“To reduce crime and the fear of crime, tackle youth crime and violent, sexual and drug

-related crime, anti-social behaviour and disorder, increasing safety in the home and public spaces.”
Home Office Aim 1

This statement confi rms our joint commitment to reduce crime and disorder. T h e D i g e s t , w h i ch is published quart e r ly, aims to support crime re d u c t i o n / c o m munity safe t y practitioners within police and local authori t i e s , working in stat u t o ry partnerships by facilitating info rm ation exchange. The Digest is a forum for your initiatives and experiences. Its success depends on you, the practitioners, c o n t ri buting your articles. Deadline for copy is given below. In order that eve ryone can benefit from your work and experi e n c e, we would ask c o n t ri butors to consider both what wo r ked and what didn’t work within their pro j e c t s. P rojects may be well conceived and still not ach i eve all their aims; this does not mean they h ave fa i l e d . Please be brave enough to discuss what aspects did not ach i eve the expected outcomes. Include as much info rm ation as you can, covering the analysis of the problem and how it was identified, the response devised and how it was implemented, and an assessment of the final outcomes.
Note:

The inclusion of mat e rial in the Digest or re fe rence to any pro d u c t s / s e rvices does not signify that they have been tested or evaluated. Nor should inclusion be thought to confer ‘official’ approval.
This publication may n ot be cop ied, photocopied, re p roduced, or con ve rted to any electronic form unless for police or local authority use only.

April 2002
The next Digest will be with you in July 2002.

College Staff
Director Steve Trimmins Support Services Ann Keen Sarah Thompson Ruth Whitaker Training Team David Fernley June Armstrong Martin Fenlon Amanda Scargill Pat Varley Administration Unit Mark Ledder Information Service Gill Archibald Stuart Charman Jane Hopper Kathleen Noble Abby Hickman Training Resource Solutions Simon Jones Jane Carpenter Michael Hawtin Richard Wales Editor Jane Hopper Design/Production Michael Hawtin

All contributions be submitted by June 7th 2002.
Contributions to: Jane Hopper
Information Team

Tel: 01347 825065 Fax: 01347 825097
Home Office Crime Reduction College The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825060 Fax: 01347 825099 e-mail: crc@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

For Training or General Enquiries: Tel: 01347 825060

April 2002

1

College News

4

Changes in the Information Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Au Re vo i r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Crime Reduction Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Partnership Development Seminars 17th and 18th January 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Crime Reduction Training in Estonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Isle of Man Constabulary Standard Crime Prevention Officers Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Active Communities Anti-Social Behaviour/Disorder

8 9

Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Acceptable Behaviour Contract Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Anti-Social Behaviour Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Good Practice Unit, Chartered Institute of Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Burglary

11

An Apple a Day keeps the Burglars at Bay - Lights on Timers Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Crime Prevention Security Surveys Pro g ra m m e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The ‘Wobbler’ - Distraction Burglary Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Business Crime CCTV Designing Out Crime

12 13 14

Hotel Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Dover Partnership Against Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Operation Hawkeye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 ACPO Crime Prevention Initiatives Update and Secured by Design News . . . . . . . . . . .14 Home Zones: A Planning and Design Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Sustainability and Crime Conference - Recognising and Managing the Drivers of Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Planning Appeal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Planning for Crime Prevention: A Transatlantic Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Planning and Design - Secured by Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Lighting Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Secured by Design Commercial Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Domestic Violence

18

Breaking the Silence: Breaking the Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Domestic Violence: Enough is Enough! CD-Rom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Wear a White Ribbon and Say No to Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Drugs & Alcohol

19

At the margins: drug use by vulnerable young people in the 1998/99 Youth Lifestyles Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Middle market drug distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 NE Choices: the results of a multi-component drug prevention p ro g ramme for adolescents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Say No And Phone (SNAP) Anti-Drugs Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Helping you to reduce crime & disorder: The pub industry and local partnerships working together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 D e r by s h i re Drug Market Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Peaks and Dales Safer Pubs and Clubs Pilot Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 New Guidance for Dance Clubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

2

Contents

April 2002

G e n e ra l

25

Analysis for Crime Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 British Community Safety Award Winners 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Consultation by Crime and Disorder Pa rt n e r s h i p s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships: Round One Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Criminal Statistics England and Wales 2000 - Statistics relating to crime and criminal proceedings for the year 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Working out what to do: evidence based crime reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Kent Criminal Justice Conference Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Policing Priority Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 National Community Safety Network Conference 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Pro p e rt y

31

Security at Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Mobile Phone Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Operation Castillion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Operation Quad “QC” Clydesdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Sold Secure - Domestic Security Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Preventing Theft on Construction Sites: Tips for Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Mobile Phone Marking/Awareness Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Racially Motivated Crime Rural Crime Vehicle Crime

35 36 37

Building Cohesive Communities: A Report of the Ministerial Group on Public Order and Community Cohesion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Empowering young people in rural Suffolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 C a ra van Crime: A Police Officer’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 The ‘Take me to Bed’ Key Ring Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Operation Coppergold Hosts National Stolen Lorry Load Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Victims & Witnesses

38

Criminal Neglect: No Justice Beyond Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Text Messaging Service for Hard of Hearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Safe & Sound - Temporary Wireless Intruder Alarm System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Violent Crime & Street Robbery Violence at school and work Youth Crime

40 40 41

Each Article in the Digest is highlighted with an icon which will define the product described in that article. They are: Campaign/ Initiative Publication

Big Dave Gouder - Against Bullying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Banknote Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Can mentors help primary school children with behaviour problems? . . . . . . . . . . . .41 “Check It Out...Know Your Rights” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 “Know Fear” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Dalston Youth Project Part II (11 - 14) An Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 ‘ H a rd - t o - Re a c h ’ Young People and Community Safety: a model for participatory research and consultation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Conference on Tackling Child Exploitation on the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Splash Scheme Summer 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Crime Reducing Football Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Jack ‘n’ Danielle: Personal Safety for Young People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Community Safety Poster Competition 2003 - Drugs and their effects within the community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Working with Young People on Estates: The role of housing professionals in multi-agency work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 ‘Get Hooked on Fishing’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Video

Website/ Electronic Information G e n e ra l / Exchange of Ideas/ Conferences

April 2002

Contents

3

Changes in the Information Team
Fo l l owing the depart u re of Heather Row l att last ye a r, the Info rm ation Te a m now has a replacement Inquiry Service Manager. C o n g r at u l ations to Jane Hopper who passed the promotion board fo r thi s post and now takes up the role of handling e n q u i ries whether by phone, fax or t hrough the Crime Reduction Website. Jane now becomes editor of the Digest. We also welcome Abby Hickman who joins the team full-time as Info rm ation Assistant from her role as the administrator of Business Crime Check .A bby will continue to support Business C rime Check but at a reduced level as her work for the Info rm at i o n Team increases.

Au Revoir
M a r ch saw us bid fa rewell to M a rt i n M i l b u r n, our Training Team Leader, w h o left the College to return to his home force, N o rth Yo r k s h i re. M a r tin has led the c o n t i nuing improvement of our on-site p rogramme of courses for CPOs and A L O s and the academic accre d i t at ion of these c o u r s e s. He has played a key role in the d evelopment of our external modular p rogramme for par tnerships with our training part n e r s , N ational Police Tr a i n i n g and the Local Gove rnmen t A s s o c i at i o n . M a rtin has re p resented the Home Office in Jap a n , Estonia and the Ukraine. We all wish him well for the future. D avid Fe rn l ey will ably fill M ar t i n ’s shoes as Training Te a m Leader for the tim e being. Melissa Ke e b l e, a member of the Support S e rvices Te a m , also left the Coll ege re c e n t ly. M elissa has star ted a business as a Complime n t a ry Tre atment T h e r ap i s t . We wish her good luck with her new venture.

Crime Reduction Website
“Displacement Theory?” “Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity?” Do you sometimes hear the names of techniques and theories and wonder what they ’re all about? The ‘Practical Skills’ area of the Crime Reduction Website has been set up to enable you to obtain a quick bri e fing on some of the theories that , as a crime re d u c t i o n / c o m mu n i t y safety practitioner, you might hear mentioned in conversation. The briefings have been designed to be used by experienced people wanting to brush up on the fa c t s , and for novices who would like an introduction to something not encountere d e l s ew h e re. The area might even provide ideas on how to tackle a pro blem that yo u ’ve been having in your area. The facility has star ted small but wil l be expanded soon. C u rre n t ly ava i l able are summaries of: • Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity (CCO) framework • Displacement Theory • Problem solving ch e ck l i s t • P ro bl e m , Cause, Tactic or Tre at m e n t , Output and Result (PROCTOR) • Routine Activity Theory • Scanning, Analysis, Response, Assessment (SARA) • Situational crime reduction ch e ck l i s t s You can find the ‘Practical Skills’ a re a , along with the latest announcements, re p o rt s , research and a wealth of other crime reduction material at: www.crimereduction.gov.uk, the No.1 on-line resource for crime reduction. April 2002

If you have any ideas or comments about the website, please contact us direct on Tel: 01347 825064 or fill in a feedback form on the website www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

4

College News

Digest Questionnaire results
As pro m i s e d , we have distil led the responses from the Digest questionnaire into something more manag e abl e and p resent the main results below. We have t a ken on board a number of suggestions and will be taking these fo r ward in the coming months. The responses broadly correspond with our readership with a strong police input re p l i c ating the fact that the bulk of copies a re sent to police forces for onward distribu t i o n , although it was a l ittle d i s appointing not to re c e i ve more responses from local government readers. not view/use a PDF version or would pri n t it rather than read it on scre e n . A furt h e r 13% did not have access to a PC to view a PDF version. Many comments related to the d i f ficulty of reading from the scre e n , o r requested a printed copy as well. We wi ll continue to make a PDF version of each issue ava i l able t o those wishing to add it to a corporate intranet. 53% of respondents believed they would use the Digest if it we re publ i s h e d on the Crime Reduction Website. We will be exploring the feasibility of this over the coming months. A pro p o rtion of t he mat e rial included in the Di gest is a l re a dy ava i l able on the website when the Digest is publ i s h e d , so we would have to avoid duplication. 56% of correspondents use t he College’s Info rm ation Service.
Details of the ser vice have been sent to those requesting further information.

...over three quarters (78%) were h ap py with current fo rm at and content

Key findings 188 people responded to the questionn a i re and of these, 80% of re s p o n d e n t s re c e i ved their October 2001 Digest in the month i t was publ i s h e d . Some police respondents did not re c e i ve copies until December so we will be writing to fo r c e h e a d q u a rt e r s ’ requesting speedier distribution for all officers within force.
It is not practicable to direct mail to individual officers due to the cost and numbers i n vo l ved. Please accept our apologies but it is the only way to ensure a free Digest for individual practitioners.

O ver 80% of respondents keep the Digest for future re fe rence or pass it to someone else. With over 35% of respondents say i n g t h at their copy is read by more than two other people, numbers of people re a d i n g e a ch copy of the Digest runs to 3 re a d e r s for every copy. M o re than 96% of respondents think the Digest is of acceptable quality, the right length and is published with the ri g h t frequency.
Some people asked for more fre q u e n t issues but we would not be able to produce the Digest as a free publication on a bi-monthly basis.

Suggestions for change The most frequent comment was that ve ry little should be c h a n g e d ; of those responding to t his quest ion over thre e q u a rters (78%) we re hap py with curre n t fo rm at and content. Som e suggestions we re made by s everal re s p o n d e n t s , s u ch as a cumu l at i ve i n d e x , m o re on eva l u ation or updates of initiat i ves included in the Digest, m o re strat e g y / m a n agement info rm at i o n and more web s i t e / e l e c t ronic re s o u r c e g u i d a n c e. Som e re quested more info rmation on training.
We are always trying to increase the number of e valuated schemes we include, but this is often not possible due to the local nature of the schemes and the short time over which they run. We do chase for updates where notified of likely dates, but would ask for your help as we cannot always follow-up and are reliant on the goodwill of contributors. We will be focusing on the results of the Crime Reduction Programme as evaluations are released, and are looking at the best ways of providing an index. We have an internal database and will always provide information if you are researching a particular topic - this goes beyond Digest articles as we have other sources of information not published in the Digest. Give us a ring if you would like to use this facility.

94% of respondents scored highly the usefulness of the Digest to their work, with t he main reasons being the inclusion of contacts for other schemes around the c o u n t ry and the avoidance of wheel re invention. Although 34% of respondents stat e d t h ey would find an electronic PDF ve r s i o n useful to read on screen, 53% would either

...focusing on the results of the Crime Reduction Programme as evaluations are released, and are looking at the best ways of providing an index.

April 2002

College News

5

Partnership Development Seminars 17th and 18th January 2002
The Home Office Crime Reduction College re c e n t ly wo r ked with Gove rnment Offi c e N o rth East and Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service to look at ways in which the fi re and rescue serv ice could link more e f fe c t i ve ly wit h crime and disorder reduction partnerships. 57 people attended 2 sem inars, including re p re s e n t at i ves from Nort h umberland Fire and Rescue Serv i c e, Ty n e and Wear Metropolitan Fire Br i g a d e, Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue B r igade and Nor thumberland Coun ty Council. The seminars provided the opportunity for delegates to: • examine national and regional crime and disorder issues • discuss their potential contributions to Section 17 and Section 115 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 • • • apply a problem-solving approach to fi re - re l ated incidents identify funding streams exchange good practice.

Initial fe e d b a ck from those who attended suggests that , whilst the seminars we re successful in ach i eving their aims, f u rther training events involving bri g a d e s in the North East and other partners wo u l d c o n t ri bute to enhancing these links.

Crime Reduction Training in Estonia
The Crime Reduction College has been involved in Crime Reduction training in Estonia since J u ly last year with the aim of assisting the country in meeting their social re q u i rements fo r accession to the European Community. The contract for training, funded by the European Commission, was won and administered by Gloucestershire Constabulary, and representatives from the force, including Ch/Insp M a rtin Surl, DC Paul Francis and ALO Derek Harri s o n , h ave all been active ly invo l ved in the va rious stages of the training sch e d u l e. M a rtin Milbu rn , June A rm s t ro n g, Pat Va r l ey and C h ristine Morrison (fo rm e r ly of the College) Training Team have been working alongside them, designing and delivering four phases of training which have focussed on: • Basics of crime Reduction • Problem Solving • Partnership Development • Designing Out Crime.
The last phase of the training took place earlier in March this year and delegates included representatives from local government, The Ministry of Justice, Police departments, and the voluntary sector.


6 College News

...involved in Crime Reduction training in Estonia since July last year...meeting their social requirements for accession to the European Community.

April 2002

Isle of Man Constabulary Standard Crime Prevention Officers Course
Last year the Crime Reduction College wo r ked closely with the Isle of Man Constabu l a ry to p rovide a pilot course for a mix of managers and practitioners whose roles invo l ve them in giving crime prevention advice or managing crime reduction initiat i ve s. The Force Crime Reduction Officer, Phil Drowley, played a key role in organising and cofacilitating the event, which incorporated local issues and legislation. Because of the success of the course, the Chief Constable aims to extend crime reduction training across the whole force (350 officers) as being fundamental to the effe c t i ve delive ry of the constabu l a ry ’s p ri o ri t i e s. Two participants on the pilot course have subsequently requested secondments to Crime R e d u c t i o n . The College has since been contracted to provide an input to four Continu i n g Professional Development (CPD) courses for managers in 2002/2003.

April 2002

College News

7

Frequently Asked Questions
West Midlands Police

Like many forces, West Midlands Police receive thousands of calls every week from members of the public wanting answers to a wide range of questions. As a result, and in an attempt to reduce unrelated police calls and the amount of time spent in responding to them, they have p roduced a useful booklet for the publ i c, with clear, concise info rm at i o n , w h i ch answe r s almost 100 ‘Frequently Asked Questions’. The booklet covers more than 40 topics. Some of these include: • Abandoned cars • Anti-social behaviour • Chemists’ rota • Dangerous dogs • What to do if you witness a crime • Lost pro p e rt y • Motoring offences • Noisy neighbours • Reporting a crime • Stop and search policy • Wheel clamping A large pro p o rtion of calls focus on motoring issues, t h e re fo re this subject takes up a l a rge section of the booklet, with advice ranging from what to look for when buying a second-hand car, to when you need to produce driving documents at a police station. West Midlands Police have emphasised that this booklet has not been produced as a substitute for people who re q u i re legal adv i c e. T h ey suggest that for more info rm ation on detailed legal issues, people are advised to contact a solicitor.

8

Active Communities

April 2002

Acceptable Behaviour Contract Officer
New Forest Community Safety Partnership

The New Fo rest Community Safe t y Partnership has created a new role to tackle anti- social behav i o u r, an “A c c e p t a b l e Behaviour Contract Officer” (A B C O f f i c e r) . The post is part-time for a pilot p e riod of 1 year and is funded through the Pa rtnership Development Fund from the Government Office for the South East. The post was established as a result of a Best Value Rev i ew and due to continu i n g complaints from the community about low l evel anti-social behaviour from a minori t y of young people. The ABC Officer is employed thro u g h the District Council but is re s p o n s i ble to

the Wessex Youth Offending Te a m . A c c e p t able behaviour contracts have become mu c h more co-ordi nat e d , a n d extra support is offe red to combat antisocial behaviour through the ABC Offi c e r. Pa re n t i n g, b e h avioural change or dive rs i o n a ry support can also be offe red to families whose teenagers are made subjects of an acceptable behaviour contract.

Anti-Social Behaviour Orders
N ew proposals re l ating to Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) are being considered as amendments to the Police Reform Bill which was put before parliament on 24 January 2002. These pro p o s a l s , w h i ch aim to increase the effe c t i veness of measures against anti-social behaviour, include: • An interim Anti-Social Behaviour Order - to enable immediate action to be taken prior to going through the full process. The Order would be made at the first court appearance, pending a full hearing. This would enable the community to be protected from a persistent offender without delay. • An Anti-Social Behaviour Order which would “travel” with the person on whom it is served. This will tackle the problem of people moving to other areas and resuming their anti-social behaviour. • Looking to extend the scope of the Orders by allowing registered social landlords and the British Transport Police, to apply. Both will be required to consult the local authority q u i ck ly and simply, as well as the police, in the area in which the behaviour has occurred. • Exploring with the Lord Chancellor’s Department to see if there might be a role for County Courts in making Orders, for example where the court is dealing with applications for evictions or injunctions. • Proposal to place restrictions on the actions of offenders once they are back in the community by allowing those convicted of crime and disorder offences to receive an Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO) on top of their sentence. The Police Refo rm Bill, subject to parliamentary ap p rova l , is expected to be enacted by the end of the current parliamentary session (November 2002). Revised official guidance on successfully using the ASBO process will be produced once any new legislative changes have taken effect.
The text of these proposals can be found in amendments to the Police Reform Bill, tabled on 5 March and debated in the Lords on 12 March:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200102/ldbills/048/amend/ml048-iv.htm.
More information about the Police Reform Bill can be found on the website www.policereform.gov.uk. To access the full text of the Bill, view

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200102/ldbills/048/2002048.htm.

April 2002

Anti-Social Behaviour/Disorder

9

Good Practice Unit, Chartered Institute of Housing
The Good Practice Unit (GPU) was set up by the Chart e red Institute of Housing in 1994 and ident ifies and collat e s i n fo rm ation on good practice across all housing sectors in the UK. The unit maintains a dat abase of initiat i ve s , p o l i c i e s and pro c e d u res of Social Landlords enhanced by a library of housing practice documents. As an example of the work of the GPU, Good Practice Br i e fing Paper Issue 14 , “Neighbour Nuisance: N ew Initiat i ve s ” g i ves info rm ation on the pro blems of nuisance and anti-social behaviour fo r residents and landlords on housing estat e s. This bri e fing paper is an updat e d version of Paper No 3, d ated 1995, identifying the many legal d evelopment s extending the powers of l a n d l o r d s , councils and the police to deal with nuisance behav i o u r, including the Housing Act 1996 and the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. Paper 14 has advice on preventing and t a ckling nu i s a n c e, with a focus on legal solutions and mu l t i - agency initiat i ve s , a n d includes guidance on supporting victims, m e d i ation serv i c e s , witness evidence and details of the re l evant powers of landlords and other agencies.
For further information or a copy of Briefing Paper 14 published in October 1998 (price £10) contact the Good Practice Unit, Chartered Institute of Housing, Octavia House, Westwood Way, Coventry CV4 8JP Tel: 02476 851700 Fax: 02476 694209 or E-mail: gpu@cih.org.

10

Anti-Social Behaviour/Disorder

April 2002

An Apple a Day keeps the Burglars at Bay Lights on Timers Initiative
Suffolk Constabulary

H u n d reds of apples we re used by Suffolk Police to promote an important crime re d u c t i o n m e s s age which should help to minimise the risk of opportunist bu rg l a r s in the are a . The ap p l e s , w h i ch carried the ‘lights on timers’ l o g o, a re the latest method to be tried in a bid to get various crime reduction messages across. The apples are individually grown in small bags by a local fa rm e r, and a re branded with the ‘lights on timers’ m e s s age using a tec h n i q u e d eveloped in Jap a n . B e fo re being exposed to the sun, a logo sticker is applied to the fruit using an edible adhesive, so that the area undern e at h the sticker remains pale. S u f folk Police have used the apples to remind householders to use time sw i t ches when leaving their pro p e rties in a bid to deter bu rg l a r s. L e aving a light on gives the impression that someone is at home, a n d together with other crime prevention measure s , can help to minimise the risk of pro p e rt y being targeted by burglars. The apples we re used as a marketing hook and we re successful in their aim of gaining wide and prominent coverage of the message in the press and other media. 1000 apples were d i s t ri buted to schools and Crime Prevention Pa n e l s , although the main focus was the more detailed message delive red by the media. S u f folk hope to use a similar method this autumn, but with a new quirky message.

Crime Prevention Security Surveys Pro g ra m m e
Metropolitan Police

This is an updated version of the compute rised domestic Crime Prevention Securi t y S u rvey (CPSS) ori g i n a l ly introduced by the Metropolitan Police in 1993. C re ated initially for pro - a c t i ve use, t h e s u r vey was re-designed so that re p o rt i n g and inve s t i g ating officers at the scenes of domestic bu rg l a ri e s , as wel l as Cr i m e P revention Offi c e r s , could make use of the p rogramme when asked to carry out a security survey. The CPSS programme was developed to simplify and standardise the way in which surveys are conducted, as well as producing a pro fessional and personalised survey re p o rt for eve ry householder requesting a s u rvey, e n s u ring a consistent ly high standard of crime prevention advice.

Some improvements to the 2002 programme include: • All the advice topics have been updated to reflect changes to ACPO policy. • The layout has been modified so as to reduce the number of pages for a report covering every topic. • The survey tick box form can now be produced in either A4 or A5 size. • There is now the option to enlarge the size of the text in the report to cater for the visually impaired. • The template is up to 10% smaller and should therefore run more efficiently. The programme is compat i ble wi th M i c rosoft Office 95, 97 and 2000 re s p e ctively and once installed, gives access to the CPSS Template and User Guide.

April 2002

Burglary

11

The ‘Wobbler’ - Distraction Burglary Initiative
Thames Valley Police

As par t of the Tham es Va l l ey Po l i c e distraction bu rg l a ry initiat i ve ‘O p e ra t i o n Re s o l ve’ , O x ford Po l i c e, in associat i o n with Thames Wat e r, h ave launched their l atest device to wa rn householders befo re opening their doors to strangers. The ‘Wo b b l e r’ , w h i ch has been designed to stick to the front door at eye l evel or ab ove the door lock , includes a simple message ‘Keep Them Out’ on the f ront in bl a ck and ye l l ow. It has be en designed to move either when the door is opened or as the person moves towards it. The back plate at t a ches to the door with a

s t i cky pad and advises occupants to make s u re they know who they are letting in to their home. The ‘Wobblers’ will be distributed by a newly formed network of agencies involved with re t i red or elderly residents in the are a including Age Concern , O x fo r d s h i re Social Services and Retired Staff Associations.

Hotel Watch
West Midlands Police

O f ficers from Dudley in the West Midlands set up a hotel wat ch scheme fo l l owing an armed ro bb e ry in the area last summer, and a number of hotels have alre a dy signed up to take part. Hotels are provided with compreh e n s i ve training and a pre s e n t ation pack , w h i ch is made ava i l able to hotel staff and i n c l u d e s : t he West Midlands force ‘Knowing your H o t e l’ b o o k l e t ,

ro bb e ry prevention CD-Rom and booklet, c redit card fraud info rm at i o n , b o m b p ro c e d u re literat u re, hotel wat ch posters, i n fo rm ation on the ‘ ring master messag i n g s e rv i c e ’ used by the sch e m e, and Hotel Watch contacts and co-ordinators details. Training sessions are organised for a m a x i mum of ten people cove ring topics such as: • what to do in the event of an armed ro bb e ry ? • vehicle security • credit card fraud • personal safety advice • opportunist crimes • bomb procedures.

12

Burglary/Business Crime

April 2002

Dover Partnership Against Crime
Kent Police

South East Kent Po l i c e, D over District Council and local businesses in the area have joined forces to cre ate the Dover Pa rtnership Against Crime (DPAC) run by The Dover Retail Cri m e O p e r ation (DRCO). The DRCO has been re g i s t e red as a company limited by guarantee, i s n o n - p ro fit making and is curre n t ly ap p lying for Chari t able Trust status to maximise its funding opportunities. The DRCO was awarded £12,000 from the Partnership Development Fund allocation for the are a , w h i ch has since been used to re c ruit the Scheme Intelligence Co-ordinat o r, as we l l as being spent on computer equipment to use with the scheme. The benefits of DPAC being run on behalf of the Dover Retail Crime Operation by Ke n t C o n s t abu l a ry include security and info rm at i o n - s h a ring issues. H aving been completely s e c u rity ch e cked ahead of their appointment in to the post, the co-ordinator can benefi t f rom access to police intelligence systems and photograp h s , subject to data protection and constabulary protocols, which enables them to best manage the scheme’s ap p ro a ch to intelligence-led crime reduction. The scheme operates a ‘Shop Wa t c h’ , w h i ch uses radios from a local supplier, w h o agreed to sell the radios to the DRCO to rent directly to Dover businesses, which ensures that all pro fits from the rental of the radios goes to the DRCO. The money to pay for the radios was provided by the Kent People’s Trust on an interest-free loan to DRCO. The DPAC membership h as grown from around 50 to nearly 70 mem bers since December last year to now include licensed pre m i s e s , and on the 29th Ja nu a ry this ye a r, D PAC was awarded the Br itish Retail Consortium ‘ S a fer Shopping Awa r d ’ . DRCO is now seeking funding to ut ilise the Business Info rm at ion Cri me System (BICS) to share i n fo rm ation online with other schemes operating around the UK.

Operation Hawkeye
British Transport Police

O p e r ation Haw keye is a part n e r s h i p i n i t i at i ve set up by London Underg ro u n d and British Tr a n s p o rt Po l i c e, in associat i o n with the car park operating companies, B T and SSR Pe r s o n n e l . It aims to reduce cri m e by equipping al l underg round car parks with comprehensive CCTV systems. The pro j e c t , w h i ch was named “ B e s t Pa rtnership Initiative” in the 2001 Securi t y Excellence Awa r d s. The awards we re s p o n s o red by Security Installer and SMT p u bl i c at i o n s , and t he pan el of judges

included re p re s e n t at i ves from the Securi t y Industry Council and the National Approval Council for Security Systems. The operation re c e i ved £2 million f rom the Gove rn m e n t ’s CCTV initiat i ve in December 1999 and since then, a furt h e r £1 million has been pledged. R e g u l a r meetings held between the Bri t i s h Transport Police, London Underground and the three car park management companies led to the deployment of security guards at car parks and an initial 40% reduction in c ri m e. O p e r ation Haw keye has re c e i ve d s u p p o rt from va rious agencies including C r ime Concer n and the Suzy Lamplugh Trust.

April 2002

Business Crime/CCTV

13

ACPO Crime Prevention Initiatives Update and Secured by Design News
National ALO Conference Date The 2002 National Architectural Liaison Officers Conference will be held at the Hilton Hotel, B l a ckpool from the 18th to the 20th June this ye a r. In addition to a range of high pro fi l e s p e a ke r s , t h e re will be a Question Panel and an exhibition of products on designing out c ri m e. Details of t he confe re n c e, togeth er with ap p l i c ation fo rm s , h ave alre a dy been circulated to police forces and those registered directly with ACPO CPI.

New Secured by Design leaflet published ACPO CPI has re c e n t ly published a new 3-fold leaflet explaining the Secured by Design p ro j e c t . The design fo l l ows the theme of the ‘SBD Fo c u s ’ n ewsletter and describes the relationship with three key areas: the police, the security industry and the built environment. O ver 25,000 copies have alre a dy been distri buted to police officers re g i s t e red with AC P O C P I , including Force Crime Prevention/Reducti on Offi c e r s. F u rther supplies can be purchased through ACPO CPI and may also be reprinted with specific department or officers’ details if required.

CPI Link for Scotland Sandra McNiven from Strat h c lyde Police has been seconded to the Scottish Business Cri m e C e n t re to re p resent ACPO CPI in Scotland, and develop Secured by Design. Sandra has a b a ck g round in architectural liaison, c rime reduction and operat i o n s , and is a we l c o m e additi on to the ACPO CPI Te a m . She can be contacted at Unit 15 Be ta Centre, S t i r l i n g University, Innovation Park, Stirling FK9 4NF Tel: 01786 447441 or E-mail: sbd@sbcc.org.uk.

Secured by Design Website and Internet - How are we doing? Fo l l owing the initial enthusiasm of the re - l a u n ch of the Secured by Design web site in July 2001, it seemed reasonable to sample a typical month and see how many people had visited the site. In Ja nu a ry 2002, w w w. s e c u re d b yd e s i g n . c o m received over 2,500 unique visitors, an average of 82 per day and in the same month the site registered 157,000 hits. There is now a formal link to www.SourceUK.net, an on-line magazine that has recently i n t roduced a security section sponsored by ACPO CPI. The section publishes fa c t u a l , n o n a dve rtising re p o rts and articles on va rious aspects of securi t y. A rticles can be submitted fo r inclusion on this site, the Secured by Design website or for inclusion in the SBD Fo c u s magazine. This often stimu l ates deb ate and offers other’s points of view whilst ensuring the magazine is kept up-to-date.
ACPO CPI do not authorise any other Internet magazines or product directories to use the Secured by Design logos or material, so please be aware of circulars and marketing ploys claiming relationships with ACPO CPI or Secured by Design, and report any instances immediately.

Alan McInnes General Manager ACPO CPI

14

Designing Out crime

April 2002

Home Zones: A Planning and Design Handbook
Mike Biddulph and The Joseph Rowntree Foundation

A home zone is a residential street in which the living env i ronment clearly pre d o m in ates over the provision for traffi c. It is an e nv i ronment where the design of the spaces between homes provides space fo r motor ve h i c l e s , but where the wider needs of the residents are fully accommodat e d . This is ach i eved by adopting approaches to s t reet design, l a n d s c aping and highway e n g i n e e ring that control how ve h i c l e s m ove. If it is well designed, vehicles will o n ly be able to travel at less than 10 mph w h i c h m eans that other things such as a reas for ch i l d ren to play, l a rger gardens, cycle parking and seating for residents, can be introduced into the street. This handbook explains what hom e zones are, and describes where they might work best, and what t hey can and can’t a ch i eve. The book has been written fo r a nyone starting out on the process of planning and desi gning a hom e zone s ch e m e, and has two main aims. • The first is to suggest ap p ro a ches to planning, designing and developing a home zone, based on the experiences

of others who have gone through a similar process. The second is to provide advice about what a home zone might be like.

A home zone should ful fi l s everal objectives and some of these include: • It should improve feelings of safety in residential areas. • It should promote greater use of the public spaces in residential areas and through design, promote a greater diversity of activity within the street. • Because the threat of fast traffic is removed, it should encourage people to walk and cycle within and through the area. • It should make the street look more attractive by introducing new types of paving or encouraging more planting. • It should also contribute to improving the quality of the urban environment.

Copies of this book, published in December 2001, can be obtained from Marston Distribution Tel: 01235 465500 or via E-mail: direct.orders@marston.co.uk. Price £13.95 plus £2 P&P. ISBN 1-86134-371-X.

Sustainability and Crime Conference Recognising and Managing the Drivers of Crime
The Building Research Establishment (BRE) is holding a conference at the Scientific Societies Lecture T h e at re, New Burlington Place, London, on 27 June this year to present the results of its work on the interaction between sustainability and crime. The confe rence aims to provide guidance on how the design and management of the urban env i ronment can respond to issues of crime and anti-social behaviour and lead to a sustainable and satisfactory level of community safety. These tools can be applied to both new build and existing developments in the fight against crime. The confe rence will run from 10.00am to 3.00pm, and the cost will be £95 (excluding VAT), which includes attendance, refreshments and copies of the guidance produced.

The conference aims to provide guidance on how the design and management of the urban environment can respond to issues of crime and anti-social behaviour...
April 2002

Designing Out crime

15

Planning Appeal
Thames Valley Police

A re s e a r ch lab o r at o ry with offices in the Thames Va l l ey area has won an appeal fo r the use of anti-climb protection. As a result of targeted thre ats and d e m o n s t r at i o n s , the org a n i s ation decided to install anti-climb protection to the top of a perimeter wall to deter any potential c riminal activity. After seeking adv i c e, t h e l ab o r at o ry did not ap p ly for planning p e rmission to the City Council until after fitting the pro t e c t i o n , w h i ch was subsequently refused by the Council. The lab o r at o ry appealed against this decision with support from the police on

the grounds that no other security arrangem ents could be m ade to ensure the deterrence of trespassers and the protection of nearby re s i d e n t ’s pro p e rt i e s. The ap p e a l was eve n t u a l ly allowed and concluded that c ri me prevention m easures more than o u t weighed the harm and character of the area.

Planning for Crime Prevention: A Transatlantic Perspective
Richard Schneider, University of Florida and Ted Kitchen, Sheffield Hallam University

visit the website at:

http://www.sponpress.com

This book is for anyone wanting to find out how planning processes and crime preve n t i o n activities can be integrated more effe c t i ve ly. It is essential reading for practitioners engag e d in planning, including police, and those invo l ved in the built env i ronment and commu n i t y disciplines. The book looks at the publ i c ’s concerns over crime and the fear of crime and re l at e s them to the contribution that urban planners and planning processes can make in response to these issues. The main focus is how crime opportunities can be prevented or reduced through the design, planning and management of the built env i ro n m e n t . The perspective of the book is transatlantic and combines theoretical mat e rial and practice in both the USA and the UK, which has not previously been pulled together in this way. The first part of the book looks at understanding ideas and practice, and introduces the t h e o ries of place-based crime preve n t i o n . It explores what is known about the degree of crime in the two countries, together with some of the issues surrounding crime statistics. The second part examines policy and practice in the USA and the UK, via a series of case s t u d i e s , looking at how this translates to practice on the gro u n d . The final part make s c o m p a risons between the positions in the two countri e s , b e fo re outlining some ideas and lessons from this material in order to highlight the way forward.

Planning and Design - Secured by Design
North Yorkshire Police

In Ja nu a ry this ye a r, N o rth Yo r k s h i re Po l i c e g ave its ful l backing to an A r ch i t e c t u r a l Liaison Policy adopting the principles of ‘Secured by Design’ and ‘Secured Car Parks’ on all of the police authori t y ’s new bu i l d and property refurbishment. By suppor ting this policy, N o rt h Yo r k s h i re Police fi rm ly endorses its belief in these initiat i ves and the A r ch i t e c t u r a l

Liaison Officers for the force have been encouraged by this pro g re s s.

16

Designing Out Crime

April 2002

Lighting Survey
Thames Valley Police

A local resident together with a Neighbourhood Wat ch A d m i n i s t r ator from Wi t n ey Po l i c e Station have carried out a lighting survey to try and identify whether there is a link between the location of vehicle crime on an estate and the street lighting provided by the Council. Neighbourhood Wat ch Co-ordinators and members of the Residents’ A s s o c i ation have been actively involved in trying to improve the appearance of their estate, dealing with issues c o n t ri buting to vehicle crime and a general fear of crime in the area. The estate consists of over 200 houses with pedestrian access to the front and ve h i c u l a r access to the rear. Each house has an adjoining garage, or a block of garages nearby. When the e s t ate was built in the late 1960s early 1970s it was generally accepted that each household usually only had the use of one car. However, today it is very diffe re n t , with as many as three cars to one household. The lighting survey focuses on a combination of readings of light emissions taken at night from each street lamp, at specified distances, using photographic ev i d e n c e, t o g e t h e r with the general knowledge of the residents themselves. Oxfordshire County Council offered a dvice on the standard LUX levels and light emissions for the estat e, and as a re s u l t , it wa s easy to define the areas that did not meet this standard. G e n e r a l ly, the light levels on the roadways was found to be good, however the footpaths often fell short of the standard, with the main pro blem being poorly maintained fo l i age of trees and shrubs on the est at e, resulting in dark areas and shadows on the footpaths. Alleyways at the rear of properties also had insufficient lighting, increasing the potential for fear of crime together with an increased risk of vehicle crime. The findings of the survey we re presented to the Neighbourhood Wat ch and Residents’ Association members and it was agreed that the owners of the foliage should be asked to deal with this pro bl e m , w h i ch would consequently improve the light emissions. An ap p l i c at i o n was also put forward to the District Council for funding to improve the lighting in alleyways and re m ove high walls surrounding a garage bl o ck to enable the re-design and implementation of designated parking spaces for residents. The application was successful, and work is well underway to improve this area of the estat e. The County Council have also intro d u c e d new ‘Give Way’ and ‘Slow’ road markings to encourage a reduction in speed, and all entrance areas to individual cul-de-sacs now have a street sign to identify specific house numbers. The appearance of the estate has gre at ly improved, with people working together to help one another, w h i ch has encouraged a good community spirit and improved peace of mind for the residents.

Secured by Design Commercial Award
Hampshire Constabulary

On 28th Feb ru a ry this ye a r, the Chief C o n s t able of Hampshire Constabu l a ry, M r Paul Ke rn ag h a n , p resented the Secured by Design award to the Chief Exe c u t i ve of Slough Estates, Mr Derek Wilson. H a m p s h i re Constabu l a ry fo rm ed a p a rtnership over 2 years ago with Slough E s t ates and t heir consultants at the time when development of an old Depart m e n t for Env i ro n m e n t , Food and Rural A f fa i r s (DEFRA) site at Fa rn b o rough was being c o n s i d e re d . Slough Estates planned to build a new business park on the site offering 1.7 million square feet of office space. The site

is now well under c o n s t ruction incorp or at ing a hi gh-te ch s e c u rity infrastru c t u re including an integrated CCTV system, a l a rm e d help points, 24 hour manned guarding and fo rm ation of a Business Park Secur ity Committee. T h e S e c u red by Design award has been granted under the conditions t hat eve r y unit is designed and built t o the re q u i re d standards to ensure continuity thro u g h o u t the park.

April 2002

Designing Out Crime

17

Breaking the Silence: Breaking the Chain
South Wales Police

This video fo rms part of an awa reness campaign, o rgani sed by t he Bridgend Domestic A bu s e Fo rum and was funded by the Home Offi c e t h rough the Crime Reduction Pro g r a m m e, s u p p o rted by the A rts Council of Wales and the Arts for All Lottery. The video, which is used as a training aid for schools and other organisations, shows a group of young people from Ogmore Compre h e n s i ve S ch o o l , who explore the many issues surrounding domestic violence and bullying relationships, and the effects that these re l ationships can have on their victims. The group inter v i ews va ri o u s e x p e rt s , including re p re s e n t at i ves from Wo m e n ’s A i d , the police, Victim Support , a mar ri ag e guidance counsellor and a v ictim of domestic v i o l e n c e, who descr ibes her life in an abu s i ve relationship. T h rough the use of drama, and animat i o n , the group expresses their feelings on domestic violence and harmful re l at i o n s h i p s , with the aims of encouraging discussion, b reaking taboos and identifying solutions. The video also fe at u res emergency contacts and telephone numbers.
The video runs for 27 minutes and copies are available from DI Steve Trigg, South Wales Police Community Safety Dept Tel: 01639 889190.

Domestic Violence: Enough is Enough! CD - Ro m
Metropolitan Police

This CD-Rom has been produced by the M e t ropolitan Po l i c e, in partnership with Po l a roid Euro p e, as part of the M e t ropolit an Police domestic violence s t r ategy and fe at u res transcripts of all the speeches from a conference hosted by them in October 2000 cal led ‘D o m e s t i c Violence: Enough is Enough’. The CD-Rom is inte nded to help to highlight the initiat i ves cove red at t he confe re n c e, a n d s h a re the info rm at i o n for t hose unable to at t e n d , as well as p roviding a re s o u r c e for those working in the field of domestic violence.

The confe rence was the highest pro fi l e event so fa r, o rganised by Project A d h i k a r I n t e rn at i o n a l , w h i ch aims to cre ate a g l o b a l , mu l t i - agency response to the cri m e of domestic violence. As well as copies of t r a n s c ripts from the confe re n c e, the CDRom also contains electronic copies of back up documents, video of the va ri o u s s p e a kers pre s e n t , together wit h ot her reference mat e ri a l .

18

Domestic Violence

April 2002

Wear a White Ribbon and Say No to Domestic Violence
Sussex Police

The county of Sussex has shown its support to the c h a ri t abl e org a n i s at i o n “Wo m a n k i n d” in the inter n at i o n a l campaign against violence towards women, also known as “White Ribbon Day” , h e l d at the end of November 2001. Sussex Police displayed boxes of white ri bbons and posters in 30 police stat i o n s and training receptions for members of the p u blic and staff to purchase to raise awa re n e s s , and challe nge people’s perceptions of the pro blems of domestic violence in society today. West Sussex

County Council staff re c e i ved leaflets in their pay packets to emphasise this issue. Va rious other org a n i s ations also pledged their support to the campaign, and s everal diffe rent events we re held in shopping malls and drop-in centres around the re g i o n . Although this initiat i ve t ook place at the end of November 2001, domestic v iolence is an ongoing o p e r ational pr i o rity for Sussex Po l i c e. Funds raised from the initiative will further s u p p o rt Wo m a n k i n d ’s awa reness and education programme around the UK.

At the margins: drug use by vulnerable young people in the 1998/99 Youth Lifestyles Survey
Home Office Research Study 228
This Home Office re p o rt presents an analysis of data from the 1998/99 Youth Life s t y l e s S u rvey (YLS) which included a re p re s e n t at i ve sample of almost 5,000 young people ag e d between 12 and 30 years of age. It focuses on levels of drug use by vulnerable young people s u ch as serious and persistent offe n d e r s , rough sleepers, s e rial ru n away s , t ruants and those excluded from sch o o l . All of these groups we re found to have high rates of drug use. T h e re p o rt also considers access to dr ugs and the pat t e rns of dru g - re l ated behavi our and offending in comparison with other young people. The data contained within this re p o rt is an important addition to the main measures of drug use obtained from the British Crime Survey (BCS) and the National Schools Survey. The levels of use and ease of access to drugs we re consistently higher for vulnerabl e g ro u p s , although it was not always possible to control for other potentially confo u n d i n g factors. Where this was done, in terms of age and gender, the relationships usually remained. I n d e e d , an important finding from this analysis has concerned the interaction betwe e n gender and ‘vulnerability’, particularly among the younger groups of truants and excludees. As an example, r ates of dr ug use among excludees - the more disaffected of the two groups - were inva ri ably higher for girls than for boys. Although the analyses are unable to re s o l ve whether higher prevalence of drug use leads to d e p e n d e n t / p ro bl e m atic use, c o m p a r at i ve ly heavy drug use at a young age can often be a wa rning signal. I n d e e d , the vulnerable groups examined here often had higher levels of m o n t h ly use of a Class A drug in comparison with more mainstream young people. M o re detailed surveillance of drug use in this populat i o n , t r a cking their behaviour as they grow older, is recommended.
For free copies of the report, published in November 2001, contact Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Information and Publications Group, Room 275, 50, Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Alternatively you can view the full document via their website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs/hors228.pdf.

April 2002

Domestic Violence/Drugs & Alcohol

19

Middle market drug distribution
Home Office Research Study 227
This Hom e Office re p o rt outli nes how d rugs are transfe rred from import ation to s t reet level in the UK. It seeks to improve the understanding of the ‘middle marke t ’ d rug distri bution system, and the dealers who act as bro kers operating between the wholesale and retail levels. The info rm at i o n within the re p o rt was gat h e red via tap e recorded inter v i ews from a sam ple of o f fenders im pr isoned for dr ug dealing offences, together with an equal number of personnel from Her Majesty’s Custom and E x c i s e, N ation al Cr iminal Intel ligence S e rv i c e, N ational Crime Squad and police force drug squads. These were then supplemented with a small number of interv i ew s with barr i s t e r s , who had exper ience of drug trials. The re s e a r ch carried out confi rms the i m p o rtance of law enforcement activity targeting the middle market drug suppliers, w h i c h is the subject of a Home Offi c e funded Task Force involvin g four police forces in the Midlands. • Business principles are predominant in the potentially lucrative drugs market, which means that ‘violence-avoidance’ is the more general rule. Violence attracts attention and is ‘bad for business’. Violence is most usefully understood as a consequence of market dysfunction and disorganisation.

The Midlands pilot sch e m e, l a u n ch e d in October 2001 and fully operational from Ja nu a ry 2002, r uns for 12 months and i nvo l ves West Midlands, West Mercia, S t a f fo r d s h i re and Wa r w i ck s h i re police fo r c e s. The Task Force consists of a d e d i c ated team of officers who will targ e t c ross border ‘ h i g h - l eve l ’ d rug dealers, looking to seize assets of those convicted of d r ug dealing. The scheme is funded by £900,000 from the Confi s c at e d Assets Fund.

Key findings • Although drug markets are hierarchical, they are also highly flexible with the possibility for roles of supplier and buyer to be inter changeable at wholesale and ‘middle m a r ke t ’ levels. • The ‘middle market’ drug dealers operate a multi-commodity brokerage linking what are essentially monocommodity supply chains above them to retailers who are also likely to deal in a more limited range of substances. • There is not so much a national drugs m a r ke t , as a series of loosely interlinked local and regional markets. Cross-regional networks are in evidence, although the main basis of drug dealing operations probably remains local and regional. • There is some evidence of ‘middle market’ drug brokers making direct contact with intermediaries to warehousing systems in mainland Europe and importing modest loads on that basis, thus leap-frogging more traditional systems of bulk import at i o n and wholesale trade. 20 Drugs & Alcohol

Copies of the report, published November 2001, are free and can be obtained from Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Information and Publications Group, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211, E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Alternatively you can view the full document via their website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/ pdfs/hors227.pdf.

April 2002

NE Choices: the results of a multi-component drug prevention p ro g ramme for adolescents
Drugs Prevention Advisory Service (DPAS)

Paper 14

This re p o rt outlines the ‘NE (North East) Choices’ multi-component drugs preve n t i o n programme for young people in the North East of England. It describes the development and i m p l e m e n t ation of the second two years of the programme - the Year Ten and Year Eleve n i n t e rventions - and re p o rts findings from the eva l u ation of the complete pro g r a m m e. T h e three year intervention combined drama, work with parents, classroom activity, youth work, media and info rm ation activities, and the target population was young people aged between 13 - 16 years as they pro g ressed through sch o o l .T h e re we re three intervention phases and these we re : • Year Nine - delivered in 1996/97 to a target group aged 13 - 14 • Year Ten - delivered in 1997/98 to a target group aged 14 - 15 • Year Eleven - delivered in 1998/99 to a target group aged 15 - 16. The aims of the programme were to: • reduce the prevalence of drug use • delay the age of start of drug use • reduce the frequency of drug use among those who use drugs • reduce mixing of drugs including drugs and alcohol NE Choices was evaluated at a number of levels including a baseline and three follow-up s u rveys conduct ed t o examine the potential impact of the programme on drug taking behaviour. Despite evidence that young people found the programme cre d i ble and engag i n g, t h e intervention was not associated with any changes in drug taking behaviour. Possible explanations are discussed within t he re p o rt , including methodological issues, d e l i ve ry an d ap p ro p ri ateness of the target group.

For free copies of this report and the Briefing Paper which accompanies it, contact DPAS, Room 314, Horseferry House, Dean Ryle Street, London SW1P 2AW Tel: 020 7217 8631 Fax: 020 7217 8230 or E-mail: Public_Enquiry.dpas@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Alternatively access the document on line via their website at:

http://www.dpas.gov.uk/ nechoices_report.pdf.

Say No And Phone (SNAP) Anti-Drugs Message
Crimestoppers

O ver 3,000 school ch i l d ren f rom 23 s chools in the Oxford area at t e n d e d c o n c e rts by pop singer David Graham to hear how they can fight back against drugs. The aims of the concert s , w h i ch fo rm p a rt of the Crimestoppers SNAP ( S ay No And Phone) Campaign, we re t o raise awa reness of dru g - re l ated crime amongst young people, and to let them know that t h ey can re p o r t info rm ation on dr u g dealers anonymously via the Crimestoppers freephone number 0800 555 111. The eve n t , s p o n s o red by the Oxfo r d M a i l , was the third SNAP event to be held in 2001, and as it proved to be so successful, the Oxford Mail are planning to repeat sponsorship in 2002.

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Helping you to reduce crime & disorder: The pub industry and local partnerships working together
The British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) Partnerships Initiative

Misuse of alcohol can result in criminal/anti-social behaviour and is associated with many offences from anti-social public order to traffic offences and assault. This leaflet, produced jointly by the British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA) and the Home O f fi c e, p rovides an ove rv i ew of the British Beer and Pub A s s o c i ation Pa rtnerships Initiat i ve, launched in March 2000, which helps to ensure that the environment in which people enjoy their services, is kept safe and secure. The initiat i ve aims to support local communities in reducing alcohol-re l ated crime and d i s o r d e r, by active ly promoting closer industry invo l vement in the work of local crime and disorder reduction strat e g i e s. Members of the BBPA play a va l u able role in the exchange of i n fo rm at i o n , and provide knowledge on good pub management and design, t r a n s p o rt and other issues. Since the launch of the initiat i ve, over 100 partnerships have invited BBPA re p re s e n t at i ves to join them. R e p re s e n t at i ves are generally company - b a s e d , with the re l evant bu s i n e s s , o p e r ational and local knowledge to become invo l ved in local dialogues on crime and d i s o r d e r, and can make a significant contri bution to the policy making process of part n e rships.

Derbyshire Drug Market Project
Derbyshire Constabulary

In Ja nu a ry 2000 Derby s h i re Constabu l a ry applied and was successful in a bid under the Crime Reduction Programme Ta rg e t e d Policing Initiat i ve for funding drug marke t m ap p i n g. L ater that ye a r, the Drugs and Alcohol Action Teams in Derby s h i re we re also successful in their bid to secure funds to establish a Drug Market Response Gro u p and so continue t he Derby s h i re Dru g Market Project for three years. The Drug Market Project will conduct in-depth analysis of nu m e rous high pro fi l e and pro bl e m atic drug markets in D e r by s h i re over the next three ye a r s , w i t h the focus on Class ‘ A ’ d ru g s , p a rt i c u l a r ly h e roin and cocaine. It will map all are a s a c ross Derby s h i re, with emphasis on ten key areas in the region. Some of t he aims of t he pro j e c t include. 1 . To provide a co-ordinated intell igence led programme of activity to tack l e and disrupt a number of m ajor and p ro bl e m atic drug markets.

2 . To raise awa reness of what re s o u r c e s and agencies exist within the drug marke t and to make the best possible use of them. 3 . To plan and implement action to d i s r upt dr ug markets combining e n forcement activity with other measure s to create a sustained impact. These and the other aims of the project will be ac h i eved through re s e a r c h and analysis of what already exists to tackle this p ro bl e m . In addition, t h e re will be ag re e d action plans and implementation of these plans together with the eva l u ation of the success of the pro j e c t , c a rried out both internally and externally. The Drug Market Response Group will work in an area for several month s, e n s u ring that help and advice is ava i l abl e for those who want it, as well as prevention acti vity that is sustainable in the longer t e rm .

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April 2002

Peaks and Dales Safer Pubs and Clubs Pilot Project
Derbyshire Constabulary

The Peaks and Dales Safer Pubs and Clubs s cheme was introduced in the Derby s h i re Dales and High Peak areas in Feb ru a ry 2000 and as a result won a Crime Concern British Community Safety Award in 2001. The aim of the scheme was to re d u c e violent cri m e, the fear of violence and the s e riousness of inj ur ies in and aro u n d licensed pre m i s e s. A partnership betwe e n D e r by s h i re Dales Dist rict Council, H i g h Peak Borough Council , U n i versity of D e r by s h i re and the police was fo rmed to m a n age and implement the sch e m e. Fo u r pilot pubs and clubs we re identi fied in M at l o ck and Buxton through analysis of violent crime statistics and by ap p ro a ch i n g the licensees dire c t . A strategy was dev i s e d which includes: • Safer by Proof of Age • Safer by Design • Safer by Glass Management • Safer by Doorstaff • Safer by Dispersal • Safer by Training and Education • Safer by Drugs Protocol • Safer by Pubwatch • Safer by CCTV • Safer by Exclusion D e r by University took on the Safer by Train ing and Education and provided a training guide for staff working within a s a fer pub or club. T h ey ran a competition for students to design the Safer Pubs and

Clubs logo and leaflets for the scheme were c re ated and produced by High Pe a k Borough Council. A six-month period of monitoring and eva l u ation carried out by Derby s h i re Po l i c e fo l l owed fu ll implementation of the s cheme in Ja nu a ry 2001 and key fi n d i n g s included: • Within the Buxton pilot premises and surrounding area, the average violent incidents over the previous 3 years was 24 compared to the project year which was 12 resulting in a 50% reduction. • Within the Matlock pilot premises and surrounding area, the average violent incidents over the previous 3 years was 32, compared to the project year which was 24 - a 25% reduction. • 82% of licensees’ staff said they felt safer since the introduction of the scheme. • 67% of local police officers said that there had been improved communication with licensees since the start of the scheme. The first Safer Pubs and Clubs awa r d was presented to each of the pilot premises on 6th August 2001. Those who at t a i n e d , and continue to maintain the awa r d s t a n d a r d s , can seek re - a c c re d i t at i o n a n nu a l ly ensuring continued reductions in v i o l e n c e. To dat e, 15 additional pubs and clubs in the area are working towards the accreditation.

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New Guidance for Dance Clubs
Home Office

The Home Office h as issued new safe t y guidelines in a bid to help clubs to comply with licensing law s. The ‘Safer Clubbing Guide’ contains comprehensive new advice for club ow n e r s , dance event pro m o t e r s and local authority licensing depart m e n t s on how to ensure the health and safety of a nyone attending dance events in England. This includes tips on how to prevent dru g s from being allowed into and used in clubs, and guidelines on how to ensure that the risks associated with drug taking in clubs are reduced. The guide emphasises that licensing authorities need to ensure that clubs: • Provide adequate supplies of drinking water • Prevent overcrowding • Ensure proper air conditioning and ventilation • Take steps to prevent overheating • Ensure that venues comply with health and safety legislation. To help club owners tackle dr u g dealing in their pre m i s e s , the Safe r Clubbing Guide recommends that: • Clubs need to hire police-approved staff to prevent criminal organisations using door supervisors as a way of running drug-dealing operations. • A well-trained team of professional door staff should carry out searches, as these can be extremely effective in preventing clubbers and dealers taking drugs into clubs. • Metal detectors should be used to detect weapons; especially fi re a rms taken into clubs. • Door staff should regularly patrol all areas of the venue, especially corridors or secluded areas, to help people in need and prevent drug dealing.

The guide suggests that campaigns in clubs to persuade people not to use dru g s a re like ly to be ineffe c t i ve, as a majority of these people are alre a dy confi rmed dr u g users. It recommends that a harm reduction ap p ro a ch is more like ly to encourag e c l u bbers to reduce the amount of dr u g s and alcohol they consume as many are u n d e rmining their attempts to keep cool and hy d r ated by their dr ug use and high levels of alcohol. To help club owners deal with dr u g induced pro bl e m s , the guide re c o m m e n d s t h at : • Club employees should be trained as first aiders to recognise and deal with people who are intoxicated through d ru g s , alcohol or a combination of both. • A separate treatment room should be set aside to provide support to clubbers suffering the negative effects of drug use in a calm, cool environment.
Copies of the ‘Safer Clubbing Guide’ can be obtained from the Drugs Prevention Advisory Service (DPAS) Tel: 020 7217 3446 or can be downloaded from: http://www.drugs.gov.uk .

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April 2002

Analysis for Crime Prevention
Crime Prevention Studies Volume 13 - edited by Nick Tilley
Published in March 2002, this collection of 7 papers from we l l - k n own authors aims to improve the conduct and use of analysis for c ri me preve n t i o n . A n a lysis f o r c ri m e prevention is differentiated from analysis of c r ime prevent ion in that the lat t e r comments on what has been and is being done to try to prevent crime. A n a lysis for prevention is oriented to forming preventive strategies: • by identifying concentrations of crime or single offences where there is a potential yield from preventive effo rt s • by helping to find the most efficient effective and perhaps equitable means of prevention • by helping to forecast likely future crime problems with a view to developing pre-emptive strategies. The papers are split into sections according to their fo c u s : a n a lysing general p at t e rn s , ap p lying analysis in practice, using past re s e a r c h and the re l at i o n s h i p b e t ween re s e a r ch policy and practice. Topics cove red include the ‘ t i m e - w i n d ow ’ effect in the measurement of repeat victimi s at i o n , the future of pre d i c t i ve cri m e m ap p i n g, hot spots/gro u p s / t i m e s , a n t i c ip at o ry benefi t s , p ro blem oriented policing and constr uction sites, t r a n s fe rr i n g k n owledge of crime preve n t i o n , and what policy advisers and practitioners need from re s e a r ch . Crime Prevention Studies is an international book series dedicated to re s e a r ch on s i t u ational crime prevention and other i n i t i at i ves to reduce opportuniti es fo r c ri m e. It is co-published by the Cri m i n a l Justice Press (US) and Willan Publ i s h i n g (UK).
Volume 13 is available from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT Tel: 01884 840337/849085, F ax: 01884 840251 or E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk ISBN 1-881798-34-8 (pbk) 240 pages, priced at £27.50 for the paperback version.

British Community Safety Award Winners 2001
Securicor and Crime Concern

The British Community Safety Awa r d s , s p o n s o red this year by Securi c o r, a re designed to highlight innovation and best practice in the field of crime reduction. Now in their fifth year, the awards have become a regular part of the crime reduction calendar. The winners in 2001 were:

Low Hill and Bushbury Neighbourhood Safety Project
(Wolverhampton)

A highly visibl e, c o m munity based project that works in partnership to combat cri m e and social exclusion. It was set up in response to the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 with the overall aim of engaging the local area in the implementation of action plans and to undertake work to make the solutions sustainable beyond the project life. Over the past three years that the project has been operational, there has been a 41% overall drop in domestic bu rg l a ry and a 35% drop in overall crime. The project’s success has been attributed to its partnership work, which has allowed effective work to flourish.
Contact: Chris Dyer 01902 556624.

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British Community Safety Award Winners 2001

Safer Pubs and Clubs
(Peaks and Dales)

A project that aims to reduce violent cri m e, the fear of violence and the seriousness of i n j u ries caused as a result of violence in and around licensed pre m i s e s , n a m e ly pubs and c l u b s. Four licensed premises in the Peaks and Dales area we re presented with their Safe r Pubs awards based on the following reductions in violent incidents: Burlingtons - 100%; The Eagle - 80%; Olde English - 50% and Brody’s - 100%.

Offence Resolution Project
(Hawick, Scotland)

Working towards preventing young people from entering the criminal justice system while at the same time, e n abling injured parties of offences to have some input into what happens to offenders and to ensure their views are considered in the resolution of the crime. The project works towards three main aims: to reduce the likelihood of re - o f fending fo r those aged 11 - 16 who have committed an offe n c e ; to support a resolution between the parties involved in an offence and to offer support to those affected by offending behaviour. O p e r ating as a vo l u n t a ry pro c e s s , both the offender and the victim are contacted and aske d whether they would be willing to re s o l ve their offe n c e. Depending on the outcome, a n ap p ro p ri ate plan is devised with the main focus being that the young person gains an understanding of the consequences of their offence.

Justice Support Project
(Teeside)

Aims to strengthen the skills that young people alre a dy possess to help them deal more p o s i t i ve ly with life’s difficult issues. It is widely accepted that tackling the problem of youth c rime impacts ve ry favo u r ably upon all aspects of the life of a commu n i t y. The strength of this is in its ability to design and dire c t ly deliver specialist pro g r a m m e s , w h i ch address the d i versity of ch i l d ren and young people’s issues and which , if it we re not for the pro j e c t , would not exist. S t a rted as a two - year pilot programme in 1993 with a target of a 5% reduction in youth crime, the project has now worked with more than 2500 young offenders a ch i eving a 36% reduction in youth crime.

Prolific Offender Project
(Newcastle)

A community-based initiative, which targets the most ‘hard-core’ of persistent offenders. The project was ori g i n a l ly the brainchild of the local Crime and Community Safety To p i c G roup of the Newcastle We s t e rn Urban Vi l l ages Community Pa rtnership SRB. It is made of 95% of people with serious drug misuse pro blems who larg e ly commit offences to fund their drug hab i t s. All of the offenders must have committed six or more crimes in a 12month period - one of which must be a serious indictable offence - to be eligible for the six or twe l ve month pro g r a m m e. Since it began, the pro l i fic offenders team shows a total of 34 offenders have been on the project of which 17 (57%) have been crime free or have shown a very marked reduction in their offending. The Pro l i fic Offender Project wa s selected to go fo r ward to compete in the European Crime Prevention Awa r d s to be held in December 2001. A f urther fi ve proj ects we re awarded ‘ C e rt i fi c ates of Excellence’ and these we re :

• •

• • •

Reducing Burglary (Stoke on Trent) Past the winning post, Racecourse estate (Houghton le Spring, Northumberland) Safer Stations (Wandsworth) Phoenix Project (Sunderland) Youth Matters (Lincoln)

Four received ‘Certificates of commendation’ • Safer Scotland (Scotland) • Domestic Violence Support (Gloucester) • Trends (Blandford) • Kids on Track (Durham).

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Consultation by Crime and Disorder Pa rt n e r s h i p s
Home Office Police Research Series Paper 148
C o n s u l t ation is important in all stages of C rime and Disorder Reduction Pa rt n e r s h i p working. The Pol icing and Reducing Crime Unit (PRCU) commissioned re s e a r ch to identify good practice in the methods used by partnerships in England and Wa l e s , t o e n able the Home Office to provide furt h e r guidance on this subject. The re s e a r ch wa s based on a survey of Community Safety Coo r d i n at o r s , a brief rev i ew of audits and s t r ategies and discussion with re l eva n t n ational and local org a n i s at i o n s. F i ve case studies cove red in-depth inter v i ews and analysis of documentation. The report covers: • the aims of consultation • consultation in practice • the impact of consultation • the limits of consultation • conclusions. Recommendations Focussing: Partnerships should determine why and how particular forms of consultation are being undertaken, as consultation without clarity is likely to be ineffective. Streamlining: Partnerships should seek to utilise consultative fora where possible for other purposes (SRB consultation, Best Value consultation, and Police authority consultation). Mainstreaming: Partnerships should seek opportunities to learn from each other to avoid ‘ re i nventing the wheel’. Planning consultat i o n :T h e re should be a designated person within each partnership with responsibility for planning a coherent, long-term consultation strategy over three years, selecting methods, identifying hard to reach groups and offering advice as to which work should be undertaken i n t e rn a l ly or externally. Contractors: External contractors should be used when particular skills are required and not otherwise available to the partnership. Use of these contractors should be carefully managed to ensure ap p ro p ri ate and timely re p o rt i n g. Different methods for different groups/locations: Data collection should be realistic and ap p ro p ri at e. Surveys are ap p ro p ri ate for general populations, and other more qualitative methods such as focus groups may be more ap p ro p ri ate for ‘hard to reach groups’. Different consultation for different p u rp o s e s : Different methods may be ap p ro p ri ate at different stages of the consultation process. •

Copies of this report can be obtained free from Research, Development and Statistics Directorate Communications Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT T el: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk. Alternatively you can view the full document via their website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/ prgpdfs/prs148.pdf .

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Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships: Round One Pro g re s s
Home Office Police Research Series Paper 151
This re p o rt details the findings from case s t u dy re s e a r ch undert a ken in thre e partnership areas, which looked at how the p a rtnerships ap p ro a ched early activities in the fi rst three years of the part n e r s h i p working cycle. It examines the considerable a ch i evements of partnerships to dat e, t h e p ro blems encountered and how these we re ove r c o m e, toge ther with areas fo r development. The re p o rt contains re c o m m e n d at i o n s and examples of good practice, w h i ch should enable practitioners invo l ved in the second round of partnership working to c o m b at the difficulties encountered in the first ro u n d . Some of these re c o m m e n d ations include: • Partnerships should allow for unforeseen delays in each stage of the audit, consultation and strategy formulation process. • Partnerships should ensure that both operational and strategic staff within partner agencies, c o n t ri bute to the development of strategies and action plans using the problem-solving ap p ro a ch . Financial plans should be developed by each partnership when formulating strategies. Partnerships should aim to co-ordinate their strategies with those of neighbouring partnerships, which may involve combining resources to implement joint projects and sharing knowledge and expertise in preparing bids. E ve ry partnership should develop a media strategy, which should identify those responsible for media re l at i o n s , and how and when agencies’ activities within the partnership are publicised.

Copies of this report can be obtained free from Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice. gsi.gov.uk. Alternatively you can view the full document on the Home Office website at:

http://www.homeoffice. gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/ prs151.pdf.

This paper will also be of use to policy m a kers and those providing su pport to p a r tnerships in central and re g i o n a l g ove rn m e n t , as it explores in considerabl e depth the part n e r s h i p ’s ach i evements and the challenges remaining.

Criminal Statistics England and Wales 2000 - Statistics relating to crime and criminal proceedings for the year 2000
Home Office

This re p o rt , p u blished in December 2001, p rovides statistics for the year 2000 re l ating to c r im inal offences recorded by 43 police forces and re l at ing to cautions and cour t proceedings in England and Wales. The re p o rt gives an overall summary of the criminal justice system in 2000, c o m p a ri n g with previous ye a r s ’ d at a . S u m m a ries include: recorded cri m e, d e t e c t i o n s , o f fe n c e s , a rre s t s , o f fe n d e r s , c a u t i o n s , c o u rt pro c e e d i n g s , s e n t e n c i n g, the prison populat i o n , and cri m i n a l careers. In addition to these summari e s , the re p o rt also contains compre h e n s i ve and detailed breakdowns of the data underlying these summaries, in both graphical and tabular fo rm at s.
Copies of the report can be obtained from The Stationery Office, PO Box 29, Norwich NR3 1GN Tel: 0870 600 5522 Fax: 0870 600 5533 or E-mail: book.orders@theso.co.uk. (price £25.75). The document can also be downloaded free from:

http://www.archive.official-documents.co.uk/document/cm53/5312/crimestats.pdf.

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Working out what to do: evidence based crime reduction
Home Office Crime Reduction Research Series Paper 11
The aim of this re p o rt is to help police services and local partnerships ap p ro a ch cr i m e p revention and pro blem solving in a cohere n t , i n fo rmed and stru c t u red way, to improve p rospects for real ach i eve m e n t . It distils principles for effe c t i ve, evidence-based practice. D r awing mainly on re s e a r ch in the United States and United Kingdom, it discusses the application of six key concepts: • Aims describe overall problem solving or crime reduction aspirations e.g. to reduce burglary. • Problem-specification comprises a more detailed and evidenced statement of an aim e.g. reduce burglary by tackling repeat victimisation, having established that this is a major issue in the project area. • Tactics describe what will actually be done to tackle the problem. • Mechanisms refer to the ways in which tactics will bring about change. • Context comprises the place, time, social organisation etc within which the tactics will activate change mechanisms. • Replication involves adopting and adapting approaches that have been found effective in one context, such that they will work similarly when implemented in another place. The examples used in the re p o rt re l ate specifi c a l ly to situational crime preve n t i o n , fo r w h i ch there is the strongest re s e a r ch base, though the principles would be re l evant also to other ap p ro a ches to prevention. The report uses a case study of domestic bu rg l a ry. As situational tactics are rooted in re s e a r ch showing the significance of opportunity in the generation of criminal behav i o u r, the re p o rt shows they are pro b ably most useful in s t r ategies that target pro blems concentrated on particular places, v i c t i m s , p roducts or methods. It describes Clarke’s typology of opportunity reducing techniques, highlighting the u n d e r lying change mechanisms through which situational measures can bring about their effects. Whilst accepting that no situational measure provides a panacea, the re p o rt looks at the skills needed to decide on tactics and ways of sustaining effe c t s , g i ven that many cri m e reduction tactics have a ch a r a c t e ristic life - c y c l e. S t r ategies involving a coherent blend of tactics have gre at pro m i s e, for example ‘ c r a ck d own and consolidat i o n ’ and ‘ weed and seed’. These mix enforcement, to bring about short-term impacts, with measures liable to produce longer-term changes in the wake of the short-term measures. The paper suggests that implementing a strategic ap p ro a ch to cr ime reduction and p ro blem-solving along the lines described depends on a strong strategic planning cap a c i t y, good data and an ability to analyse it, and willingness and capacity to ap p ly leverage, w h e re necessary, on those best placed to act to reduce crime. It ends with two checklists: • for police agencies and partnerships to ensure they are set up to deliver effective evidence-based practice. • for those trying to address problems to check that what they are planning makes sense. This report springs from a project that was jointly supported by the Home Office and the US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.
Copies of this report can be obtained free from Research, Development and Statistics Directorate Communications Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk. Alternatively you can view the full document via the Home Office website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/crrs11.pdf.

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Kent Criminal Justice Conference Series
University of Kent

...look at new and innovative ways of working in the criminal justice field.

The Kent Criminal Justice Centre, p a rt of the University of Ke n t , p resents a series of p u blic seminars each spring and this ye a r t h ey will look at new and innovat i ve way s of working in the criminal justice fi e l d .T h e s e ries will draw on a number of local and regional partnerships to share their experiences and observations. F i ve seminars are scheduled for this year cove ring va r ious ap p ro a ches to c riminal justice, ranging from the Refe rr a l Order sch e m e, to arts for offe n d e r s , d ru g s e d u c ation in the classro o m , courses fo r asylum seekers and youth ment ori n g. Seminars began on We d n e s d ay 6th March and conclude on We d n e s d ay 29th May and t a ke place in the Lecture T h e at re at the C a n t e r bu ry Business Sch o o l , U n i versity of Ke n t . Talks commence at 6.00pm fo l l owe d by a drinks reception.

Future seminars include: Wednesday 1 May Doing the Arts Justice - Arts Interventions in Criminal Justice Settings Wednesday 15 May Cops in the Classroom - Should the Police be involved in Drugs Education Wednesday 29 May Asylum Seekers and Refugees - Adapting to the Change
Seminars are open to all and are free of charge however you should reserve a place by contacting Judy Lee on Tel: 01227 823275 or E-mail: J.C.Lee@ukc.ac.uk.

Policing Priority Areas
Home Office

The Home Secretary has announced the introduction of five nationwide key Policing Pri o ri t y A reas (PPAs) as outlined in the white paper “ Policing a New Century ” , w h i ch will re c e i ve targeted help in reducing crime and anti-social behaviour. Over the next six months five pilot areas, including Southwark, London, Stoke, B r a d fo r d , B ristol and Rhyl in North Wales will each re c e i ve specialist support in tackling crime and d i s o r d e r, i m p roving the quality of life for local re s i d e n t s. I m p roved partnership working at all levels will be fundamental to the reduction in crime in these areas, which were identified following consultation between Crime Reduction Directors and the Police. PPAs can be streets or estates with specific policing problems reinforced by high levels of crime and a lack of confidence in the area from the community. Assessments of the fi ve pilot areas will be carried out by Crime Concern and NAC RO who will aim to identify the challenges to effe c t i ve policing and recommend any future action. Their reports are due out this summer. The Police Standards Unit (PSU) will provide limited funding for specific purposes fo r this project and details of this will be announced in due course, together with specialist e x p e rtise and support .T h ey will also encourage increased partnership working and will monitor performance throughout the duration of the scheme. Existing initiatives in re l at i o n to both neighbourhood re n ewal and a reduction in crime and disorder will continue and complement the project.


30 General

...will receive targeted help in reducing crime and anti-social behaviour.

April 2002

National Community Safety Network Conference 2002
The National Community Safety Network Confe rence 2002 “ Widening the Net: N ew Alliances” and Annual General Meeting will be held in Edinburgh between 12 - 14 June this ye a r. Practitioners from a range of org a n i s ations will meet at the Heriot Watt Unive r s i t y c o n fe rence centre to look at issues including: • The national and European community safety scene. • New trends and partnership performance via a ‘reality ch e ck ’ . • Strengthening and raising the profile of community safety work. • The future for practitioners and the Network. C o n fe rence delegates will also be invited to attend a dinner in the prestigious ‘ D y n a m i c E a rt h ’ centre located beside the site of the new Scottish Parliament.
Further details about the conference, including how to become a member of the National Community Safety Network, are available via the National Community Safety Network website at:

http://www.community-safety.net.

Security at Places of Worship
Lancashire Constabulary

L a n c a s h i re Constabu l a ry has produced an A4 guide on aspects of safety and securi t y at places of worship. The guide was produced i n t he a f t e rm ath of th e terro ri st at t a c ks in the Uni ted States last ye a r, to hel p raise awa reness in some areas of securi t y, w i t h the ultimate aim of reducing the vulnerability of places of wo r s h i p. It prov i d e s s p e c i fi c, as well as general c o m munity safety and cri m e p revention advice in order to reduce the risks of places of worship becoming victims of crime and vandalism.

Topics in the guide include: • Areas of Security Consideration • Valuable items inside places of worship • External Security Considerations • Internal Security Considerations

April 2002

General/Property

31

Mobile Phone Theft
Home Office Research Study 235
Home Office re s e a r ch has shown that ch i l d ren of school age are at least fi ve times more l i ke ly to become victims of mobile phone theft, including robbery, than adults. The info rm ation contained within this re p o rt was taken from the British Crime Survey (BCS) 2000, two school surveys and analysis of recorded police ro bb e ry fi g u re s. It confi rm s t h at mobile phone crime has dramat i c a l ly increased in recent ye a r s , r ising by 190% since 1995. Mobile phones are now invo l ved in 28% of all ro bb e ries compared to 8% thre e years ago. The Gove rn m e n t ’s initiat i ve to tackle mobile phone crime includes police targeting of hotspots and persistent offe n d e r s , e d u c ation programmes in schools and re l aying cri m e prevention messages to retailers and operators, together with a well-publicised campaign. The Home Office is also explori n g, in association with the mobile phone industry and the police, the feasibility of piloting a text-bombing initiative similar to the type successfully carried out in Holland. Key findings from the report show that: • In 23 per cent of incidents victims were using their mobile phone or had it on display when it was targeted • Victims of mobile phone ro bb e ry tend to be younger than victims of other types of ro bb e ry - 48% of victims are under 18 • Mobile phone ro bb e ry is in the main a male on male activity - 90 per cent of offenders are male; and 80 per cent of victims are male • Two thirds of ro bb e ries are committed by offenders working in groups • The peak age for offenders is 16. One third of all offenders were aged 15 or 16 • Mobile phone ro bb e ry is more prevalent in city centres • One third of all ro bb e ries involve a mobile phone only • Victims under 18 were mainly targeted between 2pm and 10pm, while those aged 18 and over were targeted between 10pm and 6am (more phone ro bb e ries than other robberies occurred during the early hours of the morning).

Copies of this report can be obtained free from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications and Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211. The document can also be viewed and downloaded from the Research, Development and Statistics pages of the Home Office website at:

http://www.homeoffice. gov.uk/rds/pdfs/ hors235.pdf.

Operation Castillion
Metropolitan Police

The Metropolitan police have launched a n ew website aimed at reuniting victims of bu rg l a ry with more than £2 million wo rt h of stolen jewe l l e ry, wat ches an d other expensive items. Operation Castillion targets criminals who specialise in handling and re c e i v i n g stolen goods. R e c ove red items are organised into categories and appear on the website w w w. m e t . p o l i c e . u k / c a s t i l l i o n and people are encouraged to access t he site if they have been the victims of bu rg l a ry or ro bb e ry in case their pro p e rt y is fe at u re d . Since 12 November 2001 the web s i t e has enabled the Operation Castillion Te a m to return 38 items to their rightful owners.

32

General

April 2002

Operation Quad “QC” Clydesdale
Strathclyde Police

L a n a r k s h i re Police in par tnership with va rious other ag e n c i e s , h ave been invo l ve d in the launch of a unique electronic tagging system designed to deter the theft of highvalue quad bikes and fa rm mach i n e ry fro m farms in the Clydesdale area. The syst em uses individually code d radio frequency identifi c ation tag s , w h i ch can be fit ted quick ly to quad bikes and most ot her pieces of mach i n e ry. T h e ow n e r ’s detai ls are recorded on to a n ational dat ab a s e, w h i ch is accessible 24 hours a day, and once at t a ch e d , the tag is ve ry difficult to re m ove. A scanner, fi t t e d with a UV light, is used to read the ID tag. The light enables the operator to also re a d dots or marker pens.

Sold Secure - Domestic Security Products
Although better known for cert i fi c ation of automotive pro d u c t s , Sold Secure have been testing domestic security products for several years now. As with many other security products, it is often impossible to tell how good a window or door- l o cking system is until it is too lat e. To help crime reduction practitioners, S o l d S e c u re have developed a series of test specifi c ations using the latest European and Bri t i s h S t a n d a r d s , together with the Sold Secure at t a ck test expert i s e. As a re s u l t , p roducts beari n g the Sold Secure Logo are guaranteed to provide a strong defence against the determ i n e d c ri m i n a l . Using the normal grading of Gold, S i l ver and Bro n z e, the user can buy securi t y products according to the risk. The lat est company t o have ac h i eved Sol d Secure C e rt i fi c ation in this area is Gre t s ch - U n i t a s , best known fo r their GU and Ferco brand names. Sold Secure have j ust finished testing a range of fi ve GU products and these now appear on the Sold Secure Approved Products List. The range of domestic security products on the Sold S e c u re A p p roved Products List is steadily incre a s i n g, w i t h items for windows, doors and now even sheds. Discussions are c u r re n t ly ongoing with seve ral oth er window and door h a r dwa re suppliers, w h i ch will mean that there should soon be a more comprehensive list of domestic security products.
For further information on all Sold Secure Approved Products, visit the website: http://www.soldsecure.com. Alternatively, if you would like to be included on the mailing list for regular updates E-mail Sold Secure direct at: admin@soldsecure.com.

April 2002

General

33

Preventing Theft on Construction Sites: Tips for Builders
West Yorkshire Police

West Yo r k s h i re Police have produced a leaflet in association with Kirklees Local Au t h o rity Building Control in an effo rt to reduce thefts from building sites. E a ch ye a r, builders and constru c t i o n companies lose millions of pounds due to vandalism and theft of plant, t ools and other equipment including computers. Building sites are often open to theft both by on-site wo r kers and opport u n i s t s who see an open inv i t ation to steal. T h i s leaflet covers info rm ation on: • Why criminals target some construction sites over others to commit theft?

• •

How to take steps to make a site more theft resistant? Site Security Responsibilities.

The l eaflet also contains details of useful contacts for further info rm ation on any aspects of site security and safety.

Mobile Phone Marking/Awareness Campaign
Norfolk Constabulary

N o r folk Constabu l a ry has re c e n t ly carri e d out a mobile phone security marking and awa reness campaign using the fo r c e ’s mobil e police office to t a rget the more r u r a l areas of the region. C rime Preve n t i o n O f fi c e r s , with the help of Special Constables and C rime Prevention Pa n e l M e m b e r s , will visi t supermarkets in 5 of the main market t owns on Sat u r d ays betwe e n Feb ru a ry and A p ril offe ring a fre e mobile phone marking ser vice using an ultra-violet pen and high visibility tamper-proof stickers. In addition to marking phones, officers will issue re g i s t r ation cards for people to record t heir phone details, as well as

p roviding personal safety adv i c e, a n d i n fo rm ation on how to report the theft of a mobile phone to t he ap p ro p ri ate serv i c e p rov i d e r. Home Office posters and leaflets h ave also been distri buted to pubs thro u g h local ‘Pub Wat ch ’ g roups with info rm at i o n on how to keep property safe and secure. It is hoped that aft er t he final ro a d s h ow, the sc heme will extend t o yo u t h ve nues such as youth clubs and va ri o u s other youth groups in the region.

Editor’s note: Property marking schemes should adhere to the Association of Chief Police Officer (ACPO)/Home Office principles of property marking. Details of these are published on the Crime Reduction website: w w w. c r i m e re d u c t i o n . g ov. u k / p ro p e rt y 0 1 . h t m

34

General

April 2002

Building Cohesive Communities: A Report of the Ministerial Group on Public Order and Community Cohesion
Home Office Race Equality Unit

The Community Cohesion Review Te a m was set up in the afterm ath of the disorder that took place in Bradfo r d , B u rn l ey and Oldham in the summer of 2001. Their first task was to re p o rt on the disorder, identifying the key themes or practices which we re evident in are a s w h i ch had experienced disorder, and making re c o m m e n d ations for action to improve community cohesion, cutting across a wide range of local and national agencies. Their report was published on 11 December 2001. The team was specifically asked to seek the views of local people in the areas affected and m a ke re c o m m e n d ations to Ministers on what changes in policy and practice might be n e c e s s a ry to improve community cohesion and prevent further tro u bl e. The team was less c o n c e rned with the circumstances of each area but wanted to focus on what went right as well as what went wro n g. T h ey visit ed Oldham , B r a d fo r d , B u rn l ey and also Southall, Birmingham and Leicester. A number of re c u rrent elements contri buting to a deeply fractured community we re identified: • Ignorance about each other’s communities had grown into fear. This was exploited by extremist groups determined to undermine community harmony and foster divisions. • F ru s t r ation had been borne out of poverty and deprivation. Opportunities were seen as far from equal. • Failure to communicate and a lack of honest and robust debate meant that people tended to ‘tiptoe around’ the sensitive issues of race, religion and culture. • Lack of a clear and consistent message from principal political and community leaders at a local level. • Little attempt to develop clear values, which focus on what it means to be a citizen of a multi-racial Britain. • The plethora of initiatives and programmes to tackle the needs of many disadvantaged and disaffected groups seemed rather to ensure divisiveness and a perception of unfa i rn e s s. In response to this the team’s main recommendations are: A meaningful concept of ‘citizenship’ in which the responsibilities of citizenship are clearly established. The setting up of a national debate heavily influenced by younger people, to discuss in an open and honest way the issues preventing community cohesion and develop a permanent infrastructure to give young people a bigger voice and stake in society. Develop clear values of what it means to be a citizen of a modern multi-racial Britain and use them to provide a more coherent approach to education, housing, regeneration, employment and other programmes. Each local area needs to prepare a local community cohesion plan, which will combat fear and ignorance of different communities. The promotion of cross-cultural contact between different communities to foster understanding and respect and develop a programme of ‘myth busting’. A new Community Cohesion Task Force needs to be established to oversee the implementation of this work.

• •

• • •

Building Cohesive Communities: A Report of the Ministerial Group on Public Order and Community Cohesion is available on the Home Office website at: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/new_indexs/index_racial-equality.htm or for free hard copies contact the Home Office Race Equality Unit, Community Cohesion Team, 12th Floor, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2247 Fax: 020 7273 3771. Continues...

April 2002

Racially Motivated Crime

35

Building Cohesive Communities: A Report of the Ministerial Group on Public Order and Community Cohesion
(continued from previous page)

Also published on the same date (and ava i l able from the same location) was the fi r s t re p o rt of the inter- M i n i s t e rial Public Order and Community Cohesion team, w h i ch sets out the following actions: • Community Cohesion is made an explicit aim of Government, so that investment in s ch o o l s , housing and neighbourhood renewal considers this goal. • A debate is initiated at national and local level on the core values on which citizenship of m o d e rn , multi-racial, Britain is based. • Community Cohesion action plans should be drawn up for Bradford, Oldham and B u rn l ey by April 2002. • Community Support Teams should be developed to support local leadership in places where their contribution is needed. • The Regional Co-ordinator posts within Government Offices to remain to help build a longer-term approach to the capacity building that began with the community facilitators.

Empowering young people in rural Suffolk
Home Office Research Study 234
This research paper outlines a project set up as a result of concerns raised by rural youth workers in Suffolk about the lack of facilities for young people, and the young people’s feelings of powerlessness within the c o m mu n i t y. The project was a ch a l l e n g i n g attempt to work in a stru c t u red way with small groups of young people in a number of very rural locations. The main aims of this pro j e c t , w h i ch was targeted at young people aged 13 to 20 years living in rural Suffolk, were to: • improve the access to local services • increase and promote the involvement of young people in civic life and decision making • reduce criminality and anti-social behaviour. Six case studies are used to show the impact of the project. • The project engaged with approximately 200 young people over three years and most of the young people interviewed felt they had been empowered, although there were one or two exceptions. • Citizenship has been achieved in several areas where young people are working for the benefit of others and/or fundraising for the wider community. • One formally constituted Youth Forum has been fo rm e d .T h ree youth clubs have youth representation on their management committees. Post project, one Youth Village Hall Committee has been formed. • The mobile provision was extremely successful at engaging with young people.The area that operated without this facility struggled to engage with them.The mobile resource has been incorporated as an element of the On Track project, now funded by the Children and Young People’s Unit, which is operating in the Haverhill area. • Pubs emerged as a youth facility with the support of both publicans and parents alike and played a positive role in the community in the absence of other youth provision. These ach i evements we re realised in spite of serious implementation pro bl e m s. E a r ly in the pro j e c t ’s life, a lack of A dv i s o ry G roup guidance meant that the pro j e c t became more reactive than proactive. Rather than young people being referred to the project, project workers had to literally ‘find’ young people to volunteer to take part in the interventions. There was an over ambitious range of interventions over a too widespread geographical a re a , without the necessary time to implement them and a lack of cohere n t s t r at e g y. This led to several inter ve n t i o n s h aving to be dropped from the pro j e c t . I n response to the transport pro bl e m s highlighted by the project, Suffolk Action for C o m munities in Rural England (SACRE) is also piloting a Moped Loan Scheme fo r young people.

Copies of this report can be obtained free from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications and Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211. The document can also be viewed and downloaded from the Research, Development and Statistics pages of the Home Office website at:

http://www.homeoffice. gov.uk/rds/pdfs/ hors234.pdf.

36

Racially Motivated Crime/Rural Crime

April 2002

C a ra van Crime: A Police Officer’s Guide
Camping and Caravanning Club

This booklet and accompanying video and CD Rom have been devel oped to assist police officers in identifying and recording details of stolen caravans. The pack has bee n produced by the Camping and Caravanning Club in conjunction with the A s s o c i ation of Chief Police Officers and on behalf of an industry-wide working group. Funding was obtained from the club, together with the N ational Caravan Council, C a r avan Club and Caravan Registration and Identifi c at i o n Scheme (CriS). With ap p rox i m at e ly 4,000 tour i n g c a r avans stolen each ye a r, w h i ch is about a q u a rter of all new caravans sold annu a l ly, the theft of caravans continues to ri s e. T h e C a r avan Registration and Identi fi c at i o n S chem e (CriS) holds the details of ove r 10,000 outstanding caravan thefts with as few as one in four of these caravans eve r recovered. This pack helps the police to determine whether a caravan has been stolen, a n d e n ables them to recognise the many make s

and models of the estimated half a million t o u ring caravans on the road today. It also s h ows how to c h e ck t he V I N, read the e l e c t ronic tag (where fitted) and ask fo r ‘ wild card’ C riS ch e cks where it is suspected that the VIN may have been modified. Pa cks are ava i l able free of ch a rge and may be copied freely for police use.

For a copy of the booklet, video and CD Rom contact the Camping and Caravanning Club Greenfields House, Westwood Way, Coventry CV4 8JH Tel: 02476 856797.

The ‘Take me to Bed’ Key Ring Scheme
South Yorkshire Police

South Yo r k s h i re Police have introduced an initiat i ve that includes a cri m e reduction message with a diffe re n c e. The ‘Take me to Bed’ key ring sch e m e e n c o u r ages people to keep their car keys with them at all times - in effect to take them to bed with them when they go. It has been set up by the Sheffield N o rth Policing A rea due to an increase in bu rg l a ries where offenders have b ro ken in to pro p e rties specifi c a l ly with the intention of stealing car keys to high value motor vehicles. Offenders were identified as keeping a watch on health and leisure clubs’ car parks in the area, then following the owners of high value vehicles home, returning later at night to break in to the property and stealing the car keys to m a ke off with the car. Using statistical info rm ation and other dat a , the police we re able to identify particular makes of vehicles as potential targ e t s , and it was clear from this, t h at offenders had also found a simple way of identifying the owners addresses. Health clubs and car retailers in the Sheffield area we re introduced to the key ri n g s cheme with a message from South Yo r k s h i re Po l i c e, ‘ Ta ke me to Bed’. Key rings we re d i s t ri buted to owners of high value vehicles in hotspot areas identified by using cri m e statistics and the PNC Quest system.

Editor’s note: We hope to give an update of this idea in the next issue to see if it is possible to measure the impact of the method of communication, as well as any direct impact on crime figures.

April 2002

Vehicle Crime

37

Operation Coppergold Hosts National Stolen Lorry Load Conference
West Midlands Police

A team of officers from the West Midlands ‘Operation Coppergold’ initiative have played host to the city’s first National Stolen Lorry Load Confe rence with the aim of highlighting the increasing problem of thefts of lorries and their loads. Operation Coppergold has been running since 1998, and was set up to specifically tackle the pro blem of lorry and trailer cri m e. E a c h month the fo rum of officers invo l ved in the p roject meets at a diffe rent ve nue around the country to exchange info rm ation and intellig e n c e. A ny info rm ation is then fo r warded to the National Stolen Lorry Load Desk run by Essex Police, the central point of info rm ation for this type of offence. The info rm ation is then a n a lysed to try and identify pat t e rns of offences and offenders to determine the ori g i n at i n g force. D e l e g ates at the confe rence we re able to discuss va rious issues with colleagues fro m other police fo r c e s , as well as re p re s e n t at i ves from the insurance, h a u l ag e, and securi t y i n d u s t ri e s.

Criminal Neglect: No Justice Beyond Criminal Justice
Victim Support

Victim Support , the national ch a r ity fo r peopl e affected by cr i m e, h ave re c e n t ly p u blished a re p o r t entit led: “C r i m i n a l Neglect: No Justice Beyond Criminal Justice”, which identifies that the needs of victims of crime are often ignore d .T h ey are using the re p o rt to highlight a campaign e n c o u r aging policy makers across all are a s of gove r nment and social provision to recognise and fully provide for the needs of victims of crime. The re p o rt focuses on three specifi c a re a s : h o u s i n g, h e a l t h c a re and fi n a n c i a l s u p p o rt . It includes examples of ways in w h i ch the wider needs of victims of cri m e are overlooked including: • Lack of training for medical staff in the support and info rm ation requirements of patients whose injuries have been caused by criminal actions. • No arrangements in place to ensure landlords provide safe and secure accommodation. • Inadequate accommodation for victims of crime who need re-housing due to crimes affecting them in their homes, or because offenders live in the locality.

Insufficient measures to make insurance more affordable for people on low-incomes. Social Security rules, which mean people receiving compensation for criminal injuries, are more likely to have their benefits stopped.

The re p o rt concludes with the actions needed to improve the support provided to victims of crime. These include: • A new way of thinking about crime • Government to recognise their responsibility to victims of crime • A more co-ordinated and pro-active response.
Copies of the report can be obtained free from Victim Support Tel: 020 7735 9166 Fax: 020 7582 5712 or can be viewed and downloaded from the website at:

http://www.victimsupport.org.uk/ neglect/criminal_neglect.htm.

38

Vehicle Crime/Victims & Witnesses

April 2002

Text Messaging Service for Hard of Hearing
West Midlands Police

West Midl ands pol ice have introduced a m obile phone text messaging service to help peopl e who are hard of hearing to contact the police in an emergency. As well as being able to commu n i c at e with the police, the new service will also p rovide an opportunity for people to send i n fo rm ation to the police in text fo rm . The scheme was introduced as a re s u l t of a survey carr ied out by West Midlands Police in conjunction with the Bri t i s h Institute of the Deaf. The sur vey showe d t h at 98% of hearing im paired people a l re a dy use SMS text messag i n g, and 85% would like to use this service to be able to contact the police. A further 83% said they would be willing to register for the service.

It is unlike ly that all the m essag e s re c e i ved woul d be for the police, a n d discussions have taken place with the Fire S e rvice to explore the potential issues of this service. It is hoped that the scheme will be considered nat i o n a l ly, w h i ch , i n the long term , will mean that people who are hard of hearing will find it mu ch easier to get in touch with the police and potentially other agencies.

Safe & Sound - Te m p o ra ry Wi re l e s s Intruder Alarm System
Safer Merthyr Tydfil

This scheme was launched by Safer Merthyr Ty d fil and r uns alongside their we l l e s t ablished and successf ul ‘ H o m e s a fe ’ , ‘ Z e ro To l e r a n c e ’ and ‘ Ta ke 2’ yo u t h mentoring scheme. The pur pose of this initiat i ve is to p rovide security in the fo r m of a t e m p o r a ry, w i reless intruder alarm system, w h i c h is developed and produced by H o m e s a fe personnel. The alar ms can be installed in less than 30 minu t e s , and are issued free of ch a rge for a pre - d e t e rm i n e d period of time. The main aim of the scheme is to help to cre ate an enhanced peace of mind to recent victims of cri m e, d o m e s t i c v i o l e n c e, and the e lderly who can have l o n g - t e r m stays in hospit al and have t o l e ave their homes unoccupied for long p e riods making them more vulnerable to at t a ck . The alarms come in a port able self contained case and can be powe red by a n o rmal 13-amp socke t . To ensure that the a l a rm provides the maximum effect when a c t i vat e d , an auto-dialler facilit y is al so

i n c l u d e d , w h i ch will contact three pre recorded telephone nu m b e r s. T h e auto-dialler requires a live telephone socket and is programmed to dial a set telephone number, d e l i ve ring a pre-recorded message to alert friends or fa m i ly that the system has been activat e d . A dummy bell box can also be fit ted if re q u i red containing a flashing comfo rt light there fo re acting as an extra deterrent to possible intruders.

April 2002

Victims & Witnesses

39

Big Dave Gouder - Against Bullying
Bedfordshire Police

B u l lying can be an ordeal for victims, p a rt i c u l a r ly young people who often encounter it at s ch o o l . H oweve r, help and advice is on hand in the fo rm of pro fessional strongman “ B i g Dave” Gouder. As a ch i l d , D ave was a victim of bu l lying and so he knows only too well the misery and pain that it causes. That is why he now visits schools all around the country at the inv i t at i o n of local police forces to talk about bullying and the effects it can have on young people. T h e re are va rious fo rms of bu l lying from verbal abuse to actual physical and bru t a l h a rm , but it is always unkind and cowa r d ly, and can cause a lack of confi d e n c e, l ow selfesteem and in extreme cases can be life threatening to the victim. D ave ’s act includes him pulling a doubl e - d e cker bus across the ch i l d re n ’s play g ro u n d fi r s t ly to cap t u re their at t e n t i o n . He then goes on to give a pre s e n t ation to the ch i l d ren on h ow to be strong and say no to bu l ly i n g. As well as the pro blems of bu l ly i n g, he also talks about the dangers involved in drugs misuse and he discusses the risks of experimenting with illegal substances. Since Dave started touring the country nearly two and a half years ago he has visited over 273 schools putting his anti-bullying message across and has received very positive feedback from both staff and pupils at the schools.

Banknote Watch
Home Office/Scottish Executive/Northern Ireland Office

Banknote Wa t c h aims to make it diffi c u l t for ro bbers to spend st olen cash by e n s u ring that not es are stained with a special dye in the event of a ro bb e r y. I f ro bbers are unable to dispose of marke d m o n ey, t h ey may be less like ly to steal it in the first place. New posters will highlight the message by encouraging retailers not to accept stained notes and Cr ime Preve n t i o n O f ficers throughout the country can use the posters to target areas where arm e d robbery is a serious problem. The initiat i ve is being funded by the Home Offi c e, Scottish Exe c u t i ve and N o rt h e rn Ireland Offi c e, as well as receiving support from users of smoke and dye systems and m embers of the re t a i l industry. Although banknotes can becom e m a r ked over time, the red or purple dye used to specifi c a l ly st ain note s can be instantly recognised. People innocently in possession of stained notes can be re - i m bursed with a replacement note by contacting a bank or building society, who wil l explain how they can claim.

As well as identifying st olen notes, Banknote Wat ch will also provide intelligence gat h e ring info rm ation for police, who will in some cases, be able to identify w h e re the notes we re actually stolen fro m . Fo rensic evidence could potentially lead b a c k to the ro bb e r, and by handing in stained money, the public are also helping in the fight against armed ro bb e ry.
For more information contact the Home Office Tel: 020 7230 3729 or log on to the website: http://www.banknotewatch.org .

40

Violence at school and work/Violent Crime & Street Robbery

April 2002

Can mentors help primary school children with behaviour problems?
Final report of the three-year evaluation of Project CHANCE carried out by the Thomas Coram Research Unit between March 1997 and 2000

Home Office Research Study 233
This re p o rt provides a summar y of t he eva l u ation of project C H A N C E, w h i ch wa s set up in 1996 and is a commu n i t y - b a s e d i n t e r vention programme designed t o p revent potential long-term anti-social b e h av i o u r, social exclusion and cri m i n a l o f fe n d i n g. The re p o rt ou tlines the eva l u at i o n ’s findings and identifies the resulting lessons for other mentor pro j e c t s and evaluations in this area. P roject CHANCE provides trained mentors who work on a one-to-one basis with pri m a ry school c h i l d ren who have s h own som e behavioural pro bl e m s. T h e goal is to intervene early, to support and steer the ch i l d ren away from more seri o u s and long-term problems. Some of the main findings of t he report were: • The use of mentors to support primary s ch o o l - aged children with behaviour p ro blems is innovative and the programme has plausible, evidencebased ap p ro a ch e s. The first goal is to establish a trusting relationship. The mentor then builds on this to deliver a solution-focused intervention, designed to increase the child’s competencies and resiliency. • The children, their parents and the mentors all report improvements in the children after the mentoring period. The main gains reported are in the development of confidence, self-control and social awareness and relationships. • This finding may indicate that mentoring cannot achieve significant generalised behavioural change in such children within a year, implying a need for additional support. It is equally possible that it indicates the need to further develop the solution-focused stage of mentoring. • The project’s goals were achieved and financial support ensured, but the additional commitments over-extended the project. Fewer children than planned completed the mentor programme, with the result that it proved substantially more expensive than budgeted for. Numbers are currently returning to target levels.

Copies of this report can be obtained free from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications and Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211. The document can also be viewed and downloaded from the Research, Development and Statistics pages of the Home Office website at: http://www.homeoffice.gov. u k / rd s /

pdfs/hors233.pdf.

April 2002

Youth Crime

41

“Check It Out...Know Your Rights”
Northern Constabulary

The “Check it Out...Know Your Rights” booklet has been developed and pro d u c e d by Nort h e rn Constabu l a ry in part n e r s h i p with Highland Youth Voice in a bid to become m ore ‘ youth fri e n d ly ’ t o yo u n g people in the area. The booklet, w h i ch is aimed at yo u n g people aged 14 to 18 years of age, provides i n fo rm ation about a young person’s ri g h t s , as well as giving details on re c ruitment to the police serv i c e. It is divided in t o six sections including: • Young People and the Police • Young People and Drugs

• • • •

Young People and Alcohol Young People and Personal Safety Young People and Vehicles Recruitment

It is hoped that t he booklet will be used as part of the schools liaison pack ag e, and there is scope for it to be re-written so t h at it is suitable for pr i m a ry sch o o l ch i l d re n . A total of 20,000 booklets have been distri buted to sch o o l s , youth clubs, youth cafe s , swimming pools and ot her places where young people meet.

“Know Fear”
Lancashire Constabulary

This video teaching pack age has been produced by Lancashire Constabu l a ry in associat i o n with the Youth Offending Teams of Blackpool and Lancashire in response to the grow i n g crime of young people driving re ck l e s s ly in stolen motor vehicles, also known as ‘joyriding’. This hard-hitting video is based on a true life incident involving an innocent 17 year old b oy on a day out to Black p o o l , w h o, whilst crossing the sea front pro m e n a d e, was knocke d d own by a speeding stolen vehicle travelling in the wrong dire c t i o n . The video invo l ves live helicopter fo o t age which shows the young boy thrown over the bonnet of the vehicle and left for dead, whilst the driver speeds off. The young boy surv i ve d , but has had to learn to live with terri ble injuri e s , i n c l u d i n g having to learn to walk again, and is confined to a wheelchair for the majority of the time. “K n ow Fe a r” has been produced with the aim of highl ighting t he dangers and distre ss caused by d riving a stolen motor ve h i c l e. It has been designed for groups of young people identified as ‘at risk’ from becoming involved in this type of crime. Ross Kemp of ‘ E a s t e n d e r s ’ fame introduces the video and Coldplay and the Manic Street Pre a ch e r s provide the soundtrack.

42

Youth Crime

April 2002

Dalston Youth Project Part II (11 - 14) An Evaluation
Home Office Research Study 232
This re p o rt on the Dalston Youth Project II ( DYP II) describes a new and innovat i ve approach to working with children aged 11 - 14 who are at risk of being excluded from s ch o o l , by of fe ri ng mentor ing suppor t combined with supplementary educat i o n . The project ai med to re a ch 30 yo u n g people in each of the three years it ran. R e s e a r ch has re p e at e d ly shown that young people are at r isk of offending if t h ey come from unstable fa m i ly b a ck g rounds and have poor re l at i o n s h i p s wit h their pare n t s. The re s e a r c h also i n d i c ates that young people who re c e i ve i n a d e q u ate parental supervision and have delinquent sibl ings and peers are more l i ke ly t o offe n d . Poor perfo r mance at s ch ool and tr u a n c y, together with d i s ru p t i ve behaviour and low levels of a ch i evement are all associated with delinquency. The proje ct is located wi thin the London Borough of Hack n ey, and wo r k s with young people who are at r isk of becoming invo l ved in criminal activities. The four main components of the p rogramme we re a residential we e ke n d , a m e n t o ring component, an e ducat i o n a l c o m p o n e n t , and a pare n t / g u a r d i a n component. There were four aims and objectives to the project which were: 1. To improve basic education skills (literacy, numeracy, life skills) in the target group as well as to increase the group’s motivation to learn. 2. To improve social skills and reduce conflict with parents and other adults. 3. To reduce offending rates, drug use, truanting or other at-risk behaviour within the target group. 4. To establish a team of volunteers in the local community trained and supported by the project to act as mentors to the young people. The residential we e kend at the start of each year was successful and the mentoring re l ationships proved beneficial to both mentor and mentee. About half the mat ch e s we re successful in that t hey maintained contact throughout the 12 months of the pro j e c t .T h e extra tuition after sch o o l p roved more difficult with va ried attendance rates and d i f ficulties due to turn ove r of tutors over the 3 years of the pro j e c t . Pa rents saw the p roject as for the yo u n g people not for th emselve s and did not attend the p a rental training sessions, alth ough they support e d p re s e n t ation evenings and graduation night. Overall the project achieved some level of success with about half of the group of young people and considerable success with fi ve or six individuals. H oweve r, h a l f did not engage wit h the project in any meaningful way, w h i ch questions whether the right young people were referred to the p ro j e c t , and whether a one-year project is long enough to consolidate the gains made and enable those who part i c i p ated to make continued progress.
Copies of this report can be obtained free from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications and Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211. The document can also be viewed and downloaded from the Research, Development and Statistics pages of the Home Office website at: http://www.homeoffice.gov. u k / rd s /

. . . o f fe ri n g mentoring support combined with supplementary education.

pdfs/hors232.pdf .

...whether a one-year project is long enough to consolidate the gains made and enable those who participated to make continued pro g re s s.

April 2002

Youth Crime

43

‘Hard-to-Reach’ Young People and Community Safety: a model for p a rt i c i p a t o ry research and consultation
Police Research Series Paper 152 - Briefing Note
This bri e fing note outlines re s e a r ch commissioned to examine homeless and sch o o l excluded young people’s ex periences of crime and disorder. It sets out a model fo r c o n s u l t at i o n , Pa rt i c i p at o ry Action Research and Consultation (PA R C ) , w h i ch was deve l o p e d for use with hard-to-reach young people elsewhere as part of the research. The first round of audits and strategies produced by Crime and Disorder Reduction Pa rtnerships showed that young people we re larg e ly included as offenders rather than as victims of cri m e. Their views we re not generally uncove red in audits, t h ey we re not we l l re p resented in consultations and few strategies addressed their role as victims. T h e s e limitations were compounded for hard-to-reach groups of young people. The fi e l dwork was undert a ken in Newcastle upon Tyne in 2000 and invo l ved over 250 homeless and school excluded young people as well as over 75 people who work with these groups. The briefing note lists the suggestions from the main report (to be published shortly) on consultation with hard-to-reach young people: • consultation should include a strong qualitative element (eg their attitudes, experiences and understandings of crime should be explored in depth) • p a rt i c i p at o ry research approaches offer great benefits in involving young people in the audit and strategy process and in promoting their interests • research findings should be addressed and acted upon where ap p ro p ri at e, but since there are limitations to such methods, their use as a basis for action must be acknowledged if they are to be used effectively.
Copies of this report published in January 2002 can be obtained free from Research, Development and Statistics Directorate Communications Development Unit, Room 275, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk. Alternatively you can view the full document via their website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/prs152bn.pdf.

Conference on Tackling Child Exploitation on the Internet
West Midlands Police

West Midlands Police hosted a one-day c o n fe rence in November last ye a r, w h i ch highlighted the need for a mu l t i - ag e n c y ap p ro a ch between European police fo r c e s in a bid to tackle the growing pro blems of paedophiles using the Internet to exploit young children. The confe rence was organised as a result of a visit to Belgium, by officers from the West Midlands Paedophile Unit. It wa s attended by a total of 68 delegat e s including Senior police officers and o f ficials from the Pro b ation Service fro m B e l g i u m , England and the Republic of

I re l a n d , who visited as part of a long-term E u ropean initiat i ve aimed at tackling the p ro blem of ch i l d ren becoming victims of this type of crime. T h e re we re several speakers including re p re s e n t at i ves from the Copine Pro j e c t , w h i ch seeks to address ch i l d re n ’s vulnerability in re l ation to new tech n o l o g i e s , i n p a rticular issues re l ated to ch i l d p o rn o g r ap hy and the Intern e t , t o g e t h e r wit h info rm ation on a mu l t i - ag e n c y approach and the European perspective. Delegates rated the conference as either excellent or very good.

44

Youth crime

April 2002

Splash Scheme Summer 2002
Wiltshire Police

Splash - School s and Poli ce Liais on Activities for the Summer Holidays - is n ow in its 13th year and alre a dy t he s cheme is geari ng up to support yo u n g people aged 10 to 16 years of age in Swindon and Wiltshire this summer. Summ er holidays are oft en diffi c u l t times for young people and their fa m i l i e s , and many youngster s find themselve s getting into tro u ble through bore d o m , o r because they are simply unable to afford to attend va r ious activities and events being run in their area. Swindon and Wi l t s h i re have the a dva n t age of an excellent Splash sch e m e, w h i c h provides a fu ll programme of activities for young people throughout the s u m m e r. The program me includes computer skills, drama, circus skills, music, and dance and animation wo r k s h o p s , together with va rious sport s. A Discount

Tr avel Scheme ensures even more accessibility to the youngsters, with extra help for the most disadvantaged in the are a .T h e re is also a Splash Guide, vo u chers and a trave l card ava i l able to eve ry 10 - 16 year old, e n s u ring that the summer is a safe one fo r the young people. The Splash Team have re c e n t ly sent activity grant packs to youth centre s , l e i s u re centres and other vo l u n t a ry gro u p s in the county, i nviting them to ap p ly for a grant to r un activities this summer. L a s t year Splash re c e i ved 97 ap p l i c ations fro m these gro u p s , and issued grants totalling £35,000. As a registered ch a ri t y, Splash rely h e av i ly on donations from companies, individuals and trusts, and have to raise the m o n ey to fund the sch e m e. This year the t a rget is £108,000, w h i ch is a small pri c e to pay when supporting over 45,000 young people in the county.

Crime Reducing Football Tournament
South Wales Police/Neighbourhood Watch

Coca-Cola Enterprises Ltd is sponsoring a new football tournament aimed at reducing crime amongst the young people of South Wales. The scheme was launched with help from fo rm e r L i ve rp o o l , J u ventus and Wales star Ian Rush together with the 2001 ‘Champions of Cardiff’ winner. The Coca-Cola ‘Champion of Champions’ Junior Five-a-Side Football Tournament aimed at 5 to 15 year olds is being organised by South Wales Police/Neighbourhood Wat ch Sport s Tr u s t , set up in Cardiff in 1999. The aims of the trust are to dive rt young people fro m g at h e ring on st reet cor n e r s , and to encourage them into organised community sport s activities. The competition involves six regional heats and four age categories ranging from under 8 ’s , to under 15’s with the winner of each group taking part in the fi n a l s. The rules are simple, and the games are open freely to any child between 5 and 15 years of age. Coca-Cola have ag reed a thre e - year sponsorship deal with the trust which will prov i d e n ew sports equipment and resources to run the tourn a m e n t , as well as providing prizes for the teams who re a ch the fi n a l to be held at the Mill ennium Stadi um this summer. T h e t o u rnament will also re c e i ve Sport s m at ch funding from the Sports Council for Wales who will match the sum contri bu t e d by Coca-Cola Enterprises Ltd. The trust hopes to cover mid and North Wales in 2003 so t h at a ‘Champions of Wa l e s ’ t o u rnament can be set up, w i t h the aim of reducing crime amongst young people cove ring a much wider area.

April 2002

Youth Crime

45

Jack ‘n’ Danielle: Personal Safety for Young People
Lothian & Borders Police

This video and accompanying guidance notes have been produced for pre s e n t e r s dealing with issue s of personal safe t y amongst young people aged 15 - 18 ye a r s of ag e. The pack age also aims to encourag e young people to deve l o p their own strategies fo r coping in va rious situat i o n s t h at they have identified as causing them concern. The video was written and p e r fo rm ed by Liberton and G e o rge Her iots High Sch o o l s , and was produced by Lothian & Borders Police in part n e r s h i p with t he City of Edinbu rg h Council Education Department. The video consists of ei gh t d i f fe rent scenar ios highlighting s p e c i fic issues, w h i ch in turn fo rm a s h o rt story. None of these scenari o s has a definite conclusion, as the overall aim of the video is to encourage the audience,

together with the pre s e n t e r s , to discuss the issues raised and develop strategies for each s i t u at i o n . The scenarios run consecutive ly, and are re p e ated with time in between to a l l ow the presenter t o pause the video b e fo re continuing on to the next issue. T h e guidance notes are an integral part of the p a ck age and allow the presenter to identify i m p o rtant issues, and expand on them in discussion with the audience. The total running time of the video is 14 minu t e s , and by the end of the input, the presenter should have helped the group to recognise the r isks that exist and t he ways to develop strategies to be able to deal with these risks by looking at preve n t at i ve measures.

Community Safety Poster Competition 2003 - Drugs and their effects within the community
South Wales Police

N ow in its sixth ye a r, this initiat i ve aims to help young people understand the issues s u rrounding community safety through art and design. Pupils from local schools are asked to design posters on a specific crime topic and the winning design is then displayed on

buses used by the ch i l d ren to travel to and f rom sch o o l . The best 13 pictures are then also incorporated into a calendar sponsored by the City and County of Swa n s e a , Community Education Department. Last years competition featured designs on car crime with over 600 entries fro m ch i l d ren in both Compre h e n s i ve and P ri m a ry schools in the area. This year the subject will be drugs and the effects they have on the commu n i t y, and the winner and runners up will each re c e i ve gift vo u chers and a cert i fi c ate fo r their entries.

46

Youth Crime

April 2002

Working with Young People on Estates: The role of housing professionals in multi-agency work
Joseph Rowntree Foundation/Chartered Institute of Housing

This re p o rt examines the role of the housing officer in delive ring diffe rent types of yo u t h work on ten social housing estat e s , and is based on re s e a r ch and analy s i s , t h rough va ri o u s case studies, focusing on provision for 10 to 16 year olds. Section one looks at young people living in social housing and: • estimates that a quarter of all children aged 10 - 15 live in social housing, and 28% of social housing residents are under the age of 16. These children are more likely than their owner-occupied peers to experience economic disadvantage, and low income is more commonplace • heads of households are more likely to be dissatisfied with where they live on social housing estates compared with those living in owner-occupation. This case study highlights reasons for this as unhappiness with estate layouts, poor facilities, and limited ranges of shops. Some estates were identified as having a widespread fear of c ri m e, and in particular crime caused by known ‘problem’ families or individuals. Section two goes on to discuss working with children and young people. Three ch ap t e r s explore initiatives based on four inter-linked options: 1. Diversionary activity. 2. Developmental work. 3. Centre-based work. 4. Detached youth work. Most estates had a pack age of youth projects that included at least one of these types of wo r k , and in some cases, this pack age was organised according to an ove r a r ching yo u t h strategy. This section also assesses the diffe rent types of youth work including va rying levels of input from housing professionals on the case study estates. Discussions on the specific youth projects and initiatives outline the variety of experiences and ap p ro a ch e s. Section three of the report, explores a number of key issues that arose from the re s e a r ch . C h i l d ren and young people ‘hanging aro u n d ’ was expressed fre q u e n t ly as a complaint fro m e s t ate re s i d e n t s , but it was felt by those interv i ewed that playing and meeting on the stre e t s has always been common activity for young people, and is not a crime. Potential ap p ro a ch e s to complaints included encouraging commu n i c ation and negotiation between older and younger re s i d e n t s , together with the provision of space where ch i l d ren and young people could congregate freely. Youth consultation is also a key issue, and on most estat e s , some sort of consultat i o n exercise took place to find out more about what young people wanted. It was suggested that questions about facilities had to take in to account what is ach i evabl e, a f fo r d able and sustainable. The last section concludes with a series of policy and practice points as a direct result of the research completed on the ten case study estates. The practice points are aimed at housing o f ficers considering their role in mu l t i - agency work with young people, and some of the principal points were: • There are no instant solutions and on all the estates where youth work was effe c t i ve ly engaging with young people, projects had a long lead-in time. • Knee-jerk responses to the ‘problem’ of children and young people can be expensive and are often ineffective in the long term. • Housing managers should not expect to find a quick cure for young people hanging around, and rather they should consider finding space for this sort of activity on their estates. • Initial and continued consultation with young people is essential to the success of any youth provision. Consultation processes will create loyalty to the services provided, and help to promote high levels of use, and low levels of vandalism.

For copies of this report published in October 1998 and priced £10.95 contact the Chartered Institute of Housing, Octavia House, Westwood Way, Coventry CV4 8JP Tel: 02476 851700 Fax: 02476 694209 or E-mail: gpu@cih.org.

April 2002

Youth Crime

47

‘Get Hooked on Fishing’
Durham Constabulary and Durham Agency Against Crime

The ‘Get Hooked on Fishing’ s cheme wa s l a u n che d on 22nd A p ril 2000 at Wi t t o n Castle Trout Lakes near Bishop Au ck l a n d , County Durham. The scheme was devised and is run by PC Mick Watson of Durham Constabu l a ry, s u p p o rted by the Durham Agency A g a i n s t C rime (DA AC) and Bishop Au ck l a n d Angling Club. Its aims are to reduce cri m e and anti-social behaviour amongst yo u n g p e o p l e, by encouraging them to become i nvo l ved in a hobby that is both worthwhile and enjoyable. The scheme is open to young people between the ag e s of 10 and 16 and gives them th e c hance to exper i e n c e the sport of fishing by p roviding one-to-one c o a ching in fresh wat e r angling and conservation over a minimu m of 4 day s. 1 32 yo u n g people part i c i p ated in the scheme in its’ fi r s t ye a r, and many are we l l on their way to becoming very competent anglers. 12 p a rticipants we re selected to attend a special coach i n g d evelopment week attended by c e l eb rity Chri s Ta r ra n t, to enabl e them to train to become peer-led coach e s.

Some of these now assist the adult coach e s during angling sessions. E a ch young person is given additional telephone numbers and contacts fo r re l evant web sites where they can obtain a dvice and additional help on fishing and other issues. Each participant also receives a monthly newsletter. As a result of attendin g the sch e m e, findings reveal that the young people feel a huge sense of ach i eve m e n t , and gain i m p roved social skills as well as incre a s e d c o m mu n i c ation and practical skills. T h e i r p atience and confidence are also deve l o p e d toget her with increased env i ro n m e n t a l awareness and angling ability. Due to the success of the initiative, and the interest it has generated with other o rg a n i s ations it has been developed as ‘ G e t Hooked’ nationally. Year 2 ends in June this year and wa s led by students who attended the ori g i n a l s ch e m e. Expectations are that by the end of the two years, more than 300 young people will have taken part in the scheme.

The next Digest will be with you in July 2002. be submitted by June 7th 2002. All contributions
Contributions to: Jane Hopper Information Team Tel: 01347 825065 Fax: 01347 825097
Home Office Crime Reduction College, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825060 Fax: 01347 825099 E-mail: crc@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

48

Youth Crime

April 2002