Information Digest

“To reduce crime and the fear of crime, tackle youth crime and violent, sexual and drug-related crime, anti-social behaviour and disorder, increasing safety in the home and public spaces.”
Home Office Aim 1

This statement confirms our joint commitment to reduce crime and disorder. The Digest is published quarterly and aims to support crime reduction/community safety practitioners in police and local authorities working in statutory partnerships by facilitating information exchange. The Digest is a forum for your initiatives and experiences. Its success depends on you, the practitioners, contributing your articles. Deadline for copy is given below. Articles MUST be submitted by this date. So that everyone can benefit from your work and experience, we ask contributors to consider both what worked and what didn’t work within their projects. Projects may be well conceived and still not achieve all their aims; this does not mean they have failed. Please be brave enough to discuss what aspects did not achieve the expected outcomes. Include as much information as you can, covering the analysis of the problem and how it was identified, the response devised and how it was implemented and an assessment of the final outcomes.
Note:

The inclusion of material in the Digest or reference to any products/services does not signify that they have been tested or evaluated. Nor should inclusion be thought to confer ‘official’ approval.
You can reproduce material from this Digest, but we ask that you reference CRC and the originating organisation as the source, do not use the information out of context and that there are no charges connected with the reproduction of the material.

January 2005
The next Digest will be with you in April ‘05.

Centre Staff
Director’s Office Steve Trimmins Ann Keen Centre Support Liz Walton Pam Foster Adrienne Jowitt-Thrall Mark Ledder Dianne Waudby Ruth Whitaker Training Resource Solutions Martin Jones Simon Jones Michael Hawtin Bob Sanders Information Services Jane Carpenter Stuart Charman Gary Ingham Jane Jones Kathleen Noble Richard Wales Learning & Development Team David Fernley Gill Archibald June Armstrong Janet Caton Dee Cooley Martin Fenlon Jason Roach Kim Sutton Editor Jane Jones Design/Production Michael Hawtin

All contributions must be submitted by February 25th 2005.
Contributions to: Jane Jones
Information Services Team

Tel: 01347 825095 Fax: 01347 825097
Home Office Crime Reduction Centre The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825060 Fax: 01347 825099 E-mail: crc@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

For Training or General Enquiries: Tel: 01347 825060

January 2005

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Contents

News

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Crime Reduction Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Good Practice Seminars 2004/2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Advanced Associate Trainers Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Community Safety Qualifications Questionnaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Ideas Exchange - 'What Are You Doing?' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Digest Submissions Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Ideas and Initiatives

7

Oxford’s Park & Ride System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 'On the Beat with Mark and Eddie' - Wythenshawe FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Forecourt Watch Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Super Kids - Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 A Guide to Health and Safety in Newspaper Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Operation Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Capture the Deal – Capture the Thieves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 ‘Go Easy’ Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Home Safety Information Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 ‘Boro Buzz’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 ‘Don’t be a Target’ Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The ‘Big Screen’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Operation Payback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Theft from Motor Vehicles Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Graffiti Watch Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Crucial Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Three Strikes Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 SAFER HOMES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 ‘Fun Day’ for Safety Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Rochdale Case Intervention Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 No Trick or Treaters, Thank You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Partnership Working

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Car Clear Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Safer Swansea Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Sexual Assault Referral Centres and Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) dealing with Sexual Crime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Surrey Neighbourhood Watch Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Nuisance Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Community Graffiti Murals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Tackling Mobile Phone Theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Operation Cascade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Any views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect Home Office or Government policy.

Domestic Violence Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Promoting Home Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

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Contents

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

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Rural Racism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Beacon Learning Exchange Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Reclaiming the Streets: Surveillance, social control and the city . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Drugs and Crime: Second edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Sustainable Solutions to Anti-social Behaviour: Local Government’s joined-up approaches to tackling anti-social behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Facilitating community involvement: practical guidance for practitioners and policy makers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 CCTV and Policing: Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain . . . . . . . .25 Problem-Oriented Policing: From Innovation to Mainstream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Policing Drugs on the streets of Europe Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Tackling Drugs Supply Conference and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Fear and Fashion: The use of knives and other weapons by young people . . . . . . . . .27 What works in community involvement in area-based initiatives? A systematic review of the literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Building Communities, Beating Crime: A better police service for the 21st Century . .28 Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Drugs Use and Begging: A Practice Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 National ‘Market Place’ Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Drug Misuse 2004: Reducing the local impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Secured by Design Innovation Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Secured by Design Bi-Monthly Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Research

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Parental drug and alcohol misuse: Resilience and transition among young people . .32 When Violence Hits Home: How Economics and Neighborhood Play a Role . . . . . . . . .33 Crime in England and Wales: Quarterly Update to June 2004 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Problem-Oriented Guides for Police - Underage Drinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Tackling domestic violence: exploring the health service contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Tackling Domestic Violence: the role of health professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Decision-making by house burglars: offender’s perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Piloting ‘On the spot penalties’ for disorder: final results from a one-year pilot . . . . .36 ID Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Each article in the Digest is highlighted with an icon which defines the product described in that article. They are: Campaign/ Initiative Publication

Talking Shop

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Video

Answers on a Postcard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Criminology Corner 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Website/ Electronic Information General/ Exchange of Ideas/ Conferences

January 2005

Contents

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News

Crime Reduction Website
The Crime Reduction Website has seen some major updates over the past few months including the addition of 10 Second Polls to the site's Homepage. These are quick questions, intended to be fast, fun and interesting to help both the web team and site users get an idea of what other practitioners think and feel about crime reduction issues. Questions are updated at least every 2 weeks. The first 10 Second Poll asked 'How do you feel about the Crime & Disorder Act review?' Responses include: 17% of users felt optimistic. 35.8% cautious. 13.2% pessimistic. 13.2% indifferent. 20.8% asked “What CDA review”? You can visit the poll on the Crime Reduction Website at: www.crimereduction.gov.uk A new Neighbourhood Watch (NHW) Mini-site aimed at NHW Co-ordinators is now available on the Crime Reduction Website (www.crimereduction.gov.uk/ neighbourhoodwatch/nwatch01.htm). It includes a separate dedicated NHW Discussion Forum and Ideas Exchange offering advice on setting up and running a NHW scheme. New Toolkits have recently been published on the site including Motor Salvage Operators' Regulations, Section 17 and Alcohol-Related Crime. A programme to refresh and renew all old-style Toolkits is underway (www.crimereduction.gov.uk/ toolkits/index.htm).
For more information on the website contact Stuart Charman Tel: 01347 825064 E-mail: stuart.charman@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or Richard Wales Tel: 01347 825185 E-mail: richard.wales@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Crime Reduction Centre, Info. Services Team, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG.

Good Practice Seminars 2004/2005
The second seminar in this year’s programme on "Violent Crime" was held on 15 - 16 September 2004 at Aston University, Birmingham. The programme was developed in partnership with the Home Office Violent Crime Policy Team and contributions reflected the 4 strands of the government’s Violent Crime Strategy. Over 120 delegates attended the event, which was chaired by John Curtis from the Government Office for the West Midlands. The first day began with presentations and discussions on alcohol and the night-time economy. Safer Swansea representatives provided a lively presentation on the triage centre made available in the city during Christmas and New Year 2003. Manchester City Centre Safe also described their work with the Licensing Trade to tackle problem drinking. A guns and offensive weapons debate included contributions from West Midlands Police and provided an overview of local issues. A representative from the Peace Alliance spoke passionately about the waste of young lives due to gun crime and showed the video “Untouchable”, details of which featured in the October Digest. Day 2 of the seminar began with a series of presentations on domestic violence including: • The impact of domestic violence on children. • The issues facing women from black and minority ethnic communities. • Developing domestic violence strategies. This was followed by a session on anti-social behaviour which looked at Manchester City Council's use of anti-social behaviour legislation. Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council also provided a practical examination of the partnership’s use of Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs) with young people. A full report of the event, including presentations, is available on the Crime Reduction Website: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/gpvca00.htm The “Prolific and other Priority Offenders" seminar took place on 1 - 2 December 2004 in Manchester and a report of this event will be available on the Crime Reduction Website in early 2005.

For more information about the seminars contact Dee Cooley, Crime Reduction Centre, Learning & Development Services, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825050 E-mail: dee.cooley@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or visit the Crime Reduction Website:

www.crimereduction. gov.uk/gp00.htm

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News

January 2005

Advanced Associate Trainers Award
Over the last 2 years the Crime Reduction Centre (CRC) has trained a number of Associate Trainers (ATs) who are licensed to deliver an introductory course on crime reduction. Thanks to their effort and commitment, over 4000 certificates have now been issued to Associate Trainers. In December 2004, the first group of Advanced Associate Trainers (AATs) were trained to deliver a more comprehensive 2-day foundation course in Crime Reduction and Community Safety. AATs all hold a nationally recognised training qualification and the first 10 AATs also completed their City & Guilds (7302) Certificate in Delivering Learning - An introduction'. CRC aims to support a core of 50 standard ATs and 20 AATs throughout England and Wales. The next event will be an Associate Trainer Conference to be held at the CRC on 22nd - 23rd March 2005.
For more information contact Martin Fenlon, Crime Reduction Centre, Learning & Development Services, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825076 E-mail: martin.fenlon@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk or visit the Crime Reduction Website:

www.crimereduction.gov.uk/crimereductioncentre24.htm

Community Safety Qualifications Questionnaire
We had a very limited response to this questionnaire and can therefore only draw similarly limited conclusions from the exercise. We thought we would share some of these with you, so that you have the chance to respond if you have different views. Responses came from 3 sources: • The National Community Safety Network Conference held in summer 2004. • Digest readers. • Crime Reduction Website visitors. Thanks to all those who contributed. We asked some general background questions to determine whether the desire for formal qualifications in professional development rested with a particular group within the community safety sector. This does not appear clear cut and we have the added disadvantage that the sample of respondents was not truly representative of the whole sector. The main findings from the general questions include: • Most respondents classed themselves as either community safety or crime reduction officers. • Most had been working in their current role for between 1 and 3 years. • Over half had both O and A levels and just under half (48%) had a first degree, which may, or may not be related to community safety/crime reduction. Highlights from responses on the types of qualifications required: • A high proportion of respondents (16-37%) left a number of the qualification options blank, rather than stating a preference. • More people (45%) registered a real or medium need for short courses. • The Continuing Development Award received an even spread of responses across the range of perceived needs. • 37% of respondents felt there was no need or low need for a foundation degree/certificate in higher education.The same was true for a criminology or criminal justice degree, although a number of respondents did already possess a criminology degree. • More respondents (37%) felt there was a real or medium need for a postgraduate diploma in community safety/crime reduction than no need/low need The results will be shared with the Skills for Justice Sector Skills Council (SJSSC) as a snapshot of preferences for formal qualifications in professional development.

If you have any comments or questions, please contact Gill Archibald, Crime Reduction Centre, Learning & Development Services, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825074 E-mail: Gill.Archibald@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

January 2005

News

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Ideas Exchange - 'What Are You Doing?'
Alternatively, you can print the form and send it to: Jane Jones, Crime Reduction Centre, Information Services Team, The Hawkhills, Easingwold, York YO61 3EG Tel: 01347 825095 Fax: 01347 825097 E-mail: jane.jones@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

The Ideas Exchange on the Crime Reduction Website (www.crimereduction.gov.uk/ cgi-bin/ iex/iex.pl) is a database of ideas and initiatives on all crime reduction topics. It is useful for obtaining quick ideas and can be used as an information-sharing tool for practitioners. It is also user friendly and fully searchable by crime topic and geographic area. This information is also considered for inclusion in future copies of the Digest.
We are always interested to hear about your ideas and initiatives. If you are working on a project or initiative, whether it is planned, ongoing or recently completed, you can submit this information via the Crime Reduction Website on the 'What are you doing ' form at:

www.crimereduction.co.uk/cgi-bin/iex/iex.pl?action=whatrudoing

Digest Submissions Policy
The Digest allows contributors to make information available to others without loss of ownership. Material submitted for inclusion will be formatted, edited and collated initially by the Editor of the Digest. Articles accepted for inclusion will also be published in electronic format on the Crime Reduction Website Ideas Exchange: www.crimereduction.gov.uk/cgibin/iex/iex.pl Information can be submitted by: • Word document via E-mail to: jane.jones@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk • Fax to the Home Office Crime Reduction Centre, Information Services Team, Fax: 01347 825097. • Post to: Jane Jones, Information Services Team, Crime Reduction Centre, The Hawkhills, Easingwold,York YO61 3EG. Contributions should adhere to the following guidelines. • Refer to a specific initiative, event or publication relevant to crime reduction/community safety practitioners. Wherever possible, contain evidence of evaluation or cost-benefit analysis. Where a project has not been completed, contributions should aim to contain some interim evaluation and indication of any future follow up. Be original ideas and material. Duplicates of other projects/ initiatives will only be accepted if they contain significant differences. Not be “press release” copy, unless supported by other documentation. Press release does not usually contain sufficient detailed information. • Not be announcements of local publicity events or campaigns unless there is some form of evaluation or the event/ campaign is of national value. Pictures and Logos Where possible, pictures or logos should be included with articles. They can be sent as hard copy or electronically. It is always better to send the original image, as this will ensure higher quality reproduction. Please try to send the original image and not a picture as part of a document or presentation. Electronic Image specification • PC or Mac format: colour images at least 400dpi can be .jpg, .tiff, .bmp. • Black & white images at least 600dpi should be .tiff or .bmp. • Original electronic artwork can be sent as Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop files. • Can be sent on disk, CD or Zip disk or by e-mail.

Language and text • Digest content should be written for the target audience of crime reduction practitioners. • The use of technical terms should be avoided. Where they are used they must be fully explained. • Use plain English and short sentences. • Make it accurate, brief and relevant. • Avoid acronyms by using the full name. If an acronym recurs within an article, give the full name and acronym for the first occurrence and use the acronym only for subsequent occurrences e.g: Crime Reduction Centre (CRC).

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News/Digest Submissions Policy

January 2005

I d e a s a n d I n i t i a t i ve s

Oxford’s Park & Ride System
Thames Valley Police

Oxford’s Park & Ride system is one of the UK's largest and longest established. The first car park for 250 cars was opened in 1973 and since then new car parks have been added, providing space for over 5,000 cars. Six years ago, Oxford’s park & ride car parks suffered with severe crime problems, averaging approximately 400 crimes per year. Since then, Thames Valley Police, in partnership with Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire County Council started a year on year improvement scheme. In November 2002 a new car park was opened, which incorporated as many crime prevention features as possible, including a centrally placed public waiting room with an airport style control room located above it to enable security officers to have 360 degree visibility. This is backed up by a full CCTV system and a minimum of one officer in the control room and one on patrol at any time. There is also a secure cabinet facility for cyclists to store their bikes. The principles of the Safer Parking Scheme (formerly the Secured Car Parks Award Scheme) have been used in each new car park and now 4 out of 5 have received this award.
For more information contact Roger Hampshire, Oxfordshire Crime Prevention Design Advisor, Thames Valley Police, Witney Police Station, Welch Way, Witney, Oxon OX28 6JN Tel: 01993 893875 Fax: 01993 893894

'On the Beat with Mark and Eddie' Wythenshawe FM
Greater Manchester Police

Wythenshawe FM is a government funded community radio station providing a forum for music and information unavailable elsewhere in the region. Working in partnership with the com munity and community groups, South Manchester Crime Reduction Advisers were often invited to give advice on the show on policing, domestic burglary, personal safety and vehicle crime. Due to its popularity, the radio station decided to dedicate an hour specifically to policing issues. 'On the Beat with Mark and Eddie' was launched in September 2004 and the first show presented advice on domestic burglary, bogus officials and cane and hook burglaries. A different subject is discussed each week. Guests from other police departments and partner agencies are also invited to provide information on

subjects such as crime scene investigation, drug abuse and traffic. The Crimestoppers number is publicised and police operations including Magpie, Hawk and Xcalibre are also discussed.
For more information contact Mark Flanagan or PC Eddie Lindsay, Greater Manchester Police Divisional HQ, Crime Reduction Department, Elizabeth Slinger Road, West Didsbury, Manchester M20 0PT Tel: 0161 856 6170

January 2005

Ideas and Initiatives

7

Forecourt Watch Scheme
West Midlands Police

West Midlands Police have set up a new Forecourt Watch Scheme in partnership with the British Oil Security Syndicate (BOSS), which is aimed at reducing 'drive off' offences at petrol stations. Under the new scheme, staff at petrol stations will report 'bilkings' (driving off without paying) to the police, providing them with information on the vehicles involved. Officers are then responsible for distributing a standard letter to the owner of the vehicle, requesting that they pay the garage within seven days. If no payment is received within this time, the garage then informs the police, who are able to consider prosecuting the owner for intent to steal. Since the introduction of the scheme, local figures for this type of crime have reduced quite significantly and it is hoped that it will be adopted force-wide in the near future.
For more information contact Det Chief Insp Tim Godwin, West Midlands Police, Operational Command Unit, Stoney Stanton Road, Coventry CV6 5DG Tel: 0845 113 5000 Ext: 7933 6200 Fax: 02476 539139 E-mail: t.godwin@west-midlands.pnn.police.uk Website: www.west-midlands.police.uk

Super Kids - Evaluation
East Riding of Yorkshire Council

Details of the Super Kids event featured in the October 2004 edition of the Digest. Since the event took place, an evaluation has been carried out based on the teacher's questionnaires, pupil's 'thank you' letters and participant's observations of the project. Super Kids took place in March last year in partnership with the East Riding of Yorkshire Council, “Prison Me, No Way” Trust and the Specialist Health Promotion Service of the Hull and East Riding Primary Care Trusts. It was attended by nearly 5,000 pupils aged 9 - 11 years. The aim of the event, which consisted of 11 short workshops, was to educate children on a range of personal safety issues, as well as informing them about the potential risks they are exposed to in their everyday lives. Pupils were also made aware of the dangers of becoming involved in criminal activity and anti-social behaviour and were provided with information on a wide range of health issues, including healthy eating and anti-smoking advice. Following the event, teachers were asked to complete a questionnaire. The feedback included: • 97% of teachers who responded assessed the event as either excellent or very good. All felt that pupils had benefited from the event.

99% were satisfied with booking and transport arrangements. • All teachers felt that Super Kids linked with the Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (PSHCE) part of the curriculum. • 97% of teachers believed that the event could reduce the chances of young people being injured or committing a crime • All teachers intended to attend the event if it was available next year. Teachers were also asked to rate the workshops in terms of interest, content suitability and relevance to the age group and their overall satisfaction with the presentation. The results of those who responded were very positive and most felt that the workshops were either ‘excellent’ or ‘very good.’
A copy of the full evaluation is available from Colin Dawson, Anti-social Behaviour Team, East Riding of Yorkshire Council, County Hall, Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire HU17 9BA Tel: 01482 396382 Fax: 01482 396428 E- mail: colin.dawson@eastriding.gov.uk

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Ideas and Initiatives

January 2005

A Guide to Health and Safety in Newspaper Delivery
West Midlands Police

When a local study revealed that newsagents took an ad hoc approach to the training, support, responsibilities and supply of reflective equipment for young people delivering newspapers, West Midlands Police decided to produce a Guide to Health and Safety in Newspaper Delivery. Concerned about young people's safety, the police produced this guide to provide a more consistent approach to health and safety issues surrounding young people delivering papers in the area. A flyer, aimed at young people, was also distributed via local newsagents, which outlined some of the dangers associated

with newspaper delivery and how to best avoid potential problems. The guide contains: • A Guide to the Law. • General Advice and Risk Assessments, including a sample risk assessment. • Road and Cycle Safety, including a cycle checklist. • Nuisance Animals. • Working Alone • Manual Handling, including average weights of newspapers. • Protective Equipment and Clothing. • Information for Parents, including a list of useful contacts.

For more information contact Rene Evans, Community Partnerships Officer, West Midlands Police, Halesowen Police Station, Laurel Lane, Halesowen, West Midlands B63 3JA Tel: 0121 626 9234 E-mail: r.evans@ west-midlands.pnn. police.uk

Operation Impact
Warwickshire Police

Warwickshire Police have relaunched Operation Impact, a countywide fight against burglary, which led to a significant reduction in domestic burglaries when it was initially implemented in May 2000. The aim of this initiative is to prevent repeat victimisation by offering support, advice and reassurance to the community. Victims of burglary are given an information pack providing details of how the burglary will be investigated by the police and what the victim should do following the burglary, including: • Cancelling all credit/debit cards. • Contacting insurers. • Property marking and recording the details. • Replacing door and window locks. • Possibly upgrading or improving current home security measures. Details of support services are also available, together with advice on other aspects of burglary prevention. Smartwater property marking kits, funded by Basic Command Units (BCUs) and Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) are included in the packs and in 2003/04 over 1,800 premises were offered property marking kits. Handbooks are delivered to victims' neighbours to ensure they are aware of the measures they can take to avoid becoming victims themselves. Other features of Operation Impact include: • High profile and covert police operations. • The use of intelligence to target offenders and hot spots. • Priority given to quicker attendance at domestic burglaries by police officers and scenes of crime officers. • Fast tracking of forensic samples to support the rapid identification and arrest of offenders. So far the initiative has proved extremely positive for both police and victims. An evaluation will be carried out in April 2005.

For more information contact Martyn Stephens, Warwickshire Police, Police Station, Vicarage Road, Nuneaton CV11 4DW Tel: 02476 641111 Fax: 01926 415678 E-mail: martyn.stephens@ warwickshire.pnn.police.uk Website:

www.warwickshire.police.uk

January 2005

Ideas and Initiatives

9

Capture the Deal – Capture the Thieves
West Midlands Police

West Midlands Police Safer Motors Team have launched a new campaign to encourage people buying second-hand cars to take a photograph of the seller before they hand over any cash. The campaign was set up following an increase in the number of car buyers conned into handing over thousands of pounds, only to find their new car is in fact stolen. By taking a few simple precautions, buyers can dramatically reduce their

chances of being deceived by car thieves: • Ensure you visit the seller’s home – don’t do a deal in a car park or let them visit your home. • Don’t pay cash – if there is a dispute later, there is no way of tracing the seller. Pay by banker’s draft, which will at least leave an audit trail. • Consider taking a photograph of the seller standing in front of the vehicle, ensuring the registration is clearly on show. If people are genuine sellers, they should have no reason to object. If the car is then identified as stolen, it will assist the police in tracing the person.
For more information contact Insp Alison Barton, Safer Motors Co-ordinator, West Midlands Police HQ, Lloyd House, Colmore Circus, Birmingham B4 6NQ Tel: 0845 113 5000 Ext: 7922 6253 E-mail: a.barton@west-midlands.pnn.police.uk

‘Go Easy’ Campaign
West Midlands Police

A major new awareness campaign has been launched by West Midlands Police aimed at reducing binge drinking and alcoholrelated crime and disorder in Birmingham city centre. The ‘Go Easy’ campaign is funded by the Birmingham Crime and Disorder Partnership and Broad Street Steering Group, which includes representatives from the Birmingham City Centre Partnership, City Council, Police, Licensees, Taxi Associations and local residents. This group was set up in April 2004 following concerns that Broad Street had become a focal point for anti-social binge drinkers.

The campaign is part of a series of initiatives to improve the area and is based primarily on ideas from a focus group of young people. The campaign intends to highlight the possible consequences of binge drinking among young people, which is a growing problem facing many towns and cities. A series of adverts warning youngsters of the dangers they could face if they drink excessively form the basis of the campaign. These adverts show how people can change during the course of an evening's drinking session and will feature across the city on buses, trains, taxis and bus shelters, as well as on beer mats and in bar washrooms.
For more information contact Jackie Harrison, West Midlands Police HQ, Lloyd House, Colmore Circus, Birmingham B4 6NQ Tel: 0121 626 5197 E-mail: j.harrison@west-midlands.pnn.police.uk

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Ideas and Initiatives

January 2005

Home Safety Information Pack
Norfolk Constabulary

The Police and Fire Service have set up a joint initiative to provide crime reduction and home safety advice to new householders. Information packs containing a selection of leaflets offering advice on crime reduction and fire safety have been distributed to Estate Agents and Local Authority and Housing Association offices to distribute to home owners when they move into their new house.
For more information contact PC Pat Bailey, Crime Reduction Officer, Norfolk Constabulary, Eastern Area Headquarters, Great Yarmouth Police Station, Howard Street North, Great Yarmouth NR30 1PH Tel: 01493 333039 E-mail: baileype@norfolk.pnn.police.uk

‘Boro Buzz’
Safer Middlesbrough Partnership

Safer Middlesbrough Partnership set up an initiative at the end of last year in a bid to reduce anti-social behaviour and nuisance during the Halloween period. The initiative, called ‘Boro Buzz’ aimed to encourage young people off the streets, particularly on Mischief Night and Halloween, by providing other activities for them to participate in. About 100 events were held across the region, including a football tournament, which saw young people of all ages involved in 27 teams, each with 7 players. There were also DJ workshops and the chance to make an animated film or produce a video for the more creative youngsters, as well as judo sessions and Halloween walks. Another event included Dance Sensation 2004, held at Middlesbrough Theatre and performed with the help of the 2 Funky Dance Studio.

A total of 110 young people joined in the dance session, which lasted two and a half hours and was presented to a sell out audience.

Boro Buzz also included day trips, details of which were included in leaflets posted to 13 to 19 year olds in the area. The leaflets were also made available at the council’s reception points, libraries and at youth and community centres.

For more information contact Terry Murphy, Crime and Disorder Co-ordinator, Safer Middlesbrough Partnership, 2 River Court, Brighouse Road, Riverside Park, Middlesbrough TS2 1RT Tel: 01642 354025 E-mail: terry_murphy@ middlesbrough.gov.uk or visit the website:

www.borobuzz.co.uk

‘Don’t be a Target’ Campaign
Greater Manchester Police

The ‘Don’t be a Target’ campaign was set up in partnership with the police and the licensing trade following an increase in the numbers of thefts from the person in public places where people relax such as bars, clubs and restaurants. The ‘target’ idea for the campaign has been designed to show the public that it is their property that is the target for criminals. It goes on to point out the simple steps people can take to avoid becoming a victim of this particular crime. The campaign uses stickers in cloakrooms, main entrances and bar areas as well as leaflets placed at public information points. Serviettes have been used instead of beer mats to highlight the message in bars and clubs.

For more information contact PC Stuart Pizzey MBE, Crime Reduction Adviser, Greater Manchester Police, Bootle Street Police Station, Manchester M2 5GU Tel: 0161 856 3046 E-mail: stuart.pizzey@ gmp.police.uk

January 2005

Ideas and Initiatives

11

The ‘Big Screen’
Greater Manchester Police

For more information contact PC Stuart Pizzey MBE, Crime Reduction Adviser, Greater Manchester Police, Bootle Street Police Station, Manchester M2 5GU Tel: 0161 856 3046 E-mail: stuart.pizzey@gmp.police.uk

The ‘Big Screen’ is the latest tool in the fight against street crime in Manchester city centre. The scheme was set up in partnership with Greater Manchester Police, the BBC, Manchester City Council, Philips and the Triangle Shopping Centre and is sponsored by the Royal Bank of Scotland. The Big Screen is a 25 square metre video display with full sound system, which is located in

Exchange Square in Manchester. Using state of the art technology, the screen shows a wide range of televised events including news, sport and entertainment over 24 hours, 7 days per week. Taking advantage of the screen and its location, it has been used in a bid to reduce the incidence of street crime in the city centre by broadcasting a colourful, crime prevention cartoon entitled, ‘It doesn’t take a genius to stop street crime’. The cartoon incorporates 3 messages all aimed at reducing street crime and covering care at cash points, keeping your mobile phone safe and credit card safety advice. Since broadcasting the crime prevention messages on the screen, statistics have shown that robbery in the year to April 2004 is down by 18.6% and theft from people has been reduced by 41.8%. The messages will feature on the Big Screen for up to one year and it is hoped that other messages will be developed in the future.

Operation Payback
West Midlands Police

Operation Payback took place during October 2004 and involved 4 police forces; West Midlands, West Mercia, Warwickshire and Staffordshire all working in partnership with the British Transport Police and HM Customs and Excise. Using new powers from the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, officers are able to seize cash, drugs and assets if they are believed to be the result of criminal activity. During the campaign: • £177,000 was retained by HM Customs and Excise officers during operations at Birmingham and Coventry airports. • £283,694.32 was forfeited in hearings in the West Midlands during the operation. This is cash that has been proven to be the result of criminal activity and has to be paid back through the courts. • Over £36,000 in cash was retained from two vehicles stopped by Central Police Motorway Group on Midland's motorways. • Seven cash seizures were made in Staffordshire totalling £163,000. Training documentation about the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and how it can be applied to anyone who has benefited from criminal activity has been presented to every officer in the 4 Midlands police forces. The operation proved to be a huge success and the substantial amounts of cash retained during this operation will now be invested back into the fight against crime.
For more information contact Keiley Gartland, Press Officer, Crime Support, West Midlands Police HQ , Lloyd House, Colmore Circus, Birmingham B4 6NQ Tel: 0121 626 5499 E-mail: k.gartland@west-midlands.pnn.police.uk

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Ideas and Initiatives

January 2005

Theft from Motor Vehicles Campaign
Devon and Cornwall Constabulary

Devon and Cornwall Constabulary have set up an initiative, funded by the Home Office, in a bid to reduce the number of thefts from motor vehicles by increasing the public’s awareness. The initiative targets people in hotspot areas who leave property on display in unattended vehicles, therefore increasing the opportunity for theft from their car. Police distribute double-sided cards containing crime reduction advice and the message ‘Avoid Being a Victim’. Cards are completed by the officer on duty, advising of property left on display or thanking the vehicle user for not leaving items on display. A fold over and tear off section of the card provides information on useful contacts, which can be kept in a wallet or purse for future reference. Cards are enclosed in a 'Polite Notice' self-adhesive plastic wallet and stuck to the driver’s side window so that they are easily visible to the owner. All vehicles in the chosen location will receive notices so that property on display is not made obvious to would-be criminals. It is hoped that this initiative will help to reduce the number of thefts from vehicles in the area and increase the public’s confidence in the police through heightened police visibility.

For more information contact DC Robert Bunney, Problem Solving and Demand Reduction, Devon and Cornwall Constabulary, Middlemoor HQ, Exeter EX2 7HQ Tel: 01392 452559 E-mail: robert.bunney@ devonandcornwall. pnn.police.uk

Graffiti Watch Initiative
Devon & Cornwall Constabulary

A new group has been set up in partnership with the police, Neighbourhood Watch (NHW), local councils and East Devon Safety Partnership to target graffiti artists in Exmouth. The group aims to reduce graffiti in the town, while informing local residents of the role they can play to combat this type of nuisance. During the early part of 2004, local Neighbourhood Watch Co-ordinators began experiencing problems with graffiti and anti-social behaviour in the area. Working in partnership with the police, they set up the Graffiti Watch Working Party, which is responsible for setting up initiatives to combat the problem of graffiti. Some of the schemes they have implemented include: • The Town Management Team task their street cleaner to tackle public areas and street furniture affected by graffiti to ensure that it is removed quickly and effectively. • Graffiti postcards have been distributed to properties affected by graffiti, informing the owner of their responsibility to remove the graffiti as quickly as possible to avoid a reoccurrence of the problem. The postcard can then be placed in the window of the property to help deter graffiti artists from re-offending.

A graffiti poster has been designed for prominent positions in the area to advise property owners of their responsibility to remove graffiti from their property and remind people to report sightings of offenders. A ‘Clean up’ group has been established following a request for Neighbourhood Watch volunteers. Group members receive training on how to use graffiti removing products to enable them to target problem areas around the town. They concentrate particularly on private properties, where the owners are unable to remove the graffiti themselves due to ill health or financial reasons. A local paint supplier has agreed to supply paint-removing products at a discounted cost to Neighbourhood Watch members.

The initiative received extensive coverage in the press and as a result a local NHW member has donated cash, which will be used as a reward for anyone identifying offenders that results in their arrest. The NHW ‘Clean up’ group will also use it to fund the removal of graffiti.

For more information contact Julia Ryder, Watch Development Officer, Devon & Cornwall Constabulary, Intelligence and Incident Management Unit (East), Exmouth Police Station, North Street, Exmouth EX8 1JZ Tel: 01395 226120 or PC Andy Squires, Neighbourhood Beat Manager, Tel: 08452 777444.

January 2005

Ideas and Initiatives

13

Crucial Crew
Safer Neath Port Talbot Partnership

For more information contact Lisa Voisey, Community Safety Support Officer, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council, 2nd Floor, Port Talbot Police Station, Station Road, Port Talbot SA13 1JB Tel: 01639 889162 E-mail: l.voisey@npt.gov.uk

Crucial Crew is the annual safety event aimed at Year 6 pupils (10-11 year olds) with the objective of delivering short, sharp messages on a number of personal safety and crime prevention issues. It is a multi-agency event involving representatives from the police, fire service and local authority departments. As part of last year’s event, Safer Neath Port Talbot introduced a new concept to Crucial Crew with the inclusion of a peer education set. Year 9 pupils from local comprehensive schools took part in the Schools Crime Prevention Initiative 2004. The initiative has been running for over 9 years and this year's theme focussed on binge drinking. Pupils were given information from various agencies about binge drinking, which they had to arrange into a lesson to deliver to Year 7 pupils. The final part of the initiative involved the groups adapting the lesson into a 10-minute interactive set to present to Year 6 pupils visiting Crucial Crew. Each comprehensive school took part in the event and groups used various methods to deliver their messages, even though they had all started with the same information. Formats used included quizzes, dramas and interactive activities and many awarded prizes for correct answers and participation. Early feedback from primary school pupils and teachers indicates that the concept of young people delivering this type of information to much younger children is extremely successful. It is hoped that the peer education involvement will continue in future Crucial Crew events.

Three Strikes Policy
Taunton Deane Borough Council

Criminals convicted of anti-social behaviour in Taunton will now be subject to the yellow and red card system, or ‘Three Strikes and You’re Out’ rule. The three-step system, which has been set up in partnership with the police, local authority, Taunton Crime Reduction Partnership and local licensees, will deal predominantly with drink-fuelled, late night disorder in the town. The system operates as: Step 1. After a first conviction for antisocial behaviour, the police send a letter and yellow card to the criminal, which acts as a warning of the likely consequences that could follow. The back of the card features a health education message outlining the physical and psychological effects of alcohol abuse. The card also provides contact details of support organisations. Step 2. Following a second conviction within a twelve-month period, another letter is sent, accompanied by a red card. Offenders are again reminded of the possible civil and criminal justice penalties that could be served against them. They are informed that further offending may lead

to an application for an Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO). This time the card contains a stronger health message, including gender specific information on the effects of alcohol on the body and the added risks of becoming a victim of crime. Offenders are also notified that they are banned from all Taunton Pub Watch premises for 28 days. Subject to funding, there are plans to replace this ban with a three-hour alcohol awareness training session. Step 3. After a third conviction for anti-social behaviour, offenders become targets for an ASBO application. If the new policy is successful in Taunton, it is hoped to extend it to other areas, with the possibility of adopting it as a model for towns and cities across the country.
For more information contact Sgt Nic Crocker, Avon and Somerset Constabulary, Taunton Police Station, Upper High Street, Shuttern, Taunton TA1 3QA Tel: 01823 363112 E-mail: nic.crocker@ avonandsomerset.pnn.police.uk

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January 2005

SAFER HOMES
Cheshire Police

The SAFER HOMES initiative was launched in April last year by Sir Bobby Charlton. The objectives of the initiative are to improve domestic burglary investigation, provide a high quality of service to victims, reduce repeat victimisation and engage the whole community in reducing offences of burglary. The initiative has been developed to take into account good practice gathered from around the country by a small team of police officers working on behalf of the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) Burglary Reduction Working Group and the Home Office Police Standards Unit. Examples of this good practice have been incorporated in 'The Domestic Burglary National Good Practice and Tactical Options Guide' circulated to all Basic Command Units (BCUs). The guide adopts a holistic approach and views the investigation of domestic burglary as a series of business processes starting from the initial call from the victim to the final disposal of the case in the Criminal Justice System. Measures include: • Call handlers asking specific questions of burglary victims in order to assist the investigative process. In addition, they provide immediate crime scene preservation advice. • A crime scene investigator visits all domestic burglary scenes and a specially trained and experienced police officer acts immediately on the information and evidence recovered from the scene. • Crime Scene Investigators speak directly with the victim and arrange a mutually convenient time to examine the crime scene. • Evidence from the crime scene is fast tracked into the forensic process. In this way results are available far more quickly, leading to offenders being identified and arrested. • A Burglary Victim Pack is given to householders following a crime and a specially trained officer conducts an assessment of the victim's home and offers recommendations to improve security.

A SAFER HOMES home security assessment booklet is available to help support crime reduction activity by police crime reduction advisors and community safety partners. In addition, an interactive household security survey is available on the Cheshire Police Website (www.cheshire.police.uk/ showcontent.php?pageid=367). Staff are required to comply with minimum standards for all the business processes and performance is monitored. An important part of the initiative is raising individual awareness on the issues surrounding doorstep crime. By training the Homewatch Management Team, local co-ordinators and members of the community workforce i.e. home care assistants, healthcare visitors and other agencies dealing with older people will be able to constantly reinforce the key crime reduction messages and encourage the wider community to look out for vulnerable neighbours.

Cheshire crime figures since the April launch indicate domestic burglary has reduced by 33% whilst the detection rate stands at 26%. The initiative will be independently evaluated on behalf of the Police Standards Unit by University College, Chester. The evaluation will be completed in the autumn of 2005.
For more information contact Detective Chief Inspector Geoff Elvey, Cheshire Police Burglary Co-ordinator, Constabulary HQ, Oakmere Road, Winsford CW7 2UA Tel: 01244 614594 E-mail: geoff.elvey@cheshire.pnn.police.uk

January 2005

Ideas and Initiatives

15

‘Fun Day’ for Safety Issues
Safer Merthyr Tydfil

Safer Merthyr Tydfil’s Community Safety Wardens teamed up with their partner agencies to host a ‘fun day’ for the local community with the aim of raising awareness of personal safety issues. The event included presentations from the environmental regeneration charity Groundwork, Communities First, Sure and Home Start. South Wales Police offered advice on all aspects of crime prevention and the Fire Service were also on hand to advise on fire safety.

The event was attended by over 400 people and was a huge success with local residents.
For more information contact Robert Cunningham, Community Safety Warden Supervisor, Safer Merthyr Tydfil Community Safety Advice Centre, 2 Talbot Square, Penydarren, Merthyr Tydfil CF47 9LP Tel: 01685 388100 E-mail: wardens@smt.org.uk

Rochdale Case Intervention Group
Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council Community Safety Unit

A network of agencies in Rochdale set up a Case Intervention Group (CIG) in May 2004, with the aim of preventing and reducing anti-social behaviour and crime and disorder in the area. The group meets on a monthly basis and consists of a panel of agencies concerned with the well being of children and young people. It includes professionals from statutory and voluntary organisations who support children, young people and their families and intervene where risks have been identified. Referrals are accepted from a wide range of agencies, with the only restriction on members of the public who should report to the Anti-Social Behaviour Team based at Rochdale Community Safety Service. Once a referral has been accepted, an action plan is agreed and the panel proposes a date for review, which is usually within one month. The review follows the same process as a new case. Where an action plan has been successful, it is no longer discussed. The panel receives 8 to 10 referrals each month and approximately 60 – 70% are accepted.
For more information contact Kylie Thornton, Anti-Social Behaviour Co-ordinator, Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council Community Safety Unit, Town Hall, Rochdale OL16 1AB Tel: 01706 864691

No Trick or Treaters, Thank You
Surrey Police

As part of Operation Safer Surrey, Surrey Police is involved in an ongoing campaign called 'Surrey Street Standards'. Contributing to these standards has been the production of a No Trick or Treaters, Thank You sticker, which can be fixed to the front door and windows with the aim of deterring unwanted visitors. More than 10,000 stickers have been circulated to households across the county and an evaluation of the success of the scheme will be carried out in the future.

Early indications show that the stickers have been an extremely valuable way of reducing the nuisance and distress caused by unwanted callers at the door. Work is underway to develop the scheme for 2005.
For more information contact Julie Willson, Senior Publicity Officer, Surrey Police HQ, Mount Browne, Sandy Lane, Guildford GU3 1HG Tel: 01483 482325 E-mail: 7642@surrey.pnn.police.uk

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January 2005

Pa r t n e r s h i p Wo r k i n g

Car Clear Scheme
Norfolk Constabulary

On 2 February 2004, Norfolk Constabulary launched the Car Clear Scheme, which involves representatives from the police, fire service and local authority working in partnership. The aim of Car Clear is to: • reduce the number of abandoned vehicles on the street • reduce the number of deliberate vehicle arsons • improve the speed of recovery • remove vehicles used in crime. The scheme is funded by the government’s anti-arson fund and is made up of 3 recovery criteria: • Police and Fire Service Vehicles Scheme is used where a vehicle does not have keeper details or road tax and is damaged, normally by vandalism. Under this scheme, the vehicle is removed and destroyed within 30 minutes. • Community Vehicles Scheme is used where a vehicle has no keeper, or a keeper that denies ownership, no road tax and has markers on the Police National Computer (PNC) for being involved in crime. This scheme allows the vehicle to be recovered and destroyed in 30 minutes. • 101 Scheme is used in joint co-operation with the local authority. Section 101 of the Road Traffic Act 1974, allows local authorities to remove vehicles, which are considered abandoned within 24-hrs. Initially the partnership looked at the worst effected areas for abandoned vehicles and designated them as ‘hot spot’ areas. Vehicles of low monetary value and with no road tax found in any of these areas are served a 24-hour notice for removal. The local authority is then responsible for removing the vehicle the following day.

Since the launch of the scheme the partnership has recovered: • 92 vehicles under the Police/Fire Service Scheme. • 32 vehicles under the Community Vehicle Scheme. • 327 vehicles under the 101 Scheme. These figures do not include vehicles recovered under the normal 7 day notice scheme. The public’s response to the scheme has been extremely positive. Vehicle Arson was reduced by 30% in the first financial quarter of the year, compared to the same period in 2003 and a further 50% on the first quarter during the second period. Deliberate fires cost Norfolk people over £3 million each year and most of these are vehicle-related. This scheme aims to make the public aware that while a fire appliance is dealing with a vehicle, they are unable to protect another person’s property. Each vehicle fire costs the Fire Service approximately £880 to extinguish, plus additional costs due to the damage to road surfaces and contamination. The Car Clear Scheme allows the partnership to work together with Street Wardens, Environmental Rangers and Borough Engineers to tidy up the streets of Norfolk and help combat anti-social behaviour and crime.
For more information contact David Law, Traffic Manager, Norfolk Constabulary, Great Yarmouth Police Station, Eastern Area Headquarters, Howard Street North, Great Yarmouth NR30 1PH Tel: 01493 333126 E-mail: lawda@norfolk.pnn.police.uk

Deliberate fires cost Norfolk people over £3 million each year and most of these are vehicle-related

January 2005

Partnership Working

17

Safer Swansea Partnership
South Wales Police

For more information contact A / Insp Bryan Heard, South Wales Police, Partnership Office, C/O Cockett Police Station, John Street, Cockett, Swansea Tel: 07970 187961 E-mail: Bryan.Heard@ south-wales.pnn.police.uk Website:

In September last year, Dee Cooley a member of the Learning and Development Team at the Crime Reduction Centre (CRC) visited the Safer Swansea Partnership, a group made up of representatives from the public, private and government sectors all working together with the aim of making the area a safer place in which to live and work. The partnership is actively involved in informing local residents of the benefits of becoming a member of Neighbourhood Watch and is extremely successful at developing and targeting new campaigns, with one of the keys to their success being good design and marketing. The group employs the services of a neighbouring print and design company, who can translate their information into campaign materials for distribution to the local community. Some of their most successful work has included: • Publicity on drink spiking. • Crime prevention booklet written in partnership with inmates from Swansea Prison. • Innovative posters and cards of Swansea football and rugby teams offering advice to children and young people on how to stay safe. They have recently been involved in a group looking at the issue of distraction burglary. Other members of the group include representatives from Age Concern, the police, utilities and Trading Standards. Their aim is to raise awareness of distraction burglary amongst the elderly, their family, carers and other relevant agencies. In addition, the partnership deals with issues surrounding anti-social behaviour and youth issues, as well as co-ordinating clean-ups in the community. They are currently working together on a campaign looking at violent crime.

www.saferswansea.org.uk

Sexual Assault Referral Centres and Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) dealing with Sexual Crime
Home Office

For more information and details of the forthcoming funding contact Helen Musgrove, Home Office, Sexual Crime Reduction Team, Violent Crime Unit, Room 314, 50 Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 3123 E-mail: helen.musgrove@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

In the coming financial year (2005-06), the Home Office will be inviting local partnerships of police and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in all areas of the country to apply for 'start-up' funding to assist with the establishment of Sexual Assault Referral Centres (SARCs). SARCs provide a comprehensive range of services for victims of rape and sexual assault, which can include forensic examination, mental and sexual health services, emergency contraception and assistance with completing a police report. At their most effective, SARCs are a partnership between the police service, health service, and voluntary sector and can benefit from input from other agencies such as the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and private companies. By providing an integrated service, SARCs are not only of benefit to victims,

but also to professionals working in these areas, providing a high quality resource and clearly defined set of care networks that they can refer rape victims to. Ultimately, better services should lead to more reporting, recording and subsequently more convictions of those offenders who commit such appalling crimes, driving the incidence of rape and sexual assault down. CDRPs looking to address sexual offending may wish to include the development of a SARC in their forthcoming strategies. CDRPs can play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of SARCs, helping to broker partnerships between local police forces, health agencies, and voluntary organisations that could be in a position to benefit from central funds.

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Partnership Working

January 2005

Nuisance Vehicles
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

The government announced a crackdown to rid Britain's streets of nuisance vehicles recently. Working in association with various government agencies and the independent national charity, Environmental Campaigns (ENCAMS), who run the Keep Britain Tidy campaign, this tough new approach will see the strengthening of a range of measures aimed at removing untaxed and unregistered vehicles from streets and public spaces. Local authorities will be given greater powers to fine offenders and the general public will be encouraged to dispose of vehicles responsibly. The approach coincides with the announcement that all London boroughs will now remove nuisance vehicles within 72 hours of a report from a member of the public, thanks to ‘Operation Scrap-It’, which forms part of the government’s ‘Together’ campaign. Over 300,000 vehicles are abandoned nation-wide every year, encouraging crime, anti-social behaviour and arson. A further one million are uninsured and untaxed for more than 3 months. With no current keeper these are likely to be abandoned in the future. The problem has increased significantly in the last 5 years and is

expected to continue to worsen. The new national strategy will: • Give local authorities more powers to immediately seize and destroy vehicles causing a nuisance. • Support local authorities to make wider use of the powers already available • Make the polluter pay with increased fees and charges to better reflect the cost of removal and storage. • Pay for experts to share their learning through a new advisory service to support local authorities in tackling the problem. • By 2008, cut the number of abandoned vehicles by 25% to less than 250,000 half the predicted total of 500,000. Investigating and removing nuisance vehicles currently costs local authorities across the country £26 million annually. Vehicle arson costs £230 million a year to clean up. Failure to tax vehicles adds up to £93 million in lost revenue. Unlicensed and uninsured drivers are estimated to add £30 to every motor insurance policy. ENCAMS will be working throughout January with over 130 councils on a campaign to remove unwanted vehicles for free.

For more information contact Kristian Bentham, ENCAMS, Elizabeth House, The Pier, Wigan WN3 4EX Tel: 01942 824778 E-mail: kristian.bentham@encams.org or visit the website:

www.encams.org/ BestPractice/ vehicleamnesty. asp?Sub=0&Menu=0.26. 15.148.150

Surrey Neighbourhood Watch Association
Surrey Police

In July 2004, the newly formed Surrey Neighbourhood Watch Association, the Surrey Police Authority and Surrey Police officially signed a Service Level Agreement committing themselves to promote and support Neighbourhood Watch throughout the county. The aims of this new group include increasing the number of households participating in Neighbourhood Watch Schemes and regularly updating local coordinators with information on crimes occurring in their neighbourhood. The intention is to combat the fear of crime, by making the public aware of the true level of local criminality. The police and police authority have also committed to involving

NHW in widespread consultation and ensuring a single point of contact for each local area, as well as countywide. It is hoped that by setting up this new group, partners will show an increased commitment to each other and help to spread good practice in the fight against crime, so that members of the community will feel safer and more secure in their everyday lives.
For more information contact Sgt Mike Jones, Force Crime Reduction Adviser, Surrey Police HQ, Mount Browne, Sandy Lane, Guildford GU3 1HG. Tel: 01483 482443 E-mail: jones976@surrey.pnn.police.uk

January 2005

Partnership Working

19

Community Graffiti Murals
Southampton City Council - Outer Shirley Community Safety

Southampton City Council, local Neighbourhood Watch group and other crime reduction partners have been working together to improve a number of subways with a reputation for being dark and encouraging anti-social behaviour, fires and rough sleepers. The Southampton City Council ‘Clean Team’ and local graffiti artists got together with school children in the area to produce colourful designs to cover the walls of two subways and make them more appealing to members of the public. The effects of the graffiti art designs significantly reduced the problems in the subways. As a result, the partnership group decided to extend the theme to a local shopping parade, where youngsters congregated and disturbed shoppers by playing football and generally causing a nuisance. In consultation with retailers and the young people themselves, benches where the young people gathered, were moved to a nearby park and goalposts placed alongside. The retailers and youngsters were then asked to produce designs to represent the 8 shops in the parade and 8 fine mesh security fencing panels were ordered for the graffiti artists to paint the designs on. Since the completed panels were installed, complaints about football have dramatically decreased and retailers are much happier to open later at night without fear of anti-social behaviour.
For more information contact Bob Reeve, Outer Shirley Community Safety Co-ordinator, Outer Shirley Regeneration, Community Fire Safety Offices, Redbridge Fire Station, Southampton SO16 4GZ Tel: 02380 529 357 Fax: 02380 776 565 E-mail: bob.reeve@southampton.gov.uk

Tackling Mobile Phone Theft
Afan Tawe Nedd Crime Prevention Panel and Safer Neath Port Talbot Partnership

The Afan Tawe Nedd Crime Prevention Panel and Safer Neath Port Talbot Partnership have implemented an initiative to tackle the problem of mobile phone theft. Over the last few years there has been an increasing number of mobile phone thefts in the area, many of which have involved violent behaviour. Those most at risk are 12 to 16 year olds and the problem is increased because many young people are not aware that they are at risk and so are less likely to take safety advice from the ‘older generation’. The partnership developed the initiative using the peer education method of passing on knowledge and advice to vulnerable groups. During the spring and summer terms last year, each school held a lunchtime post-coding session, where pupils could have their phones security

marked by the Junior Crime Prevention Team, who were also responsible for advertising the initiative within the school. The events were supported and supervised by the Afan Tawe Nedd Crime Prevention Panel, who paid for the mobile phone security stickers, the police and the community safety team. A total of 2,500 mobile phones were security marked and information and advice was given to every mobile phone owner. The events proved very popular, with an excellent turn out at every school and some schools requiring a repeat visit.
For more information contact Sian Morris, Community Safety Project Officer, Neath-Port Talbot County Borough Council, 2nd Floor, Port Talbot Police Station, Station Road, Port Talbot SA13 1JB Tel: 01639 899161 E-mail: s.morris@npt.gov.uk

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Partnership Working

January 2005

Operation Cascade
East Riding of Yorkshire Council

Operation Cascade consists of a specially designed training course for groups and individuals including special constables, tenants associations, residents groups, Crime Prevention Panels and Neighbourhood Watch members. The course introduces volunteers to the basic principles of domestic surveying. It encourages them to work in partnership with the Police and Fire and Rescue Service to reduce the opportunity for house burglaries and injury as a result of domestic fires. The course has been designed around a computer based training programme and is broken down into three separate modules, delivered over three sessions. On completion, delegates will be able to: • Survey a domestic property. • Identify potential security risks. • Make recommendations to reduce the risks. • Understand the balance between security and safety.

• •

Understand their roles and responsibilities when surveying. Understand how their home surveys fit into the wider picture (of any local initiatives).

Trained volunteers distribute leaflets to previously identified locations offering to carry out a domestic survey. The leaflets explain that volunteers will attend in pairs at a mutually agreed time to provide advice on crime prevention and home safety measures. Householders are asked to contact the volunteers via a specific number to arrange an appointment. The Home Office Crime Reduction Centre has licensed this course and upon completion, a certificate is awarded to each delegate.

For more information contact PC Linda Duncan, Crime Reduction Officer, Safe Communities East Riding, County Hall, Beverley HU17 9BA Tel: 01482 396384 E-mail: Linda.Duncan@ eastriding.gov.uk

Domestic Violence Campaign
Communities First Domestic Violence Partnership

The Communities First Domestic Violence Partnership is made up of organisations, groups and individuals with a common interest in developing quality support services for adults, children and young people who have witnessed, experienced or who are currently witnessing or experiencing domestic violence. The partnership has recently been involved in raising awareness of domestic abuse using a series of promotional days in the area. These events include distributing white ribbon pins and balloon days, where large numbers of white or red balloons are released to generate publicity for the campaign. Because victims of domestic abuse can be a hard to reach group within communities, the partnership have incorporated an extensive beer mat campaign in an effort to reach all sections of the community. The beer mats, which have

been distributed to public houses, social and sporting clubs, include useful contacts for advice and support for anyone suffering from domestic abuse. The partnership also arranged a number of daytime self-defence classes for vulnerable females in local community centres across the county borough. Communities First are currently putting together an awareness raising video on domestic abuse, which will be available later this year.
For more information contact Bethan Walilay, Communities First Domestic Violence Co-ordinator, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council, 2nd Floor, Port Talbot Police Station, Station Road, Port Talbot SA13 1JB Tel: 01639 889126.

January 2005

Partnership Working

21

Promoting Home Security
Metropolitan Police

For more information contact Paul Anstee, Metropolitan Police, Safer Neighbourhoods Unit, 7 Soho Square, London W1D 3QB Tel: 020 7297 8527 E-mail: paul.anstee@met.police.uk

The latest British Crime Survey statistics show that people with minimal home security face a 12% risk of being burgled, whereas those with extra security is 1.2% and those with high levels of security is 0.7%. With this in mind, the Metropolitan Police have set up a project to provide crime prevention demonstrations at local B&Q Do-It-Yourself (DIY) stores in the London area. B&Q has a social responsibility policy, which includes obtaining timber from well managed sources, cleaning up public areas around their stores, funding professional intervention as a result of drugs misuse and providing skills training for young people at risk of committing crime. This initiative involves: • Hosting crime prevention demonstrations for the public and local agencies in purposebuilt in-store demonstration areas, involving B&Q carpenters/electricians and the local crime prevention officer. • Improving the quality, range and marketing of their crime prevention products. Presentations last for approximately one hour and are adaptable depending on the area of crime to be addressed, although they all include: • An introduction and welcome from the store manager. • Crime prevention officer’s presentation, providing information on local crime patterns and home and personal safety. • B&Q demonstration on how to fit a selection of items such as spy holes, door chains and locks. • Question and answer session and close. • Refreshments and networking. The demonstrations have been evaluated by B&Q and feedback is extremely positive from all who attended. Specific feedback has been captured on the learning achieved and what the attendees were going to do personally or collaboratively after the event to improve home security/personal safety. B&Q have added crime prevention to their social responsibility, 5 year community regeneration strategy and are committed to driving forward this agenda.

Publications & Publicity

Rural Racism
Edited by Neil Chakraborti and Jon Garland

This book addresses the frequently overlooked issue of rural racism and provides a comprehensive overview of what is a multi-faceted and under-researched problem. It aims to provide new insights on issues that are only now receiving recognition at national and local level. It seeks to conceptualise rurality and the way in which the experiences of 'others' fit within the broader rural context. It examines the different forms that racism can take in the countryside and charts the particular dynamics of racism and rurality. The book also highlights the importance of developing sustainable responses to the problem of rural racism and discusses ways in which prejudice can be challenged

within environments typically unfamiliar with 'difference'. This publication will be of particular interest to academics, students and practitioners with an interest in discussions surrounding racism, rurality, identity and community.
Copies of this book, published in October 2004 and priced £30.00 (hardback) can be obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk or visit their website:

www.willanpublishing.co.uk

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Partnership Working/Publications & Publicity

January 2005

Beacon Learning Exchange Event
Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council is one of only 9 councils to be awarded Beacon Status for their Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP). •

• The council is hosting a Learning Exchange Event on Tuesday 1st February 2005 at the Oakwood Centre in Stockton. The event will concentrate on Stockton’s best practice and will demonstrate their unique approach to operations such as tackling anti-social behaviour. It will focus on consultation and operational support and will include a tour of the local area, together with the opportunity to attend a choice of 4 workshops including: • Community wardens workshop, which will focus on the key themes and

experiences of setting up, running and evaluating community wardens. It will take delegates through a day in the life of a warden and provide ideas to help establish similar schemes elsewhere. Working practice workshop, which will focus on joint working and demonstrate the Safer Stockton Partnership’s approach to delivering and monitoring a comprehensive community safety plan. Anti-social behaviour workshop, which will be facilitated by the crime and disorder manager and look at the council’s approach to tackling antisocial behaviour based on prevention, support and enforcement. Consultation – engaging and empowering communities to tackle crime workshop, which will demonstrate the Council’s interactive website (www.stockton.gov.uk) that enables the public to view the work of the council and register any complaints they may have.

For more information and to book a place contact Debbie Coulson, Beacon Co-ordinator, Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council, The Security Centre, The Square, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 1TE Tel: 01642 528434 Fax: 01642 415590 E-mail: debbie.coulson@ stockton.gov.uk

Reclaiming the Streets: Surveillance, social control and the city
Edited by Roy Coleman

This book, published by Willan Publishing, considers the use of CCTV as much more than a crime prevention tool. It looks at the key agencies involved in surveillance and in doing so, redefines the legitimate uses of the city streets. Taking a wider view, this publication explores the use of CCTV cities. It uses Liverpool city centre as a case study and investigates the area’s main influential authorities. It discusses partnership working and the key agencies' attempts to provide order and control on the city’s streets. The book also raises questions about organisations with particular interest in CCTV and looks at how these organisations promote their vision of law and order on the streets, define crime and disorder and how they selectively control the risks. The book reflects on the relations between state, power and surveillance and considers concerns about the role of CCTV in tracking and punishing offenders such as street traders, the homeless and youths. By looking at the most influential organisations, the book exposes the argument of the notional friendly ‘eye in the sky’ and the motivations behind current political attempts aimed at reclaiming the streets.
Copies of this book, published in October 2004 and priced £30.00 (hardback) can be obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk or visit their website: www.willanpublishing.co.uk

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

23

Drugs and Crime: Second edition
Edited by Philip Bean

Copies of this book, published in September 2004 and priced £17.99 (paperback) can be obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk or visit their website:

www.willanpublishing.co.uk

Many crimes committed in Britain are drugs-related and many offenders report drug use prior to being charged with an offence. However, the direct link between drug use and crime is often less clear because many of these offenders would have committed offences anyway. These offences need to be separated from those that are directly caused by drugs. This publication, originally published by Willan Publishing in 2001, expands and builds on the strengths of the first edition. It extends its coverage to Scotland and Ireland and includes a new chapter on the theoretical debates surrounding drugs and crime.

A range of issues associated with drugrelated crimes are discussed in the book, providing an authoritative and straightforward introduction to the subject. It looks at drug markets, violence within those markets, policing and the use of coercive treatment through the criminal justice system. It also covers gender issues, including the treatment of women drug users. A key focus of the book is the importance of reducing the supply of drugs locally, nationally and internationally.

Sustainable Solutions to Anti-social Behaviour: Local Government’s joined-up approaches to tackling anti-social behaviour
Local Government Association

Copies of this paper, published in October 2004 can be obtained free of charge from the Local Government Association, LGConnect, Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ Tel: 020 7664 3131 Fax: 020 7664 3030 E-mail: info@lga.gov.uk or visit their website:

www.lga.gov.uk/home.asp

Anti-social behaviour incorporates a broad range of disorder, from threatening behaviour and petty crime to graffiti and neighbour disputes. The Local Government Association (LGA) supports appropriate enforcement to deal with anti-social behaviour, but also argues that the greatest change will occur when efforts are focussed on both prevention and rehabilitation as well. This paper discusses the complex nature of many anti-social behaviour cases to illustrate the need for a balanced approach to tackling the issues. It provides examples of local authorities’ work, often in partnership with other organisations. Research carried out by the LGA has shown that anti-social behaviour is one of the top community safety issues faced by local authorities. Available data and statistics are inclined to support this as a priority. For example: • The British Crime Survey (BCS) 2002/03 reported that about one in three people perceived some form of anti-social behaviour to be a problem in their area. One in five reported ‘high levels’ of anti-social behaviour although by 2003/04 this had dropped to one in six. • The proportion in the BCS citing rubbish and litter as a problem in their area rose from 26% to 29% over the same period, peaking in 2002/03 at 33%. • Around 250,000 neighbour disputes are reported each year to local authority housing and environmental health service departments in England and Wales. • Anti-social behaviour was perceived by residents to be twice as high in deprived areas than nationally. • Since 1996, the proportion of people in the BCS reporting vandalism, graffiti and other acts of property damage as a ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ big problem has increased from 24% to 28% in 2003/04.

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Publications & Publicity

January 2005

Facilitating community involvement: practical guidance for practitioners and policy makers
Home Office Development and Practice Report 27
This paper is based on a systematic review of ‘what works’ in community involvement in areabased initiatives (ABIs) (See Home Office On-line Report 53/04). The paper aims to provide practical guidance for practitioners and policy makers on how best to facilitate effective community engagement and draws primarily on findings from the main review. Twenty-six experiential studies and 8 reviews were included in the systematic review. The results show that, although there are no simple and straightforward ways to increase community involvement, it is important to consider the local context for each initiative (e.g. previous history and patterns of community involvement, the characteristics of people targeted for involvement and controversial issues in the area such as a threat to a service). The impact of community engagement on ABIs was not clear, but evidence suggests that it has a more positive than negative effect on improving public services and strategies, personal and community development and the sense of inclusion, self-respect and self-esteem among the members of the local community. Although the effect community involvement had on ABIs is not obvious, there was some general consensus on what worked including: • Identifying local circumstances that may present barriers to effective community involvement (e.g. lack of transport infrastructure) and acting on these. • Acknowledging the diversity of local communities and developing both targeted and universal strategies to reach all members of the local community including traditionally 'hard to reach' groups such as women, young people, people with a disability and members of minority ethnic groups. • Publicising and raising the awareness of the initiative among all members of the local community. • Involving local residents in the management of the project. • Providing a variety of opportunities for training and support for local people and professionals. • Using regular evaluation of the initiative as a tool to identify barriers to community involvement and actions to address these. • Establishing effective ways of partnership working between statutory and non-statutory agencies and the local community.

Copies of this report, published in October 2004 are available free of charge from the Research Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Copies can also be viewed and downloaded from the Home Office Website:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ rds/pdfs04/dpr27.pdf

CCTV and Policing: Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain
Edited by Benjamin J Goold

This book looks at how the police in Britain first became involved in public area surveillance and how they have attempted to use CCTV technology to prevent, respond to and investigate crimes. The book examines the ways in which CCTV cameras are used by the police and their partner agencies and describes the impact that CCTV has had on police practices. It considers the factors that affect the use of CCTV and explores the relationship between public surveillance, policing and social control. It also

considers how the development of surveillance technologies like CCTV might shape policing over the coming century.
Copies of this book, published in February 2004 and priced £50.00 (hardback) can be obtained from Oxford University Press, FREEPOST NH 4051, Corby, Northants NN18 9BR Tel: 01536 741727 Fax: 01536 746337 E-mail: bookorders.uk@oup.com or visit their website: www.oup.co.uk

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

25

Problem-Oriented Policing: From Innovation to Mainstream
Crime Prevention Studies Volume 15
Edited by Johannes Knutsson in consultation with Ronald V Clarke

Crime Prevention Studies is an international series of publications dedicated to research on situational crime prevention and other initiatives involved in reducing the opportunities for crime. This book addresses the theories and practices of problem-oriented policing (POP), an approach that moves away from incident-driven policing to a more proactive and preventive process. It explores why problem-oriented policing interventions have been shown to be effective and places special emphasis on addressing the obstacles that have been identified in implementing them successfully. The book also considers what needs to be done to improve the number and quality of problem-oriented policing projects and includes key contributors to the field from the UK, USA and Europe. Other topics discussed include: • Police managers and line officer's openness to problem-oriented policing. • The willingness and capacity of police organisations to make necessary changes.

• •

The in-house expertise of police in crime analysis. Support from academia and the research community in supporting good practice. The need for police to be aware of concepts from situational crime prevention and environmental criminology. Experience in implementing other evidence based strategies like repeat victimisation. The expectations of the wider community about the police role and function.

Copies of this book, published in April 2004 and priced £27.50 (paperback) £40.00 (hardback) can be obtained from Willan Publishing, Culmcott House, Mill Street, Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3AT Tel: 01884 840337 Fax: 01884 840251 E-mail: info@willanpublishing.co.uk or visit their website:

www.willanpublishing.co.uk

Policing Drugs on the streets of Europe Conference
Centre for Public Innovation/Home Office

For general information about attending the conference contact Det Insp Ian Robinson, Home Office Drug Strategy Directorate, Room 245, 50 Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 3727 E-mail: ian.robinson@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

A unique conference on neighbourhood drug enforcement will be held in Barcelona on 16 – 18 February 2005. This international conference, organised by the Centre for Public Innovation in association with the Home Office, provides the first ever opportunity for law enforcement officers throughout Europe to meet and exchange ideas and strategies for tackling the problem of street-level drug supply. The programme for the event includes speakers from the UK, Netherlands, Sweden and Spain and a series of practical workshops where delegates can:

• • •

Hear speakers outline major initiatives. Learn about innovative methods of enforcement activity at workshops. Meet colleagues working in similar fields and develop networks to improve and share good ideas and good practice. Stay in touch afterwards through webbased forums.

For information on costs and to book a place contact the Trident Business Centre, 89 Bickersteth Road, London SW17 9SH Tel: 020 8767 7264 E-mail: book@policingdrugs.com or visit the website:

www.policingdrugs.com

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Publications & Publicity

January 2005

Tackling Drugs Supply Conference and Awards
Home Office

The Home Office will host the third annual conference aimed at tackling drugs supply on 14 – 15 March 2005 in Cardiff. The conference seeks to identify, promote and recognise best practice among police forces in tackling drugs supply and covers a varied programme addressing topical issues that influence and affect supply disruption.

For more information on costs and to book a place contact Calder Conferences, Woodside Court, Clayton Wood Rise, Leeds LS16 6RF Tel: 0870 382 2277 Fax: 0870 382 2278 Email: tacklingdrugs2005@caldercon.co.uk or visit the website:

www.calderconferences.co.uk/ tacklingdrugs_policeawards.asp

Fear and Fashion: The use of knives and other weapons by young people
Lemos & Crane supported by Bridge House Trust

This report, commissioned by the Bridge House Trust, London's biggest grant-giving charity, seeks to establish clearer evidence about the use of knives and weapons by young people, as well as identifying approaches currently being taken to deal with the problem. It draws on an extensive literature review, an e-survey of schools, community and voluntary groups working with young people in London and discussions with Corporation of London stakeholders and invited practitioners. Part 1 sets out the available research and views of practitioners about the extent and reasons why young people carry knives and other weapons. The second part deals with some of the approaches currently being used and the last section summarises the findings and suggests the key elements of a programme to address the problem. The main findings suggest that the extent of carrying knives and other weapons among young people appears to be growing. This affects 11 to 16 year olds, as well as those between 16 and 25 although the likelihood of knives being used is greater in the older age group. Young people carry knives in school, youth clubs and on the street. Although boys are more likely to carry knives than girls there is also a problem among girls. Young people who have been excluded from school are the most likely to carry and use knives and other weapons, as well as commit other offences. Fear is the most common reason given by young people, youth workers and teachers for carrying knives. Peer influences, group identity and fashion also seems to play a part in encouraging young people to carry knives. A lack of support from parents, schools and youth community services also increases the likelihood of offending generally. Drawing on the literature and this research, key priorities for action are: • Developing local demonstrations, programmes and activities. • Developing good practice materials for schools, youth clubs, youth offending teams and the police. • Promoting and disseminating good practice materials and examples.

Peer influences, group identity and fashion also seems to play a part in encouraging young people to carry knives...

The report, published in October 2004 can be viewed and downloaded via the website: www.bridgehousegrants.org.uk/docs/Fear_and_Fashion.pdf or contact the Bridge House Trust, Corporation of London, PO Box 270, Guildhall, London EC2P 2EJ Tel: 020 7332 3710 Fax: 020 7332 3720 E-mail: bridgehousetrust@corpoflondon.gov.uk

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

27

What works in community involvement in area-based initiatives? A systematic review of the literature
Home Office On-line Report 53/04
This report was commissioned by the Home Office to support Civil Renewal. Increasing community involvement is seen as key to this agenda, which seeks to put active citizens at the heart of tackling social problems. The report is the product of a systematic review of research evidence on the effectiveness of community involvement in Area Based Initiatives (ABIs). The studies reviewed in the report provide partial and mixed answers to the questions that arise when considering what works in community involvement in ABIs. Essential factors to consider for future research include: • Research expertise in evaluation and in social and democratic theory. • Development of a set of hypotheses for testing about the purpose and effects of community involvement. • Careful design of a set of case studies with common research instruments used to explore qualitative aspects of ABIs. • Collection of data on impacts in case studies to include identifiable instrumental effects as well as developmental and ‘due process’ effects of involvement. • Use of a detailed survey instrument to collect data for a representative sample of the population.
Copies of this report, published in October 2004 are available via the Home Office Website only: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs04/rdsolr5304.pdf Application for reproduction of this report should be made to the Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Building Communities, Beating Crime: A better police service for the 21st Century
Home Office Copies of the White Paper, published in November 2004 and priced £20.75 can be obtained from the Stationery Office (TSO), Mandela Way, London SE1 5SS Tel: Tel: 0870 600 5522 Fax: 0870 600 5533 E-mail: customer.services@tso.co.uk The document can also be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.policereform.gov.uk /docs/prwp2004.html
(please be aware that this is a large file and may take some time to download).

The government has published a White Paper on police reform entitled ‘Building Communities, Beating Crime’, which sets out its vision for continued improvements in policing in order to build safety, security and stability in our communities. Proposals include: • A review of the partnership provisions in the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, to make partnerships more effective and truly accountable, with local authorities playing an increased role both as partners and scrutinisers. • New powers for police community support officers (PCSOs). • National standards for the recruitment, pay and training of PCSOs and the development of a minimum set of powers for all PCSOs. • Local policing plans to incorporate priorities identified by Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs). • A dedicated policing team for each neighbourhood. • A 10-point customer service charter for each police force. • Electable police authorities. • A new national 3-digit non-emergency telephone number.

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Publications & Publicity

January 2005

Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act
Home Office

The Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Bill, published on 2nd December 2003 received Royal Assent on 15th November 2004. The Act is the biggest overhaul of domestic violence legislation for thirty years and heralds tough new powers for the police and the courts to tackle offenders, while ensuring victims get the support and protection they need. For the first time, a statutory code of practice provides a range of rights to victims together with the establishment of an independent Commissioner. The Act will ensure more offenders pay towards supporting victims. The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority will be able to recover money from offenders and a surcharge will be placed on criminal convictions and fixed penalty notices, which will contribute to the Victims Fund. For motoring offenders the surcharge will only apply to the most serious and persistent offenders. The Act also creates a new offence of causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult. This will help to ensure that offenders who remain silent or blame each other do not escape justice. Key provisions in the Act include: • Making common assault an arrestable offence. • Significant new police powers to deal with domestic violence including making it an arrestable, criminal offence to breach a non-molestation order, punishable by up to five years in prison. • Strengthening the civil law on domestic violence to ensure cohabiting same-sex couples have the same access to nonmolestation and occupation orders as opposite sex couples, and extending the availability of these orders to couples who have never lived together or been married. • Stronger legal protection for victims of domestic violence by enabling courts to impose restraining orders when sentencing for any offence. Until now, such orders could only be imposed on offenders convicted of harassment or causing fear of violence. • Enabling courts to impose restraining orders on acquittal for any offence (or if

a conviction has been overturned on appeal) if they consider it necessary to protect the victim from harassment.This will deal with cases where the conviction has failed but it is still clear from the evidence that the victims need protecting. Putting in place a system to review domestic violence homicide incidents, drawing in the key agencies, to find out what can be done to put the system right and prevent future deaths. Providing a code of practice, binding on all criminal justice agencies, so that all victims receive the support, protection, information and advice they need. Allowing victims to take their case to the Parliamentary Ombudsman if they feel the code has not been adhered to by the criminal justice agencies. Setting up an independent Commissioner for Victims to give victims a powerful voice at the heart of government and to safeguard and promote the interests of victims and witnesses, encouraging the spread of good practice and reviewing the statutory code. Giving victims of mentally disordered offenders the same rights to information as other victims of serious violent and sexual offences. Giving the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority the right to recover from offenders the money it has paid to their victims in compensation. A surcharge to be payable on criminal convictions and fixed penalty notices, which will contribute to the Victims Fund. For motoring offenders the surcharge will only apply to serious and persistent offenders. Closing a legal loophole by creating a new offence of causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult.The offence establishes a new criminal responsibility for members of a household where they know that a child or vulnerable adult is at significant risk of serious harm. Bringing in the Law Commission recommendation for a two-stage court trial to ensure that high volume crimes like fraud and Internet child pornography can be punished in full.

Copies of the Act can be obtained priced £10.50 from The Stationery Office (TSO), Mandela Way, London SE1 5SS Tel: 0870 600 5522 Fax: 0870 600 5533 E-mail: customer.services@ tso.co.uk Copies can also be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.hmso.gov.uk/acts/ acts2004/20040028.htm
(please be aware that this is a large file and may take some time to download).

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

29

Drugs Use and Begging: A Practice Guide
NACRO and Home Office Drugs Strategy Directorate

Copies of this report, published in September 2004 are available free of charge from Prolog UK Tel: 0870 241 4680 Fax: 0870 241 4786 E-mail: homeoffice@prolog.uk.com Copies can also be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.drugs.gov.uk/ ReportsandPublications/ Communities/ 1099306326/ H10020_ HomeOfficeReport.pdf

This guide was written to support the development of services that are successful in attracting, engaging and sustaining contact with drug users who beg as part of a wider strategy. Many of those who beg and use drugs do not make full use of the support services available to them. The public has a right to feel safe in their communities. The guide suggests that by educating them about the link between drug use and begging and the alternatives to giving money, as well as offering pathways that provide ways out of begging, the needs of both the public and those who beg to support drug use will be met. Begging is a criminal offence. It proposes that begging should be tackled through effective enforcement to reassure the public that it will not be accepted in any community. Some of the ways to tackle begging and its connection with drugs include: • Understanding the situation - why people beg and the effects it has on communities. • Effective partnership working reducing drug-related begging will be more effective if relevant organisations and personnel work together. • Dedicated staff roles - specialist staff from many different agencies may need

to be given a dedicated brief to work on this issue. Flexible services - all services that cater for drug users who beg must take on a flexible approach. Reaching out to the client group agencies need to take services directly to the drug users who beg by either sending teams onto the streets or into facilities already well used by drug users. Motivation to change - contact with outreach workers can be a catalyst for change, but motivation may also need the use or threat of enforcement. Data and information - a database for tracking drug users who beg, along with effective structures for workers to exchange information may need to be put in place.

The guide is aimed at those who commission services for people with drug problems, those who beg and those working with them. It will be useful to Drug Action Teams (DATs), Criminal Justice Integrated Partnerships, Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs), drug services, local authorities and the police.

National ‘Market Place’ Event
West Yorkshire Police

Following the success of previous events, West Yorkshire Police is hosting their National ‘Market Place’ event on Thursday 3rd February 2005 at West Yorkshire Police Training School in Wakefield. The aim of this year’s event is to provide a national forum for sharing good practice in the field of crime reduction and community engagement. Delegates are given the opportunity to provide short presentations (approximately 15 minutes) on an initiative that they have been directly involved in. To ensure that attendees get the most from the day, presentations should fit in with the theme of crime reduction and/or community engagement. The success of previous events has been attributed to the diversity of topics presented and the support from around the UK in delivering these presentations. Please be aware that places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis and there is no obligation for attendees to deliver a presentation.
For more information contact Alex Fox, Project Officer, HQ Community Safety, PO Box 9, Laburnum Road, Wakefield, West Yorkshire WF1 3QP Tel: 01924 292386 Fax: 01924 292595 E-mail: af406@westyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

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Publications & Publicity

January 2005

Drug Misuse 2004: Reducing the local impact
Audit Commission

The Audit Commission produced the report ‘Changing Habits’ in 2002, which recommended wider and more flexible community-based drug treatment services for adults. Since then, there has been a great deal of progress, with local commitment backed by national strategies and programmes and funding having an impact. The capacity of local drug treatment services has grown. Local agencies are working more effectively in partnership and services are more integrated. As a consequence, waiting times are down and 20% more users are now starting treatment. There is also a national programme specifically aimed at getting offenders into treatment. This report, published in November 2004, recognises this progress and makes recommendations for local agencies and government to: • improve the focus on the drug user and carer • provide ‘follow-on’ services to enable drug users to complete the recovery journey • reduce reliance on short-term funding streams, encouraging mainstream solutions • develop strategic regulation. The report is aimed at decision-makers in local authorities, education services, English Primary Care Trusts (PCTs)/Welsh Local Health Boards (LHBs), police, probation and prison services. It looks beyond community treatment to determine how well the national drug strategy is being delivered locally. The report traces 2 improvement journeys, which are illustrated using fictional stories. The first, for individuals, follows a path from problematic drug use towards a stable life that is safe for the individual people nearby. The second, for local agencies working in partnership, brings together people from different organisations and varying perspectives to reach a shared goal. Both paths include 3 key stages: • recognising the problem • finding the right route • maintaining progress.

Copies of this report are available free of charge from the Audit Commission, Publications Department, PO Box 99, Wetherby LS23 7JA Tel: 0800 502030 Fax: 0870 121 4217 E-mail: audit-publications@ twoten.press.net Copies can also be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.audit-commission. gov.uk/reports/index.asp

Secured by Design Innovation Awards
ACPO CPI Ltd

The 2004 National Architectural Liaison Officer (ALO)/Crime Prevention Design Advisers (CPDA) Conference has been confirmed a great success according to delegates. Over 200 crime prevention professionals attended the event, which was held in November last year. Seminars were presented on a range of topics including the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister's 'Safer Places' guide, Secured by Design (SBD) and Planning Authority Strategy, Creating Safer and Sustainable Communities and Forward Planning on Terrorism. Various companies who produce SBD licensed products exhibited at the event, which also allowed delegates the opportunity to discuss relevant issues with security professionals. In appreciation of the high standard of entries from last years competition, ACPO CPI Ltd has announced the second annual '£20,000 Secured by Design Innovation Awards' to reward the most innovative and effective ways of promoting and developing the Secured by Design project. Prizes totalling £20,000 will be awarded to the best entries, which can cover any aspect of the SBD project. Winners will be those whose projects best support the SBD concept through innovation, effective development or successful promotion. The award will be paid to the parent force of the winners, for the sole use of developing secured by design-related activity. This competition is open to Architectural Liaison Officers (ALOs), Crime Prevention Design Advisers (CPDAs) and serving members of UK police forces. Entries must be supported by a Chief Officer or head of department. The closing date for the competition is 30th September 2005.

For more information on the competition rules and how to enter contact ACPO CPI Ltd, 7th Floor, 25 Victoria Street, London SW1H 0EX. Tel: 020 7227 3423 Fax: 0207 227 3400/01 E-mail: acpocpi@ acpo.pnn.police.uk or visit the website:

www.securedbydesign.com

January 2005

Publications & Publicity

31

Secured by Design Bi-Monthly Newsletter
ACPO CPI Ltd

SbD Focus is the newsletter produced by ACPO Crime Prevention Initiatives Limited to inform organisations about news and developments in Secured by Design, ACPO CPI Ltd and related issues. The newsletter has recently increased from a yearly to a bi-monthly publication, to promote the increasing number of SBD projects and developments nationwide.
SbD Focus can be viewed and downloaded via the Secured by Design Website:

www.securedbydesign.com

Re s e a r c h

Parental drug and alcohol misuse: Resilience and transition among young people
Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Copies of this report, published in October 2004 can be obtained priced £13.95 from York Publishing Services Ltd, 64 Hallfield Road, Layerthorpe, York YO31 7ZQ Tel: 01904 430033 Fax: 01904 430868 E-mail: orders@ yps-publishing.co.uk (title your email ‘Order Enquiry’) or download the report free from their website:

This study explores the experiences of 38 young people, both male and female between the ages of 15 and 27 with at least one parent with a drug or alcohol problem. Participants were recruited from various backgrounds through a range of formal and informal settings to participate in this research, which was conducted using in-depth qualitative interviews to explore the young people’s accounts of their childhoods, current situations and futures. The study examines: • the situations they were in • the difficulties they encountered • what helped and the resources that were available to them • the choices they made • where they are now and what they feel the future holds for them. Some of the key findings of the research include: • The young people’s interview accounts portrayed disrupted and difficult lives. Parental substance misuse was at the centre of a web of problems that often included violence and neglect. The young people suggested that they only gradually recognised that there was a problem and they then had to manage this knowledge both within the family and beyond. Uncertainty about reactions of others and concerns about the stigma and types of interventions

www.jrf.org.uk/bookshop/ eBooks/1859352499.pdf
Related findings can also be downloaded via the website:

www.jrf.org.uk/ knowledge/findings/ socialpolicy/pdf/064.pdf

that might ensue from services all seemed to limit the sharing of their difficulties. A large minority had drug problems themselves and although this may not have resulted directly from parental substance misuse, it was another source of vulnerability for them. Alcohol and drug misuse had some different impacts. Respondents with alcohol-misusing parents talked more about violence and parental ‘disappearances' from the home. The short and long term effects of drugs on the parent’s health could be more frightening and the illegal nature of drugs meant that respondents felt more effort had to be put into concealment and silence. Respondents also talked about their futures, with many already moved into independent accommodation, sometimes supported by services. All had similar goals and dreams in terms of getting a job, a house and having a family. For some, particularly those with a substance misuse problem, their focus was much more on the present and getting their lives together. For others, further or higher education was seen as a route to ensure current or future independence.

32

Publications & Publicity/Research

January 2005

When Violence Hits Home: How Economics and Neighborhood Play a Role
United States Dept of Justice, National Institute of Justice

Previous research has explored how people's personalities and relationships lead to violence against women. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research, development and evaluation agency of the United States (U.S.) Department of Justice have sponsored this study, which takes a wider look at the causes of intimate violence. The study was compiled using data from the U.S. Census and the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH). It reveals that the incidence of violence in the home is aggravated by economic factors, apart from the characteristics of the individuals involved. It looks at the links between intimate violence and personal and economic well being, as well as how the neighbourhood in which women live may influence them to stay in or leave an abusive relationship.

Some of the main findings include: Women, who live in economically disadvantaged communities and are struggling with money in their own relationships, suffer the greatest risk of intimate violence. For the individuals involved, both objective (being unemployed or not making enough money to meet family needs) and subjective (worrying about finances) forms of economic distress, increase the risk of intimate violence against women. African-americans and whites with the same economic characteristics have similar rates of intimate violence. However, African-americans have a higher overall rate of intimate violence partly due to higher levels of economic distress and their location in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Copies of the summary and full report, published in September 2004 can be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/ pubs-sum/205004.htm

Crime in England and Wales: Quarterly Update to June 2004
Home Office Statistical Bulletin 14/04

The latest British Crime Survey (BCS) figures are based on interviews with individuals living in private households, conducted between July 2003 and June 2004 and incidents experienced by survey respondents in the 12 months prior to their interview. The quarterly crime figures show that vehicle theft, burglary and robbery have continued to fall. The main points in this report include: • The risk of being a victim of crime is 25%. This is lower compared with the year to June 2003 and also lower than it was in 1981, the year of the first BCS. • Significant falls in vehicle thefts, all household crime and all personal crime compared with the year to June 2003. • Police statistics showed a 14% increase in violence against the person in April to June 2004, compared with the same period in the previous year. • Approximately half of all violent crimes recorded by the BCS and violence against the person recorded by the police did not involve injury to the victim. • The number of burglaries and vehicle thefts recorded by the police fell by 23% and 18% respectively. • In the year to June 2004, there were a provisional 10,590 firearm offences representing an increase of 3% compared with the previous year. • Fear of crime has fallen compared with the previous year, as has the level of perceived anti-social behaviour. • Levels of confidence in most aspects of the criminal justice system (CJS) have improved, compared with the previous year.
Copies of this report, published in October 2004 can be viewed and downloaded via the Home Office Website only: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs04/hosb1404.pdf

There is also an online supplement to this report entitled: "Distraction burglary: recorded crime data", which is also available via the website only: www.homeoffice.

gov.uk/rds/pdfs04/ hosb1404supp.pdf%5D
Application for reproduction of these reports should be made to the Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

January 2005

Research

33

Problem-Oriented Guides for Police Underage Drinking
Problem-Specific Guides Series No. 27 - United States Department of Justice
The Problem-Specific Guides summarise information on how the police can reduce the harm caused by specific crime and disorder problems. They will be of most use to those who: • Understand basic problem-oriented policing principles and methods. • Can look at a problem in depth. • Are willing to consider new ways of doing police business. • Understand the value and limits of research knowledge. • Are willing to work with other community agencies to find effective solutions.
Copies of this report, published in September 2004 can be viewed and downloaded via the website:

www.cops.usdoj.gov/ mime/open.pdf?Item

The guides draw on research findings and police practices in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Scandinavia. This guide begins by describing the problem of underage drinking and reviews factors that contribute to it. It identifies a series of questions to help analyse local underage drinking problems, reviews responses to the problem and provides data from evaluated research and police practices.

Tackling domestic violence: exploring the health service contribution
Home Office Online Report 52/04
This report describes the process and outcome evaluations carried out on the 4 health projects (the health project package) funded under the Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) Violence Against Women Initiative. Each project implemented a different programme of work, with the common element of sign posting women into specialised support agencies. The key findings include: South West Birmingham Domestic Violence Programme, which demonstrated that the provision of outreach support in a GP practice setting is one way of providing readily accessible support to women experiencing domestic violence. It showed that provision of expanded help line hours is very important in enabling women to access services quickly. It also highlighted that training and raising awareness of health staff played an important part in facilitating women’s access to domestic violence support services. North Devon and Torridge Early which Inter vention Programme, succeeded in providing support to survivors of domestic violence in an accident and emergency (A&E) department at relatively low cost to the agencies concerned, by utilising Victim Support volunteers. While the numbers using the service were small, it is likely that there would have been higher uptake had the training for health staff been more comprehensive. Salford Enhanced Evidence Gathering Scheme, which showed that it is possible to gather enhanced evidence by using cameras in a GP practice. However, the extremely low uptake (only one person had photographs taken) and other reasons identified in the report, means that it cannot currently be regarded as a costeffective use of resources. Wakefield Suppor t and Sur vival Health Initiative, which demonstrated that it is feasible to make routine enquiries about experience of domestic abuse in a GP practice. It indicated the value of short surveys into the prevalence of domestic abuse amongst women attending the practice as one way of confirming the importance of the issue in each practice. The project also showed the importance of introducing routine enquiry in GP practices and the need for appropriate training.

Copies of this report, published in October 2004 can be viewed and downloaded via the Home Office Website only:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ rds/pdfs04/ rdsolr5204.pdf%5D
Application for reproduction of these reports should be made to the Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

34

Research

January 2005

Tackling Domestic Violence: the role of health professionals
Home Office Development and Practice Report 32
The Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) Violence Against Women Initiative (VAWI) was an evidence-led programme that aimed to find out which approaches and practices were effective in supporting survivors of domestic and sexual violence and in reducing incidents of abuse. In July 2000, 34 multi-agency victim-focused projects were funded, which developed and implemented a range of interventions in various settings and among different population groups. Five of these projects were based within health contexts, such as primary care and accident and emergency (A&E). All 5 projects aimed to encourage and support the disclosure of domestic violence and help the survivor’s entry into specialist domestic violence support services. This report is based upon findings from independent evaluations of these projects, as well as available published research literature. About one in 4 women will experience domestic violence at some time in their lives, which can have short and long term effects in terms of physical, mental and sexual health. This report shows how health professionals can make an important contribution to tackling domestic violence by: • Asking women directly about whether they have experienced abuse. • Enabling women to access specialised services. • Supporting them in changing their situation. The health service also needs to take action by: • Improving availability of information on domestic violence and services for those who experience it. • Providing/acquiring appropriate training for health professionals. • Instituting systems of enquiry about domestic violence.

Copies of this report, published in October 2004 are available free of charge from the Research Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Copies can also be viewed and downloaded from the Home Office Website:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ rds/pdfs04/ dpr32.pdf%5D

Decision-making by house burglars: offender’s perspectives
Home Office Findings 249
This study was based on interviews carried out in southern England with burglars who were asked to describe the decisions they had taken when planning and carrying out domestic burglary. They also offered their views on the deterrent value of various interventions. Some of the key points in the study include: • The main reasons given by interviewees for starting burgling were the influence of friends, the need to fund drug use and boredom. • Need of money for drugs was the main reason given for more recent burglaries. • The likely 'yield' was a burglar's key consideration when deciding which house to target. • Offenders were more likely to base decisions about the attractiveness of a property on beliefs that the occupants had goods worth stealing than on structural aspects of the building. Offenders were most likely to take cash, jewellery, laptops and credit cards. Over two-thirds of the sample said they had returned to a property they had burgled before and taken items from it on a second occasion. Over half of the sample knew who lived in the property they were burgling. Interviewees did not believe burglary to be risky, especially once they had disposed of the goods taken.

Copies of this report, published in November 2004 are available free of charge from the Research Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk Copies can also be viewed and downloaded from the Home Office Website:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ rds/pdfs04/r249.pdf

January 2005

Research

35

Piloting ‘On the spot penalties’ for disorder: final results from a one-year pilot
Home Office Research Findings 257
This report summarises the pilot scheme to issue penalty notices or ‘on the spot penalties’ to punish low-level disorder offences such as ‘causing harassment, alarm or distress’ and ‘disorderly behaviour while drunk’introduced by the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001. It is considered one way of dealing speedily with anti-social offending and reducing the workloads of both the police and courts. The pilots ran for a 12-month period from August 2002 and took place in 4 police force areas. These covered 11 disorder offences for those aged 18 or over. The purpose of penalty notices for disorder (PNDs), often referred to as ‘on the spot fines’ was first considered in the late 1990s as a way of accelerating action on the more serious cases by diverting less serious cases from the court system. Some of the key points in this report include: • 6,043 PNDs were issued in the 4 pilot areas during the study period. 9 out of 10 were issued for just 2 offences: 2,951 (49%) for ‘causing harassment, alarm or distress’ and 2,530 (42%) for ‘disorderly behaviour while drunk’. • Evidence from 2 pilot areas suggested that between a quarter and a half of PNDs went to offenders who would otherwise have been cautioned or prosecuted. This suggests that there were many new cases which received PNDs. • Issuing PNDs was less time-consuming than current procedures, with an estimated saving of between 1.5 and 2.5 police hours compared with a caution or prosecution. • Fewer than 2% of recipients requested a court hearing. • Police officers in the pilot areas favoured extending the range of (minor) offences for which PNDs might be used.

Copies of this report, published in September 2004 are available free of charge from the Research Development and Statistics Directorate (RDS), Communications Development Unit, Room 264, 50 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 020 7273 2084 Fax: 020 7222 0211 E-mail: publications.rds@ homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk and can also be viewed and downloaded from the Home Office Website:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/ rds/pdfs04/r257.pdf

ID Cards
Home Office

The Government is making good progress with plans for Identity (ID) Cards as suggested by a Home Affairs Select Committee report produced last year. Improvements to the scheme will make it simpler, clearer and more effective including: • A single, universal ID card for all UK nationals issued alongside passports will simplify the operation of the scheme and reflects public support for a universal card. • A new executive agency will be set up incorporating the UK Passport Service, working closely with the Home Office Immigration and Nationalist Directorate. • A simpler and more secure verification process. There will be a standardised on-line verification service that will make the system more secure against fraud and provide a full audit trail. A summary of responses to public consultation on and research into the public’s views on ID cards has also been published and can be viewed on-line via the website: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/comrace/identitycards/index.html
For more information contact the Home Office Identity Cards Programme Team, 50 Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AT Tel: 0870 000 1585 E-mail: identitycards@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

36

Research

January 2005

Answers on a Postcard
Performance managing and yet still managing to perform
Unaccustomed as I am to playing devil's advocate (not), in this edition I am going to raise the question of whether the world has gone performance management crazy? I am not for one moment suggesting that performance management is not important, because knowing whether initiatives are working as planned is clearly essential, but rather is there currently too much emphasis placed on measuring performance, or is it about right? Recently for me, this question has surfaced after several conversations with practitioners. One told me that he felt the current climate demanded that so much time be dedicated to the management of performance, that often not enough was left to actually perform, that is to implement initiatives as comprehensively as he would have liked. Is this a common view or just an isolated experience? I am not questioning whether we need targets (personally I think we do, but this could be a discussion for the future), it is the management of performance I want to look at, which, although it includes target setting (such as milestones), also includes objectives, outcomes, outputs etc. One practitioner told me of an interesting situation that he found himself in as the manager of a crime reduction initiative in Merseyside (the names and figures have been changed to protect the innocent). Manager X said that he had set the objective of reducing commercial burglary in a specific area by 12 per year, which equated to the milestone objective of 3 per quarter (i.e. 1 per month). In the first quarter he reported to the Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) Board that commercial burglaries had been reduced by 6, which was 50% of the initiative's objective for the entire year. In the next quarter they reduced by 2. When he presented the second quarter's update to the CDRP board he was asked why the initiative had slipped off track and had not reached its quarterly target of 3, despite achieving 2/3 of its objective for the whole year in the first 6 months! Hopefully, the above is an isolated and extreme example, but it does suggest that sometimes we might not see the wood for the trees as far as performance management and achieving targets are concerned. In its defence, it was not performance management per-se, which gave rise to this scenario. Appropriate use of performance management shows us that this initiative was surpassing its objective by a country mile, but implementing performance targets to the 'nth' degree to clarify performance can have the opposite effect and actually cloud it.

Please e-mail your views on this subject and any good, bad or ugly scenarios and I'll put them together in the next edition. Answers on a postcard please to: jason.roach2@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

...knowing whether initiatives are working as planned is clearly essential, but is there currently too much emphasis placed on measuring performance?...

January 2005

Talking Shop

37

Criminology Corner 4
In this edition I am going to introduce a topic that does not readily spring from criminology or crime science, but nevertheless has promising implications for all of us tasked with reducing crime. I introduced the topic in the last edition as 'knowledge management', but in the meantime it has changed its name to 'Improving Performance through Applied Knowledge' - IPAK. So that's the new name, but what is it and how is it going to help with crime reduction practice? IPAK represents an attempt to collect and collate all the knowledge we have acquired about various crime types, distil it and disseminate it via a host of different media. In plain English, it is a project which will draw together all good practice, practitioner experience, academic knowledge and research and make it available to practitioners in 'user-friendly' ways. The policing side of the Home Office is planning to use IPAK to improve police performance. You are probably thinking, well there are a host of different databases already, which display good practice, what is the point of another one? IPAK is not about just databases, nor is it about just good practice, instead it is about 'good knowledge'. Good practice tends to be thought of as those initiatives that achieve positive outcomes and which we can all replicate. I have suggested before that this is too narrow a definition. Good practice represents far more than just projects worth replicating, such as: how to do something, what works and why? Good knowledge on the other hand, represents a wider more comprehensive definition, which encompasses: • Good practice examples. • Knowledge about crime and crime types - what we know already. • Tacit knowledge - knowledge about how something was done (such as getting elected members on side, or partners around a table). The IPAK project aims to improve crime reduction performance by drawing together these 3 different types of knowledge and packaging them for practitioners to use. So, how will it work? The IPAK process begins at the Review and Generate stage. Here good ideas and practice are collected and collated and combined with 'what we already know' about a particular crime type, for example, burglary. This knowledge is then formally evaluated and validated at the Consolidate stage of the IPAK process. At this stage the audiences for the knowledge are identified and dissemination considered. At the last stage, Implement, ways of delivering the knowledge are developed; existing practice reviewed and the knowledge is disseminated using various media. The IPAK process should produce (at least in theory at the moment) valuable knowledge products for practitioners to use, which fuse together all the knowledge and good practice about specific crime types. At present there is either a dearth of specific crime type knowledge or an array of conflicting information in plethora of different forms, found in a multitude of disparate places, most of which have limited or no evaluation. IPAK aims to alleviate this practitioner headache. The IPAK process is about to be piloted, which will take until September 2005. Initially, it will focus on burglary and preventing youth drug misuse. I apologise if I have raised your hopes only to tell you that you have to wait until next year, but I thought it a good idea to start raising practitioner interest now, especially as we will be asking for good knowledge from you all very soon. 'Improving Performance through Applied Knowledge', please remember it - it promises much in the future. I'll get back to mainstream criminology and crime science in the next edition and explore the importance of Repeat Victimisation.
Please send your comments to my usual e-mail: jason.roach2@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Theory and practice are even closer than you think

38

Criminology Corner

January 2005

Index
Alcohol-related crime ................................................................................................................4, 10, 40 Anti-social .....................................................1, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 33, 36, 40 Arson .............................................................................................................................................17, 19 ASBO ..................................................................................................................................................14 Burglary ....................................................................................................7, 9, 15, 18, 33, 35, 37, 38, 40 Car park ..........................................................................................................................................7, 10 Forecourt ..........................................................................................................................................2, 8 CCTV .....................................................................................................................................3, 7, 23, 25 Community Safety ............................................................................1, 2, 5, 14, 15, 16, 20, 23, 24, 30, 40 Council ...........................................................................................4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 20, 21, 23 Crime and disorder .................................................................1, 2, 9, 10, 11, 16, 18, 23, 28, 30, 34, 37, 40 Crime Prevention Officer .....................................................................................................................22 Crime reduction .....................................1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21, 30, 34, 35, 37, 38 Domestic abuse ............................................................................................................................21, 34 Domestic violence ............................................................................................2, 3, 4, 21, 29, 34, 35, 40 Drugs ......................................................................................... 1, 3, 7, 12, 24, 26, 30, 31, 32, 35, 38, 40 Firearms .............................................................................................................................................33 Good Practice ............................................................................................2, 4, 15, 19, 26, 27, 29, 30, 38 Graffiti .................................................................................................................................2, 13, 20, 24 Grant ..................................................................................................................................................27 HM Customs and Excise ......................................................................................................................12 ID Cards ..........................................................................................................................................3, 36 Ideas Exchange .............................................................................................................................2, 4, 6 Knives .............................................................................................................................................3, 27 Local authorities .................................................................................................. 1, 17, 19, 24, 28, 30, 31 Mobile Phone ............................................................................................................................2, 12, 20 Neighbourhood Watch ...........................................................................................2, 4, 13, 18, 19, 20, 21 Neighbourhood Watch Association .................................................................................................2, 19 Police .....................................................1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, ........................................................................................................26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 34, 36, 38 Primary Care Trusts ....................................................................................................................8, 18, 31 Problem-oriented policing ........................................................................................................3, 26, 34 Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 .................................................................................................................12 Racism ............................................................................................................................................3, 22 Safety ................................................1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 28, 30, 40 Secured by Design .....................................................................................................................3, 31, 32 Security ..............................................................................................2, 7, 8, 9, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28, 31 Sexual Crime ...................................................................................................................................2, 18 Toolkits ................................................................................................................................................4 Vehicles ........................................................................................................2, 7, 8, 10, 13, 17, 19, 33, 40 Victims ......................................................................................................9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 29, 33, 34, 35 Violence ..........................................................................................2, 3, 4, 21, 24, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, 40 Website .........2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 15, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 40

January 2005

Index

39

The Digest - previous issues October 2004
• • • • • • •
The Tilley Award Winners 2004 Community Safety Booklets Improving Confidence in Justice Out on the town - and out of control? Reducing alcohol-related crime and disorder Identity Theft Prevention Website Annual Youth Justice Convention 2004 Assessing the impact of the Reducing Burglary Initiative in southern England and Wales

July 2004
• • • • • • •
Burglaries & Crime in Student Campus Accommodation Grand in the Hand Helps Tackle Anti-social Behaviour National Domestic Violence Helpline Questionnaire on Community Safety Qualifications Vehicle Crime Information Pack Card Fraud Prevention Leaflet Safer Places: The Planning System and Crime Prevention

April 2004
• • • • • • •
Cannabis is STILL illegal Avon & Somerset put Bristol's students in space Watch Over Me Operation Eskell Safer Homes Initiative International Community Justice Awards Best Practice? Finding your way through the fog

January 2004
• • • • • •
Building Civil Renewal Philip Lawrence Awards Experimenting...with Drugs Take Stock of Your Lock Hats off to crime Safe and Sound in Teeside

You can view this edition of the Digest and previous issues at:

www.crimereduction.gov.uk/digest.htm

40

The Digest - previous issues

January 2005