difference between front-wheel, rear- wheel, and fourwheel drive. 10.Brake System Do the following: a. Explain the brake system (including anti-lock systems) and how it operates. b. Explain the differences between disc and drum systems. c. Demonstrate how to check the condition of a vehicle's brake system. After checking make recommendations for repairs (if necessary).

Take a flight in an aircraft. type of aircraft. elevators. and wax the exterior. and explain why this profession might interest you. and jet engines. straight descent. Use this information to determine the operating cost per mile for each vehicle. Do TWO of the following: a. Use a vinyl and rubber protectant (on vinyl tops. descending turn. Clean the vehicle. c. and duration of flight. c. Using one of many flight simulator software packages available for computers. Pick one and find out about the education. c. b. and report on your impressions of the flight. Measure a true course on the chart. Point out on a model airplane the forces that act on an airplane in flight. and wind drift. d. towing. Do the following: a. level turn. Record the date. and experience required for this profession. b. perform a preflight inspection of a light aircraft. and rudder) affect the airplane's attitude. and rental car. straight climb. e. both inside and out. Explain clear-coat paint and the precautions necessary for care. climbing turn.Find out about three career opportunities in the automotive industry. comprehensive. One must be new and one must be used. how the primary control surfaces (ailerons. with your parent's permission. Describe some kinds and uses of aircraft today. Explain the operation of piston. turboprop. and discuss what you learn with your counselor. . Perform an oil filter and oil change on a vehicle. b. training. Obtain and learn how to read an aeronautical chart. rubber door seals. Locate the manufacturer's jack Use the jack to demonstrate how to engage the jack correctly on the vehicle.Do two of the following: a. compass deviation. Arrive at a compass heading.) and explain the importance of the protectant. the third vehicle can be new or used. Aviation 1. and how a propeller produces thrust. Determine the value of three different vehicles you are interested in purchasing. Correct for magnetic variation. d. 12. find out the requirements and cost of automobile insurance to include basic liability and options for collision. Define 'aircraft'. and landing. Discuss this with your counselor. Under supervision. For each vehicle. Choose a car cleaner and wax product for a vehicle you want to clean. Explain the following: the recreational pilot and the private pilot certificates. 2. Using the three vehicles you chose and with your merit badge counselor's assistance. place. sidewalls. Explain how to properly dispose of the used oil and filter. d. complete the operation/maintenance chart provided in the merit badge pamphlet. Demonstrate how the control surfaces of an airplane are used for takeoff. then change a tire correctly.11. the instrument rating. 'fly' the course and heading you established in requirement 2c or another course you have plotted. etc. Explain how an airfoil generates lift.

3. Get others in your troop or patrol to make their own model. Build and fly a fuel-driven or battery-powered electric model airplane. Visit an airport.) Report on the operation and your impressions of the facility. compass. Call in advance. tick bites. frostbite. Government Offices. flight service station. tachometer. Do ONE of the following: a.e. oil pressure gauge. heading indicator. b. Explain the purposes and functions of the various instruments found in a typical single-engine aircraft: attitude indicator. insect stings. Pick one and find out the education. or Flight Standards District Office. and oil temperature gauge. Do the following: a. and battery packs. . Backpacking 1. terminal radar control facility. and blisters. Start from the commercial airport nearest your home. Do ONE of the following: a. Build a model FPG-9. heat reactions. with your parent's permission). including hypothermia. how runways are numbered. Describe safety rules for building and flying model airplanes. List 10 items that are essential to be carried on any backpacking trek and explain why each item is necessary. dope. Discuss the prevention of and treatment for the health concerns that could occur while backpacking. Visit a Federal Aviation Administration facility — a control tower. Create an original poster of an aircraft instrument panel. Transportation Department. 5. then organize a competition to test the precision of flight and landing of the models. 2. b. f. training. paint. dehydration. air route traffic control center. From timetables (obtained from agents or online from a computer. and explain why this profession might interest you. Find out about three career opportunities in aviation. After the visit. Federal Aviation Administration. airspeed indicator. turn and bank indicator. altimeter. Include and identify the instruments and radios discussed in requirement 2f. Report on your impressions of the museum or show. 4. g. mark a route for an imaginary airline trip to at least three different locations. Discuss this with your counselor. Tell safety rules for use of glue. Visit an aviation museum or attend an air show. (Phone directory listings are under U. 3. plastics. vertical speed indicator. and experience required for this profession. Create an aviation flight plan and itinerary for each destination. Describe 10 ways you can limit the weight and bulk to be carried in your pack without jeopardizing your health or safety. report on how the facilities are used. and how runways are determined to be 'active. snakebite. On a map. navigation (GPS and VOR) and communication radios. c.S. Define limits on the number of backpackers appropriate for a trek crew. decide when you will get to and leave from all connecting points. fuel. Do the following: a.' b.

Demonstrate that you can read topographic maps. 4. participate in at least three backpacking treks of at least three days each and at least 15 miles each. b. Demonstrate two ways to treat water and tell why water treatment is essential. and what to do if you get lost. and using at least two different campsites on each trek. 6. c. Do the following: a. 5. Demonstrate that you know how to operate a backpacking stove safely and to handle liquid fuel safely. Write a plan for a backpacking trek of at least five days using at least three different campsites and covering at least 30 miles. Explain how to stay found. b. e. Explain to your counselor the importance of staying well hydrated during a trek. complete a hike of at least 2 miles. Your plan must include a description of and route to the trek area. Write a plan for a patrol backpacking hike that includes a schedule. While on a trek.b. c.Do the following: a. Do the following: a. 11. Prepare at least three meals using a stove and fuel you can carry in a backpack. Show you can properly shoulder your pack and adjust it for proper wear. b. Demonstrate that you know how to keep cooking and eating gear clean and sanitary. Carry everything you will need throughout the trek. use a map and compass to establish your position on the ground at least three times at three different places. Conduct a prehike inspection of the patrol and its equipment. b. Describe the importance of and means to assure personal cleanliness while on a backpacking trek. 7.Using Leave No Trace principles. c. Tell what factors are important in choosing a campsite. Tell how you would minimize risk on a backpacking trek. 8. 9. Describe how a trek crew should be organized. 10. While carrying your pack. Do the following: a. Do the following: a. Tell how to prepare properly for and deal with inclement weather. d. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of three different types of backpacking stoves using at least three different types of fuel. Describe the importance of using Leave No Trace principles while backpacking. b. and that you practice proper methods for food storage while on a backpacking trek. c. Describe proper methods of handling human and other wastes while on a backpacking trek. Show that you know how to properly pack your personal gear and your share of the crew's gear and food. c. and at least five ways you can lessen the crew's impact on the environment. Do the following: a. d. a schedule . OR use a GPS receiver unit to establish your position on a topographic map and on the ground at least three times at three different places.

Using Leave No Trace principles. Demonstrate that you know how to use a bird field guide. and/or the year-round range of one species of each of the following types of birds: a. 4. Describe the bird's main feeding habitat and list two types of food that the bird is likely to eat. c. 3. Prepare a field notebook. a. Explain what the specification numbers on the binoculars mean. Explain the function of a bird's song. c. Demonstrate that you know how to properly use and care for binoculars. Sketch or trace an extended wing and label six types of wing feathers. Warbler or vireo e.(including a daily schedule). Plover c. . b. Show how to adjust the eyepiece and how to focus for proper viewing. c. Bird Study 1. Do ONE of the following: a. b. Falcon or hawk d. and note the behavior of the bird making the sound. take the trek your have planned and. a. Heron or egret f. the breeding range. Note why you think the bird was making the call or song that you heard. including notes about what worked well and thoughts about improvements that could be made for the next trek. Explain the need for bird study and why birds are useful indicators of the quality of the environment. Note the location and habitat. complete at least one service project approved by your merit badge counselor. and record the following information from your field observations and other references. or year-round resident of your area. a list of food and equipment needs. while on the trek. Show that you are familiar with the terms used to describe birds by sketching or tracing a perched bird and then labeling 15 different parts of the bird. Keep a daily journal during the trek that includes a day-by-day description of your activities. and a budget. 2. Show how to properly care for and clean the lenses. winter. b. Sparrow g. making a separate entry for each species. a safety and emergency plan. Be able to identify five of the 20 species in your field notebook by song or call alone. 6. For each of these five species enter a description of the song or call. Note the date and time. Seabird b. 7. Show your counselor that you are able to understand a range map by locating in the book and pointing out the wintering range. d. Note whether the bird is a migrant or a summer. Go on a field trip with a local club or with others who are knowledgeable about birds in your area. Observe and be able to identify at least 20 species of wild birds. Nonnative bird (introduced to North America from a foreign country since 1800) 5.

2. Camping 1. describe what birds you hope to attract. Explain what kinds of information are collected during the annual event. List assignments for each member. insect stings. Tell your counselor what makes the area you visited good for finding birds. if anything. If the number of birds of these species is decreasing. Tell your counselor which birds your group saw and why some species were common and some were present in small numbers. 2.1. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. 2. b. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. general planning. 3. and what. equipment needs. c. 3. snakebite. Keep a list or fill out a checklist of all the birds your group observed during the field trip. and respond to these hazards. mitigate. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in camping activities and what you should do to anticipate. 4. 5. frostbite. Build a birdbath and put it in an appropriate place. 1. b. and hyperventilation. menu planning. Do the following: a. tick bites. Tell your counselor which species are uncommon. Build a bird feeder and put it in an appropriate place in your yard or another location. 8. find the name and location of the Christmas Bird Count nearest your home and obtain the results of a recent count. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout. including creating the duty roster. could be done to reverse their decline. and explain why these birds are abundant. or a topographical map and a GPS receiver. heat reactions. b. Explain the term 'layering'. and setting up camp. and why. including hypothermia. Tell your counselor which species are most common. altitude sickness. blisters. Do the following: a. dehydration. Do ONE of the following. Build a backyard sanctuary for birds by planting trees and shrubs for food and cover. For the option you choose. and explain why these were present in small numbers. By using a public library or contacting the National Audubon Society. 3. Write a personal plan for implementing these principles on your next outing. help prevent. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. a. b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping. Do the following: a. . explain why.

Cook at least one breakfast. three lunches. .6. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather. Using a liquid fuel stove 3. footwear. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following: a. and explain why each item is needed. animals. Explain the safety procedures for: 1. Proper storage of extra fuel b. you need not pitch your own tent. d. Using a propane or butane/propane stove 2. Make a comfortable ground bed. Working with another Scout. and that it has been assembled properly for comfort. when and where they could be used. e. and how to care for tents. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves. Do the following: a. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout. b. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing. 8. size. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove Show experience in camping by doing the following: a. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed. Plan two breakfasts. c.and external-frame packs. Camp a total of at least 20 nights at designated Scouting activities or events. Tell the difference between internal. 7. pitch a tent. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. b. c. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. 9. bedding). weight. balance. d. and two suppers. one lunch. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. Prepare a camp menu. One long-term camping experience of up to six consecutive nights may be applied toward this requirement. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet. and neatness. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. e. d. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched. c. b. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water. Describe the features of four types of tents. and contamination. Do the following: a.

Describe how the length and shape of a canoe affect its performance. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours. 6. After completing the swim. you must do TWO of the following. blisters. Demonstrate how to correctly size a paddle for a paddler in a sitting position and a kneeling position. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. conservation. trudgen. Jump feet first into water over your head in depth. sunburn. Backpack. h. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. 10. heatstroke. Tell how it applies to canoeing activities. e. 2. 5. g. 4. tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics. On any of these camping experiences. dehydration. The most common weather and water-related hazards encountered while canoeing and how to deal safely with each one. Before doing the following requirements. Hike up a mountain. including hypothermia. only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision: 1. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different materials used to make canoes. Name and point out the major parts of a canoe. Take a non-motorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles. b. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience. 3. or cross-country ski for at least four miles. Show how to properly fit and test a PFD of correct size. In your discussion. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while canoeing. snowshoe. c. Do the following: a. Discuss the following: a. c. and good citizenship. gaining at least 1. Do the following: a. public health. Explain how such conditions are recognized. d. Discuss the general care and maintenance of canoeing equipment. survival.b.Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety. 4. or crawl. The 100 yards or 100 meters must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. Canoeing 1. Name and point out the parts of a paddle. Name the different types of personal flotation devices (PFDs). heat exhaustion. b. rest by floating. and hyperventilation. tick bites. Explain the difference between a straight and bent-shaft paddle and when each is best used. . f. then swim 25 yards or 25 meters using an easy resting backstroke.000 vertical feet. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more. insect stings. 3. and explain when each type should be used. swim 75 yards or 75 meters in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke. The BSA Safety Afloat policy. breaststroke. 2. 5. b.

Move the canoe sideways or abeam in either direction. c. Describe how personal and group equipment can be packed and protected from water. forward sweep. Change places while afloat in the canoe. With a companion. In deep water. or a canoe trailer. exit the canoe and get back in without capsizing. Discuss what personal and group equipment would be appropriate for a canoe camping trip. backstroke. if possible) and return it to its proper storage location. or push a swamped canoe 50 feet to shallow water. a vehicle. Safely carry and launch the canoe from a dock or shore (both. c. d. J-stroke Using the strokes in requirement 7. rescue a swamped canoe and its paddlers by emptying the swamped canoe and helping the paddlers safely reenter their boat without capsizing. Move the canoe in a straight line for 50 yards. Launch from shore or a pier (both. Pivot or spin the canoe in either direction. 9. wearing the proper PFD and appropriately dressed for the weather and water conditions. and J-stroke. . Repeat while paddling on the other side. Demonstrate how to load and secure equipment in a canoe.6. if possible). 8. k. j. h. Forward stroke b. tow. Pushaway e. b. Using appropriate knots. In the shallow water. if possible). In deep water. draw stroke. empty the swamped canoe and reenter it. demonstrate how to secure a canoe to a rack on land. pushaway stroke. Capsize the canoe and demonstrate how staying with a capsized canoe will support both paddlers. demonstrate the following paddling strokes as both a bow and stern paddler: a. Reverse or back sweep For stern paddling only: g. Using a single-blade paddle and paddling only on one side. d. Stop the canoe. 7. i. Repeat after switching positions and paddling sides: a. reverse or back sweep. Draw d. wearing the proper PFD and appropriately dressed for the weather and water conditions. demonstrate solo canoe handling: a. Wearing the proper PFD and appropriately dressed for the weather and water conditions. g. b. Forward sweep f. Demonstrate kneeling and sitting positions in a canoe and explain the proper use for each position. With a companion. b. demonstrate the following tandem maneuvers while paddling on opposite sides and without changing sides. Swim. Safely land the canoe on a dock or shore (both. demonstrate proper form and use of the forward stroke. e. f. Backstroke c. use a properly equipped canoe to demonstrate the following: a.

Compare your prediction and original conclusion with what actually happened. Demonstrate how to lay shingles. Predict what would happen if you placed an iron nail in a copper sulfate solution. Store canoe properly (with assistance. miter. Freestyle e. 10. Then. Whitewater f. Obtain an MSDS for both a paint and an insecticide. and the environment? 2. table salt from water. Describe your observations and make a conclusion based on your observations. and to join two pieces of wood with screws. Show correct use of the cross-cut saw and of the rip-saw. and clinch a nail. c. Repeat while paddling on the other side. if needed).Discuss the following types of canoeing: a. d. plumb-line. oil from water. b. Name the practical processes that require these kinds of separations. and gasoline from motor oil. set. e. disposal. 5.c. 3. How does the safe storage of chemicals apply to your home. your school. 6. chalk-line and bevel. put an iron nail in a copper sulfate solution. Do EACH of the following activities: a. Do EACH of the following activities: a. Canoe poling Carpentry 1. b. draw a spike with a claw-hammer. and safe-handling sections for these two common household products. paddle a 50-yard course making at least one turn underway and one reverse of direction. finished in a workmanlike manner. Describe how you would separate sand from water. all work to be done without assistance. your community. d. Show how to plane the edge. Demonstrate the proper way to drive. Make a simple article of furniture for practical use in the home or on the home grounds. Compare and discuss the toxicity. Describe three examples of safety equipment used in a chemistry laboratory and the reason each one is used. end and the broad surface of a board. 2. 4. In deep water. . Demonstrate the use of the rule. Write the formula for the reaction that you described. Chemistry 1. Olympic flatwater b. Outrigger c. Make a proper landing at a dock or shore (both. level. Describe what a material safety data sheet (MSDS) is and tell why it is used. Marathon d. While paddling on one side only. if possible). exit the canoe and then get back in without capsizing. Discuss the safe storage of chemicals. square.

books. In a clear container. chemical engineers. and acid rain. Describe the chemical similarities and differences between toothpaste and an abrasive household cleanser. Do ONE of the following activities: a. Cut a round onion into small chunks. Cook the second portion of onion chunks until the pieces are translucent. Explain how the end use or purpose of a product affects its chemical formulation. Pick a current environmental problem as an example. Briefly describe the purpose of phosphates in fertilizer and in laundry detergent. Using resources found at the library and in periodicals. and add it to the mixture. Describe the difference between a chemical reaction and a physical change. describe the effect on the environment of ONE of the following: 1. mix a half-cup of water with a tablespoon of oil. 5. Visit a laboratory and talk to a practicing chemist. Leave the first portion raw. global warming. Explain why the oil and water do not mix. Construct a Cartesian diver. chemical . and explain how that substance worked to combine the oil and water. Briefly describe each one. 7. or brown in color. Separate the onion chunks into three equal portions. Using reasons from chemistry. and tell how it applies to your everyday life. Also. b. Used. Describe what happened. Do EACH of the following activities: a. The production of aluminum cans or plastic milk cartons 2. List the four classical divisions of chemistry. b. Taste each type of onion. Explain what happens to molecules in the onion during the cooking process. b. Newspaper d. Briefly describe what people are doing to resolve this hazard and to increase understanding of the problem. c. Ask what the chemist does. Name two government agencies that are responsible for tracking the use of chemicals for commercial or industrial use. Pick one agency and briefly describe its responsibilities to the public and the environment. learn about two different kinds of work done by chemists. Find a substance that will help the two combine. Describe how the behavior of gases affects a backpacker at high altitudes and a scuba diver underwater. and what training and education are needed to work as a chemist. Explain the chemical effects of ozone. Sulfur from burning coal 3. motor oil 4. explain why phosphates have been removed from laundry detergents. 4. c. Do EACH of the following activities: a. Cook the third portion until the onions are caramelized. and the Internet (with your parent's permission). 6. Explain how the use of phosphates in fertilizers affects the environment. Describe the taste of raw onion versus partially cooked onion versus caramelized onion. Define pollution. Describe its function in terms of how gases in general behave under different pressures and different temperatures.3. c.

2. Explain four of the following elements of chess strategy: exploiting weaknesses. d. Explain four opening principles. king safety. pawn structure. force. 5. the white rooks on a1 and h1. time. find out the education and training requirements. and decision-making skills. using Scouting's Teaching EDGE.technicians. Demonstrate on a chessboard four ways a chess game can end in a draw." f. zwischenzug. 6. and the black king on e5. What. Do the following: a. Sportsmanship and chess etiquette 3. Set up and solve five direct-mate problems provided by your merit badge counselor. including castling and en passant captures 4. discovered attack. skewer. c. double attack. The benefits of playing chess. and the endgame. remove the defender. tempo. and how these skills can help you in other areas of your life b. Do the following: a. Do ONE of the following: a. How to set up a chessboard c. or industrial chemists. The name of each chess piece b. Play at least three games of chess with other Scouts and/or your merit badge counselor. space. d. Explain why it is considered a game of planning and strategy. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the history of the game of chess. Demonstrate to your counselor that you know each of the following. Then. With White to move first. e. Explain the four rules for castling. b. Replay the games from your score sheets and discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the following: a. d. overloading. c. demonstrate how to force checkmate on the black king. pollutants are produced and how they are handled. Demonstrate scorekeeping using the algebraic system of chess notation. interposing. How each chess piece moves. Discuss the differences between the opening. b. On a chessboard. including developing critical thinking skills. decoy. Chess 1. Set up a chessboard with the white king on e1. if any. concentration skills. For each of the jobs. pin. teach the following to a Scout who does not know how to play chess: a. Explain any five of these chess tactics: clearance sacrifice. the middle game. demonstrate a "scholar's mate" and a "fool's mate. fork. overprotecting. Visit a county farm agency or similar governmental agency and learn how chemistry is used to meet the needs of agriculture in your county. c. Visit an industrial plant that makes chemical products or uses chemical processes and describe the processes used. .

Smith Goes to Washington (G) o Remember the Titans (PG) o October Sky (PG) o Mr. Chief government buildings such as your city hall. c. With your counselor's and a parent's approval. On a map of your community. Discuss the rights. Share what you have learned with your counselor. 5. plus you. Do the following: a. Have each competitor play at least two games. b. and explain to your counselor why you agree with one opinion more than you do another one. Fire station. or school. Discuss with your counselor what citizenship in the community means and what it takes to be a good citizen in your community. police station. Discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently. Attend a city or town council or school board meeting. Boys (G) o It's a Wonderful Life (G) o Mr. and hospital nearest your home 3. Historical or other interesting points b. Some suggestions: o Follow Me. 3. place of worship. Do the following: a. and obligations of citizenship. Citizenship in the Community 1. Find out which branch of local government is responsible for this issue.b. and explain how you can demonstrate good citizenship in your community. Ask what is being done about this issue and how young people can help. locate and point out the following: 1. Scouting unit. duties. Choose one of the issues discussed at the meeting where a difference of opinions was expressed. Organize and run a chess tournament with at least four players. Choose an issue that is important to the citizens of your community. or a municipal. Show the top offices and tell whether they are elected or appointed. b. watch a movie that shows how the actions of one individual or group of individuals can have a positive effect on a community. county courthouse. Holland's Opus (PG) o Hoosiers (PG) o Pay It Forward (PG13) o Braveheart (R) . c. With the approval of your counselor and a parent. 2. interview one person from the branch of government you identified in requirement 4a. Chart the organization of your local or state government. then do the following: a. or state court session. Play in a scholastic (youth) chess tournament and use your score sheets from that tournament to replay your games with your merit badge counselor. 4. county. and public works/services facility 2. Discuss with your counselor what you learned from the movie about what it means to be a valuable and concerned member of the community.

. Discuss the national issues you learned about with your counselor. and the history. slide show. its function. Tour a federal facility. d. speech. Include information about the history. discuss what you have learned with your counselor. and the challenges it faces. digital presentation. such as your patrol or a class at school. 3. Tell your counselor why these services are important to your community.S. With your counselor's and your parent's approval. find out more about the monument. Watch the national evening news five days in a row OR read the front page of a major daily newspaper five days in a row. Discuss the rights. and other resources. Explain to your counselor what you saw there and what you learned about its function in the local community and how it serves this nation. and ethnic groups of your community. volunteers. volunteer at least eight hours of your time for the organization. fliers and other literature. Choose a charitable organization outside of Scouting that interests you and brings people in your community together to work for the good of your community. c. recreation center. b. and explain why the monument is important to this country's citizens. and obligations of a responsible and active American citizen. 6.o The Patriot (R) 2. Do the following: a. Stage your presentation in front of your merit badge counselor or a group. Using books. contact the organization and find out what young people can do to help. Tell your counselor what you learned about the landmark or site and what you found interesting about it. b. Develop a public presentation (such as a video. List some of the services (such as the library. Choose a national monument that interests you. 3. find out more about this organization. Tell your counselor what you learned about the capitol. Visit a place that is listed as a National Historic Landmark or that is on the National Register of Historic Places. Capitol. Using a variety of resources (including newspapers. After your volunteer experience is over. While working on this merit badge. Citizenship in the Nation 1. cultures. Tour your state capitol building or the U. Explain what Citizenship in the Nation means and what it takes to be a good citizen of this country. the Internet. the Internet (with your parent's permission). c. and public safety) your community provides that are funded by taxpayers. its best features and popular places where people gather. Tell your counselor what you learned. 2. or photo exhibit) about important and unique aspects of your community. public transportation. Do TWO of the following: a. duties. brochures. and employees of the organization). Choose one of the issues and explain how it affects you and your family.

List the six functions of government as noted in the Preamble to the Constitution. Discuss each of the following documents with your counselor. Show your letter and any response you receive to your counselor. Declaration of Independence b. Find out about the author. Amendments to the Constitution 5. and climate influence its economy and its global partnerships with other countries. observe a current issue that involves international trade. Citizenship in the World 1. and tell your counselor why. Preamble to the Constitution c. Do the following: a. Explain what citizenship in the world means to you and what you think it takes to be a good world citizen. 8. citizenship. natural resources. . b.4. Explain what you have learned. Explain how citizens are involved in each branch. The Constitution d. 6. a. Explain the importance of the speech at the time it was given. and obligations of U. balance of payments. its values.S. foreign exchange. In relation to this current event. and free trade. duties. Name your two senators and the member of Congress from your congressional district. choose a speech of national historical importance. 3. 2. 7. Name the three branches of our federal government and explain to your counselor their functions. tariffs. Using resources such as major daily newspapers. and obligations of U. and tell your counselor about the person who gave the speech. the Internet (with your parent's permission). Select a foreign country and discuss with your counselor how its geography. Choose a sentence or two from the speech that has significant meaning to you. and explain the rights. With your counselor's approval. sharing your view with him or her. and tell how it applies to American citizens today. b. Explain international law and how it differs from national law. discuss with your counselor how a country's national interest and its relationship with other countries might affect areas such as its security. its economy. duties. and the health of its citizens. and news magazines. Pick a current world event. Explain how one becomes a citizen in the United States. Bill of Rights e. Write a letter about a national issue and send it to one of these elected officials. Tell your counselor how you feel life in the United States might be different without each one. citizens and the citizens of two other countries. explain the importance of the system of checks and balances.S. 4. Explain the role of international law and how international law can be used as a tool for conflict resolution. For each branch of government. Discuss the similarities and differences between the rights. Do TWO of the following: a. Discuss with your counselor how these functions affect your family and local community.

Attend a world Scout jamboree. World Organization of the Scout Movement 4. c. Bureau of International Information Programs 4. CARE 5. bookstore. 1. concert. Ambassador 2. United States and Foreign Commercial Service 3. The International Committee of the Red Cross 7. The World Health Organization 5. 2. 2. and traditions practiced or enjoyed there. Participate in or attend an international event in your area. Explain how a government is represented abroad and how the United States government is accredited to international organizations. OR examine a foreign newspaper available at your local library. or newsstand. Visit the Web site of the U. 5. Show on a world map countries that use each of these five different forms of government. ethnic foods. Discuss the differences between constitutional and nonconstitutional governments. Climbing . 3. 1. Agency for International Development 5. State Department. Amnesty International 6. Find a news story about a human right realized in the United States that is not recognized in another country. 4. Do the following: 1. Do TWO of the following (with your parent's permission) and share with your counselor what you have learned: 1. Visit with a student or Scout from another country and discuss the typical values.Include in your discussion an explanation of why countries must cooperate in order for world trade and global competition to thrive. Select TWO of the following organizations and describe their role in the world. or play. 2. Visit the Web site of an international news organization or foreign government. Explain the purpose of a passport and visa for international travel. Learn more about an issue you find interesting that is discussed on this Web site. 2. Name at least five different types of governments currently in power in the world.S. The United Nations 2. 3. Do the following: 1. such as an ethnic festival. Consul 3. The World Court 3. 2. Describe the roles of the following in the conduct of foreign relations. holidays.

Explain the following: top-rope climbing. lead climbing. Figure eight on a bight b. Climbers b. Harnesses. With the help of the merit badge counselor or another Scout. and rappelling (i. and while bouldering. a. 5.. Determine how to summon aid to the climbing area in case of an emergency. Location. Properly coil a rope. including heat and cold reactions.e. 4. Evaluate the safety of a particular climbing area. Explain how the difficulty of climbs is classified. Water knot d. 7. Do the following: a. and explain what they mean. the condition of the climbing surface. help prevent. Boulderers and their spotters 6. and a helmet. Commercially made climbing harness . Explain when and how a rope should be retired. abrasions. e. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur during climbing activities. rappellers and can also wear gloves). sprains. Figure eight follow-through c. Show how to examine a rope for signs of wear or damage.1. Consider weather. or rappelling. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in climbing and rappelling activities and what you should do to anticipate. 3. Describe the kinds of rope acceptable for use in climbing and rappelling. and apply classifications to the rock faces or walls where you will demonstrate your climbing skills. Do the following: a. Demonstrate the ability to tie each of the following knots. visibility. Double fisherman's knot (Grapevine knot) 8. 2. c. Correctly put on at least ONE of the following: a. Rappellers c. Verbal signals. Explain the importance of using verbal signals during every climb and rappel. c. demonstrate the verbal signals used by each of the following: a. and respond to these hazards. snakebite. Discuss ways to prevent a rope from being damaged. and bouldering. Rope. mitigate. Belayers d. c. Present yourself properly dressed for belaying. b. b. blisters. fractures. Knots. b. climbing. stopped breathing. appropriate clothing. Give at least one example of how each knot is used in belaying. climbing. d. Do the following: a. and any other environmental hazards. footwear. d. dehydration. rope burns. and insect bites or stings. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and Outdoor Code. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person.

Tie in to a belay rope set up to protect rappellers. text messages. reading books. 12. and other print media. Take note of how each scout participates in the group discussion and how effectively he communicates his story. Belay three different climbers ascending a rock face or climbing wall. For three days. 2. Rappelling. Discuss with your counselor what your log reveals about the importance of communication in your life. Using a carabiner and a rappel device. hardware. e-mail. listening to teachers or the radio. Do ONE of the following: a. Obtain information 2. a. For each type of communication discuss with your counselor an instance when that method might not be appropriate or effective. such as talking person-to-person. Understand someone's feelings c. a. List as many ways as you can think of to communicate with others (face-to-face. A persuasive argument 3. by telephone.b. meet with other scouts or with friends. Climb at least three different routes on a rock face or climbing wall. b. c. and demonstrate good rappelling technique. Think of ways to improve your communications skills. Have them share personal stories about significant events in their lives that affected them in some way. demonstrating good technique and using verbal signals with belayer. b. Communications 1. Identify one example of each of the following. Keep track of the time and different ways you spend communicating. rappelling.Demonstrate ways to store rope. For one day. and discuss with your counselor when you have listened to: 1. Use verbal signals to communicate with a belayer. and so on). keep a log in which you describe your communication activities. Rappel down three different rock faces or three rappel routes on a climbing wall. Report what you have learned to your counselor about the differences you observed in effective communication. b. Climbing. watching television. Do ONE of the following: . c. 10. Tied harness 9. and using any electronic communication device. Belaying. Show the correct way to tie into a belay rope. In a small-group setting. d. keep a journal of your listening experiences. Belay three different rappellers descending a rock face or climbing wall using a top rope. Explain the importance of belaying climbers and rappellers and when it is necessary. secure your climbing harness to a rappel rope. letter. b. 11. and other gear used for climbing. Appreciate or enjoy something 4. Do the following: a. and belaying.

class at school. for example. email or regular mail. Pick one and find out the education. discuss with your counselor how persuasive you were. Practice active listening skills and take careful notes of each point of view. using.3. a collage. 6. brochure. training. then write the script and prepare the program. a. and experience required for this profession. Prepare teaching aids for your plan. product or service. Carry out your plan. campfire program. Show how you would call to invite this person to speak. Include at least one article and one photograph or illustration. use. a hobby. Think of a creative way to describe yourself. With your counselor's approval. or other group. like. Have the patrol leaders' council approve it. and explain why this profession might interest you. Listen actively to learn as much as you can about the person. Find out about three career opportunities in communication. b. or buy your concept. and share this with your counselor. With your counselor. career or life experiences. Write a five-minute speech. but if you decide to do so. Try to persuade the counselor to agree with. develop a plan to teach a skill or inform someone about something. or a song or skit. Include at least three articles or entries and one photograph or illustration. your troop or crew. Give it at a meeting of a group. determine whether the person has learned what you intended. make a presentation to your counselor about yourself. school board. Serve as master of ceremonies. Do the following: . Build a sales plan based on its good points. talent. Write to the editor of a magazine or your local newspaper to express your opinion or share information on any subject you choose. short story or autobiography. and include reasons why the audience would want to hear this person speak. It is not necessary to post your web page or blog to the internet. Interview someone you know fairly well. Do ONE of the following: a. Then prepare and deliver to your counselor an introduction of the person as though this person were to be a guest speaker. Send your message by fax. and one link to some other web page or blog that would be helpful to someone who visits the web page or blog you have created. 7. Cooking 1. product. or respect because of his or her position. 5. b. 8. or an interfaith worship service. debate) approved by your counselor where several points of view are given on a single issue. you must first share it with your parents and counselor and get their permission. drawing or series of photographs. flier or other printed material for your scout troop. or service in which you have great confidence. Plan a troop court of honor. After your sales talk. 4. Discuss this with your counselor. c. Attend a public meeting (city council. Present an objective report that includes all points of view that were expressed. Using the aid you created. 9. Use desktop publishing to produce a newsletter. or a sport). Choose a concept. Create a web page or blog of special interest to you (for instance.

A one-pot dinner. Milk. They need not be prepared consecutively. the two dinners. poultry. b. Oils (fats) and sugars b. nuts vi. b. drink. 3. coli (Escherichia coli) enteritis 4. A camp dinner with soup. c. yogurt. Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars. and the proper treatment. Staphylococcal enteritis 3. or an appropriate substitute. and fresh vegetables should be stored. two fresh vegetables. cheese v. d. Do the following: a. f. eggs. Describe to your counselor food preparation techniques that result in more healthful and nutritious meals. 4. Fruits iv. beans. Using the menu planned for requirement 3. Time your cooking so that each course will be ready to serve at the proper time. The food groups i. Include the following: a. When preparing your menu. c. fish. Explain the number of servings recommended per day from each group. Prepare and serve for yourself and two others. Meats. Give your counselor examples from each food group. E. fish.a. poultry. and one breakfast. Describe for your counselor the measurements of servings for each food group. Review with your counselor the injuries that might arise from cooking. transported. Label the following food groups in the pyramid and how much of each you should eat each day. Describe how meat. and properly prepared for cooking. c. Illustrate for your counselor the food pyramid that fits you. Plan a menu for two straight days (six meals) of camping. All are to be properly prepared. eggs. one lunch. make a food list showing cost and amount needed to feed three or more boys. fish. Use foods other than canned. follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid. do the following and discuss the process with your merit badge counselor: a. Vegetables iii. e. Describe the following food-related illnesses and tell what you can do to help prevent each from happening: 1. Botulism 5. 1. d. The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. and dessert. Scouts working on this . meat. chicken. Grains ii. Trichinosis 6. Hepatitis 2. Salmonella enteritis 2. Using the menu planned for requirement 3. including burns and scalds. List the utensils needed to cook and serve these meals. dairy products.

badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary. or other responsible adult). (Where local regulations do not allow you to do this. Tell what utensils were needed to cook and serve these meals. When preparing your menu. lunch. Using the menu planned for requirement 7. 7. Using the menu planned for requirement 5. the trail breakfast and dinner. use safe food-handling practices. clean up the site thoroughly. logs. lunch. and other rubbish by packing them out and depositing them in a proper container. For each meal prepared in requirement 6a. Include the following: a. c. guardian. c. b. The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. and dinner for a trail or backpacking trip where light weight is important. the counselor may change the requirement to meet the law. follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid. Dispose of garbage. 6. Plan a menu for one day (three meals) or for four meals over a two-day period of trail hiking or backpacking. Scouts working on this badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary. Prepare and serve for yourself and two others. and dinner from the menu you planned for requirement 7. b. Using the menu planned for requirement 5a. make a food list. b. Include support for your cooking utensils from rocks. showing cost and amount needed to feed yourself and at least one adult (parent. For each meal prepared in requirement 4a. clean up the site thoroughly. They need not be prepared consecutively. cans. A breakfast. When preparing your menu. For meals prepared in requirement 4a for which a fire is needed. lunch. do the following: a. follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid. List the utensils needed to cook and serve these meals. The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. d. After each meal. Figure the weight of the foods in requirement 4a. Plan a menu for three full days of meals (breakfast.) c. Dispose of garbage. or like material. 5. paper. foil. use safe food-handling practices. b. c. After each meal. cans. and dinner) to be cooked at home. Time your cooking so that each course will be ready to serve at the proper time. a. and other rubbish by packing them out and depositing them in a proper container. They need not be prepared consecutively. foil. Use a backpacking stove to cook at least one meal. Scouts working on this badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary. The same fireplace may be used for more than one meal. family member. use a lightweight stove or build a low-impact fire. d. make a food list showing cost and amount needed to feed three or more boys. Use an approved trail stove (with proper supervision) or charcoal to prepare your meals. All meals are to be cooked or properly prepared. paper. Time your cooking to have each course . You should be able to store all foods used for several days without refrigeration. Prepare and serve a breakfast.

training. 8. After doing EACH of the following. Gangs and their impact on the community c. discuss with your counselor what you have learned: a. Community Watch. 6. conduct a security survey of your home and discuss the results with your family. Why alcohol. create a page long public service announcement that could be read over the public address system at school or posted on the school's Web site. With permission from school officials. Crime Prevention 1. Explain how this program can benefit your neighborhood. Discuss the following with your counselor: a. With your parent's and counselor's approval. 5. Using the checklist in this pamphlet. c. Learn how to do a crime prevention survey. 7. Discuss this with your counselor. and while traveling. b. including youth. and experience required for this profession. Do the following: a. Find out about three career opportunities in cooking. Pick one and find out the education. and explain why this profession might interest you. Discuss the following with your counselor: a. visit a jail or detention facility or a criminal court hearing. How drug abuse awareness programs. in your community. Help raise awareness about one school safety issue facing students by doing ONE of the following: a. at school. When and how to report a crime 4. b. Discuss the role and value of laws in society with regard to crime and crime prevention. or Crime Stoppers. Teach your family or patrol members how to protect themselves from crime at home. Do ONE of the following: a. Include in your discussion the definitions of 'crime' and 'crime prevention'. and marijuana are sometimes called 'gateway drugs' and how 'gateway drugs' can lead to the use of other drugs c. tobacco. Three resources in your city where a person with a drug problem or drug-related problem can go for help . 3.ready to serve at the proper time. Inspect your neighborhood for opportunities that may lead to crime. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor. The role of citizens. Make a presentation to a group such as a Cub Scout den that addresses the issue. in crime prevention b. such as 'Drugs: A Deadly Game' help prevent crime b. Discuss your experience with your counselor. Create a poster for display on a school bulletin board. Prepare a notebook of newspaper and other clippings that addresses crime and crime prevention efforts in your community. 8. b. 2. Assist in the planning and organization of a crime prevention program in your community such as Neighborhood Watch.

Explain why these are important. and how those agencies function during emergency situations. The purpose and operation of agencies in your community that help law enforcement personnel prevent crime. mental. Choose a career in the crime prevention or security industry that interests you. Discuss your observations with your counselor. Explain the role private security plays in crime prevention. Learn about independent living aids such as service animals. c. Find out about disability awareness education programs in your school or school system. How to recognize child abuse f. The role of a sheriff's or police department in crime prevention. Visit TWO of the following locations and take notes about the accessibility to people with disabilities. b. Tell why this position interests you. Visit an agency that works with people with physical. . Do TWO of the following: a. Do ONE of the following advocacy activities: a. Your place of worship c. emotional. and teletypewriters (TTYs). employment. Learn how people with disabilities take part in a particular adaptive sport or recreational activity. Present a counselor approved disabilities awareness program to a Cub Scout pack or other group. b. canes. and education. Disabilities Awareness 1. c. Talk to a Scout who has a disability and learn about his experiences taking part in Scouting activities and earning different merit badges. explain and use person first language. Your Scout camping site d. Describe the level of education required and responsibilities of a person in that position. How the illegal sale and use of drugs lead to other crimes e. Talk to an individual who has a disability and learn about this person's experiences and the activities in which this person likes to participate. During your presentation. a. or contact a disability advocacy agency. Volunteer with a program or agency for eight hours. b. Learn about opportunities its members have for training.d. Your school b. d. Discuss the following with your counselor: a. 4. or educational disabilities. Collect and read information about the agency's activities. or park) 5. museum. 3. Discuss with your counselor proper disability etiquette and person first language. Discuss with your counselor how people use such aids. Explain what advocacy is. give examples of five things that could be done to improve upon the site and five things about the site that make it friendly to people with disabilities. d. 2. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor. The 'three Rs' of Youth Protection 9. In your notes. A public exhibit or attraction (such as a theater.

Explain what issues (including temperament) must be considered when deciding on what breed of dog to get as a family pet. "sit". . Name five professions that provide services to people with disabilities. Do the following: a. Explain the importance of dental care and tooth brushing to your pet's health. government agencies. and costs. training schedule. b. 6. ticks. Share your list with your counselor. and intestinal parasites (worms) for a dog in your area from puppyhood through adulthood. Explain the importance of house-training. Explain what "responsible pet ownership" means. Do the following: a. List 10 myths and misconceptions about people with disabilities and learn the facts about each myth. grooming and bathing schedules. 2. Pick one that interests you and find out the education.* Maintain a log of your activities during this period that includes these items: feeding schedule. the Internet (with your parent's permission). and socialization training for your dog. c. Also include a brief description of the type of housing/shelter arrangements you have for your dog. Make a commitment to your merit badge counselor describing what you will do to show a positive attitude about people with disabilities and to encourage positive attitudes among others. learn about myths and misconceptions that influence the general public's understanding of people with disabilities. c. and experience required for this profession. Do the following: a. OR give a short history of one breed. "heel". Point out on a dog or a sketch at least 10 body parts. "down". Using resources such as disability advocacy agencies. Discuss the control methods for preventing fleas. 4. Discuss how your awareness has changed as a result of what you have learned. then use it to make a presentation to a Cub Scout pack or other group. Describe some common characteristics of the dogs that make up each of the seven major dog groups. if necessary. c. "stay". keep and care for your dog. exercise periods. Give the correct name of each one. Show with your dog any three of these commands: "come". 5. Briefly discuss the historical origin and domestication of the dog. 7. Explain the correct way to obedience train a dog and what equipment you would need. Discuss the proper vaccination schedule for a dog in your area from puppyhood through adulthood. obedience training.c. b. types of food used. training. heartworms. Tell some specific characteristics of seven breeds of dogs (one from each major group). veterinary care. Discuss what you learn with your counselor. 3. and news magazines. and tell why this profession interests you. amount fed. and "drop it". b. 6. Dog Care 1. For two months. "fetch" or "get it". a weekly body weight record.

On a floor plan of a room in your home. Explain what to do if a dog is hit by a car. e. 7. Show how to safely reset the circuit breaker. parvovirus. 4. or extreme humidity) where you live that need to be considered for your dog. 7. 2. Know the laws and ordinances involving dogs that are in force in your community. c. body. Do the following: a. 8. * The activities used to fulfill the requirements for the Dog Care merit badge may not be used to help fulfill the requirements for other merit badges. f. Show which fuse or circuit breaker protects each one. Explain what overloading an electric circuit means. or head of your dog. Do the following: . c. Show how to put on a simple dressing and bandage the foot. Tell what you have done to make sure your home circuits are not overloaded. Explain the difference between direct current and alternating current. 9. Make a simple drawing to show how a battery and an electric bell work. Discuss the benefits of grooming your dog's coat and nails on a regular basis. Show how to rescue a person touching a live wire in the home. List the things needed in every dog owner's first-aid kit. Explain what to do in the event of an electrical fire. cold winters. Show how to put on an emergency muzzle. 9. 8. Demonstrate that you know how to respond to electrical emergencies by doing the following: a. the signs and symptoms and the methods of prevention of rabies. 5. Explain how to treat wounds. h. Visit a veterinary hospital or an animal shelter and give a report about your visit to your counselor. Show how to treat an electrical burn. Explain first aid for a dog bite. Discuss with your counselor any seasonal conditions (like hot summers. e. and outlets. d. Explain what to do in an electrical storm. using the checklist found in this pamphlet or one approved by your counselor. Electricity 1. 3. Tell the dangers of home treatment of a serious ailment. b. Briefly discuss the cause and method of spread. make a wiring diagram of the lights. Complete an electrical home safety inspection of your home. Make a simple electromagnet and use it to show magnetic attraction and repulsion. d. Show how to render first aid to a person who is unconscious from electrical shock. b. e. distemper. Explain why a fuse blows or a circuit breaker trips. Tell how to find a blown fuse or tripped circuit breaker in your home. and heartworms in dogs. Discuss what you find with your counselor. g.d. Explain the precautions to take in handling a hurt dog. 6. switches.

Connect a buzzer. Draw a simple schematic diagram. Tell about three audio applications of electronics. or repairing electronic devices. Tell about the need for and the use of test equipment in electronics. It must show resistors. Electronics 1. b. to the best of your ability. Tell how you can use electronics for a control purpose. Name three types of test equipment. and then choose ONE of the following and build a circuit to show the techniques used: a. and transistors or integrated circuits. Hook a model electric train layout to a house circuit. Tell the purpose of each part. 10. building. and three binary numbers into decimal numbers. Discuss each of the following with your merit badge counselor. double-throw switch. e. Tell how it works. capacitors. Show that it works. Do the following: a. b. Show the right way to solder and desolder. c. Show how to change three decimal numbers into binary numbers.a. altering. Tell what precautions should be observed when soldering printed circuit boards. explain to your counselor how the circuit you built operates. and then build an audio circuit. Use the correct symbols. and then build a control device circuit. b. voltage. Read an electric meter and. or light with a battery.Do any TWO of the following: a. Build a simple rheostat. and resistance using Ohm's law. Tell about the function of a printed circuit board. b. b. bell. 3. Tell how they operate. . Discuss with your counselor five ways in which your family can conserve energy. 2. Make and run a simple electric motor (not from a kit). using your family's electric bill. Show how to avoid heat damage to electronic components. Do the following: a. Show how to read the schematic diagram of the project you choose and.Explain the following electrical terms: volt ampere watt resistan potential ohm ce difference rectifi rheostat conductor er groun circuit short circuit d 11. Build a single-pole. Show that it works. Label all parts. determine the energy cost from the meter readings. Do the following: a. 4. c. 5. Tell about the basic principles of digital techniques. c. d. Have a key or switch in the line. and then build a digital circuit. Show how to solve a simple problem involving current. Describe the safety precautions you must exercise when using. b.

Tornado or hurricane 14. Touching a live household electric wire b.Violence in a public place c. Show three ways of attracting and communicating with rescue planes/aircraft. Clothes on fire d. Discuss with and explain to your counselor what training and education are needed for each position. Emergency Preparedness 1.Mountain/backcountry accident 11. Discuss with your counselor the aspects of emergency preparedness: 1. Respond to emergency situations 3. 1. 2. You must use situations 1. Vehicle trapped in a blizzard 9. recover.Major flood 15. A room filled with carbon monoxide c. Complete a family plan. discuss their responses. and be informed for the situations on the chart you created for requirement 2b. Show how you could safely save a person from the following: a.Avalanche (snowslide or rockslide) 17.Boating accident 12. Explosion in the home 4. Prepare for emergency situations 2. Flash flooding in town or the country 10. Vehicle stalled in the desert 8. Do the following: a. Recover from emergency situations 4. Earn the First Aid Merit Badge. 3. Mitigate and prevent emergency situations Include in your discussion the kinds of questions that are important to ask yourself as you consider each of these. and share your family plan. Discuss this chart with your counselor. .Gas leak in a home or building 13. Food-borne disease (food poisoning) 6. Automobile accident 5. Make a chart that demonstrates your understanding of each of the four aspects of emergency preparedness in requirement 2a (prepare. 3. mitigate) with regard to 10 of the situations listed below. Home basement/storage room/garage fire 3. respond. make a plan. Drowning using nonswimming rescues (including accidents on ice) 4. Find out about three career opportunities in electronics that interest you. 2. and 5 below in boldface but you may choose any other five listed here for a total of 10 situations. Home kitchen fire 2. 4. b. Fire or explosion in a public place 7. Meet with and teach your family how to get or build a kit. Then meet with your counselor and report on your family meeting.Nuclear power plant emergency 16.6.

Take part in an emergency service project. Develop an accident prevention program for five family activities outside the home (such as taking a picnic or seeing a movie) that includes an analysis of possible hazards. and the reasons for the corrections you propose. recover from. Prepare a personal emergency service pack for a mobilization call. 8. . With another person. Messenger service and communication 3. the training they need. and explain to your counselor how a group of Scouts could volunteer to help in the event of these types of emergencies. Find out who is your community's emergency management director and learn what this person does to prepare for. Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do. In your own words. and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services: 1. c. Collection and distribution services 4. Group feeding. 7. describe your part to your counselor. a proposed plan to correct those hazards. Explain the needs and uses of the contents. Tell your part in making it work. Discuss this information with your counselor and apply what you discover to the chart you created for requirement 2b. respond to. 9. c. conserving the energy of rescuers while ensuring the well-being and protection of the injured person. c. Do ONE of the following: a. explain it. show a good way to transport an injured person out of a remote and/or rugged area. with a Scouting unit or a community agency. Prepare a written plan for mobilizing your troop when needed to do emergency service. discussing what you learned during the exercise that required changes or adjustments to the plan. define entrepreneurship. Afterward. Entrepreneurship 1. either a real one or a practice drill. Review or develop a plan of escape for your family in case of fire in your home. and mitigate and prevent emergency situations in your community. 6. Using a safety checklist approved by your counselor. If there is already a plan. Explain to your merit badge counselor the role of the entrepreneur in the economy of the United States. Prepare a family kit (suitcase or waterproof box) for use by your family in case an emergency evacuation is needed. Explain the hazards you find and how they can be corrected.5. Before the exercise. inspect your home for potential hazards. b. and sanitation b. Do the following: a. Do the following: a. shelter. Identify the government or community agencies that normally handle and prepare for the emergency services listed under 6a. Take part in at least one troop mobilization. b. conduct an "afteraction" lesson. Crowd and traffic control 2.

Write down as many ideas as you can think of for a business. 3. For each of your three ideas. c. select three ideas that you believe are the best opportunities for you. If you are selling a product. How well is the business doing? Report what you learn. Determine how you can make enough of the product or provide enough of the service to meet your business goals. Explain to your counselor why you chose these three ideas rather than the others on your list. Report what you learn. Get ideas from your family and friends. 3.2. Do the following: a. 4. informally interview potential customers. Identify and describe the potential liability risks of your product or service. Conduct a feasibility study of your business idea by doing all of the following (briefly writing or explaining each item to your counselor): a. 2. Explain how you will get the money. 2. Identify the type of person who would buy your product or service. Personnel 1. Explain how you will accomplish this. e. From your list. 4. Tell how you will promote and sell your product or service to potential customers. prepare a list of questions that you would ask potential customers. Find out how the entrepreneur raised the capital (money) to start the business. Identify and interview an individual who has started his or her own business. using the lists of questions from requirement 3c. c. For each of the three ideas that you chose. b. Determine who your customers are. Determine what type of license you might need in order to sell or to make your product or service. b. Describe the unique benefits of your product or service. 5. Describe your qualifications for the work. d. Tell how you will sell your product or service and make a profit. 3. Determine whether it is technically feasible (practical or doable). choose the one idea that you feel is your best business opportunity. . Determine how your business responsibilities will fit into your schedule. 3. Explain how you determined the price. Market 1. Find out how the entrepreneur got the idea for the business and how the entrepreneur recognized it as a market opportunity. Using the information you have gathered. 4. 2. d. Product or Service 1. Calculate the selling price of your product or service. Determine how much money you will need to start your business. Tell how you will make the product or perform the service. Finances 1. Determine what parts of the business you will handle yourself. Identify your business goals. determine how much it will cost to make one prototype.

Discuss how the actions of one member can affect other members. d. Plan and carry out a project that involves the participation of your family. start your own business. plan and carry out a family meeting to include the following subjects: 1. Prepare a list of your regular home duties or chores (at least five) and do them for 90 days. Show evidence that you started your business (sales receipts. Discuss with your counselor any ethical questions you have faced or think you may face in your business venture. or photos of the product). If you will need help. describe the qualifications your helpers should have and what duties they will perform. 5. c. Project (estimate) your sales through the first three months of operation. The objective or goal of the project b. Keep a record of how often you do each of them. 4. Family Life 1. b. 3. counselor: a. Understanding the growing-up process and how the body changes. The effect of technology on your family Discussion of each of these subjects will very likely carry over to more than one family meeting. 2. When you believe that your business idea is feasible. Design a promotional poster or flier for your product or service. List several reasons why you are important to your family and discuss this with your parents or guardians and with your merit badge counselor. Sketch a prototype of your product or write a description of your service. . alcohol. 6. Avoiding substance abuse. Submit a report to your merit badge counselor outlining how the project benefited your family. all of which negatively affect your health and well-being 2. After completing the project. Discuss with your merit badge counselor how to plan and carry out a family meeting. Create the prototype. With the approval of your parents or guardians and your merit badge counselor. including tobacco. b.2. discuss the following with your merit badge. Determine whether you will need additional help to operate your business. and making responsible decisions dealing with sex 3. decide on and carry out a project that you would do around the home that would benefit your family. 5. The results of the project 6. Calculate the cost of all the materials and labor to compute the total cost of making your prototype. for example. Calculate the profit you expect to make. How individual members of your family participated c. Prepare an outline on what a family is and discuss this with your merit badge counselor. and drugs. Personal and family finances 4. Tell why families are important to individuals and to society. List all of the materials you used to make your prototype. Do the following: a. After this discussion. A crisis situation within your family 5. Do TWO of the following: a.

Give an example of how fire grows and what happens. Explain what fire safety precautions you should take when you are in a public building. List the actions that cause seasonal fires and explain how these fires can be prevented. create a home fire-drill schedule. b. 7. Do the following: a. Demonstrate lighting a match safely. Explain how to extinguish a grease pan fire. 6. 8. Then do the following: a. Fire Safety 1. List the most frequent causes of burn injuries. h. Explain the chemistry and physics of fire. d. 3. Do the following: a. b. f. Explain how burn injuries can be prevented. Explain who should use fire extinguishers and when these devices can be used. Demonstrate the safe way to start a charcoal fire. 9. Name the most frequent causes of fire in the home and give examples of ways they can be prevented. drop. fireplaces. Your understanding of what makes an effective father and why. Do the following: a. Demonstrate the safety factors. Explain what fire safety equipment can be found in public buildings. Explain the role of human behavior in the arson problem in this country b. for auxiliary heating devices and the proper way to fuel those devices.7. candles. e. Your understanding of the responsibilities of a parent. Name the parts of the fire tetrahedron. roll. and your thoughts on the father's role in the family b. and cool. Draw a home fire-escape plan. Demonstrate the technique of stop. c. such as proper ventilation. g. b. Demonstrate the safe way to melt wax. cooking. 5. Conduct a home safety survey with the help of an adult. 10. Explain why vapors are important to the burning process. Do the following: a. List common circumstances that cause holiday-related fires and explain how these fires can be prevented. Demonstrate the safe way to fuel a lawnmower. b. and conduct a home fire drill. Name the products of combustion. 2.Do the following: . c. and electrical appliances. Test a smoke alarm and demonstrate regular maintenance of a smoke alarm. Include a discussion about fires caused by smoking in the home. Explain how you would report a fire alarm. Explain the difference between combustible and noncombustible liquids and between combustible and noncombustible fabrics. 4. Explain what to do when you smell gas and when you smell smoke. Discuss the following with your counselor: a.

d. Show the steps that need to be taken for someone suffering from a severe cut on the leg and on the wrist. 4. Display and discuss its contents with your counselor. Do the following: a. 11.Visit a fire station. Explain the standard precautions as applied to bloodborne pathogens. Describe the signs of a broken bone. Explain the term triage. c. Do the following: a. 2. including open (compound) fractures of the forearm. Explain when a bee sting could be life threatening and what action should be taken for prevention and for first aid. Identify the types of fire trucks. and possible prevention measures for the following conditions: a. b. e. on a wilderness camping trip. Show first-aid procedures for handling fractures (broken bones). Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. d.a. Demonstrate using a camp stove and lantern. Explain the cost of outdoor and wildland fires and how to prevent them. Explain what measures can be taken to reduce the possibility of further complicating these injuries. f. b. First Aid 1. and lower leg using improvised materials. upper leg. 12. 5. b. Describe the symptoms and possible complications and demonstrate proper procedures for treating suspected injuries to the head. for someone who shows signals of a heart attack. Tell why this position interests you. Explain the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). and back. Find out about the fire prevention activities in your community. d. and during an activity on open water. Describe the symptoms. Tell the dangers in the use of a tourniquet and the conditions under which its use is justified. neck. Explain how to set up a campsite safe from fire. Explain what action you should take for someone who shows signals of shock. b. Second Class. and First Class ranks. Satisfy your counselor that you have current knowledge of all first-aid requirements for Tenderfoot. Explain how you would obtain emergency medical assistance from your home. Then demonstrate proper technique in performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. c. 3. Do the following: a. Prepare a first aid kit for your home. c. Demonstrate setting up and putting out a cooking fire.Choose a fire safety-related career that interests you and describe the level of education required and responsibilities of a person in that position. proper first-aid procedures. and for someone who shows signals of stroke. Hypothermia . wrist. Explain the symptoms of heat stroke and what action needs to be taken for first aid and for prevention.

5. Discuss the meaning and importance of catch and release. Obtain and review a copy of the regulations affecting game fishing where you live. Teach another Scout a first-aid skill selected by your counselor. Convulsions/seizures c. including cuts. If a sick or injured person must be moved. With helpers under your supervision. and double surgeon's loop. Do the following: a. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Explain why bait fish are not to be released. or loosened tooth i. arrange a visit with your patrol or troop to an emergency medical facility or through an American Red Cross chapter for a demonstration of how an AED is used. heatstroke. hypothermia. Muscle cramps 6. Dehydration e. Demonstrate how to tie the following knots: clinch. blood loop (barrel knot). turle. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to anglers. Frostbite d. and sunburn. 7. strains. and obeying fishing regulations. b. 2. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing sports enthusiast. 3. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace techniques. Broken. puncture wounds. 8. improvise a stretcher and move a presumably unconscious person. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment. Abdominal pain h. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fishing. Discuss the differences between two types of fishing outfits. b. Describe how to properly release a fish safely to the water. Fishing 1. scratches. 4. Point out and identify the parts of several types of rods and reels. 7. Demonstrate the proper use of two different types of fishing equipment. including the aspects of littering. c. 6. palomar. b. Discuss the prevention of and treatment for the following health concerns that could occur while fishing. Bruises. Explain how and when each would be used. heat exhaustion. Do the following: a. . Do TWO of the following: a. Knocked-out tooth j. insect bites. With your counselor's approval. courteous behavior. c. Explain how and when each knot is used.b. dehydration. Name and identify five basic artificial lures and five natural baits and explain how to fish with them. Discuss the positive effects of Leave No Trace on fishing resources. sprains f. Demonstrate this method. chipped. Burns g. trespassing. tell how you would determine the best method. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following them.

8. 3. Otherwise. Discuss the prevention of and treatment for health concerns that could occur while fly-fishing. Discuss the meaning and importance of catch and release. acquire a fish and cook it. heat exhaustion. Discuss what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to anglers. 6. poppers. Describe how to properly release a fish safely to the water. Discuss several types of fly lines. including cuts and scratches. including the aspects of littering. Demonstrate how to tie proper knots to prepare a fly rod for fishing: a. Tie at least two types of the flies mentioned in this requirement. b. Add a tippet to a leader using a loop-to-loop connection or blood knot e. Demonstrate how to match a fly rod. Catch at least one fish. . Attach backing to fly line using the nail knot c. insect bites. puncture wounds. wet flies. Go to a suitable fishing location and make observations on what fish may be eating both above and beneath the water's surface. Tie a backing to a fly reel spool using the arbor knot b. Explain why they were adopted and what is accomplished by following them. Obtain and review a copy of the regulations affecting game fishing where you live or where you plan to fish. trespassing. nymphs. mitigate. line and leader to achieve a balanced system. and explain how and when each would be used. nail knot or a loop-toloop connection d. and saltwater flies. heatstroke. and respond to these hazards. 7. Do the following: a. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace techniques. Demonstrate the ability to cast a fly 30 feet consistently and accurately using both overhead and roll cast techniques. bass bugs. clean and cook a fish you have caught. and sunburn. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing enthusiast. Attach a leader to fly line using the needle knot. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in fly-fishing activities and what you should do to anticipate. Tell what each one imitates. hypothermia. Look for flying insects and some that may be on or beneath the water's surface. b. Do the following: a. dehydration. courteous behavior. If regulations and health concerns permit. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Fly Fishing 1. c. streamers. Discuss the positive effects of Leave No Trace on fishing resources. help prevent. 5. 2. and obeying fishing regulations. Tie a fly onto the terminal end of the leader using the improved clinch knot 4. 9.9. Explain the importance of matching the hatch. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fly-fishing. Explain how and when each of the following types of flies is used: dry flies.

shrub. logs. explain whether it is considered invasive or potentially invasive. Prepare a field notebook. explain how the damage was caused. or fruiting bodies. The characteristics of leaf. identify the damage. In the field notebook you prepared for requirement 1. Otherwise. 4. shrubs. and the position on the slope). Write a description in which you identify and discuss the following: a. b. Threatened and endangered species of plants and animals b. The important ways each tree. do ONE of the following: . Fisheries habitat 8. If regulations and health concerns permit. Intermediate cuttings e. Tell which watershed or other source your community relies on for its water supply. c. In the field notebook you prepared for requirement 1. slope. wild shrubs. The habitat in which these trees. The role of prescribed burning and related forest management practices 5. cone. including recreation 3. insect. 2. List several ways the wood of each species can be used. Photograph or sketch each example. twig. Forestry 1. Clean air (carbon cycling. Do the following: a. and identify 15 species of trees. make a collection. Do ONE of the following: a. sequestration) 6. Multiple-use management b.Catch at least one fish. or damage on trees. With your parent's and counselor's approval. including the following: a. aspect. or vines are found c. Describe what forest management means. Soil protection and increased fertility 4. Collect and identify wood samples of 10 species of trees. or core samples that show variations in the growth rate of their ring patterns. and discuss possible reasons for the variations in growth rate. Describe contributions forests make to: 1. or vine is used by humans or wildlife and whether the species is native or was introduced to the area. 3. Find and examine three stumps. acquire a fish and cook it. clean and cook a fish you have caught. Find and examine two types of animal. describe the location or origin of each example (including elevation. Even-aged and uneven-aged management and silvicultural systems associated with each type d. Our social well-being. Sustainable forest management c. If it is not native. Clean water 5. and describe the effects of the damage on the trees. b.10. Wildlife habitat 7. Our economy in the form of products 2. Photograph or sketch each example. or vines in a local forested area.

b. Test 100 garden seeds for germination. How the products are made and used 7. write about a forester's occupation including the education. and the forestry techniques used to achieve the objectives. and urbanization. Name your state or local wildfire control agency.a. Take part in a forest-fire prevention campaign in cooperation with your local fire warden. Gardening 1. Explain why you think some did not germinate. Where the trees are coming from (land ownership) or where they are going (type of mill or processing plant) 5. Three vegetables that bear above the ground. local university agricultural college. 6. Explain what can be done to reduce the consequences you discussed in 6a. planted or natural) 3. tree diseases. Grow six vegetables. Three root or tuber crops. Write a brief report describing the type of forest. three from seeds and three from seedlings. absence of fire. improper harvest. or counselor. forester. c. Grow six flowers. the management objectives. Report on what you learned. Describe what you should do if you discover a forest fire and how a professional firefighting crew might control it. Three fruits 3.. Give the food value of the following: a. The origin of the forest or stands of trees being utilized (e. Visit a managed public or private forest area with its manager or a forester familiar with it. through flowering. Take a trip to a logging operation or wood-using industrial plant and write a brief report describing: 1. how it will help prevent wildfires. or a botanical garden or arboretum. nursery. and your part in it. . c. Visit one or more local foresters and write a brief report about the person (or persons). Determine the percentage of seeds that germinate. 4. Describe the consequences to forests that result from FIVE of the following elements: wildfire. and duties related to forestry. 2. career opportunities. The forest's successional stage. How waste materials from the logging operation or manufacturing plant are disposed of or utilized c. Do the following: a. 7. air pollution. What is its future? 4. Write a brief report describing the campaign. deer or other wildlife overpopulation. insects. three from seeds and three from seedlings. Do the following: a. overgrazing.g. b. The products that are made from the trees 6. qualifications. state wildfire agency. b. through harvesting. Visit your county extension agent's office. b. Or. The species and size of trees being harvested or used and the location of the harvest area or manufacturer 2.

6. Maintain this garden through harvest or flowering. e. b. etc. religious organization. 4. and descendant mean. Do ONE of the following: a. records.5. A professional genealogist (someone who gets paid for doing genealogical research) c. Complete a family group record form. Build one water garden. Maintain the water garden for 90 days. A genealogical or lineage society b. show one of . 5. Build a vermipost bin (worm compost bin) and maintain it for 90 days. archive. such as your family's organization d. or library. b. Contact ONE of the following individuals or institutions. state library. or for 90 days. With your parent's help. On another family group record form. by telephone. b. Name three types of genealogical resources and explain how these resources can help you chart your family tree. Do a time line for yourself or for a relative. Record the information you collect so you do not forget it. Obtain at least one genealogical document that supports an event that is or can be recorded on your pedigree chart or family group record. d. state or national archive. or in the ground as a small. or by e-mail or letter. A genealogical education facility or institution. You must write in it at least once a week. A surname organization. 2.) 6. Tell how you would evaluate the genealogical information you found for requirement 4b. either in a container (at least 12 by 6 inches and 6 inches deep). Ask what genealogical services. Build a compost bin and maintain it for 90 days. The document could be found at home or at a government office. Explain to your counselor what the words genealogy. Then write a short biography based on that time line. Do the following: a. At least one of the two solutions must be an organic method. genealogical library. Begin your family tree by listing yourself and include at least two additional generations. diseased plants). or three ornamental plants. Identify five garden pests (insects. Do ONE of the following: a. listing yourself and your brothers and sisters as the children. and report the results: a. Build a hydroponic garden containing three vegetables or herbs. Recommend two solutions for each pest. ancestor. decorative pond no larger than 6 by 3 feet and 24 inches deep. c. 3. or activities this individual or institution provides. choose a relative or a family acquaintance you can interview in person. Genealogy 1. Keep a journal for 6 weeks. c. You may complete this requirement by using the chart provided in the Genealogy merit badge pamphlet or the genealogy software program of your choice. 7. A genealogical record repository of any type (courthouse.

route. changing field functions. accuracy. b. Show how to plot a UTM waypoint on a map. maintain. Discuss the following with your counselor: a. and proper attire. insect stings. and considering the weather. b. Then. attributes. Do the following: a. Then mark and edit a waypoint. How to use proper geocaching etiquette when hiding or seeking a cache. Explain the effect computers and the Internet are having on the world of genealogy. 2. and dehydration. c. post. exposure to poisonous plants. d. 5. Do the following: a. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in geocaching activities. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in geocaching activities and what you should do to anticipate. help prevent. Discuss what you have learned about your family and your family members through your genealogical research. demonstrate the use of a GPS unit to your counselor. Explain how photography (including microfilming) has influenced genealogy. Explain the following terms used in geocaching: waypoint. Choose five additional terms to explain to your counselor. using Scouting's Teaching EDGE. Compare the accuracy to that found with a GPS unit. Discuss how to properly plan an activity that uses GPS. cache. difficulty and terrain ratings. Explain how the Global Positioning System (GPS) works. log. 9. 6. and changing the coordinate system in the unit. b. 4. sharing your plan with others. snakebite.your parents and his or her brothers and sisters as the children. and respond to these hazards. including cuts. b. heat and cold reactions (sunburn. Do the following: a. mitigate. Describe the four steps to finding your first cache to your counselor. Explain the UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) system and how it differs from the latitude/longitude system used for public geocaches. tick bites. Why you should never bury a cache. . heatstroke. scrapes. heat exhaustion. and how to properly hide. Show you know how to use a map and compass and explain why this is important for geocaching. Include marking and editing a waypoint. including using the buddy system. trackable. hypothermia). and dismantle a geocache c. The principles of Leave No Trace as they apply to geocaching 3. 8. c. Explain the similarities and differences between GPS navigation and standard map reading skills and describe the benefits of each. This requirement may be completed using the chart provided or the genealogy software program of your choice. Geocaching 1.

Before doing so. d. follow the logs online for 30 days and share them with your counselor. Do the following: a. Explain what Cache In Trash Out (CITO) means. and respond to these hazards. Keep a log. monitor its progress at www.com. hyperventilation. Ask your parent for permission and help before you do so. b. tick bites. 2. choice of footwear. 8. *To fulfill this requirement. “Release" your Travel Bug into a public geocache and. following the guidelines in the Geocaching merit badge pamphlet. with your parent's permission. Then. 9. share with your counselor a six-month maintenance plan for the geocache where you are personally responsible for the first three months. Explain and. Type in your zip code to locate public geocaches in your area. and proper care of feet and footwear. and what you should do to anticipate.geocaching. pick one of the three and find the cache. Create a Scouting-related Travel Bug® that promotes one of the values of Scouting. hiking safety in the daytime and at night. frostbite. where possible. and altitude sickness.com. Then. Develop a plan for conditioning yourself for 10-mile hikes. Do ONE of the following: a. help prevent. teach the players how to use a GPS unit. snakebite. Plan a geohunt for a youth group such as your troop or a neighboring pack. go to www. and describe how you have practiced CITO at public geocaches or at a CITO event. heat exhaustion. insect stings. b. with your parent's permission.7. including hypothermia. Choose a theme. heatstroke. If a Cache to Eagle® series exists in your council. and describe how you will increase your fitness for longer hikes. either create CITO containers to leave at public caches. Hiking 1. Tell your counselor about your experience. dehydration. mitigate. set up a course with at least four waypoints. sprained ankle. c. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while hiking.com for 30 days. you will need to set up a free user account with www. or your place of worship. After setting up the geocache. Share the posted information about three of those geocaches with your counselor. sunburn. 3. blisters. . and share the materials you used and developed for this event. and play the game. show the points of good hiking practices including the principles of Leave No Trace. Describe the projects that each cache you visit highlights. With your parent's permission*. or host a CITO event for your unit or for the public. Explain how hiking is an aerobic activity.geocaching. and explain how the Cache to Eagle® program helps share our Scouting service with the public. Set up and hide a public geocache. courtesy to others. visit at least three of the 12 locations in the series. at school.geocaching. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while hiking. and share this with your counselor at the end of the 30-day period.

Home Repairs 1. d. Take a hike of 20 continuous miles in one day following a hike plan you have prepared. Repair a sagging door or gate. 3. Repair the screen in a window or door. but only if Hiking merit badge requirements 1. a clothing and equipment list. Include map routes. Under the supervision of your merit badge counselor. f. and any interesting things you saw. * The hikes in requirements 5 and 6 can be used in fulfilling Second Class (2a) and First Class (3) rank requirements. * 6. Under the supervision of your merit badge counselor. d. Waterproof a basement. do FOUR of the following: a. Caulk cracks or joints open to the weather. Take five hikes.4. Repair a break in a concrete or asphalt surface. Repair a piece of furniture. h. Maintain or recondition a yard tool and show that you know how to clean up and properly store this equipment. d. 3. b. c. Prepare a hike plan for each hike. Make a written plan for a 10-mile hike. 5. Build a workbench c. e. do THREE of the following: a. Install a single-pole light switch. g. 4. each on a different day. Replace a pane of glass. Weatherstrip a window or door. g. and a list of items for a trail lunch. The hikes of requirements 5 and 6 cannot be used to fulfill requirements of other merit badges. Replace an electrical wall outlet. or trim on a house. and 4 have been completed to the satisfaction of your counselor. write a short report of your experience. Discuss general precautions related to home repairs. Locate a main electrical switch box and know how to replace a fuse or reset a circuit breaker. f. Paint or varnish a piece of furniture. e. Solder a broken wire or metal object. c. Replace an electrical cord or repair a plug or lamp socket. a door. * 7. Give dates and descriptions of routes covered. Name at least 10 safe practices that every home repairer should exercise. 5. Share this report with your merit badge counselor. do TWO of the following: a. b. do TWO of the following: . the weather. Install or build equipment for storing tools. Under the supervision of your merit badge counselor. Repair a fence. After each of the hikes (or during each hike if on one continuous "trek") in requirements 5 and 6. 2. 2. Under the supervision of your merit badge counselor. b. Repair a loose step or railing. and each of 10 continuous miles.

Do the following: a. Name four leading breeds of horses. or field and how to tie the horse securely. b. d. b. 5. Repair a leaky hose or connector. 7. c. Describe the symptoms of colic. continuously do the following movements after safely mounting the horse. Describe the fire safety precautions you should take in a barn and around horses. Repair or replace damaged tile or linoleum. including picking hooves and caring for a horse after a ride. corral. 6.Explain and demonstrate how to approach and lead a horse safely from a stall. Mend an object made of china. at ease. Repair or replace a window sash cord. Repair a leaky water faucet. and explain how to care for this equipment. Explain what conformation is and why it is important. Demonstrate how to groom a horse. Explain how to determine what and how much to feed a horse and why the amount and kind of feed are changed according to the activity level and the breed of horse. c. Show how to properly saddle and bridle a horse. Walk the horse in a straight line for 60 feet. Demonstrate how to safely mount and dismount a horse. Repair a flush toilet. and in harmony with the horse: a. Either a parent or the merit badge counselor may supervise the Scout's work on any Home repairs requirements Horsemanship 1. e. Name 15 main parts of a horse. or pottery. Paint a wall or ceiling. . do THREE of the following: a. 6. c. e. 9. Trot or jog the horse in a straight line for 60 feet. 3. b. Explain the importance of hoof care and why a horse might need to wear shoes. 10. Under the supervision of your merit badge counselor. b. Explain the difference between lameness and unsoundness. d. Reinforce a picture frame.On level ground. Clear a clogged drain or trap. Explain the special features for which each breed is known. 4. b. Clean or replace a sprinkler head. Install drapery or curtain rods and then hang drapes or curtains. Describe the safety precautions you should take when handling and caring for a horse. glass. 11. f. Do the following: a. c.a. 2. 8. Name 10 parts of the saddle and bridle that you will use. Name and describe four other horse health problems. Walk the horse in a half circle of not more than 16 feet in radius. Do them correctly. g. Replace window blind cords.

Tell the story or stories at a Scout meeting or campfire. Explain their meanings. Teach and lead one game with a Scout group. Make three food items. means of getting around. and use. Write or tell about eight things adopted by others from American Indians. Learn three games played by a group or tribe. Learn twenty-five Indian place-names. or trapped. Sing two songs in an Indian language. their shape. tribal government. g. Lope (canter) the horse in a straight line for at least 60 feet. for food. and where the path or road leads. Halt and dismount. size. as approved by your counselor. Make an item of clothing worn by members of the tribe. Describe what they did or do now that makes them notable. 2. or nation. group. c. Do ONE of the following: a. customs in warfare. Show twenty-five signs in Indian sign language. fished. Indian Lore 1. Visit it. Identify at least ten artifacts by tribe or nation. Learn in English (or in the language you commonly speak at home or in the troop) an Indian story of at least three hundred words. f. Trot or jog the horse in a half circle of not more than 30 feet in radius. Give the history of one American Indian tribe. Focus on a specific group or tribe. or any number of shorter ones adding up to three hundred words. Make and decorate three items used by the tribe. Discuss them with your counselor. h. where members of the group now live. h. Do ONE of the following: a. Write or briefly describe how life would have been different for the European settlers if there had been no native Americans to meet them when they came to this continent. d. Halt straight. group. Give a demonstration showing how a specific Indian group traditionally hunted. Lope (canter) the horse in a half-circle not more than 30 feet in radius. Back up straight four paces. . d. a. clothing styles. i. e. family and clan relationships. Learn and show how a tribe traditionally cooked or prepared food. if possible. Do TWO of the following. 4. and how they live.d. language. Include those that will help you ask for water. g. Make an authentic model of a dwelling used by an Indian tribe. religious beliefs. Tell about traditional dwellings. Visit a museum to see Indian artifacts. Learn in an Indian language at least twenty-five common terms and their meanings. Tell their origins and meanings. food preparation. 3. c. b. b. or nation that lives or has lived near you. c. arts and crafts. e. Name five well-known American Indian leaders. f. way of life. games. b. Give their tribes or nations. either from the past or people of today.

From your scrapbook collection. Tell about its governing system. birds. * Some insects are endangered species and are protected by federal or state law. Make a scrapbook of the 20 insects you observe in 4a. where possible. 7. b. In your observations. including how and why it was formed. Be sure to check natural resources authorities in advance to be sure that you will not be collecting any species that is known to be protected or endangered. illustrations. slander. Tell the things that make social insects different from solitary insects. Observe an ant colony or a beehive. and articles. Tell how insects are different from all other animals. all specimens should be returned at the location of capture after the requirement is met. sketches. Point out and name the main parts of an insect. Label each insect with its common and scientific names. 5. In most cases. fish. identify three species of insects helpful to humans and five species of insects harmful to humans. and mammals. Compare the life histories of a butterfly and a grasshopper. b. include at least four orders of insects. 6. or in any habitat where collecting is prohibited. Show the differences between insects. 9. training. Observe 20 different live species of insects in their habitat. Describe some general methods of insect control. and explain the terms libel. 4.Find out about three career opportunities in insect study. Insect Study 1. Do the following: a. 10. In your discussion. Journalism 1. 8. Share your scrapbook with your merit badge counselor. centipedes. Do the following: a. Pick one and find out about the education. Explain what freedom of the press is and how the First Amendment guarantees that you can voice your opinion. Check with your merit badge counselor for those instances where the return of these specimens would not be appropriate. Discuss this with your counselor.i. tell how to distinguish between fact and opinion.Tell how insects fit in the food chains of other insects. Include photographs. . 11. Tell what you saw. Describe some of the similarities and differences between the governments of the United States and of the Six Nations (the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy). Every species is found only in its own special type of habitat. Tell how they are different. and spiders. Describe the characteristics that distinguish the principal families and orders of insects. Learn about the Iroquois Confederacy. 3. and experience required for this profession. Raise an insect through complete metamorphosis from its larval stage to its adult stage (eg. raise a butterfly or moth from a caterpillar)*. and explain why this profession might interest you. 2.

List the different news items and features presented. Do either A OR B: a. All on the same day. Ask for a tour of the various departments. All on the same day. c. talk to an executive from the business side about management’s relations with reporters. career. Discuss the differences between a hard news story and a feature story. privacy. public figure. 2. or life experiences. Tell your counselor how long each story is and how fair and accurate the stories are in presenting different points of view. Newspaper and magazine journalism: 1. If possible. During your tour. talk to the station manager or other station management executive about station operations. During your tour. and printing). and (with your parent’s permission) view a national broadcast news source online. and (with your parent’s permission) an online news source. concentrating on those related to news broadcasts. (editorial. and malice. From each source. interview someone in your community who is influential because of his or her leadership. Explain why the different news outlets treated the stories differently and/or presented a different point of view. and the time in minutes and seconds and the online space devoted to each story. Ask for a tour of the various divisions. read a local newspaper. Share your article with your counselor. the different elements used. Choose a current or an unusual event of interest to you. Visit a radio or television station. 3. a national newspaper. read and compare a story about the same event. 2. clip. read an autobiography written by a journalist you want to learn more about. Explain what is the 'five Ws and H. watch a local and national network newscast. and photographers and what makes a 'good' newspaper or magazine. editors. Compare the story lists. and write either a hard news article OR a feature article about the event. fair comment and criticism. particularly how management and the news staff work together. b. Tell how each source handled the story differently. Write an article that tells what you learned about this person and the contributions this person has made to the field of journalism. Gear the article for print OR audio OR video journalism. Then present to your counselor either a written or oral report telling what you learned about this person. Discuss how these matters relate to ethics in journalism. With your parent’s permission and counselor’s approval. Radio and television journalism: 1.' Then do ONE of the following: a. and discuss whether the stories are fair and accurate. 2. depending on its purpose or audience. and what makes a 'good' station.defamation. talent. listen to a radio newscast. business. Visit a newspaper or magazine office. . go with a reporter to cover a news event. a newsmagazine. With your parent’s permission and counselor’s approval. b.

Take a series of photographs to help tell the story of the event in pictures. Review the BSA Safety Afloat policy. Explain the care. or crawl. Write a brief synopsis of the event as well as captions for your photos. Use either the inverted pyramid style or the chronological style. a feature story and a critical review of the event. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feetfirst into water over the head in depth. breaststroke. Name and point out the major parts of a kayak. Include news photos and feature photos in your presentation. dehydration. trudgen. and experience required for this profession. mitigate. help prevent. The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and must include at least one sharp turn. b. Review the differences in the design between recreational. and what you should do to anticipate. sprains. 4. bilge pump. 4. cold-water shock and hypothermia. Review the advantages and disadvantages of the materials most commonly used to make kayaks. b. Write two newspaper articles about the event. c. Pick one and find out the education. then swim 25 yards using an easy. width. and first-aid treatment for the following injuries or illnesses that can occur while kayaking: blisters. After completing the swim. maintenance. Then demonstrate how to select and fit a life jacket for kayaking. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while participating in kayaking activities. and explain why this profession might interest you. Attend a public event and do ONE of the following: a. Do the following: a. Level off and swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke. 2. one using the inverted pyramid style and one using the chronological style. and strains. Review the characteristics of life jackets most appropriate for kayaking and understand why one must always be worn while paddling. and rocker are involved in the design of each type. c. sunburn. and throw bag. write a news story. resting backstroke. Discuss this with your counselor. then submit it to your community newspaper or BSA local council or district newsletter for consideration. and respond to these hazards. and sea or touring kayaks. rest by floating. Before doing requirements 3 through 9. extra paddle. Kayaking 1. Do the following: a. 5. sponge. training. Using a radio or television broadcasting style. Explain to your counselor how this applies to kayaking. Find out about three career opportunities in journalism. Review the article with your counselor. c. symptoms. whitewater. . Do the following: a. heat-related illnesses. Review the importance of safety equipment such as a signal device. Include how length. b. including weather and water-related hazards.d. Review prevention. Attend a Scouting event and write a 200-word article (feature or hard news) about the event. stability. and storage of a kayak. b. 3.

Spin or pivot 360 degrees to the right and 360 degrees to the left. examples of their . Before you visit the site. Forward stroke b. choose plants that will grow in your area. or parking area suited the overall design. 5. As a solo paddler. How to choose a kayak paddle. and one ground cover. Using the trucker's hitch and bowline. Stop the boat in one boat length. c. five trees. e. parts of a paddle. Using a properly equipped kayak with an open cockpit. Landscape Architecture 1. discuss the following with your merit badge counselor: a. d. d. Paddle a buoyed course of a length determined by your counselor that includes two right turns and two left turns performed while under way. b. Stern draw 8. b. being sure that you select examples of different shapes. Discuss how the choice of trees. eating. Reenter the kayak with assistance from a buddy boat. With the help of your counselor or a local nursery. d. and empty water from the kayak with assistance. Discuss the following: a. if needed. a clear path system. and sun and shade variety. 6. and the care and maintenance of a paddle. Move abeam to the right 10 feet and to the left 10 feet. demonstrate how to secure a kayak to a rack on a vehicle or a trailer. e. Draw stroke f. Demonstrate the HELP position. 7. Capsize the kayak. shelter. do the following: a.d. swim it and the paddle to shore. c. The different materials from which paddles are made. Demonstrate a kayak-over-kayak rescue. Discuss how the designated seating. and return 25 yards in a straight line. Tell whether the design had separate spaces. make a sharp turn. Go to a completed landscape project that a landscape architect has designed. Backstroke c. 3. a sit-on-top. and security of the users. Reverse sweep e. sizes. or to a rack on land. shrubs. use a properly equipped kayak to demonstrate the following: a. Forward sweep d. and ground covers used in the project contributed to its appeal and function. if possible. or an inflatable kayak. b. Paddle a straight line for 25 yards. use a properly equipped kayak to demonstrate the following: a. and textures. Safely capsize and perform a wet exit. Explain how the design reflected consideration for the comfort. Identify five shrubs. As a solo paddler. c. obtain a plan of the design from the landscape architect if one is available. b. Bring pictures of the different planting materials or. 2. After completing requirement 1.

discuss with your counselor the duties and responsibilities of a lawyer who works for one of the groups listed. 2. You may want to include new walks. Find out about three career opportunities in landscape architecture. Give examples of each. Tell about several laws that have been passed to protect the consumer and the seller. 4. where ditches occur. Report what you learned. Law 1. bank. 7. After the trial is over. discuss it with the group. The Justinian Code. and plants within the study area. covered waiting areas. 3. Write 250 words or more on what you saw. structures. Ask five people (not more than one from your immediate family) about the role of law enforcement officers in our society. Using a measuring tape. Do ONE of the following: a." Tell some of its sources. Redesign the area on another copy of the plan. Discuss their answers with them. Be prepared to tell how you might use each in the design of a landscape. Tell what a contract is. Go to a law enforcement officer in your neighborhood and ask him about his responsibilities and duties. Pick one and find out the education. Be sure to include the driveway and the wall and door where people enter the school or place of worship. benches. title company. Make a copy of this plan to save the original.branches. leaves. The Code of Hammurabi. Find out his or her duties and responsibilities. b. d. and experience required for this profession. or flowers to a troop meeting. b. and drainage structures. b. and where water stands for a longer period of time. 4. 6. criminal law. training. Report your findings. Define "law. Plan and conduct a mock trial with your troop or school class. spacedefining plantings of trees and shrubs. Arrange a visit with a lawyer who works for a business. and explain why this profession might interest you. . Tell about several organizations there are to help them. 5. Attend a session of a civil or criminal court. Describe functions it serves. Indicate any sidewalks. The development of the jury system. Tell the main differences between them. measure and draw the entry and its nearby area using a scale of 1/8 inch equal to 1 foot on an 11-by-17-inch piece of paper. Show you can do the following: a. Two famous trials in history. Discuss this with your counselor. On one copy. trees. then do 4b and 4c using the copies. c. Look at and study a place of worship or school grounds to find the place where most people arrive by bus or car. use directional arrows to indicate where the water drains across the site. c. Discuss two of the following: a. o If it is impossible for your to arrange such a visit. Decide how you can make the place safer and more comfortable for those using it. Must all contracts be in writing? Explain. Tell what civil law is. or government. and the Magna Carta.

Before doing requirements 2 through 15 a. First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c: (9a) Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat.2. Tell which you prefer. 3. and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim. resume swimming. Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl. The order of methods in water rescue. e. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water). sidestroke. turn sharply. towels. by reaching with a suitable object. . Make a list of 15 jobs which deal with some aspect of law or legal processes. How rescue techniques vary depending on the setting and the condition of the person needing assistance. level off and swim 25 feet on the surface. show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. paddles. b. Complete Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c and First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c. Why? 4. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible. and poles. Common drowning situations and how to prevent them. c. legs. Demonstrate "reaching" rescues using various items such as arms. How to identify persons in the water who need assistance. Situations for which in-water rescues should not be undertaken. shirts. Explain the following: a. breaststroke. and by throwing lines and objects. Explain the requirements for becoming a lawyer in your state. and elementary backstroke. then return to your starting place. 3. (7c) Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg. Tell what you can do if you can afford a lawyer but do not know of any in your area. (9b) Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. (9c) With a helper and a practice victim. Tell where a person can go to obtain the help of a lawyer if they are unable to pay for one. Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c: (7a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim. Lifesaving 1. (7b) Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. d. b. Describe how judges are selected in your state. stop. 2.

b. responsive. 7. Use a proper entry and a strong approach stroke. Present a rescue tube to the subject. 6.Perform the following rescues for an unconscious practice subject at or near the surface 30 feet from shore. c. and other small craft in performing rescues.Describe how to respond if a victim submerges before being reached by a rescuer. release it. b. a. e. Perform an armpit tow for a calm. 11. 12. Perform a cross-chest carry for an exhausted. Use a proper entry and strong approach stroke. Remove the victim from the water. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject. and do the following: a. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement. 8. show how to escape from a victim's grasp on your wrist. Begin in the water from a position near the subject. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety. Show or explain the use of rowboats. b. Successfully place at least one such aid within reach of a practice victim 25 feet from shore. Perform a front approach and wrist tow. Speak to the subject and splash water on him to determine his condition before making contact. ring buoys. canoes. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less and use a non-buoyant aid. Perform the following equipment-based rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. tired swimmer resting with a back float. c. Demonstrate "throwing" rescues using various items such as lines. such as a shirt or towel. c. 9. and position for CPR. Explain when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue. Present a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety. . rescue bags. Explain the importance of avoiding contact with an active victim and describe lead-and-wait tactics. Repeat for front and rear holds about the head and shoulders. List various items that can be used as rescue aids in a noncontact swimming rescue. 5. b. with assistance if needed. Repeat using a headfirst surface dive. Provide a swim-along assist for a calm.4. d. a. Perform the following nonequipment rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Perform a rear approach and armpit tow. and escort the victim to safety. Perform an equipment assist using a buoyant aid. Explain why buoyant aids are preferred. a. and escort the victim to safety. Recover a 10-pound weight in 8 to 10 feet of water using a feetfirst surface dive. to tow the subject to safety. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.In deep water. tired swimmer moving with a weak forward stroke. responsive. passive victim who does not respond to instructions to aid himself. release it. and free-floating supports. 10.

d. 14. upon other animals (including man). Explain where mammals fit in the classification of animals. Record light conditions. 3.Demonstrate management of a spinal injury: a. heat reactions. List the different mammal species and individual members that you identified by sight or sign. Support a face up victim in calm. b. Describe its dependency upon plants. Explain the purposes of museums. what eats it. Spend 3 hours in each of two different kinds of natural habitats or at different elevations. . Visit a natural history museum. c. Explain how the animal kingdom is classified. including hypothermia. Classify three mammals from phylum through species. Tell how it reproduces. Write a report of 500 words on a book about a mammal species. shallow water. b. 15. covering the points outlined in requirement 3c. e. Make and bait a tracking pit." "invertebrate. List sources for this information. Tell how this mammal lived before its habitat was affected in any way by man. Describe how to recognize the need for rescue breathing and CPR. Write a life history of a native game mammal that lives in your area. make two study skins of rats or mice. exposure.Demonstrate knowledge of resuscitation procedures: a. f. Do ONE of the following: a. 2. Take good pictures of two kinds of mammals in the wild. Explain the meaning of "animal. and its natural habitat. Report on how specimens are prepared and cataloged. and how they depend upon it. what it eats. Turn a subject from a facedown to a faceup position while maintaining support. Mammal Study 1." and "mammal.13. Demonstrate proper CPR technique for at least 3 minutes using a mannequin designed to simulate ventilations and compressions. 4. Tell the uses of study skins and mounted specimens respectively. Tell how it is helpful or harmful to man. b.Show that you know first aid for other injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming or boating. c. Explaining the signs and symptoms of a spinal injury. sunburn. Under the guidance of a nature center or natural history museum. Report what mammals and other animals came to the bait. write a simple history of one nongame mammal that lives in your area. and hyperventilation. Tell why all mammals do not live in the same kind of habitat. Spend 3 hours on each of 5 days on at least a 25-acre area. including notes on the activities of the pictured animals. c. List the mammal species you identified by sight or sign. muscle cramps. stings." Name three characteristic that distinguish mammals from all other animals. b. and other factors. From study and reading. Do ONE of the following: a." "vertebrate. film used.

Physician's assistant .Physical therapist 14. Chiropractor 3.Osteopathic physician 12. Louis Pasteur g. Trace two possible food chains of carnivorous mammals from soil through four stages to the mammal. Edward Jenner e. Discuss the health care provider-patient relationship with your counselor. 4. Work with your counselor. Walter Reed n. and the importance of such a relationship in the delivery of quality care to the patient. Daniel Hale Williams k. Hippocrates b. Medicine 1. Florence Nightingale f. Discuss with your counselor the influence that EIGHT of the following people had on the history of medicine: a. Allopathic Physician 2. Medical laboratory technologist 7. Joseph Lister i. Marie and Pierre Curie m. Medical assistant 6. Antoine van Leeuwenhoek d. Alexander Fleming p. Licensed vocational/practical nurse 5. James Watson and Francis Crick 2.g. 5. Nurse practitioner 9. Discuss to whom those subscribing to the original version of the oath owe the greatest allegiance. Robert Koch j. Occupational therapist 10. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen l.) 1. Describe the roles the following people play in the delivery of health care in your state. Nurse-midwife 8. Gregor Mendel h. (Note: Not all may exist in your state.Pharmacist 13. 3. and compare the original version to a more modern one. select and carry out one project that will influence the numbers of one or more mammals. Charles Richard Drew q. William Harvey c. Explain the Hippocratic Oath to your counselor. Describe the role of confidentiality in this relationship. Jonas Salk r. Emergency medical technician 4.Optometrist 11. Do the following: a. Karl Landsteiner o.

and maxillofacial surgery 22. Describe the educational and licensing requirements for five of those in 4a : other than 4a1 : practicing health care in your state. a. Dermatology 6.Neurology 15.Rheumatology 25. Obstetrics/gynecology (a "primary care" specialty) 4. Describe the additional educational requirements for the five specialties or subspecialties you chose in 6a. Gastroenterology 9. reconstructive.Nephrology 13. Briefly describe the types of work performed by physicians in FIVE of the following specialties or subspecialties: 1.Hematology/oncology 11. Colon and rectal surgery 5. Surgery b. a.Radiologic technologist 18.Pathology 20.Thoracic/cardiothoracic surgery 26. Cardiology 4. Family practice (a "primary care" specialty) 3. Psychiatry 6.Urology 27.Registered nurse 19. Endocrinology 8.Plastic.Infectious disease 12. Geriatric medicine 10. Tell what is meant by the term "primary care" with regard to a medical specialty. Pediatrics (a "primary care" specialty) 5. 5. 6.Otolaryngology/head and neck surgery 19. Internal medicine (a "primary care" specialty) 2.Orthopedic surgery 18.Preventive medicine 23.Physical medicine and rehabilitation/sports medicine 21.Nuclear medicine 16.Radiology 24.Vascular surgery b. Emergency medicine 7.Respiratory therapist b. . Briefly describe the types of work done by physicians in the following "core" specialties: 1. Allergy/immunology 2. Describe the additional educational requirements for those specialties. Anesthesiology 3.Podiatrist 16.Psychologist 17.Ophthalmology 17.15.Neuro surgery 14.

Then do the following: a. b. Define the terms native metal. metallurgy. make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel. c. and become familiar with the instruments used. and the government play in influencing the practice of medicine in the United States. Metalwork 1. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metal workers. 2. b. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Visit a physician's office. alloy. c. and how it provides care to those who do not have health insurance. blood drive. Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal. Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. 3. Work-harden a piece of 26. 2 2 Compare and discuss with your counselor the health care delivery systems in the United States. . Describe how to work-harden a metal.) Discuss the components of a medical history and physical examination (an official BSA health form may be used to guide this discussion). malleable. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal. and ferrous. and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Discuss the roles medical societies. and discuss the instruments involved. Briefly tell how your state monitors the quality of health care within its borders. demonstrate to your counselor that you understand the components of a medical history and physical. Using hand tools. and Mexico. training. Show how to take a blood pressure reading and a pulse reading. Do the following: a. Canada. Explain briefly why diagnostic tests are not perfect. Read the safety rules for metalwork. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. etc) approved by your counselor. b. d. the insurance industry.7.or 28-guage sheet brass or sheet copper. Describe the characteristics of a good diagnostic test to screen for disease (eg. then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. "health fair". b. 4. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys. nonferrous. a. Pick one and find out the education. 2 2 Do the following: a. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it. preferably one who delivers "primary care. routine blood pressure measurement)." (This may be that of your counselor. c. and experience required for this profession.  If this cannot be arranged. blood pressure screening. 2 2 Serve as a volunteer at a health-related event or facility in your community (eg.

Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two-piece mold. 3.or 26–gauge sheet metal. which need not be to scale. one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another you have made yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Do the following: a. nickel silver.Founder 1. Clean and polish your objects. 2. Using lead-free pewter. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. and explain why this profession might interest you. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself. Option 2 . After completing the first four requirements. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself. Option 3 . Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools. preserve your work from oxidation. c. Make two objects out of 18. a. which need not be to scale. b. b. Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch. or lead-free pewter. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Make two molds. c. Both objects must include a soldered joint. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. b. 2. 3. One object also must include at least one riveted component. complete at least ONE of the options listed below.Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith 1. .gauge sheet copper. bending. you may substitute sterling silver. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns. edging. a. If you have prior silversmithing experience. and using cutting. which need not be to scale.Silversmith 1.Discuss this with your counselor. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel. 3. Name at least three different types of molds. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch. b. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself. and either soldering or brazing. 2. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose. a. Option 1 . make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.or 20. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch. Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools. Make two objects out of 24. 5.

c. Using lead-free pewter. a. Do the following: a. Before doing requirements 3 through 6. Do the following: a. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin. Discuss the special features of a bass boat and a ski boat. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an Lshaped bend. and blisters. and equipment storage and placement. b. and respond to these hazards. c. Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools. 2. including hypothermia. c. motion sickness. Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick. bugbites. and inboard/outboard motors and the uses and advantages of each. Show how to choose and properly fit a PFD.Blacksmith 1. make a casting using the mold that you have made. Explain the safety procedures and precautions involving swimmers and skiers in the water. 3. 3. d. Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick. b. passenger positions under way. help prevent. Motorboating 1. Draw out by forging a taper. Include a decorative twist on one object. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. d. Explain inboard. and explain when each type should be use.c. which need not be to scale. mitigate. Option 4 . make the two objects you sketched that require hot-forging. 4. perform the following exercises: a. Preserve your work from oxidation. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while motorboating. Explain how to winterize a boat motor and tell why this procedure is necessary. d. Name the different types of personal floatation devices (PFDs). Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel. b. outboard. 2. and boat wakes. Do the following: a. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend. Explain first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while motorboating. Explain the safety procedures and precautions involving handling fuel and engine servicing. b. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. c. b. dehydration. and what you should do to anticipate. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. heat reactions. and explain how such conditions are recognized. Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. .

Explain the meaning of each point. d. rhythm. b. Point out and explain the mechanical and safety features of a boat trailer. d. b. e. Board and assist others in boarding b. Describe the sound of the music and the instruments used. and listen to three of your relative's favorite tunes with him or her. showing procedures for overtaking and passing slower craft. and the titles of the pieces you heard. jazz. f. describe the setting and the reaction of the audience. g. Read all the signs and terms of the score. Identify the composers or songwriters. Do TWO of the following: a. country. Run a course for at least a mile. ethnic. and dynamics. Have a permit to run a motorboat.4. e. phrasing. f. Demonstrate proper boat-handling procedures and skills by doing the following: a. Remove a boat from the water using a trailer. Music 1. get under way. 2. reversing direction. or listen to three hours of recordings from any two of the following musical styles: blues. Launch a boat from a trailer. a. the performers. Discuss with your counselor the nautical rules of the road and describe the national and your state's aids to navigation. Sing or play a simple song or hymn chosen by your counselor using good technique. Show you know safety laws for motorboating by doing the following: a. Create an illustration that shows how tones are generated and how instruments produce sound. get out and assist others. Discuss how the hazards of weather and heavy water conditions can affect both safety and performance in motorboating. bluegrass. 5. Get under way from dockside or from a beach launch. Explain the rules or laws that apply to recreational boating in your area or state. passing oncoming traffic. 3. c. making turns. Find out what his or her favorite music is now. Find out what the most popular music was when he or she was your age. Land or dock. Interview an adult member of your family about music. and tell why these rules are required. if needed. c. Attend a live performance. Stop an secure the boat in position on the open water using anchors. If it was a live performance. Moor the boat and secure all gear. Name the five general groups of musical instruments. tone. classical. gospel. Promise that you will follow BSA Safety Afloat guidelines. opera. and using navigation aids. g. 6. Fuel the boat and complete a safety check. yielding right-of-way. Explain federal and state rules for a ventilation system. musical theater. Explain and show the correct use of equipment required by both state and federal regulations to be carried aboard a motorboat. b. How do those favorites sound to you? Had you ever heard . Discuss your thoughts about the music.

c. d.

4. Do a. b. c. d.

any of them? Play three of your favorite songs for your relative, and explain why you like these songs. Ask what he or she thinks of your favorite music. Serve for six months as a member of a school band, choir, or other organized musical group, or perform as a soloist in public six times. List five people who are important in the history of American music and explain to your counselor why they continue to be influential. Include at least one composer, one performer, one innovator, and one person born more than 100 years ago. ONE of the following: Teach three songs to a group of people. Lead them in singing the songs, using proper hand motions. Compose and write the score for a piece of music of 12 measures or more, and play this music on an instrument. Make a traditional instrument and learn to play it. Catalog your own or your family's collection of 12 or more compact discs, tapes, records, or other recorded music. Show how to handle and store them.

Nature  Name three ways in which plants are important to animals. Name a plant that is protected in your state or region, and explain why it is at risk.  Name three ways in which animals are important to plants. Name an animal that is protected in your state or region, and explain why it is at risk.  Explain the term "food chain." Give an example of a four-step land food chain and a four-step water food chain.  Do all of the requirements in FIVE of the following fields: a. Birds 1. In the field, identify eight species of birds. 2. Make and set out a birdhouse OR a feeding station OR a birdbath. List what birds used it during a period of one month. b. Mammals 1. In the field, identify three species of wild animals. 2. Make plaster casts of the tracks of a wild mammal. c. Reptiles and Amphibians 1. Show that you can recognize the poisonous snakes in your area. 2. In the field, identify three species of reptiles or amphibians. 3. Recognize one species of toad or frog by voice; OR identify one reptile or amphibian by eggs, den, burrow, or other signs. d. Insects and Spiders 1. Collect, mount, and label 10 species of insects or spiders. 2. Hatch an insect from the pupa or cocoon; OR hatch adults from nymphs; OR keep larvae until they form pupae or cocoons; OR keep a colony of ants or bees through one season. e. Fish 1. Catch and identify two species of fish. 2. Collect four kinds of animal food eaten by fish in the wild. f. Mollusks and Crustaceans 1. Identify five species of mollusks and crustaceans. 2. Collect, mount, and label six shells. g. Plants

1. In the field, identify 15 species of wild plants. 2. Collect and label seeds of six plants OR the leaves of 12 plants. h. Soils and Rocks 1. Collect and identify soils found in different layers of a soil profile. 2. Collect and identify five different types of rocks from your area. NOTE: In most cases all specimens should be returned to the wild at the location of original capture after the requirements have been met. Check with your merit badge counselor for those instances where the return of these specimens would not be appropriate. Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, some plants and animals are or may be protected by federal law. The same ones and/or others may be protected by state law. Be sure that you do not collect protected species. Your state may require that you purchase and carry a license to collect certain species. Check with the wildlife and fish and game officials in your state regarding species regulations before you begin to collect. Orienteering 1. Show that you know first aid for the types of injuries that could occur while orienteering, including cuts, scratches, blisters, snakebite, insect stings, tick bites, heat and cold reactions (sunburn, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, hypothermia), and dehydration. Explain to your counselor why you should be able to identify poisonous plants and poisonous animals that are found in your area. 2. Explain what orienteering is. 3. Do the following: a. Explain how a compass works. Describe the features of an orienteering compass. b. In the field, show how to take a compass bearing and follow it. 4. Do the following: a. Explain how a topographic map shows terrain features. Point out and name five terrain features on a map and in the field. b. Point out and name 10 symbols on a topographic map. c. Explain the meaning of declination. Tell why you must consider declination when using map and compass together. d. Show a topographic map with magnetic north-south lines. e. Show how to measure distances on a map using an orienteering compass. f. Show how to orient a map using a compass. 5. Set up a 100-meter pace course. Determine your walking and running pace for 100 meters. Tell why it is important to pace-count. 6. Do the following: a. Identify 20 international control description symbols. Tell the meaning of each symbol. b. Show a control description sheet and explain the information provided. c. Explain the following terms and tell when you would use them: attack point, collecting feature, aiming off, contouring, reading ahead, handrail, relocation, rough versus fine orienteering. 7. Do the following:

a. Take part in three orienteering events. One of these must be a crosscountry course.* b. After each event, write a report with (1) a copy of the master map and control description sheet , (2) a copy of the route you took on the course, (3) a discussion of how you could improve your time between control points, and (4) a list of your major weaknesses on this course . Describe what you could do to improve. 8. Do ONE of the following: a. Set up a cross-country course that is at least 2,000 meters long with at least five control markers. Prepare the master map and control description sheet. b. Set up a score orienteering course with at least 12 control points and a time limit of at least 60 minutes. Set point values for each control. Prepare the master map and control description sheet. 9. Act as an official during an orienteering event. This may be during the running of the course you set up for requirement 8. 10.Teach orienteering techniques to your patrol, troop or crew. * Note to the Counselor: While orienteering is primarily an individual sport, BSA Youth Protection procedures call for using the buddy system. Requirement 7a can be completed by pairs or groups of Scouts. Pathfinding 1. In the country, know every lane, bypath, and short cut for a distance of at least two miles in every direction around the local scout headquarters; or in a city, have a general knowledge of the district within a three-mile radius of the local scout headquarters, so as to be able to guide people at any time, by day or by night. 2. Know the population of the five principal neighboring towns, their general direction from his scout headquarters, and be able to give strangers correct directions how to reach them. 3. If in the country, know in a two mile radius, the approximate number of horses, cattle, sheep, and pigs owned on the five neighboring farms; or, in a town, know, in a half-mile radius, the location of livery stables, garages and blacksmith shops. 4. Know the location of the nearest meat markets, bakeries, groceries, and drug stores. 5. Know the location of the the nearest police station, hospital, doctor, fire alarm, fire hydrant, telegraph and telephone offices, and railroad stations 6. Know something of the history of his place; and know the location of its principal public buildings, such as the town or city hall, post-office, schools and churches. 7. Submit a map not necessarily drawn by himself upon which he personally has indicated as much as possible of the above information. Personal Fitness NOTE: If meeting any of the requirements for this merit badge is against the Scout's religious convictions, the requirement does not have to be done if the Scout's parents and the proper religious advisers state in writing that to do so would

d. The Scout's parents must also accept full responsibility for anything that might happen because of this exemption. 2. emotional. b. and do you know how to modify them safely through exercise. Are you immunized and vaccinated according to the advice of your health-care provider? c. Before completing requirements 2 through 9. What it means to be mentally healthy. Why physical exams are important 2. and other harmful substances can negatively affect our personal fitness. Tell what health or medical recommendations the doctor made and report what you have done in response to the recommendations. Get a statement saying that your teeth have been checked and cared for. Components of personal fitness. Do you understand the meaning of a nutritious diet and know why it is important for you? Does your diet include foods from all the food groups? d. and other practices that could be harmful to your health? g. diet. e. Are you free from all curable diseases? Are you living in such a way that your risk of preventable diseases is minimized? b.be against religious convictions. f. 1. Have a dental examination. 3. What you can do to prevent social. Reasons for being fit in all components. The seven warning signs of cancer 5. Tell what questions the doctor asked about your health. c. and behavior modification? e. With your counselor answer and discuss the following questions: a. 3. Do you carry out daily activities without noticeable effort? Do you have extra energy for other activities? f. and how the use of tobacco products. including a. Do you participate in a regular exercise program or recreational activities? . Why preventative habits (such as exercising regularly) are important in maintaining good health. Explain to your merit badge counselor verbally or in writing what personal fitness means to you. Are you free from habits relating to poor nutrition and the use of alcohol. Describe the examination. tobacco. Explain the following: 1. Discuss your activity in the areas of healthy social fitness. Are your body weight and composition what you would like them to be. Diseases that can be prevented and how 4. Do the following: a. The youth risk factors that affect cardiovascular fitness in adulthood b. or mental problems. using the Scout medical examination form. have your health-care practitioner give you a physical examination. What it means to be physically healthy and fit. alcohol. What it means to be socially healthy. drugs. Tell how to care for your teeth.

Pull-ups. complete the aerobic fitness. Run/walk as far as you can in nine minutes. counselor. How good nutrition is related to the other components of personal fitness d. Record the total number of pull-ups completed correctly in 60 seconds. Circumference of the right upper arm. flexibility. Do you sleep well at night and wake up feeling refreshed and energized for the new day? i. Push-ups. Record the number of sit-ups done correctly in 60 seconds. OR b. (Remember to keep your knees down. muscular strength.h. The components of physical fitness b. How the components of personal fitness relate to the Scout Law and Scout Oath 5. and body composition tests as described in the Personal Fitness merit badge pamphlet. Be consistent with the procedures presented in the merit badge pamphlet. make four repetitions and record the fourth reach. What good nutrition means to you c. The three components of a sound weight (fat) control program 6. Body Composition Test Have your parent. This last reach must be held for 15 seconds to qualify.) Strength Tests Record your performance on all three tests. and do you participate in its youth activities? j. Do you support family activities and efforts to maintain a good home life? 4. Run/walk one mile as fast as you can. Flexibility Test Using a sit-and-reach box constructed according to specifications in the merit badge pamphlet. The need to have a balance in all four components of physical fitness d. The importance of good nutrition b. Are you actively involved in the religious organization of your choice. midway between the shoulder and the elbow. c. Before doing requirements 7 and 8. with the arm hanging naturally and not flexed. Record the total number of push-ups completed correctly in 60 seconds. or other adult take and record the following measurements: f. Do you spend quality time with your family and friends in social and recreational activities? k. Be consistent with the procedures presented in the merit badge pamphlet. e. Aerobic Fitness Test Record your performance on ONE of the following tests: a. The sit-ups must be done in the form explained and illustrated in the merit badge pamphlet. Record your results and identify those areas where you feel you need to improve. Explain the following about nutrition: a. Your weakest and strongest component of physical fitness c. d. Explain the following about physical fitness: a. . Sit-ups.

Outline a comprehensive 12-week physical fitness program using the results of your fitness tests. and show improvement in each one. and back after breath expiration. your exercise heart rate. Look for a sale or discount coupon. 3. Do the following: . etc. Can you buy the item used? Should you wait for a sale? 2. Find out about three career opportunities in personal fitness. and warm-up guidelines discussed in the Personal Fitness merit badge pamphlet.). chest. compare and analyze your preprogram and postprogram body composition measurements. Circumference of the right thigh. Shoulders. and describe your long-term plans regarding your personal fitness. with arms hanging by placing the tape two inches below the top of the shoulder and around the arms. 1. Determine the quality of the item or service (using consumer publications or rating systems). record your results.) Call around. 7. Comparison shop for the item. j. i. Develop a written shopping strategy for the purchase identified in requirement 1a. Discuss the plan with your family. and flexibility tests every two weeks and record your results. 2.g. For the body composition test. Choose an item that your family might want to purchase that is considered a major expense. Pick one and find out the education. 8. midway between the hip and the knee. Chest. swam. repeat the three tests. Find out where you can buy the item for the best price. Write a plan that tells how your family would save money for the purchase identified in requirement 1a. Do the following: a. Before beginning your exercises. Discuss what you learned with your counselor. c. Be sure your program incorporates the endurance. intensity. and not flexed. Complete the physical fitness program you outlined in requirement 7. have the program approved by your counselor and parents. b. Discuss the plan with your merit badge counselor. 9. After the 12th week. training. Repeat the aerobic fitness. Abdomen circumference at navel level (relaxed). Consider alternatives. study ads. (Provide prices from at least two different price sources. h. by placing the tape under the arms and around the chest and back at the nipple line after breath expiration. Discuss how other family needs must be considered in this plan. and experience required for this professions. If possible. have the same person take the measurements whenever you are ready to be remeasured to chart your progress. and explain why this profession might interest you. Personal Management 1. how far you ran. 2. muscular strength. how many exercise repetitions you completed. Keep a log of your fitness program activity (how long you exercised. or biked. Discuss the meaning and benefit of your experience. 1.

Mutual funds c. Your thoughts when you buy something new and your thoughts about the same item three months later. what interest is. a. b. e. c. Explain to your merit badge counselor the advantages or disadvantages of saving or investing in each of the following: a. and how the annual percentage rate (APR) measures the true cost of a loan. Life insurance d. groceries).000 to save. devise your own. Charitable giving. Common stocks b. Compare expected income with expected expenses. savings). state how you would use the excess money (new goal. If expenses exceed income. How much the price changed from the previous day c. invest. 6. Your understanding of what happens when you put money into a savings account. Current price b. expenses. Your experience of an item you have purchased after seeing or hearing advertisements for it. The concepts of return on investment and risk. Your understanding of how the amount of money you have with you affects your spending habits. The 52-week high and the 52-week low prices Pretend you have $1. gifts.3. including reasons for using one over the other.S. 7. savings bond Explain to your merit badge counselor the following: a. If income exceeds expenses. A savings account or U. What you can do to better manage your money. 4. present the results to your merit badge counselor. (You may use the forms provided in the pamphlet. 2. Discuss with your merit badge counselor FIVE of the following concepts: a. and savings. Explain to your merit badge counselor the importance of the following information for each stock: a. expenses. b. d. Explain its purpose and your thoughts about it. The differences between saving and investing. How hunger affects you when shopping for food items (snacks. h. g. determine steps to balance your budget. Explain the following to your merit badge counselor: a. 5. b. and help prepare yourself for the future. The emotions you feel when you receive money.) When complete. b. The different ways to borrow money. A certificate of deposit (CD) e. c. Explain the concept of buyer's remorse. Prepare a budget reflecting your expected income (allowance. 1. . Did the item work as well as advertised? f. The concepts of simple interest and compound interest and how these affected the results of your investment exercise. Select five publicly traded stocks from the business section of the newspaper. What a loan is. and savings for 13 consecutive weeks. or use a computer generated version. Track your actual income. wages).

not a real-life project. skills. develop a budget for your project. writing down when you completed each of the tasks on your "to do" list compared to when you scheduled them. that must be done in the coming week. Write a "to do" list of tasks or activities. This is a project on paper. With your merit badge counselor. and/or Scout or church or club meetings. List these in order of importance to you. and diary/journal to understand when your schedule worked and when it did not work. Research the limitations of your anticipated career and discuss with your merit badge counselor what you have learned about qualifications such as education. What is your goal? b. Review your "to do" list. Demonstrate to your merit badge counselor your understanding of time management by doing the following: a. 9. Credit reports and how personal responsibility can affect your credit report. d. 8. c. Follow the one-week schedule you planned. such as homework assignments. and experience. one-week schedule. Prepare a written project plan demonstrating the steps below. Develop a list of resources. . then plan when you will do all the tasks from your "to do" list between your set activities.Do the following: a. Keep a daily diary or journal during each of the seven days of this week's activities. Develop a timeline for your project that shows the steps you must take from beginning to completion.c. d. o Work done for other merit badges cannot be used for this requirement. Identify how these resources will help you achieve your goal. sports practices or games. The differences between a charge card. developing a community service project or a school or religious event. such as school classes. e. Put in your set activities. jobs or chores. Define the project. Pets 1. chores. including the desired outcome. Present evidence that you have cared for a pet for four months. Choose a career you might want to enter after high school or college graduation. If necessary. discuss and understand what you learned from this requirement and what you might do differently the next time. Describe your project. or creating an annual patrol plan with additional activities not already included in the troop annual plan. Examples could include planning a camping trip. b. e. Discuss your completed project plan with your merit badge counselor. Make a seven-day calendar or schedule. b. Get approval before you start. c. What are the costs and pitfalls of using these financial tools? Explain why it is unwise to make only the minimum payment on your credit card. and personal projects. debit card. 10. d. a. Ways to eliminate debt. and credit card.

4. and 7c. c. about your kind of pet. 2. Do ONE of the following: 1. splinters. Show that you have read a book or pamphlet. Start a friend raising a pet like yours. Give local laws.or 3/8-inch three-stranded rope. 7b. Demonstrate the use of rope tackle to lift a weight of 25 pounds and pulling a log at least 6 inches in diameter and 6 feet long with the tackle. Using 1/4. 9.) b. and the care and storage of rope. Tell why you have this kind of pet. sprains. Make a list of the ropes and spars needed. including minor cuts and abrasions. 3. Demonstrate the following: tripod and round lashings. Explain the differences between synthetic ropes and natural-fiber ropes. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illness that could occur while working on pioneering projects. Build a scale model of a signal tower or a monkey bridge. then build the project. Use the tackle to put tension on a line. (Note: This requirement . Discuss which types of rope are suitable for pioneering work and why. In your explanation. blisters. Tell some interesting facts about it.With a group of Scouts. With your counselor's guidance. Explain the application of the trestle you build. 7. Tie the following: square knot. Explain how to improve your throwing distance by adding weight to the end of your rope. Include the following in your discussion: breaking strength. 6. demonstrate how to form each splice. bruises. dehydration. 8. 10. describe the potential damage that friction can do to a rope. Using a rope-making device or machine. Do the following: a. relating to the pet you keep. 2. 4. 3. then demonstrate how to coil and throw a 40-foot length of 1/4. 5. and round turn with two half hitches. and housing of your pet. Explain the advantages and limitations of using a rope tackle. By yourself. sheet bend. 3. if any. bowline. Explain why it is useful to be able to throw a rope. create a rough sketch of the project.or 3/8-inch rope. Show your pet in some pet show. Write in 200 words of more about the care. Help your friend get a good start. Train a pet in three or more tricks or special abilities. Pioneering 1. Describe the design of your project and explain how the anchoring system works. Explain the uses for the back splice. and short splice. make a rope at least 6 feet long consisting of three strands. OR on your own. select a pioneering project. sheepshank. rope burns. Successfully complete Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b and First Class requirements 7a. feeding. Demonstrate how to tie two spars together using a shear lashing.2. build an A-trestle OR X-trestle OR H-trestle using square and diagonal lashings. eye splice. Correctly anchor the model using either the 1-1-1 anchoring system or the log and stake anchoring method. approved by your counselor. safe working loads. heat and cold reactions. and insect bites or stings. each having three yarns. (These are the rope-related requirements.

iii. wildlife. 5. Complete ONE of the following alternatives: a. soybeans. Tell at least five ways that humans depend on plants. Tell about modern methods of commercial corn farming and the contributions that corn makes to today's food and fuel supply. cotton. Collect and name five weeds that compete with crops in your locality. Describe the nature and function of soil and explain its importance. Cotton . Tell about the texture. Make and use a seed germination tester to test 50 seeds of four of the following plants: corn. 3. List by common name at least 10 native plants and 10 cultivated plants that grow near your home. Choose ONE of the following options and complete each requirement: A. cotton. Tell how climate and location of these regions make them leaders in the production of these crops. Agronomy 1. Tell how to propagate plants by seeds. and explain how it affects corn production and how it is controlled. Tell how to control these weeds without harming people. 2. Explain photosynthesis and tell why this process is important. barley. Name and tell about careers in agronomy. List five invasive nonnative plants in your area and tell how they may be harmful. Tell about an insect that can damage corn. 6. Tell about one important insect pest and one important disease that damage each of the following: corn. 5. small grains. cuttings.may be done at summer camp. Record seed variety or experimental code number. 4. Describe how to prepare a seedbed. cotton. ii. pollinators. at district or council events. forage crops. On a map of the United States. wheat. temperature. 3. and pests affect plants.) Plant Science 1. horticulture. Make a drawing and identify five or more parts of a flowering plant. b. and botany. clover. Tell what each part does. 7. or useful insects. Explain how water. and composition of fertile soil. Tell how the spread of invasive plants may be avoided or controlled in ways that are not damaging to humans. Write a paragraph about a career in one of these fields that interests you. 2. tubers. Tell how soil may be improved. Corn i. and grafting. rice. and oil crops grow. Grow a plant by ONE of these methods. air. rye. roots. identify the chief regions where corn. alfalfa. structure. 4. Determine the percentage of live seeds. wildlife. Grow a plot of corn and have your plot inspected by your counselor. light. small grain crops. and the environment. or on a troop camp outing.

ultimate size. native habitat. Explain why a killing frost just after emergence is critical for soybeans. Tell about modern methods of commercial cotton farming. or conservatory greenhouse. Indicate how each grass and legume is used. shade tolerance. Visit one of the following places and tell what you learned about horticulture there: public garden. e. ii. texture. iii. perennial. retail nursery. and broadleaf weeds. Give production figures for small grain crops listed in the U. arboretum. production greenhouse. ii. or class about your visit. wholesale nursery. and tell the different ways of using forage crops as feed for livestock. Horticulture 1. Visit a grain elevator. Tell about modern methods of growing soybeans on a commercial scale. Explain how legumes can be used to enrich the soil and how they may deplete it under certain conditions. and label samples of each for display: perennial grasses. and discuss the contributions soybeans make to our food supply. iii. Explain how livestock may enrich or deplete the soil.S. Small Grains i. Statistical Report or Agricultural Statistics Handbook for the latest year available. ii. Oil Crops i. troop. iii. moisture requirement. habit. d. feed or seed company. and describe the processes used and tell your patrol. Collect. B. legumes. Name five poisonous plants that are dangerous to livestock. deciduous. Help in harvesting a crop of grain. Find out what hardiness zone you live in and i. Take notes. and about the uses of cotton fiber and seed and the economic value of this crop.Grow a plot of cotton and have your plot inspected by your counselor. Tell how to reduce harvesting losses and about modern methods of growing one small grain crop. and explain how it affects cotton production and how it is controlled. annual grasses. cereal plant. pH. 2. cultivar. Tell about an insect that can damage cotton. iii. flour mill. . disease resistance. ii. Grow a plot of soybeans and have your plot inspected by your counselor. Tell the kind of site where you found each sample. count. evergreen. Talk with the operator. annual. Forage Crops i. Explain the following terms: hardiness zone. c.

Record your activities. b. ii. Prune a tree. Bedding Plants i. iv. 3. ii. materials used. Fruit. Transplant 12 seedlings or rooted cuttings to larger containers and grow them for at least one month. iii. iv. grapevines. and tell some horticultural advantages of each. iii. d. b. Tell why slower-growing landscape plants are sometimes a better choice than faster-growing varieties. After obtaining permission. Explain why you chose the mix and tell what is in it. Tell some differences between gardening with annuals and perennials. watering. Explain why pruning is necessary. and costs. or shrub properly. and deadheading. grapevines. or berry crop is processed for use. b.list 10 landscape plants you like that are suitable for your climate. and tell how each practice helps your plants. Take full care of fruit or nut trees. Woody Ornamentals . Demonstrate good pruning techniques and tell why pruning is important. Grow a plant from a stem or root cutting or graft. 4. nut. Demonstrate one type of graft and tell why this method is useful. Plant five fruit or nut trees. Demonstrate mulching. c. giving the common name and scientific name for each. Transplant plants to a bed in the landscape and maintain the bed until the end of the growing season. Do EACH of the following: a. Describe how one fruit. Choose ONE of the following alternatives and complete EACH of the requirements: a. Explain the importance of good landscape design and selection of plants that are suitable for particular sites and conditions. Do ONE of the following: a. Tell why it is important to know how big a plant will grow. observations. Grow bedding plants appropriate for your area in pots or flats from seed or cuttings in a manufactured soil mix. weeding. c. Berry. or berry plants through one season. 5. and Nut Crops i. Explain the difference between vegetative and sexual propagation methods. or berry plants that are suited to your area. fertilizing. vine. c. plant a tree or shrub properly in an appropriate site.

Prune a tree or shrub properly. hardiness. fertilizing. mulching. ii. mosses. Describe the size. or near a road or railroad. and any special characteristics that make each type of tree or shrub attractive or interesting. Tell why each technique is used. iii. v. iii. near water. Determine which species of plants are the largest and which are the most abundant. fruit. b. Note whether they cast shade on other plants. Take full care of the trees or shrubs you have planted for one growing season. Visit a park. Record environmental factors that may influence the presence of plants on your site. Record any differences in the types of plants you see at the edge of a forest. pest management. forest. soil type and pH. iv. fungi. Field Botany 1. and pruning. Make a list of the plants in the study site by groups of plants: canopy trees. texture. Give the common and scientific names. watering. Design and plant a garden or landscape that is at least 10 by 10 feet. C. Tell five ways trees help improve the quality of our environment. color. Take care of the plants in your garden for one season. vines. air and soil temperature. including latitude. Home Gardening i. shrubs. composting. 2. iv. Select a study site that is at least 100 by 100 feet. flowers. or other natural area near your home. ii. . List 10 trees (in addition to those listed in general requirement 5 above) and tell your counselor how each is used in the landscape. While you are there: a. ferns. Explain why pruning is necessary. Find out which of these are native plants and which are exotic (or nonnative). List the common and scientific names of 10 kinds of native plants that are beneficial to birds and wildlife in your area. small trees. Plant 10 or more different types of plants in your garden. Demonstrate soil preparation. geology. staking. i. lichens. cultural requirements. hydrology.Plant five or more trees or shrubs in a landscape setting. Tell why you selected particular varieties of vegetables and flowers. algae. Tell four types of things you could provide to make your home landscape or park a better place for birds and wildlife. d. leaves. climate. weeding. in burned areas. c. and topography. herbaceous wildflowers and grasses.

mount. iv. Tree Inventory i. Nested Plot i. record observations about the soil and other influencing factors AND do the following. The transects should be at least 500 feet long. Visit two sites. Identify the trees of your neighborhood or a park or section of your town. ii. After gaining permission. Tell how an identification key works and use a simple key to identify 10 kinds of plants (in addition to those in general requirement 5 above). at least one of which is different from the one you visited for Field Botany requirement 1. At each site. At each site. press. identify. Choose ONE of the following alternatives and complete EACH of its requirements: a. . b. Use the transect method to study the two different kinds of plant communities. and label 10 different plants that are common in your area. Obtain a list of rare plants of your state.3. OR write and distribute materials that will help others learn about trees. Collect. Transect Study i. Tell why voucher specimens are important for documentation of a field botanist's discoveries. Visit two sites. iii. Mark off nested plots and inventory two different kinds of plant communities. record observations about the soil and other influencing factors AND do the following. 5. flowers. 6. ii. c. Tell what is being done to protect rare plants and natural areas in your state. Lead a walk to teach others about trees and their value. List the types of trees by scientific name and give common names. Then make a graph or chart to show the results of your studies. and label leaves. collect. 4. Note the number and size (diameter at 4 feet above ground) of trees observed and determine the largest of each species in your study area. Identify each tree within 10 feet of the transect line. iii. 1. press. 2. Write a paragraph about one of the rare plants in your state. ii. iii. Measure the diameter of each tree at 4 feet above the ground. or fruits to document your inventory. Tell the difference between common and scientific names and tell why scientific names are important. and map and list each tree. at least one of which is different from the one you visited for Field Botany requirement 1.

Then make a graph or chart to show the results of your studies. ii. and map each tree in a 100 by 100 foot plot. If possible. mosses. (Measure the diameter of each tree at 4 feet above the ground. visit a nature preserve managed by the organization. ii. Identify. Plant Conservation Organization Visit i. b. measure. OR. d. grasses. Tell how the specimens are arranged and how they are used by researchers. c. Tell how specimens should be handled so that they will not be damaged. Identify and map all plants (wildflowers. Describe the safety precautions you must take when making home plumbing repairs. park. iii. iv. Do the following: a. etc. Identify and map all trees and shrubs in a 10 by 10 foot plot within each of the larger areas. Describe how a properly working plumbing system protects our family's health and safety. iii. or botanical garden. List five important local health regulations related to plumbing and tell how they protect health and safety. e. ferns. If possible. Tell about land management activities such as controlled burning. 1. or measures to eradicate invasive (nonnative) plants or other threats to the plants that are native to the area. Herbarium Visit i. Write ahead and arrange to visit a private conservation organization or government agency that is concerned with protecting rare plants and natural areas. Write ahead and arrange to visit an herbarium at a university. 2. 3.) of a 4 by 4 foot plot within the 10 by 10 foot plot. Tell about the tools and references used by botanists in an herbarium. observe voucher specimens of a plant that is rare in your state.) 2. visit an herbarium Web site (with your parent's permission). Plumbing 1. Tell how a voucher specimen is mounted and prepared for permanent storage. Do the following: . Tell about the activities of the organization in studying and protecting rare plants and natural areas.

In your discussion. meningitis. influenza. dried. For all 10 diseases. drainpipe. hepatitis. solder. environmental. Show how to use five important plumber's tools. c. syphilis. bacterial. union. 6. explain how dishes and utensils should be washed. and connect two pieces of steel pipe. Do the following: a. thread. Explain how Escherichia colt (E. toxin). Cut. Tell why this is important. With your parent's and counselor's approval. Under the supervision of a knowledgeable adult. Describe how sewage and solid waste should be disposed of under wilderness camping conditions. Clean out a sink or lavatory trap. a. any possible vectors for transmission. Explain what public health is. b. b. Visit a municipal wastewater treatment facility OR a solid-waste management operation in your community. and kept sanitary at home and in camp. 4. Discuss the importance of safe drinking water in terms of the spread of disease. Include one tee. 5. flux. collective action. Name the kinds of pipe that are used most often in a plumbing system. salmonellosis. ways to help prevent the spread of infection. 7. elbow. plunger (rubber force cup). Then. AIDS. trap. explain the type or form of the disease (viral. do ONE of the following: a. and Lyme disease are contracted. in your community. 2. lead poisoning.3. Show and explain the use of drains and vents. Make a drawing and explain the drainage system of the plumbing in a house. Describe how the facility safely treats and disposes of sewage or solid waste. West Nile virus. botulism. two straight pieces. Explain what a vector is and how insects and rodents can be controlled in your home. Then. and at camp. and available treatments. . retaining nut. and one coupling. Explain why these pipes are used. b. Name five diseases against which a young child should be immunized and two diseases against which everyone should be reimmunized periodically. Tell how you would make it safe from freezing. In your demonstration. Make a drawing and explain how a home hot. herpes. plug. explain which vectors can be easily controlled by individuals and which ones require long-term.and cold. emphysema. 5. Do the following: a. tetanus. 8. demonstrate two ways for making water safe to drink that can be used while at camp. coli). Replace a washer in a faucet. solder three copper tube connections using a gas torch. tee. pick any four of the following diseases and explain how each one is contracted: gonorrhea. Public Health 1. Identify and describe the use of each of the following: washer. encephalitis. and water meter. coupling. 4. Explain the meaning of immunization. nipple. discuss the diseases for which there is currently no treatment or immunization. Using the diseases you chose for requirement 1.water supply system works. 3.

visit your city. 5. or some other group. practice it. Show you know parliamentary procedure by leading a discussion or meeting according to accepted rules of order. 2. c. Discuss what you learned with your counselor. Radio  Explain what radio is. Explain the role of the health agency you visited related to the outbreak of diseases. Learn how microorganisms in food can be killed. Compare the four leading causes of mortality (death) in your community for any of the past five years with the four leading causes of morbidity (incidence of disease) in your community. Discuss the kinds of public assistance the agency is able to provide in case of disasters such as floods. Give a three. and storage. tornadoes. 4. and other acts of destruction. Find out the education. 7. training. county. b. and learn how the facility keeps foods from becoming contaminated. 3. either as part of a group discussion or before your counselor. Collect and organize information about this topic and prepare an outline. and noise pollution. Use a subject selected by your counselor that is interesting to you but that is not known to you in advance and for which you do not have time to prepare. earthquakes. Pick a profession in the public health sector that interests you. With your parent's and counselor's approval. class at school. Discuss what you learn with your counselor. Your discussion can include the cleanup necessary after a disaster occurs. Then do the following: a. then deliver it in the conversational way. Describe health dangers from tobacco use and alcohol and drug abuse. handling. Then discuss the following: .to five-minute introduction of yourself to an audience such as your troop. Observe food preparation. Select a topic of interest to your audience. Give an impromptu talk of at least two minutes. or state public health agency.to five-minute talk on a topic of your choice that incorporates body language and visual aids. Find out what conditions allow microorganisms to multiply in food and how conditions can be controlled to help prevent the growth and dissemination of microorganisms. Prepare a three. water.b. Discuss how the agency addresses the concerns raised in requirements 1 through 6 and how the services provided by this agency affect your family. 6. and experience required to work in this profession. Write an eight. Explain how the public health agency you visited is trying to reduce the mortality and morbidity rates of these leading causes of illness and death. 8. storms. Do the following: a. Public Speaking 1.to 10-minute speech. Describe the health dangers from air. Arrange to meet with the food service manager of a food service facility (such as a restaurant or school cafeteria) and visit this establishment. b. or by answering questions on the rules of order.

including the concept of grounding for direct current circuits. for example) approved in advance by your counselor. Draw eight schematic symbols. d. Find three electrical components to match to three of these symbols. transmitter. Explain the differences between a block diagram and a schematic diagram. microphone.  Find out about three career opportunities in radio.  Explain the safety precautions for working with radio gear. power outlets. how it was used. what types of licenses are required to operate and maintain the equipment. training. Explain how the broadcast radio stations. and antenna systems.  Explain how radio waves carry information. and antenna.  Visit a radio installation (an amateur radio station. Q signals. amateur radio (at least four amateur radio bands). Discuss what the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) does and how it is different from the International Telecommunication Union.  Do the following: a. Locate on your chart at least eight radio services such as AM and FM commercial broadcast. UHF. c. amplifier. Explain the differences between an open circuit a closed circuit.  Do ONE of the following: (a OR b OR c ) a. Using proper call signs. Draw a block diagram for a radio station that includes a transceiver. HF. or digital mode. VHF. b. Include in your explanation: transceiver. (Licensed amateur radio operators may substitute five QSL cards as evidence of contacts with amateur radio operators from . Tell why the FCC has an amateur radio service. and a short circuit. citizens band (CB). broadcast station. and microwave portions of the spectrum on your diagram. The differences between broadcasting and two-way communications. amplifier. Label the MF. and the purpose of the station. and explain why this profession might interest you. Discuss what types of equipment you saw in use. once they have earned an amateur radio license. antenna. Pick one and find out the education. 2. television.a. and feed line. Draw a chart of the electromagnetic spectrum covering 100 kilohertz (kHz) to 1000 megahertz (MHz). and abbreviations. or public communications center. and public service (police and fire). Radio call signs and how they are used in broadcast radio and amateur radio d. AMATEUR RADIO 1. The differences between broadcast radio and hobby radio. b. c.  Do the following: a. carry on a 10 minute real or simulated radio contact using voice. WWV and WWVH can be used to help determine what you will hear when you listen to a shortwave radio? b. and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor. Explain what three of the represented parts do. Sketch a diagram showing how radio waves travel locally and around the world. Explain the difference between a DX and a local station. Describe some of the activities that amateur radio operators can do on the air. Morse Code. b. The phonetic alphabet and how it is used to communicate clearly.  Do the following: a. c.

SHORTWAVE LISTENING 1. fade. With your counselor's or a librarian's assistance. the pages or chapters read. etc. and subject. Do EACH of the following: a. Find the books in the library catalog. 2. list several frequency bands used by each. Keep a log of your reading that includes the title of the book. Explain how you would make an emergency call on voice or Morse code.) Properly log the real or simulated ham radio contact and record the signal report. title. For several major foreign stations (BBC in Great Britain or HCJB in Ecuador. 6. Explain who administers amateur radio exams.at least one period during daylight hours and at least one period at night. Read each book. the date you completed them. news. Explain at least five Q signals or amateur radio terms you hear while listening. BROADCAST RADIO 1. such as segue. Reading 1. Prepare a program schedule for radio station "KBSA" of exactly onehalf hour. With the assistance of your merit badge counselor or a librarian. 4.at least three different call districts. for example). b. continuity. c. including music. . b. dead air. Explain at least eight terms used in commercial broadcasting. network. Explain the differences between handheld transceivers and home "base" transceivers. remote. 3. Emergency Alert System.). biographies. note the frequencies on which your selected stations were loudest during each session. Ask your librarian or counselor about award-winning books that are recommended for readers your age and include at least one of those titles. and your thoughts about what you have read so far. and Extra Class license requirements and privileges. Discuss your reading with your counselor. d. Log the stations properly and locate them geographically on a globe. explain why you chose each book and tell whether you enjoyed it and what it meant to you. Record your program on audiotape or in a digital audio format using proper techniques. Compare your daytime and nighttime logs . cue. drama/plays. select six books of four different types (such as poetry. Listen to and properly log 15 broadcast stations Determine the program format and target audience for five of these stations. 5. Explain some of the differences between the Technician. Learn how to search your library's card catalog or computerized catalog by author. cut. and playlist. PSA. 3. Explain the uses of mobile amateur radio transceivers and amateur radio repeaters. 3. 2. Explain the differences in the signal strength from one period to the next. nonfiction. commercials. locate the books on the shelves. Listen across several shortwave bands for four one-hour periods . c. Using your log as a reference. fiction. General. and proper station identification.

2. Read about the world around you from any two sources - books, magazines, newspapers, the Internet (with your parent's permission), field manuals, etc. Topics may include sports, environmental problems, politics, social issues, current events, nature, religion, etc. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor. 3. Do ONE of the following: a. From a catalog of your choice, fill out an order form for merchandise as if you intended to place an order. Share the completed form with your counselor and discuss it. b. With your parent's permission, locate at least five Web sites that are helpful for your scouting or other activities. Write the Internet addresses of these sites in your log. Talk with your counselor or a librarian about safety rules for using the Internet. 4. With your counselor's and parent's permission, choose ONE of the following activities and devote at least four hours of service to that activity. Discuss your participation with your counselor. a. Read to a sick, blind, or homebound person in a hospital or in an extended-care facility. b. Perform volunteer work at your school library or a public library. c. Read stories to younger children, in a group or individually. Reptile and Amphibian Study 1. Describe the identifying characteristics of six species of reptiles and four species of amphibians found in the United States. For any four of these, make sketches from your own observations or take photographs. Show markings, color patterns, or other characteristics that are important in the identification of each of the four species. Discuss the habits and habitats of all 10 species. 2. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the approximate number of species and general geographic distribution of reptiles and amphibians in the United States. Prepare a list of the most common species found in your local area or state. 3. Describe the main differences between: a. Amphibians and reptiles b. Alligators and crocodiles c. Toads and frogs d. Salamanders and lizards e. Snakes and lizards 4. Explain how reptiles and amphibians are an important component of the natural environment. List four species that are officially protected by the federal government or by the state you live in, and tell why each is protected. List three species of reptiles and three species of amphibians found in your local area that are not protected. Discuss the food habits of all 10 species. 5. Describe how reptiles and amphibians reproduce. 6. From observation, describe how snakes move forward. Describe the functions of the muscles, ribs, and belly plates. 7. Describe in detail six venomous snakes and the one venomous lizard found in the United States. Describe their habits and geographic range. Tell what you should do in case of a bite by a venomous species. 8. Do ONE of the following:

a. Maintain one or more reptiles or amphibians for at least a month. Record food accepted, eating methods, changes in coloration, shedding of skins, and general habits; or keep the eggs of a reptile from the time of laying until hatching; or keep the eggs of an amphibian from the time of laying until their transformation into tadpoles (frogs) or larvae (salamanders). b. Choose a reptile or amphibian that you can observe at a local zoo, aquarium, nature center, or other such exhibit (such as your classroom or school). Study the specimen weekly for a period of three months. At each visit, sketch the specimen in its captive habitat and note any changes in its coloration, shedding of skins, and general habits and behavior. Find out, either from information you locate on your own or by talking to the caretaker, what this species eats and what are its native habitat and home range, preferred climate, average life expectancy, and natural predators. Also identify any human caused threats to its population and any laws that protect the species and its habitat. After the observation period, share what you have learned with your counselor. 9. Do TWO of the following: a. Identify at night three kinds of toads or frogs by their voices. Imitate the song of each for your counselor. Stalk each with a flashlight and discover how each sings and from where. b. Identify by sight eight species of reptiles or amphibians. c. Using visual aids, give a brief talk to a small group on three different reptiles and amphibians. 10.Tell five superstitions or false beliefs about reptiles and amphibians and give a correct explanation for each. Give seven examples of unusual behavior or other true facts about reptiles and amphibians. NOTE: Scouts must not use venomous reptiles in fulfilling requirement 8a. Species listed by federal or state law as endangered, protected, or threatened must not be used as live specimens in completing requirement 8a unless official permission had been given. In most cases all specimens should be returned to the wild at the location of capture after the requirement has been met. Check with your merit badge counselor for those instances where the return of these specimens would not be appropriate. Under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, some plant and animals are or may be protected by federal law. The same ones and/or others may by protected by state law. Be sure that you do not collect protected species. Your state may require that you purchase and carry a license to collect certain species. Check with the wildlife and fish and game officials in your state regarding species regulations before you begin to collect. Rifle Shooting  Do the following: a. Explain why BB and pellet air guns must always be treated with the same respect as firearms. b. Describe how you would react if a friend visiting your home asked to see your or your family's firearm(s).

c. Explain the need for, and use and types of, eye and hearing protection. d. Give the main points of the laws for owning and using guns in your community and state. e. Explain how hunting is related to the wise use of renewable wildlife resources. f. Obtain a copy of the hunting laws for your state. Explain the main points of hunting laws in your state and give any special laws on the use of guns and ammunition. g. Identify and explain how you can join or be a part of shooting sports activities. h. Explain to your counselor the proper hygienic guidelines used in shooting. i. Give to your counselor a list of sources that you could contact for information on firearms and their uses.  Do ONE of the following options: Option A - Rifle Shooting (Modern Cartridge Type) a. Identify the three main parts of a rifle, and tell how they function. b. Identify and demonstrate the three fundamental rules for safe gun handling. c. Identify the two types of cartridges, their parts, and how they function. d. Explain to your counselor what a misfire, hangfire, and squib fire are, and explain the procedures to follow in response to each. e. Identify and demonstrate the five fundamentals of shooting a rifle safely. f. Identify and explain each rule for safe shooting. g. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot a rifle from the benchrest position or supported prone position while using the five fundamentals of rifle shooting. h. Identify the basic safety rules for cleaning a rifle, and identify the materials needed. i. Demonstrate how to clean a rifle properly and safely. j. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a rifle. k. Using a .22 caliber rimfire rifle and shooting from a benchrest or supported prone position at 50 feet, fire five groups (three shots per group) that can be covered by a quarter. Using these targets, explain how to adjust sights to zero. l. Adjust sights to center the group on the target and fire five groups (five shots per group). According to the target used, each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score: 1. A-32 targets : 9; 2. A-17 or TQ-1 targets : 7; 3. A-36 targets : 5.  Note: It is not always practical to adjust the sights (i.e.' when using a borrowed fixed-sight rifle). For requirement 2l, you may demonstrate your ability to use the shooting fundamentals by shooting five shot groups (five shots per group) in which all shots can be covered by a quarter and then explain how to adjust the sights to zero the rifle. Option B - Air Rifle Shooting (BB or Pellet) a. Identify the three main parts of an air rifle, and tell how they function. b. Identify and demonstrate the three fundamental rules for safe gun handling. c. Identify the two most common types of air rifle ammunition. d. Identify and demonstrate the five fundamentals of shooting a rifle safely.

g. Identify principal parts of percussion and flintlock rifles and discuss how they function. b. each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score: 1. f. 2. fire five groups (three shots per group) that can be covered by a quarter. Discuss proper components of a load. Demonstrate the knowledge.Muzzleloading Rifle Shooting a. pellet air rifle at 25 feet using TQ-5 target : 8. Identify proper procedures and accessories used for loading a muzzleloading rifle. Demonstrate and discuss the safe handling rules of muzzleloading rifles. f. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzleloading rifle. each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score: 1. skills. j. k. and identify the materials needed. i. g. Option C . skills. at 25 yards using NRA A-23 or NMLRA 50-yard targets : 7. Using a BB gun or pellet air rifle and shooting from a bench rest or supported prone position at 15 feet for BB guns or 33 feet for air rifles. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting an air rifle. Using these materials. k. Rowing . Demonstrate how to clean an air rifle safely. at 33 feet or 10 meters using AR-1 targets : 6. Using a muzzleloading rifle of . fire three groups (three shots per group) at 50 feet that can be covered by the base of a standard-size soft drink can. demonstrate how to clean a muzzleloading rifle safely.45 or . including range procedures. d. m. Shoot a target with a muzzleloading rifle using the five fundamentals of firing a shot. Demonstrate the knowledge. j. and attitude necessary to safely shoot a target from the benchrest position or supported prone position while using the five fundamentals of rifle shooting. According to the target used.e. and attitude necessary to safely shoot a muzzleloading rifle on a range. Identify and explain each rule for shooting an air rifle safely. Adjust sights to center the group on the target and fire five groups (five shots per group). Identify the basic safety rules for cleaning an air rifle. According to the target used. h. c. n. Discuss proper safety procedures pertaining to black powder use and storage. l. i. at 50 yards using NRA A-25 or NMLRA 100-yard targets : 7. Identify the causes of a muzzleloading rifle's failure to fire and explain or demonstrate proper correction procedures. 2. BB rifle at 15 feet or 5 meters using TQ-5 targets : 8. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzleloading rifle safely. h. e. Discuss a brief history of the development of muzzleloading rifles. Center the group on the target and fire three groups (five shots per group). Identify the various grades of black powder and their proper use.50 caliber and shooting from a bench rest or supported prone position.

Row in a straight line for a quarter mile. Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. 8. do the following correctly in either a fixedseat or sliding-seat rowboat: 1. with your buddy assisting you. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while rowing. Complete at least 10 hours of team practice prior to the meet. b. The meet must include competition between two or more teams with different sponsors. then swim 25 yards using an easy resting backstroke. Show or explain the proper use of anchors for rowboats. Explain how such conditions are recognized. push off from the shore or a dock. lacerations. and return to the starting point. b. 4. and scull in good form over the stern for 10 yards. In a sliding-seat rowboat. Do the following: a. club. Stop. Backwater in a straight line for 50 yards. including at least one 180-degree turn. The team may be sponsored by a school. Make a turn under way and return to the starting point. Launch 2. and making headway. Review and discuss Safety Afloat and demonstrate the proper fit and use of personal flotation devices (PFDs). The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and must include at least one sharp turn. contusions. 4. Pull away from the dock. In a fixed-seat rowboat. or crawl. 5. get out onto the pier. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. turn the boat so that the swimmer can hold onto the stern. 3. Reverse roles with your buddy and repeat the procedure. Before doing the following requirements. change position with your passenger. 9. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. While giving instructions to the swimmer. come alongside a dock and help a passenger into the boat. rest by floating. 5. Tell why you should stay with a swamped boat. make a pivot turn. and help your passenger out of the boat. 2. b. 7. Land and moor or rack your craft. Participate as a rowing team member in a competitive rowing meet. Row 10 yards to a swimmer. come alongside a pier and. Wellman's knot. Resume your rowing position. or Scout unit. Help your buddy into the boat.1. bowline. 10. 3. Level off and swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke. including righting and stabilizing the craft. Do ONE of the following: a. Alone in a rowboat. Do ONE of the following: a. Tow him to shore. trudgen. breaststroke. reboarding in deep water.Describe the following: . and mooring hitch. After completing the swim. Participate in a swamped boat drill. and blisters. 6. Alone or with a passenger. Tie the following mooring knots: clove hitch. roundturn with two half hitches. including cold and heat reactions. dehydration. return along side the pier. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person.

Explain what safety is and what it means to be safe. and assault. Newspaper and other stories. and recreational rowing. facts. Discuss with your counselor how you contribute to the safety of yourself. cooking. explaining how a serious fire. and statistics showing common types and causes of injuries in the home and in the workplace. robbery. competitive. Discuss with your counselor the three R's of Youth Protection and how to recognize child abuse. such as smoking. . electrical appliances. A list of safe practices and safety devices currently used by your family. The differences between fixed-seat and sliding-seat rowing f. 11. d. burglary. b. A paragraph or more. accident. Newspaper and other stories. and how these injuries could be prevented. Explain the hazards found and how these can be corrected. As you develop the escape plan with family members. Types of craft used in commercial. The health benefits from rowing for exercise Safety 1. b. or crime could change your family life. g. Using a safety checklist approved by your counselor. e. The different meaning of the term sculling in fixed.a. Do the following: a. c. fire. share with them facts about the common causes of fire in the home. facts. and boathandling procedures in rough water and windstorms c. and how to prepare and store a boat for winter d. Types of oarlocks used in competitive and recreational rowing. Discuss with your counselor the tips for online safety. your family. Review or develop your family's plan of escape in case of fire in your home. d. c. Give some positive and negative points of each.Discuss the following: a. and candles. b. such as safety practices used while driving or working and safety devices that prevent injuries or help in an emergency. Then prepare a notebook to include: a. How to properly fit out and maintain a boat in season. written by you. 3. c. 2. Precautions regarding strong winds and heavy waves. make an inspection of your home. Facts you have obtained concerning the frequency of accidents and of crimes in your local area. Explain the steps individuals can take to help prevent identity theft. Show your family members how to protect themselves and your home from accidents. Do the following: a. and statistics showing common kinds of crimes and ways to avoid being a crime victim. and your community. b. How to calculate the weight a boat can carry under normal conditions e. Four common boatbuilding materials.and sliding-seat rowing. The advantage of feathering oars while rowing b.

Pick one career and find out the education. Salesmanship 1. b. Plan and complete a safety project approved by your counselor for your home. municipal building. Explain why it is important for a salesperson to do the following: a. Use the sales techniques you have learned. Make an accident prevention plan for five family activities outside the home (at your place of worship. and share your experience with your counselor: a. and car washing to your neighbors. b. proposed action to correct hazards. place of worship. What are the most important things to remember when talking to customers? 3. If possible.S. Help your unit raise funds through sales of merchandise or of tickets to a Scout show. shopping center. or community. visit the location where the product is built and learn how it is constructed. Write and present a sales plan for a product or service and a sales territory assigned by your counselor. Do ONE of the following and keep a record (cost sheet). c. at a theater. How is the product or service sold? .4.If a service is being sold. Follow up after the service has been completed and determine the customer's satisfaction. d. show shoveling. and reasons for the correction you propose in each plan. What made the person choose sales as a profession? 2. c. Learn all about the product or service to be sold. library. school. Department of Homeland Security's Advisory System and appropriate actions to take for each threat level. and while traveling. Include in your plan an explanation of the U. Show your family the exits you would use from different public buildings (such as a theater. Sell your services such as lawn raking or mowing. for example). supermarket. dog walking. Interview a salesperson and learn the following: 1. Each plan should include an analysis of possible hazards. Make a sales presentation of a product or service assigned by your counselor. or your place of worship) in the event of an emergency. and experience required for this profession. 5. place of employment. Follow up with customers after their purchase to confirm their satisfaction and discuss their concerns about the product or service. Research the market to be sure the product or service meets the needs of the customers. on a picnic. Explain the responsibilities of a salesperson and how a salesperson serves customers and helps stimulate the economy. Earn money through retail selling. and explain why this profession might interest you. Teach your family what do in the event that they need to take shelter in or evacuate a public place. 4. 7. Discuss this choice with your counselor. learn about the benefits of the service to the customer. training. 6. 6. Do ONE of the following: a. pet watching. 2. 3. 5. at the beach. Learn about three career opportunities in the field of safety.

4. Show that for one term or semester you have improved your school grades over the previous period. Do ONE of the following: . Do TWO of the following: a. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of research available to you for school assignments. Include relevant classes you have taken in school and merit badges you have earned. then do the following: a. What good traits should a sales representative have? What habits should the sales representative avoid? 3. Find out where they were educated. Tell about the positive contributions you made to the team and the project. 7. show your counselor how you keep track of assignments and activities. Show that you have taken part in an extracurricular school activity. b. Do ONE of the following: a. what training they received. and how their education and training have helped prepare them for the career they have chosen. Visit one. 3. Using a daily planner. b. Make a list of educational places located where you live (other than schools). leadership. Scholarship 1. Find out how they continue to educate themselves. experience. Discuss your participation in a school project during the past semester where you were a part of a team. books and periodicals. b. Interview a retail store owner and learn the following: 1. and service have been satisfactory. c. 5. With your counselor's and your parent's approval. d. Include your own questions. How often is the owner approached by a sales representative? 2. and the Internet. b. Discuss with your counselor what education. Show that you have had an average grade of B or higher (80 percent or higher) for one term or semester. What does the owner consider when deciding whether to establish an account with a sales representative? 4. or training you should obtain so you are prepared to serve in that position. Investigate and report on career opportunities in sales. interview two professionals (other than teachers or other professionals at your school) with established careers. and report on how you used the place for selfeducation. Do ONE of the following: a. Prepare a written statement of your qualifications and experience. 2. b. Discuss what you find out with your counselor. Get a note from the principal* of your school (or another school official named by the principal) that states that during the past year your behavior. and discuss how you manage your time.4. Include your own questions. and discuss with your counselor the benefits of participation and what you learned about the importance of teamwork. such as the library.

report to your counselor what you did. Venturing). 4. keep a journal documenting your day-to-day experiences. Boyce 3. West b. Write a report of 250 to 300 words about two careers that interest you and how specific classes and good scholarship in general will help you achieve your career goals. Discuss the significance to Scouting of any TWO of the following: 1. Discuss with your counselor the life and times of Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell. Texas. Upon your return. James E. and learned. Boy Scouting. Attend either a BSA national jamboree. in 2010. 2. troop committee members. and the origins of Boy Scouting and Cub Scouting under Baden-Powell. and present it to your . Daniel Carter Beard 2. Scouting Heritage 1.* Obtain information about this facility. Give a short report on what you think the role of this museum is in the Scouting program. William D. Create a report of your findings on the history of your troop. Explain why he felt a program like Scouting would be good for the young men of his day. brochures. Learn about the history of your unit or Scouting in your area. Ernest Thompson Seton 5. Boys’ Life magazine 3. Do ONE of the following: a. Waite Phillips 4. Exploring.a. you may obtain a note from a counterpart such as your parent. OR a national BSA high-adventure base. Boy Scout Handbook 4. *If you are home-schooled or your school environment does not include a principal. Scouts. While there. Do the following: a. 1. Give a short biographical summary of any TWO of the following. You may include photos. Discuss with your counselor how Scouting’s programs have developed over time and been adapted to fit different age groups and interests (Cub Scouting. Interview at least two people (one from the past and one from the present) associated with your troop. 5. saw. you may use that experience to fulfill requirement 4b. Adventure Base 100. and tell of their roles in how Scouting developed and grew in the United States prior to 1940. Brownsea Island 2. Write a report of 250 to 300 words about how the education you receive in school will be of value to you in the future and how you will continue to educate yourself in the future. The First World Scout Jamboree 3. b. b. *If you visited the BSA’s traveling tour. These individuals could be adult unit leaders. and other documents in your report. Find out when your unit was originally chartered. or representatives of your troop’s chartered organization. OR world Scout jamboree. Write or visit the National Scouting Museum in Irving. Include in your discussion how Scouting was introduced in the United States.

Find out about three career opportunities in the scuba industry.) 7. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Reproduce the equipment for an old-time Scouting game such as those played at Brownsea Island. and describe four aquatic ecosystems a diver might experience. Teach and play the game with other Scouts. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while participating in search and rescue (SAR) activities. motion sickness. Scuba Diving 1. overexertion. a. This presentation could be in the form of an oral/written report. You may find one on your own (with your counselor’s approval). Interview at least three people (different from those you interviewed for requirement 5) over the age of 40 who were Scouts. a scrapbook. Search and Rescue 1. and explain why this profession might interest you. fatigue. Do the following: a. and cuts and scrapes. and explain how to recognize such conditions. Do the following.patrol or troop or at a court of honor. dehydration. Find out about their Scouting experiences. injuries by aquatic life. 5. 6. Discuss this with your counselor. or a computer presentation such as a slide show. and then add it to the troop’s library. or you may include photographs of these items. and experience required for this profession. or pick one from the Scouting Heritage merit badge pamphlet. decompression illness. Pick one and find out the education. and share what you have learned about items in the collection. and what you . an exhibit. Ask about the impact that Scouting has had on their lives. Earn an Open Water Diver Certification from a scuba organization recognized by the Boy Scouts of America scuba policy. training. Make a collection of some of your personal patches and other Scouting memorabilia. earn the Swimming merit badge. and explain the importance of each guideline to a scuba diver’s safety. Demonstrate the proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. heat reactions. (There is no requirement regarding how large or small this collection must be. 4. Explain what an ecosystem is. Before completing requirements 3 through 6. b. 6. Discuss the Scuba Diver’s Code with your merit badge counselor. Share what you learned with your counselor. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while scuba diving. including hypothermia. squeezes. 2. Show this collection to your counselor. you may include items borrowed from family members or friends who have been in Scouting in the past. 8. 3. hyperventilation. nitrogen narcosis. With their permission.

and longitude. Using a 1:24. show that you can identify a location of your choice using UTM coordinates. Interview a member of one of the teams you have identified above. . The meaning of these terms: I. Demonstrate knowledge to stay found and prevent yourself from becoming the subject of a SAR mission. Discuss this with your counselor. Discuss with your counselor how the ICS compares with Scouting’s patrol method. then identify that location. The difference between PLS (place last seen) and LKP (last known point) c. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in SAR activities. Print out the certificate of completion and show it to your counselor. Evaluating search urgency V. See ICS-100 online training.000 scale map. Explain how the Ten Essentials are similar to a "ready pack. c. c. Briefing and debriefing Find out who in your area has authority for search and rescue and what their responsibilities are. blisters. should do to anticipate. 3. Using a 1:24. 6. Identify four types of search and rescue teams and discuss their use or role with your counselor. Area air scent dog VIII. 7." Discuss the following with your counselor: a.000 scale map. urban. b. Complete the training for ICS-100. including: snakebites. and explain the official duties of a search and rescue team. Establishing confinement VI. latitude. 5. b. and ankle and knee sprains. dehydration. Scent item VII. Introduction to Incident Command System. help prevent. Discuss what you learned with your counselor. How does the buddy system help in staying found and safe? b. and water SARs. Discuss the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) system. The difference between search and rescue b. IAP (Incident Action Plan) III. a. ask your counselor to give you a UTM coordinate on the map. Explain the differences between wilderness. ICS (Incident Command System) IV. Describe the process and safety methods of working around at least two of the specialized SAR teams you identified above.2. and respond to these hazards. Then do the following: a. Show that you can identify your current location using the UTM coordinates on a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit and verify it on a 1:24.000 scale USGS topographic map. Then do the following: a. environmental emergencies such as hypothermia or heatstroke. b. AFRCC (Air Force Rescue Coordination Center) II. mitigate. shock. 4. and learn how this team contributes to a search and rescue operation. How can knowledge of the area and its seasonal weather changes affect your plans? c.

b. Identify places in your community where you could shoot these sports and explain how you can join or be a part of shooting sports activities. Choose a hypothetical scenario.Find out about three career or volunteer opportunities in search and rescue. Discuss this with your counselor. then do the following: 1. Determine a hypothetical place last seen. After completing 8a–8c. h. Pick one and find out the education. Explain the main points of hunting laws in your state and give any special laws on the use of guns or ammunition. tracking the subject. c. training. Complete an Incident Action Plan (IAP) to address this scenario.d. Explain to your counselor the proper hygiene guidelines used in shooting. and locating the subject using attraction or trail sweep. b. Explain the main points of the laws for owning and using guns in your community and state. c. Do the following: a. List the kinds of wildlife that can be legally hunted in your state. g. and ideas for improvement. Shotgun Shooting 1. successful and unsuccessful tactics. or obtain a copy of the hunting laws for your state. b. either one presented in this merit badge pamphlet or one created by your counselor. 8. Discuss with your counselor the behavior of a lost person and how that would impact your incident action plan (for example. the differences between searching for a young child versus a teen). discuss the hypothetical scenario with your counselor. When it’s over. and explain why this position might interest you. Then do the following: a. Explain the need for and use and types of eye and hearing protection. and 2. and point out an area on your map that could be used for containment using natural or humanmade boundaries. Describe how you would react if a friend visiting your home asked to see your or your family's firearm(s). Give your counselor a list of sources that you could contact for information on firearms and their use. f. Then do the following: a. Complete an incident objectives form for this scenario. Explain why BB and pellet air guns must always be treated with the same respect as firearms. i. 9. e. . d. Discuss problems encountered. d. Identify and explain three shotgun sports. Include the following elements in the search: clue awareness. 10. and experience required for this professional or volunteer position. Plan and carry out a practice hasty search—either urban or wilderness —for your patrol or troop. Explain how hunting is related to the wise use of renewable wildlife resources. Discuss with your counselor the terms hasty team and hasty search. Successfully complete a state hunter education course. evidence preservation. hold a team debriefing to discuss the hasty search.

and explain the procedures to follow in response to each. Explain which one you would use and why. Identify the materials needed to clean a shotgun. f. Demonstrate the knowledge. j. and squib fire are. Identify the various gauges of shotguns. Do ONE of the following options: OPTION A: SHOTGUN SHOOTING (Modern Shotshell Type) a.  Scores may be fired at any time. c. shoot station 7 low house. Shooting score required. Explain what a misfire. Demonstrate how to handle shotguns in a safe manner. Note: If using a hand trap or manual mechanical trap. Demonstrate how to clean a shotgun properly and safely. Discuss a brief history of the development of the muzzle-loading shotgun. d. l.2. shoot station 3 with traps set to throw straightaway targets. skills. hangfire.  Standard clay targets customarily used for trap and skeet are to be used. using the fundamentals of shotgun shooting. and how they function. Identify the parts of a shotgun shell and their functions. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a shotgun.  Any gauge shotgun not exceeding 12 gauge may be used. . either factory or hand loaded. i. Identify and explain each rule for safely shooting a shotgun. If throwing left-handed with a hand trap the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the left and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. may be used. e. Identify the principal parts of a shotgun. Rounds need not be shot continuously or on the same day (the term ‘round’ refers to a single series of 25 shots). g.  Targets should be generally thrown so as to climb in the air after leaving the trap. Identify and demonstrate the fundamentals of safely shooting a shotgun. h. either in formal competition or in practice. and attitude necessary to safely shoot moving targets. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order. the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the right and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. manual mechanical trap. OPTION B: MUZZLE-LOADING SHOTGUN SHOOTING a. Shooting skill rules:  Targets may be thrown by a hand trap. .  If using a skeet field.Hit at least 12 out of 25 targets (48 percent) in two 25-target groups. Identify and demonstrate the rules for safely handling a shotgun. k.  All targets should be thrown at a reasonable speed and in the same direction.  If using a trap field.  Shooters must shoot in rounds of 25. or on any trap or skeet field. action types.  Any ammunition. b.

Shoot a moving target with a muzzle-loading shotgun using the five fundamentals of firing the shot. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzle-loading shotgun properly and safely. shoot station 7 low house. Identify the various grades of black powder and their proper and safe use. e. c. and how to clear a muzzle-loading shotgun's failure to fire and explain or demonstrate proper correction procedures. l. skills. : Hit at least 5 out of 15 targets in two 15target groups. Explain what a misfire. and attitude necessary to safely shoot a muzzle-loading shotgun on a range. The trap should be set to throw only straightaway targets.  If using a skeet field. g.  Any gauge shotgun not exceeding 10 gauge may be used. Demonstrate how to clean a muzzle-loading shotgun safely. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order. or on any trap or skeet field. Discuss proper safety procedures pertaining to black powder use and storage. If throwing left-handed with a hand trap the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the left and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. and explain the procedures to follow in response to each.  Targets should be generally thrown so as to climb in the air after leaving trap. Identify proper procedures and accessories used for safely loading a muzzle-loading shotgun. f. d. i. Identify the causes of a muzzle-loading shotgun's failure to fire and explain or demonstrate proper preventative procedures. the shooter should be positioned 8 yards behind the trap house.  Scores may be fired at any time. k. h. either in formal competition or in practice. and squib fire are. j. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzle-loading shotgun.  All targets should be thrown at a reasonable speed and in the same direction.  Standard clay targets customarily used for trap and skeet are to be used. Note: if using a hand trap or manual mechanical trap.b. manual mechanical trap. . Shooting skill rules:  Targets may be thrown by a hand trap. Discuss proper components of a load. Shooting score required. m. Demonstrate and discuss the safe handling rules of a muzzle-loading shotgun. the trap operator should be at least 5 feet to the right and 3 feet to the rear of the shooter. Demonstrate the knowledge. including range procedures. hangfire. n.  On a standard trap field. Identify principal parts of percussion and flintlock shotguns and discuss how they function.

heat reactions. Discuss the parts and functions of the different types of ice skates. glide forward on two feet. Do the following: 1. Starting from a T position. Perform forward crossovers in a figure eight pattern. 2. 2. . 6. Explain how to make an ice rescue. then on one foot. first right and then left. glide forward on two feet. Discuss briefly various other codes and methods of signaling which are in common use. at a rate of not less than 35 letters per minute. 4. when. sprains and strains. 3. Do the following: 1. Skate backward for at least 20 feet on two skates.Signaling 1. Give general safety and courtesy rules for ice skating. blisters. Describe the proper way to carry ice skates. Ice Skating a. Demonstrate an ability to send and receive a message in the International Morse Code by wigwag and by blinker or other light signaling device at the rate of not less than 20 letters per minute. Perform a forward shoot-the-duck until you’re nearly stopped. wireless. d. 2. 5. Skating 1. 4. 3. and cardiac arrest. including hypothermia. Complete ALL of the requirements for ONE of the following options. Do the following: 1. Describe how to store skates for long periods of time. lacerations. or other signaling device. Know the proper application of the International Morse and Semaphore Codes. Skate forward at least 40 feet and come to a complete stop. blinker. avoiding the use of toe picks if wearing figure skates. 2. 3. Send and receive in the International Morse Code. making a turn of 180 degrees around a cone. 3. frostbite. Discuss preparations that must be taken when skating outdoors on natural ice. fractures. 2. by buzzer or other sound device. such as seasonal storage. Send and receive by Semaphore Code at the rate of not less than 30 letters per minute. a complete message of not less than 35 words. c. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that may occur while skating. Rise while still on one foot. Use either a two-footed snowplow stop or a one-footed snowplow stop. first to the right and then to the left. where. shock. Make an electric buzzer outfit. After gaining forward speed. abrasions. b. Do the following: 1. and how they can be used to best advantage. stroke forward around the test area. After skating forward. 2. Glide backward on two feet for at leaast two times the skater's height.

then for at least 15 feet on one skate. 4. Perform the stepover. Perform the crosscut. f. then on the other skate. k. Skate forward with smooth. Skate backward in a slalom pattern for at least 15 feet on two skates. While skating. g. Roller Skating e. 2. 3. dribble a basketball the length of the floor. 4. cornering. Race on a speed track. then return to your starting position. 3. 3. Skate backward for at least 40 feet on two skates. Describe four essential steps to good skate care. then on the other skate. Do the following: 1. Perform a widespread eagle. Describe the required and recommended safety equipment. bending twice along the way without stopping. linked strokes on two feet for at least 100 feet. Skate forward and glide at least 15 feet on one skate. Skate forward with smooth. Shuttle skate once around the rink. Do the following: 1. 2. 2. Perform a hockey stop. skip. linked strokes on two feet for at least 100 feet in both directions around the rink and demonstrate proper techniques for stopping. 4. Do the following: 1. Do the following: 1. passing. h. Do the following: 1. OR hop. Do the following: 1. Perform a series of two consecutive spins on skates. . Discuss the parts and functions of the roller skate. In-Line Skating j. demonstrating proper technique in starting. i. then for at least 20 feet on one skate. 3. Skate forward in a slalom pattern for at least 40 feet on two skates. 3. 3. Perform the limbo under a pole placed at least chest-high OR shoot-the-duck under a waist-high pole and rise while still on one foot. Describe the parts and functions of the in-line skate. Give general safety and etiquette rules for roller skating. and pacing. 2. Skate forward and glide at least 15 feet on one skate. Do the following: 1. Give general and in-line skating safety rules and etiquette. Take part in a relay race. 4. Describe five essential steps to good skate care. and jump on skates for at least 10 feet. 2. 2.3. OR push a hockey ball with a stick around the entire rink in both directions. 4. Perform a mohawk. Stop on command on flat pavement using the heel brake. 2.

and personal gear required for small-boat sailing in warm weather and in cool weather. Discuss the warning signs of inclement weather and what to do should heavy winds develop or a storm approach. Do the following: 1. 5. Small-Boat Sailing 1. naming all of the major parts and the function of those parts. footwear. puncture wounds. 3. b. c. 3. f.* 4. and explain how to recognize such conditions. Do the following: . abrasions. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. e. Explain how water conditions. dehydration. backward swizzles. Discuss the nine points of the BSA Safety Afloat plan. From a b pace. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. m. Explain how choosing the proper clothing. 5. Do the following: 1. show that you and a buddy can sail a boat properly. 2. including hypothermia. heat reactions. perform a lunge turn around an object predetermined by your counselor. d. 3. 4. 2. linked swizzles for at least 40 feet. Perform the forward crossover. scratches. Before doing the following requirements. Describe two ways to get on and off a curb. Skate backward for at least 40 feet in a series of linked. b. 4. Describe the boat you will be using for the sailing requirement. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. cuts. contusions. Describe at least three ways to avoid an unforeseen obstacle while skating.l. Following the BSA Safety Afloat plan. Explain first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while smallboat sailing. motion sickness. and demonstrate at least one of these methods. 6. 2. Perform a series of at least four one-footed downhill slaloms on pavement with a gentle slope. Do the following: a. and blisters. Perform a mohawk. Discuss the proper clothing. the hazards of weather. do the following: a. Discuss with your counselor how to identify the wind direction and wind indicators. Prepare a typical float plan. and personal gear will help keep you comfortable and safe while sailing. Explain the importance of this task before setting sail. Before going afloat. footwear. Explain the rules of the road in general and any specific rules or laws that apply to your area or state. Describe how to pass a pedestrian or another skater from behind.safety and performance in sailing. Perform a series of forward. and heavy winds can affect both.

Upon returning to the dock. 9. Demonstrate the safety position. properly secure all equipment. Snow Sports 1. and strains. clove hitch. Demonstrate capsize procedures and. Explain the procedure used to report an accident to the local ski patrol for the area where you usually ski or ride. bruises. While sailing. . frostbite. b. Get underway from a dock. fractures. and reaching-the basic points of sail. shock. i. f. sailboards are not acceptable. mooring. 7. d. *The skill demonstrated on any boat available to the Scout.a. Do the following: a. b. § Capsize procedures should be conducted under the close supervision of the counselor. Discuss various types of sailboats in use today and explain their differences. the rescue of a person overboard. A rescue boat should be standing by to assist. Demonstrate a working knowledge of marlinespike seamanship. c. Properly set sails for a round-trip course approved by your counselor that will include running. dehydration. bowline. Self-bailing boats are acceptable for this requirement. Explain why every skier or snowboarder should be prepared to render first aid in the event of an accident. coil a line. With your counselor. 3. and fake down a line. and prepare the craft for unattended docking or beaching overnight or longer. Change direction by tacking. g. Show how to tie a square (reef) knot. furl or stow sails. and to tow the capsized craft to shore. it is suggested that the craft be smaller than 20 feet. While no specific sail plan is recommended. Discuss winter sports safety. if necessary. Extreme care should be taken to avoid personal injury and damage to the boat or equipment. sprains. two half hitches. 2. Describe how you would care for and maintain a sailboat and its gear throughout the year. change direction by jibing. cleat hitch. e. 8. Explain why each rider must follow this code. sunburn. including a safety inspection. Demonstrate the procedure to take after running aground. or beach. Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers and snowboarders. beating. mooring. Demonstrate getting out of irons. 4. or beach.§ h. Show how to heave a line. Discuss the kinds of lines used on sailboats and the types of fibers used in their manufacture. and show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while skiing or riding. c. including hypothermia. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each. demonstrate good helmsmanship skills. Tell how to apply splints. Demonstrate the use of each. review sailing terminology and the points of sail. and figure-eight knot. Do EACH of the following: a. The boat must be capsizable and have the capability of sailing to windward. Prepare a boat for sailing.

and herringbone maneuvers. i. including the responsibility of individuals regarding avalanche safety. demonstrate five to 10 christies. Explain the American Teaching System and a basic snow-skiing progression. Explain the importance of strength.b. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected. . p. Name the major ski organizations in the United States and explain their functions. h. Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing n. and downhill skiing. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following: 1. Demonstrate the ability to ski in varied conditions. show linked wedge turns. On a moderate slope. Discuss the five types of Alpine skis. Include the straight run. On a gentle slope. ski touring. demonstrate some of the beginning maneuvers learned in skiing. Explain the Smart Style safety program. Discuss classical and telemark skis. and moguls. Show your ability to select. k. Discuss the basic principles of waxing for cross-country ski touring. the correct equipment for ski touring in safety and comfort. Explain the international trail-marking system. Tell why it is important and how it applies to skiers and snowboarders in terrain parks and pipes. 5. Show how to use and maintain your own release bindings and explain the use of two others. use. Explain the precautions pertaining to avalanche safety. o. g. l. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for downhill skiing. and flexibility in downhill skiing. e. wedge stop. snow conditions. f. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily. b. Tell the meaning of the Wilderness Use Policy. if necessary. ski mountaineering. gliding wedge. c. j. Complete ALL of the requirements for ONE of the following options: downhill (Alpine) skiing or cross-country (Nordic) or snowboarding. Discuss the differences between cross-country skiing. d. Traverse across a slope m. q. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for skiing. A sideslip and safety (hockey) stop to each side 3. and repair. On slightly steeper terrain. endurance. Explain the international DIN standard and what it means to skiers. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis safely and easily. Downhill (Alpine) Skiing a. sidestep. Short-. d. medium-. c. Explain why each skier and snowboarder must adopt this policy. and long-radius parallel turns 2. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others. Maintain your balance and ability to turn. including changes in pitch.

Demonstrate exercises and activities that will get you fit for snowboarding. flow.Do the following: 1. v. traverse. Discuss the correct use of your clothing and equipment. sidesteps. ii. On a cross-country trail. and jump turns . cc. Include the sideslipping maneuver. sideslip. Do the following: 1. Demonstrate several methods of dealing with steep hills or difficult conditions. On a moderate slope. Tell about prevention and what action must be taken in the event of any type of injury or accident. ff. Explain the need for leashes. Demonstrate your ability to select the correct equipment for snowboarding and to use it for safety and comfort. endurance. dd. show traversing. Show a degree of stamina that will enable you to keep up with an average ski-touring group your age.r. packed slope. and ski-pole "glissade. Show how to use and maintain your own bindings. y. Demonstrate the proper use of a topographic map and compass. carved. z. and a wheelie. pole timing. bb. On a gentle slope. to cope with an average variety of snow conditions. kk. u. Include traverses and kick turns going uphill and downhill. pole drag. Discuss forward-fall injuries. On slightly steeper terrain. Include the straight run.Discuss the four types of snowboards. List items you would take on a one-day ski tour. and flexibility in crosscountry skiing. x. gg. t. w.Demonstrate the basic principles of waxing a snowboard. show some basic ways to control speed and direction. rhythm. demonstrate an ollie. 2. step turn. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for a one-day ski tour. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for skiing. demonstrate effective propulsion by showing proper weight transfer from ski to ski. and explain the use of the different binding methods. Demonstrate how to carry a snowboard easily and safely. wedge stop.Explain the international trail-marking system. On a gentle. on a tour. Demonstrate your ability. and how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected. jj. and wedge turn maneuvers. 2. s. a nose-end grab. hh. ee. and glide. Show basic ways to control speed and direction. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected. Skidded. demonstrate beginning snowboarding maneuvers. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others. Explain the importance of strength. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for snowboarding. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following: 1." Snowboarding aa.

and moguls. 5. lacrosse. water polo. and back. establish a personal training program suited to the activities you chose for requirement 4. Take part for one season (or four months) as a competitive individual or as a member of an organized team in TWO of the following sports: baseball. Discuss the following: a. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while playing sports. blisters. and other harmful substances can negatively affect your health and your performance in sports activities c. muscle cramps. With guidance from your counselor. Stops 3. Riding fakie ll. heat and cold reactions. What an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete d. Demonstrate proper technique for your two chosen sports. The importance of maintaining good health habits for life (such as exercising regularly). Demonstrate your ability to ride in varied conditions. The importance of the physical exam b. mm. Then with your chosen sports do the following: a. snow conditions. . field hockey. Maintain your balance and ability to turn. Explain the importance of the following: a. Sports 1. bowling. neck. fractures. Then do the following: a. 2. alcohol. basketball. The importance of maintaining a healthy diet 3. List the equipment needed for the two sports you chose. b. and development in these sports for one season (or four months). the importance of sportsmanship. tennis. c. including sprains. and suspected injuries to the head. strains. The importance of warming up and cooling down b. and how the use of tobacco products. injured teeth. Give the rules and etiquette for the two sports you picked. practice. Draw diagrams of the playing areas for your two sports. ice hockey. softball. contusions. dehydration. nausea. football. table tennis.2. abrasions. Organize a chart to track your training. and the traits of a good team leader and player who exhibits Scout spirit on and off the playing field 4. Name the major snowboarding organizations in the United States and explain their functions. The attributes (qualities) of a good sport. soccer. b. Describe the protective equipment and appropriate clothing (if any) and explain why it is needed. including changes in pitch. cross-country. The importance of weight training c. Your counselor may approve in advance other recognized sports. volleyball. but not any sport that is restricted and not authorized by the Boy Scouts of America.

sunburn. heatstroke. Discuss the prevention and treatment for health concerns that could occur while swimming. Before doing the following requirements. b. and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim. 3. stop. Do the following: a. successfully complete Second Class rank requirements 7a-7c and First Class rank requirements 9a-9c. show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. including hypothermia. (7c) Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching your arm or leg. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. and cuts and scrapes. (7b) Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. belt. Remove shoes and socks. swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke. by reaching with a suitable object. Explain how to recognize such conditions. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. and show that you can float using . then swim 25 yards using an easy. trudgen. (9b) Before doing the following requirements. and long-sleeved shirt). muscle cramps. level off and swim 25 feet on the surface. Second Class rank requirements: (7a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim. 2. rest by floating. spinal injury. long pants. turn sharply. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible. First Class rank requirements: (9a) Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat. The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water. resume swimming. At the end of the season. After completing the swim. The 100 yards must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. socks. resting backstroke. (9c) With a helper and a practice victim. 4. Swimming 1. swim trunks. hyperventilation. and by throwing lines and objects. stings and bites. or crawl. then return to your starting place. heat exhaustion.c. Demonstrate survival skills by jumping feetfirst into deep water wearing clothes (shoes. dehydration. inflate the shirt. breaststroke. share your completed chart with your counselor and discuss how your participation in the sports you chose has affected you mentally and physically.

Do the following: a. OR. sidestroke for 25 yards. also from the dock or pool deck. Explain why swimming or survival floating will hasten the onset of hypothermia in cold water. Do a headfirst surface dive to a depth of at least 5 feet and swim underwater for three strokes. Come to the surface. discuss safety in both pool and open-water snorkeling. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support. Demonstrate selection and fit of mask. take a breath. Demonstrate the following competitive swim skills: 1. Following the guidelines set in the BSA Safe Swim Defense. Float faceup in a resting position for at least one minute. d. . Use the feetfirst method of surface diving and bring an object up from the bottom. Demonstrate survival floating for at least five minutes. 2. then show how to reinflate the pants while still afloat. Do a headfirst surface dive (pike or tuck) and bring the object up again. Racing form for 25 yards on one competitive stroke (front crawl. 8. In water over your head. and demonstrate your knowledge of BSA policies and procedures relating to that sport. repeat 8b2 with an additional stroke. b. back crawl for 25 yards. Describe the sport of scuba diving or snorkeling. c. c. b. but not to exceed 10 feet. 7. Do the following: a. Discuss why swimming is favored as both a fitness and a therapeutic exercise. 10. Remove and inflate the pants for support. Explain the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise. do each of the following: a. Racing turns for the stroke you chose in 8b2. back crawl. and fins. Demonstrate proper use of mask. OR b. Swim continuously for 150 yards using the following strokes in good form and in a strong manner: front crawl or trudgen for 25 yards. 6. breaststroke. and elementary backstroke for 50 yards. Describe the sport of competitive swimming. and explain why many people today do not get enough of the beneficial kinds of exercise. snorkel. or butterfly) 3. Demonstrate snorkeling and scuba diving knowledge: 1. 5. if the camp facilities cannot accommodate the racing turn. in water at least 7 feet deep. breaststroke for 25 yards. Racing dive from a pool edge or dock edge (no elevated dives from racing platforms or starting blocks) 2. b. and repeat the sequence twice. 4. show a standing headfirst dive from a dock or pool deck. demonstrate the HELP and huddle positions. 3. Explain their purposes. and fins for underwater search and rescue. Show a long shallow dive. 9. While wearing a properly fitted personal floatation device (PFD). snorkel.the shirt for support. Do ONE of the following: a.

Do the following: a. showing how to proceed noiselessly and "freeze" when occasion demands. or mud. Discuss with your counselor the incentives and obstacles for staying with the fitness program you created in requirement 10c.2 points each f. d.4 points each b. (c). Make satisfactory plaster cast of wild animal or bird tracks with identification imprint on back of cast . or submit satisfactory evidence that he has trailed six different kinds of wild animal or birds in snow. and describe gait and speed. Live bird on nest . Submit satisfactory evidence that he has trailed two different kinds of wild animals or birds on ordinary ground far enough to determine the direction in which they were going. Submit evidence that he has scored at least 30 points from the following groups: Group (f) and 4 of the 5 groups (a). three of which may be domestic. young or old.c. b. the gait or speed. etc. Identify resources and facilities available in your home community that would be needed for such a program. their direction of travel. Describe how alcohol and other drugs affect the human body and why a person should never drink and drive.. Write a plan for a swimming exercise program that will promote aerobic/vascular fitness. Know and recognize the tracks of ten different kinds of animals or birds in his vicinity. 5. 4. Live wild animal larger than woodchuck . body flexibility. recognizable photographs of: a. (b). 2. (b). Describe the top 10 mistakes new drivers frequently make. (e) must be represented in the score of 30 and at least 7 points must be scored from (a). and also give any other information deduced. and discuss how personal health awareness and self-discipline would relate to your willingness and ability to pursue such a program. and describe gait and speed. sand. (d). Submit satisfactory evidence that he has tracked a human being and deducted from the trail whether it was man or woman. strength and muscle tone. Live bird away from nest .2 points each Traffic Safety 1. their direction of travel. far enough to determine the direction they were going and their gait or speed. Tracking 1. Name the two items you are required by law to carry with you whenever you operate a motor vehicle. or (c). or drive while under the . Give names of animals or birds. Give the names of animals or birds trailed. Tracks of live wild animal or bird .4 points each d. 3.3 points each e. Make a clear. Explain the unique benefits that could be gained from this program. Demonstrate by means of a tracking game or otherwise. ability to track skillfully in shelter and wind. and weight control for a person of Scout age. dust.3 points each c. Live woodchuck or smaller wild animal . and their gait or speed.

and illicit drugs. . signals. Using your family car or another vehicle. 50. Using your family car or another vehicle. demonstrate that all lights and lighting systems in the vehicle are working. Explain how roadside hazards and road conditions contribute to the occurrence and seriousness of traffic crashes. measure with a tape measure : not in a car : and mark off with stakes the distance that a car will travel during the time needed for decision and reaction. 4. Do the following: a. d. List five safety features found in motor vehicles besides occupant restraint systems. and tell how drivers can minimize distractions. Explain the purpose of different types of signs. Do the following: a. find out what is the legal blood alcohol concentration and the consequences for driving while intoxicated or driving under the influence. Explain how color and shape are used to help road users recognize and understand the information presented on traffic and roadway signs. Find out what the open-container law is in your state. Demonstrate a method to check for adequate tire tread. including prescription drugs. Demonstrate how to properly wear a lap or shoulder belt. List five common distractions. how each works. and 70 miles an hour on dry. Describe the function and explain why each type of light is important to safe driving. c. Describe at least four factors to be considered in the design of a road or highway. d. b. Explain why a driver who is fatigued or distracted should not operate a motor vehicle. Demonstrate the difference in nighttime visibility between a properly lit bicycle and rider (or a pedestrian) wearing reflective material and a bicycle and rider with no lights (or a pedestrian) dressed in dark clothing. For the state where you live. d. Describe each feature. Explain why it is important for drivers and passengers to wear safety belts at all times. Explain why proper tire tread is important to safe driving. Explain why proper tire pressure is important to safe driving. 2. Discuss how environmental factors such as bad weather and road conditions will affect the distance. without reflective material. b. and the braking distance necessary to stop a car traveling 30. level pavement. 3. Describe instances in good and bad weather when windshield washers are important to safe driving. In a location away from traffic hazards. demonstrate how to check tire pressure and identify the correct tire pressure for the vehicle. and how each contributes to safety. c.influence of any mind-altering substances. c. explain how driver distractions contribute to traffic accidents. Demonstrate with a smear-and-clear test if the windshield blades will clear the windshield completely or need to be replaced. b. Describe at least three examples of traffic laws that apply to drivers of motor vehicles and that bicyclists must also obey. and pavement markings. Describe how volunteer drivers can plan to be alert when transporting Scouting participants. Do the following: a. cold medications.

Know the safety precautions that must be used by the boat operator in pulling waterskiers and wakeboarders. Accompanied by an adult and a buddy. for 30 minutes on each visit. faster. Discuss the findings with your merit badge counselor. Discuss with your merit badge counselor possible ways to solve one of those problems. heat exhaustion. Show how to enter the water from a boat and make a deepwater start without help. and blisters. back to dock. At this intersection. Initiate and organize an activity to demonstrate the importance of traffic safety. successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. c. one ski. dehydration. slower. Interview a traffic law enforcement officer in your community to identify what three traffic safety problems the officer is most concerned about. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. c. skier in water. d. As a group. Count the number of violations or number of drivers not wearing a seat belt. Know the Water Sports Safety Code. 4. Explain how such conditions are recognized. survey (1) such violations as running a red light or stop sign. b. Show the following skier signals to the safety observer in the boat: skier safe. male or female. Name the different types of personal flotation devices (PFDs). Do the following: a. Promise that you will live up to it and follow it in all water work for this badge. discuss what you learn with your counselor and at least three other teenagers. Before doing the following requirements. do EACH of the following: a. visit five Web sites that cover safe driving for teenagers. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in water sports. Tell how it applies to Water Sports. b. Do the following: a. 6. violations. 3. including hypothermia. cut motor. Showing reasonable control while using two skis. Water Sports 1. Show how to choose and properly fit a PFD. turns. Keep track of the total number of vehicles observed so that you can determine the percentage of compliance vs. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. or a wakeboard. Do ONE of the following: a. and explain when each type should be used. Using the Internet (with your parent's permission). minor cuts. . 5.5. heatstroke. pick a safe place to observe traffic at a controlled intersection (traffic signal or stop sign) on three separate days and at three different times of the day. sunburn. Record in general terms if the driver was young or old. Discuss the BSA Safety Afloat policy. 2. b. or (2) seat belt usage.

middle. Recover and put on your ski(s) or wakeboard that has come off during a fall. show that you can adjust bindings to fit.b. precipitation. Explain what weather is and what climate is. Discuss the safety rules with your family. Tell what causes wind. Discuss how the weather affects farmers. and upper levels of the atmosphere. why it rains. Draw a diagram of the water cycle and label its major processes. Determine how severe weather and flood warnings reach the homes in your community. Record the following information at the same time every day: wind direction and speed. Be sure to make a note of any morning dew or frost. and Internet sources (with your parent's permission). In the log. anemometer. Do ONE of the following: a. temperature. Show you can cross both wakes four times and return to the center of the wake each time without falling. Tell why weather forecasts are important to each of these groups. Make one of the following instruments: wind vane. 9. Visit a National Weather Service office or talk with a local radio or television weathercaster. Also. and types of clouds. Find out what type of weather is most dangerous or damaging to your community. Draw cross sections of a cold front and a warm front showing the location and movements of the cold and warm air. 2. 4. Give a talk of at least five minutes to a group (such as your unit or a Cub Scout pack) explaining the outdoor safety rules in the event of . 6. aviators. Name five dangerous weather-related conditions. Relate these to specific types of weather. show that you know how to properly adjust the bindings on your ski(s) or wakeboard to fit yourself. Define meteorology. hygrometer. 3. While on shore. sailors. Give the safety rules for each when outdoors and explain the difference between a severe weather watch and a warning. Explain the difference between high and low pressure systems in the atmosphere. b. Weather 1. in deep water. and how lightning and hail are formed. Explain the water cycle to your counselor. and the location of precipitation. Do ONE of the following: a. local agricultural extension service officer. Then. and the outdoor construction industry. Define acid rain. Tell which is related to good and to poor weather. show that you can drop handle and coast to a stop without loss of balance. or university meteorology instructor. rain gauge. Keep a daily weather log for 1 week using information from this instrument as well as from other sources such as local radio and television stations or NOAA Weather Radio. the location and types of clouds associated with each type of front. 7. 5. the frontal slope. private meteorologist. Identify which human activities pollute the atmosphere and the effects such pollution can have on people. Identify and describe clouds in the low. 7. c. Show you can fall properly to avoid an obstacle. also list the weather forecasts from radio or television at the same time each day and show how the weather really turned out. 8.

Name the different mechanical and thermal cutting methods. 10. or lessen these hazards. share your outline with your counselor for approval. including gas regulators. including filler metals and welding gases. c. Have your counselor inspect and approve the area for the welding process you have chosen. Discuss one advantage and one limitation for each process. and what you should do to anticipate. mitigate. and make a list of the different components of the equipment required for each process. electrode. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while welding. 4. Then. injuries or illnesses that could occur while welding. b. clothing.lightning. Explain and demonstrate the proper care and storage of welding equipment. 2. Describe the appropriate safety gear and clothing that must be worn when welding. Choose one welding process. flash floods. b. help prevent. slag. Select two welding processes. and the prevention of. and protective clothing and footwear. including electrical shock. b. 5. Read several articles about acid rain and give a prepared talk of at least five minutes to a group (such as your unit or a Cub Scout pack) about the articles. b. and what protects the molten metal from the atmosphere. share your outline with your counselor for approval. and footwear. eye injuries. dizziness. Do the following: a. With your counselor. and equipment settings. and the responsibilities required of such a position. After successfully completing requirements 1 through 5. Choose one method and describe how to use the process. Before your talk. Explain the terms welding. filler materials. sketch your initial onto a metal plate. 6. Show that you know first aid for. fume inhalation. and tornadoes. Using a metal scribe or soapstone. use the equipment you prepared for the welding process in 5b to do the following: a. Set up the process you have chosen. work clamps. how heat is generated. and exposure to hazardous chemicals. cables. Discuss with and explain to your counselor what training and education are required for such a position. present yourself properly dressed for welding—in protective equipment. . skin irritation. 3. discuss general safety precautions and Material Safety Data Sheets related to welding. and oxidation. Welding 1. b. Do the following: a. Discuss one advantage and one limitation of this process. and weld a bead on the plate following the pattern of your initial. Cover a small plate (approximately 3” x 3” x ¼”) with weld beads side by side. Before your talk. burns. Do the following: a.Find out about a weather-related career opportunity that interests you. tools. Describe the welding process. Explain the importance of the MSDS. what kind of filler metal is added (if any).

Then demonstrate the following strokes: cross forward. earn the Kayaking BSA Award. Include in your explanation a discussion about throw ropes. Do the following: a. If you are completing these requirements as a solo canoeist. b. 4. If you are using a kayak to complete these requirements. Then demonstrate the following strokes: cross forward. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a person.c. c. and explain why the profession might interest you. Tack two plates together in a lap joint. Do ONE of the following: a. stern pry. Review with your counselor the first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while working on the Whitewater merit badge. Pick one and find out the education. Discuss this with your counselor. b. Do the following: a. 2. and low brace. bruises. Tack two plates together in a T joint. Duffek. demonstrate basic canoe-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within 160 seconds while paddling tandem with a buddy. Before doing requirements 4 through 13 earn the Canoeing merit badge if you will be using a canoe to earn this merit badge. Explain how such conditions are recognized. e. Find out about three career opportunities in the welding industry. Tack two plates together in a square groove butt joint. Weld the two plates together from 6c on both sides. d. demonstrate basic solo canoe-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within 160 seconds. f. c. then weld a T joint with fillet weld on both sides. heat reactions. insect stings. blisters. including hypothermia. 7. Discuss the role of the American Welding Society in the welding profession. and experience required for this profession. cuts. b. training. cross draw. bow pry. have your counselor inspect it. Duffek. Identify and explain the use and importance of safety equipment on moving water. whistles. high brace. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor. b. demonstrate basic kayak-handling skills by completing the Scout gate test within . have your counselor inspect it. high brace. If you are completing these requirements as a tandem canoeist. If you will be using a kayak. 3. and shoulder dislocation. Do the following: a. Review and compare BSA Safety Afloat and the American Whitewater safety guidelines and demonstrate your understanding of these principles by answering questions from your counselor. Whitewater 1. dehydration. then weld a lap joint with fillet weld on both sides. cross draw. and low brace. and how to choose and properly fit PFDs (personal flotation devices) and helmets.

Describe the various types of kayaks and how they differ in design.Wearing the proper personal flotation device (PFD) and being appropriately dressed for the weather and water conditions. and discuss the importance of hazard recognition. c. Launch and land. 4. low-head dam. both sides. standing wave. Explain the terms downstream V. 7. pillow. Stop the kayak. Do the following: a. c. Demonstrate your ability to read the river where you are practicing and demonstrating your whitewater skills. horizon line. d. current. Identify the different materials used in modern whitewater canoe construction and the advantages and disadvantages of each. b. Explain and then demonstrate using the following river signals: "Run right. Pivot 360 degrees to the right and left. Demonstrate the following strokes: Duffek. e. wave. strainer. 3. a. If a tandem canoe is used. bend. ledge. 6. c. and functional features of paddles used in whitewater activities. shallows. 9. the skills must be demonstrated from both the bow and stern positions. Identify the specific characteristics of the river that are factors in your classification according to the International Scale. d. identify the advantages and special uses for kayaks and decked canoes in running water. riffle. or solo kayak). 5." "Are you OK?" and "Help!" 8. and purpose. 2. Do the following: a. perform the following skills in moving water in a properly equipped whitewater craft of your choice (tandem canoe. high brace. drop. materials. Move the kayak forward in a reasonably straight line for 10 yards. . Explain the importance of scouting before committing to running a rapid. Discuss the personal and group equipment necessary for a safe whitewater outing and how and why it is used. low brace.160 seconds. b. Sideslip. and sleeper. eddy line. 10." "Stop. Paddle forward in a straight line. d. solo canoe. Identify the advantages and special uses for kayaks and decked canoes in moving water. Explain the International Scale of River Difficulty and apply the scale to the stretch of river where you are practicing and demonstrating your whitewater skills. b. Then do the following: 1. safety. and sculling draw. hydraulic. Discuss the construction. falls. rock. Backpaddle. eddy. Move the kayak sideways to the right and to the left." "Run down the center. Ferry upstream and downstream." "Run left. and discuss good judgment when evaluating a stretch of river or a particular rapid. Explain how to pack and protect these items. Explain how to scout and read a river while ashore and while afloat. Explain the importance of communication during every whitewater outing. Explain the differences between flatwater and whitewater canoes.

Plan on 15 to 20 hours of instruction and practice. the U. The learning objectives emphasize safety and basic skills proficiency. A counselor who does not believe the Scout has reached this level of skill and understanding should not award the merit badge. Determine local rules and obtain permission from landowners and land managers in advance. and emergency procedures.when and how to do it. Peel out. c. including class size and previous flatwater skills. It is the merit badge counselor's responsibility to follow all BSA safety policies.S. d. schedule. Discuss the use of inflatable rafts on moving water. A whitewater merit badge counselor must be designated by the local council service center. procedures. should be limited only to rapids with a rating of Class I or Class II. canoeing. 13. The time needed for the Scout to reach adequate proficiency will vary depending on several factors. 20-920A. Execute the plan with others Note to the Counselor The instruction and experience necessary to complete the Whitewater merit badge requirements are intended to prepare the Scout for his initial whitewater experience. especially Safety Afloat and the safety guidelines set forth by American Whitewater. equipment. explain the special safety precautions that should be taken when using an inflatable raft and the risks of "tubing" on moving water. Explain what steps you have taken to comply with BSA Safety Afloat and the American Whitewater safety guidelines. 12. Portaging . around 8 to 10 Scouts per pair of instructors.f. No. or kayaking instructors by the American Canoe Association.Participate in a whitewater trip using either a canoe or kayak on a Class I or Class II river. The objective is to introduce the skills and equipment with emphasis on safety and self-protection. plus the required trip. A Scout earning this award will have taken the first step toward whitewater proficiency. Supplemental Information and additional strokes should not be introduced until the basic requirements are met. Whitewater instruction should follow all requirements. Safe rescue of others in various whitewater situations situations using a throw rope. Help to prepare a written plan specifying the route. Canoe Association. but will achieve true proficiency only through further training and practice under proper supervision and conditions. the American Whitewater. 11. The instructor-to-pupil ratio should be kept small. safety precautions.Discuss the use of inflatable boats on moving water. In your discussion. Eddy turn. including a wet exit if necessary b. and techniques presented in this pamphlet. Self-rescue and procedures when capsized in moving water. On-the-water instruction and practice. He must fully understand and appreciate the limits of his own ability and experience. A Scout earning this merit badge should have a keen appreciation of the risks and precautions of whitewater sports to help ensure that future whitewater activity will be conducted in a safe manner. . A recommended merit badge course outline can be found in the aquatics section of the BSA publication Camp Program and Property Management.Explain and demonstrate: a. including the whitewater trip specified in the requirements. The minimum time for training is that which leaves the Scout prepared. The whitewater buddy system using at least three persons and three craft. g. Persons trained as whitewater.

For the purpose of this demonstration. help prevent. 12. Spend a night in your shelter. 9. Cold and snowy b. use techniques that have little negative impact on the environment. scratches. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses likely to occur in backcountry settings. heat reactions. Explain what precautions you should take to safely use your tools. blisters. tick bites. mitigate. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in woodwork activities. 11. b. list the seven priorities for survival in a backcountry or wilderness location. 2. Show five different ways to attract attention when lost. 7. Wilderness Survival 1. 10. build and light three fires. Using three different methods (other than matches). 8. Persons currently trained as BSA Aquatics Instructors can assist local councils in planning for whitewater instruction and identifying whitewater counselors. Describe ways to avoid panic and maintain a high level of morale when lost. or river) 5. and what you should do to anticipate. Describe from memory five ground-to-air signals and tell what they mean. reptiles.Show that you know the proper clothing to wear in your area on an overnight in extremely hot weather and in extremely cold weather. Put together a personal survival kit and be able to explain how each item in it could be useful. and shock. Demonstrate how to use a signal mirror. dehydration. b. and explain why this is important. 3. Describe the steps you would take to survive in the following conditions: a. Do the following: a. and bears. Woodworking 1. severe bleeding. cuts. Tell what precautions must be taken to help prevent loss of . lake. insect stings. Do the following: a. (Sample Kit) 6. Hot and dry (desert) d. Improvise a natural shelter. and respond to these hazards. and snakebites. Explain the importance of each one with your counselor.Explain why it usually is not wise to eat edible wild plants or wildlife in a wilderness survival situation. frostbite.or by other agencies recognized by the BSA National Health and Safety Service are qualified for designation as Whitewater merit badge counselors. Explain how to protect yourself from insects. c. including hypothermia. Wet (forest) c. including splinters. Windy (mountains or plains) e. From memory. Water (ocean.Demonstrate three ways to treat water found in the outdoors to prepare it for drinking. Show that you know first aid for injuries that could occur while woodworking. 4.

2. Create your own carpentry project. Do any TWO of the following: a. plane. Make a cabinet. and then build your project. and union organization that woodworking experts have in your area. Help make and repair wooden toys for underprivileged children OR help carry out a carpentry service project approved by your counselor for a charitable organization. OR (2) miter. Make working drawings of a project needing (1) Beveled or rounded edges OR curved or incised cuttings. Describe the chief qualities of each. 5. and explain why and when it is necessary to use a dust mask. Show the proper care. Build this project. use. Describe how timber is grown. Give the best uses of each. eyesight or hearing. 7. Sharpen correctly the cutting edges of two different tools. dowel. Collect and label blocks of six kinds of wood useful in woodworking. Using a saw. c. Tell how lumber is cured. harvested. plane. and storage of all working tools and equipment that you own or use at home or school. Keep track of the time you spend and the cost of the materials. 3. b. box or something else with a door or lid fastened with inset hinges. career opportunities. Talk with a cabinetmaker or carpenter. and bit. apprenticeship. 6. graded. brace. Cut parts from lumber that you have squared and measured from working drawings. Find out about the training. . seasoned. or mortise and tenon joints. work conditions. b. hammer. work hours. b. Earn the Totin' Chip recognition. Do the following: a. Do the following: a. c. pay rates. and milled. make something useful of wood. 4. and sized. List the materials you will need to complete your project.