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Thursday,May16,2013 50¢daily Delphos,Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
TellingTheTri-County’sStorySince1869
Ottoville advances in baseball
tourney, p6
Spring farm safety, p4
www.delphosherald.com
Partlycloudy
thismorn-
ingandthen
becoming
mostlysunny
laterinthe
day.Highs
intheupper70s.Partly
cloudytonightwithlowsin
themid50s.Seepage2.
Ottoville to let Emergency Levy expire
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — Ottoville School
District voters will get a reprieve on
taxes beginning in 2014. The school
board voted unanimously Wednesday
to allow the district’s Five-year
Emergency Levy to expire this year
and not place it on the ballot for
renewal in November. The 2.7-mill
levywasvotedinat$150,521peryear.
While focusing on finances,
Treasure Bob Weber outlined the
district’s Five-year Forecast. The
school’s ending balance on June
30 is projected at $3,634,496; June
30, 2014, $3,482,664; June 30,
2015, $2,885,837; June 30, 2016,
$1,893,443; and June 30, 2017,
$474,255.
Weberpointedtotherevenuepor-
tion of the report with increases in
Real Estate taxes and the school’s
IncomeTaxLevybutdeclinesinstate
funding and with the elimination of
theTangiblePersonalPropertyTax.
On the expenditure’s side, Weber
noted increases in wages and benefit
costs,Obamacareandpurchasedser-
vices.Healsobroughtattentiontothe
ever-risingcostsofpropertytaxfees,
bankchargesandfees,liabilityinsur-
ance and audits required by the state
everyotheryear.
The forecast is to be submitted to
theOhioDepartmentofEducationby
May31.
The board also approved a list of
50 graduates for the class of 2013.
Commencement is set for 1 p.m.
Sundayintheschool’sgymnasium.
School Guidance Counselor Mark
Knott submitted his intent to resign/
retire effective May 31. The school
board thanked Knott for his 30-plus
yearsofservicetothedistrict.
With just days left in Ottoville’s
academic year, school board mem-
bersstartedonmeasuresforthesum-
mer and the 2013-14 school year.
Theyapproved:
• Continuing membership in the
OhioHighSchoolAthleticAssociation
forthe2013-14schoolyear;
• Rick Fischer, Ralph Luersman
and Dave Kimmet as van drivers for
thepurposeoftowingthebandtrailer
for parades, contests and shows for
the2013-14schoolyear;
• All head coaches to use school
facilities for their sports camps or
clinics during the spring/summer
2013 with the stipulation that all
receipts and expenditures from such
campsbeprocessedthroughthetrea-
surer’soffice:
• Erin Gudakunst to use school
facilities for a dance recital. The
buildingwillbeusedMay22-24.All
necessaryformshavebeencollected;
and
• The Ottoville Fire Department
to use school facilities for Fire
Convention meeting from 7 a.m. to
noononJune15:
High School Principal Jon
Thorbahnreportedtheschool’srecent
annual Cancer Walk generated more
than $7,500 and was a success with
complimentsfromstudents,staffand
thecommunity.
Levyexpirationwillsave
taxpayers$150Kperyear
See OTTOVILLE, page 3
TheDelphosVeterans
Councilwillplaceflags
onareacemeterieson
Saturdayinpreparationfor
theMemorialDayHoliday.
ThefollowingSaturdayis
plannedincaseofrain.
Veteransoranyonewish-
ingtohelpareaskedtomeet
between8:45a.m.-9a.m.at
VFWPost3035inthewest
parkinglot.Thegroupwill
leaveshortlyafter9a.m.
Ifanyfamilymember
findsafellowdeceasedvet-
eran’splotdoesnothave
aflagmarkerand/oraflag
hasbeenmissed,please
notifytheVFW.Theyare
placingcloseto1,600flags
thisyearanddon’twantto
leaveanyveteranwithout
thehonorheorshedeserves.
Toletusknowofthemissed
plot,call419-692-8816.
Whencallingabout
amissedflagorflag
holder,pleaseinclude:
•Cemetery:St.John’s,
Resurrection,WestSide,
WalnutGrove,Landeck,
Harshong,PikeMennonite,
Donors,CarmeanorKing;
•Whereserved:WWI,
WWII,Korea,Vietnam,Iraq,
AfghanistanorStateSide
(noforeignservice);and
•Approximatelocation.
Veteransto
placeflagsat
cemetery
St. John’s high-schoolers hold May Day activities
St. John’s High School students celebrate May Day on Wednesday by participating in co-ed kickball, dodge ball and other games. Above left:
Tyler Conley runs to kick the ball and send it out to left field during the games. Above right: Strategizing against the boys during the co-ed dodge-
ball in the Robert A. Arnzen Gymnasium are, from left, Morgan Jostpille, Erica Saine, Megan Joseph, Kaitlyn Slate and Kylie Fritz. (Delphos
Herald/Stephanie Groves)
Foundationsets
golfscramble
TheMakeItEnough
Foundationwillholdagolf
scrambleonJune17atthe
FindlayCountryClub.
Teamregistrationis$500,
whichincludesgreensfees
andacartforafoursome,
giftbaganddinnerafterthe
scramble.Mulligansare$5
apiecewithalimitof10
perteam.Therewillalsobe
a“BeatthePro”contest.
Therangeopensat9
a.m.withtee-offat10:30
a.m.Dinnerwillbeserved
at4p.m.withtrophypre-
sentations,contestwinners
andsilentauctionresults.
Sponsorshipopportuni-
tiesarestillavailable.
Checksmadeout
to“MakeItEnough
Foundation”canbe
mailedtoPOBox221,
OttovilleOH45876.
ContactKevinAltenburger
at614-595-5684forsponsor-
shipormoreinformation.
Relayteamsets
LadiesNight
TheDelphosRelayfor
LifeteamFischin’fora
CurewillholdLadiesNight
Out!from6:30-8:30p.m.
TuesdayatJubileeWinery.
Allproceedsbenefitthe
AmericanCancerSociety.
‘SharetheRoad’
andresponsibilities
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS—MayisMotorcycleSafetyAwareness
Month,whichisacampaignpromotingmotorcycleaware-
nessandencouragesalldriverstosharetheroadwithmotor-
cyclists.Motoristswillseeanincreaseinenforcementby
localpolicethroughoutMaytoensuremotorcyclistsanddriv-
ersofalltypesofvehiclesareobeyingstateandlocallaws.
According to the Governors Highway Safety Association
(GHSA),morethan5,000liveswerelostintheUnitedStates
in2012duetomotorcyclefatalities.Thestatisticisanincrease
of close to nine percent from 2011. The report indicates that
since 1997 to 2011, motorcyclist fatalities have more than
doubled,from2,116to4,612.
There were 150 Ohio motorcyclists killed during the first
ninemonthsof2012,upsixfromthesametimeframein2011.
OhioStateHighwayPatrolPublicAffairsUnitSpokesperson
Bradley Shaw reported there have been 12 motorcycle-
involvedfatalcrashesresultingin12deathsreportedsofarin
2013. None of the reported fatalities occurred in Allen, Van
WertorPutnamcounties.Oftheseaccidents,onlyfourcyclists
werewearinghelmets,fourofthecyclistswereimpairedand
speedwasafactorinsixofthecrashes.
Factors contributing to the rise in motorcyclist fatalities
in 2012 include warmer temperatures, the economy and gas
prices. Record-high temperatures in the spring extended the
riding season and contributed to the increase of fatalities in
the first six months. Economic improvements allowed more
peopletopurchaseandridemotorcycles.Additionally,higher
gaspricesspurredmorepeopletochoosemotorcyclesastheir
modeoftransportation.
Anothercontributingfactorfortheriseinriderfatalitiesis
the decrease in states with universal helmet laws. Currently,
only19statesrequireallriderstowearhelmets,whichisdown
from26in1997.
Jenningstograduate35
Information submitted
FORT JENNINGS —
Fort Jennings High School
principal and school board
members will hand out 35
diplomas during the school’s
commencement ceremonies
at 8 p.m. Friday in the high
schoolgymnasium.
Speakers include:
Valedictorian Kaitlin
Stechschulte; Salutatorian
Sara Miller and honor stu-
dents Rachel Krietemeyer
andAlexVonLehmden.
Stechschulte is the daugh-
ter of Bruce and Brenda
Stechschulte. She is a mem-
ber of the National Honor
Society, TEAMS, Math Club
andStudentCouncil.Shewas
involvedinband,seniorclass
play, school musical and Big
Brothers/BigSistersprogram.
She participated in soccer,
cheerleading, track and CYO
volleyball. Kaitlin was on
HonorRollIandwasselected
for Senior in the Spotlight.
She is a Eucharistic Minister,
Mass server and lector at St.
JosephCatholicChurchandis
involvedwithyouthministry.
She plans to attend The
Ohio State University and
major in chemical engineer-
ing.
Miller is the daughter of
Pat and Kathy Will and Dan
and Leslie Miller. She was
a member of the National
HonorSocietyandwassenior
class president. She was
involved in yearbook, school
musicalandseniorclassplay.
She was on Honor Roll I
and participated in march-
ing and concert band. She
was a member of the Fort
Jennings4-HShowmenClub
andCarteensandparticipated
in the Putnam County Youth
Advisory Board and was a
leadershipteammember.
Miller plans to attend the
University of Saint Francis,
majoringinnursing.
Krietemeyer is the
daughter of Dan and Karen
Krietemeyer.Shewasamem-
ber of the National Honor
Society and FCCLA and
was active in TSA TEAMS,
JETSandwasaBigBrother/
Big Sister mentor. She was
on Honor Roll I and was
involved in band, senior
class play, school musical
and CYO volleyball. She is
a Mass server at St. Joseph
Church, church festival vol-
unteerandsummervolunteer
atStRita’sMedicalCenter.
Krietemeyer plans to
attend the University of
Cincinnati, majoring in nurs-
ing.
Von Lehmden is the son
of Brett and Cheryl Von
Lehmden. He was a mem-
ber of the National Honor
Society. He was involved in
the senior class play, school
musicalandband.Hewason
Honor Roll I and was select-
edforSeniorintheSpotlight.
Von Lehmden plans
to attend The Ohio State
University.
Photo courtesy of Metrocreative.com
See SHARE, page 3
Stechschulte Miller
Krietemeyer
Von Lehmden
See GRADs, page 3
2
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selected varieties
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Open: 24 Hours Monday-Friday
Saturday & Sunday: 7am-midnight
2 – The Herald Thursday, May 16, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
IT WAS NEWS THEN
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 235
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Pamela Eloise ‘Pam’
(Patton) Meyer
Jan. 2, 1947-May 14, 2013
Pamela Eloise “Pam”
(Patton) Meyer, 66, passed
away Tuesday in Fort Worth,
Texas.
She was born Jan. 2, 1947,
in Lima.
Survivors include her
mother, Patricia “Pat” Patton;
her husband, Jim; children,
Kimberly (Steve) Page, Jason
(Michelle) Meyer, Heather
(Shane Randell) Meyer and
Amanda Meyer; and grand-
children, Landon Page,
Mitchell Page, Avery Meyer
and Rylee Meyer. She is also
survived by Candice (Patton)
Shaffer, Mike Patton, Patrick
Patton, Jay Patton, Norlyn
Labrano and Lonnie Grewe
Miller.
She was preceded in death
by her grandfather, Oscar
Heyser; her father, Ronald
“Bud” Patton; and Madonna
Heyser, Orvin Heyser, Robert
and Lola Heyser, Elvin and
Juanita Patton and Clarabelle
and Norbert Grewe.
Mrs. Meyer gradu-
ated from St. John’s High
School in Delphos in 1965
and from Nazareth College
in Kalamazoo, Mich., in
1970. She was a dedicated
and devoted teacher, earn-
ing Teacher of the Year in
Albuquerque, N.M., in 2007.
She enjoyed the outdoors, hot
air ballooning with friends
and spending time with her
beloved dog, Cheyenne.
Funeral services will
begin at 11 a.m. Friday at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic
Church, 2016 Willis Lane,
Keller, Texas. Friends may
call from 6 to 8 p.m. today
at Lucas Funeral Home, 137
E. Hill St., Keller, with the
Rosary being recited at 7 p.m.
The Associated Press
Today is Thursday, May 16, the 136th day
of 2013. There are 229 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On May 16, 1943, the nearly month-long
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising came to an end
as German forces crushed the Jewish resis-
tance and blew up the Great Synagogue. An
estimated 7,000 Jews were killed during the
uprising, while about 7,000 others were sum-
marily executed. The remaining Jews, more
than 40,000 of them, were deported to con-
centration camps.
On this date:
In 1763, the English lexicographer, author
and wit Samuel Johnson first met his future
biographer, James Boswell.
In 1770, Marie Antoinette, age 14, married
the future King Louis XVI of France, who
was 15.
In 1868, the U.S. Senate failed by one
vote to convict President Andrew Johnson
as it took its first ballot on the 11 articles of
impeachment against him.
In 1920, Joan of Arc was canonized by
Pope Benedict XV.
In 1939, the government began its first
food stamp program in Rochester, N.Y.
In 1948, CBS News correspondent George
Polk, who’d been covering the Greek civil
war between communist and nationalist forc-
es, was found slain in Salonika Harbor.
In 1961, Park Chung-hee seized power in
South Korea in a military coup.
In 1988, the Supreme Court, in California
v. Greenwood, ruled that police can search
discarded garbage without a search warrant.
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop released
a report declaring nicotine was addictive in
ways similar to heroin and cocaine.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush
launched his re-election campaign. The Senate
committed $15 billion to fight global AIDS.
Five years ago: President George W. Bush
visited Saudi Arabia, where he failed to win
help from Saudi leaders to relieve skyrocket-
ing American gas prices. Osama bin Laden
said in an audio statement that al-Qaida would
continue its holy war against Israel and its
allies until the liberation of Palestine. Robert
Mondavi, the patriarch of California wine
country, died in Yountville at age 94.
One year ago: Mary Richardson Kennedy,
64, the estranged wife of Robert Kennedy Jr.
whose death sent America’s great political
family into grief again, died in Bedford, N.Y.,
a suicide.
Today’s Birthdays: Actor George Gaynes
is 96. Jazz musician Billy Cobham is 69. Actor
Bill Smitrovich is 66. Actor Pierce Brosnan is
60. Actress Debra Winger is 58. Olympic gold
medal gymnast Olga Korbut is 58. Actress
Mare Winningham is 54. Rock musician
Boyd Tinsley (The Dave Matthews Band) is
49. Rock musician Krist Novoselic (noh-voh-
SEL’-ik) is 48. Singer Janet Jackson is 47.
Country singer Scott Reeves (Blue County)
is 47. Actor David Boreanaz is 44. Political
correspondent Tucker Carlson is 44. Actress
Tracey Gold is 44. Tennis player Gabriela
Sabatini is 43. Country singer Rick Trevino is
42. Musician Simon Katz is 42. Entrepreneur
Bill Rancic (TV: “The Apprentice”) is 42.
Actress Tori Spelling is 40. Actress Lynn
Collins is 36. Actress Melanie Lynskey is 36.
Actress Megan Fox is 27. Actor Jacob Zachar
is 27. Actor Marc John Jefferies is 23. Actor
Miles Heizer is 19.
Aug. 13, 1934-May 15,
2013
Leona L. Holloway, 78,
of Lima, died at 12:28 a.m.
on Wednesday at Shawnee
Manor.
She was born Aug. 13,
1934, in Delphos to Clyde
E. and Elsie I. (Miller) Clark,
who preceded her in death.
On April 25, 1957, she
married Laymon G. “Junior”
Holloway, who died March
30, 2012.
Survivors include a
son, Charles David (Kim)
Holloway of Lima; a daugh-
ter, Debra Sue (Steve) Cleaves
of Fort Jennings; four grand-
children, Bret S. Holloway,
Shane M. Holloway, Morgan
Holloway and Nicholas
Hoffman; a brother, Dallas
(Nelly) Clark of Vieques,
Puerto Rico; two sisters, Sally
Selvaggio of Lima and Carol
(Timothy) Keane of Fort
Wayne; and one niece and
four nephews.
She was also preceded in
death by two nephews.
Mrs. Holloway was a
graduate of Continental High
School. She was a member
of the the Fraternal Order
of Eagles Aerie 370 and the
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
1275, Ladies Auxiliary. She
and her husband had wintered
in McIntosh, Fla., for 18 years,
where she was a member of the
Orange Lake Baptist Church
and First Baptist Church of
Citra. She loved being in
McIntosh, which is a quaint
little Victorian town, where
she loved to socialize and take
trips to the flea markets. Her
hobbies included cooking and
tending to her garden, taking
special care of her roses. She
will be remembered for her
love of reading, shopping and
spending time with her family
and friends. She was fiercely
devoted to her children and
grandchildren.
Funeral services will
begin at 1 p.m. Friday at
Shawnee Chapel, Chiles-
Lehman Funeral & Cremation
Services, the Rev. Rob White
officiating. Burial will be in
Memorial Park Mausoleum,
Lima.
Friends may call from
2-7 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
Preferred memorials are to
the American Cancer Society.
Leona L. Holloway
One Year Ago
Retirees were hon-
ored at Tuesday’s meet-
ing of the Elida Board of
Education. Participating in
the ceremony were Kathy
May, Marsha Johnson,
Carol Gibson, Janice Flick,
David Wollenhaupt, Bruce
Sommers, Constance Cramer,
Board President Dennis
Fricke and Superintendent
Don Diglia.
25 Years Ago – 1988
Stacey Becker, 7, got an
assist from her father, Joe
Becker, as they tried to get
their small kite airborne at the
annual Delphos Jaycees kite
fly Sunday at Stadium Park.
Stacey was winner of the
smallest kite category. Other
winners were Josh Wade,
funniest, Aaron Becker, big-
gest, Stacey Heindel, high-
est, and Tony Heindel, most
original.
Renovation of the his-
toric Deep Cut rest area on
State Route 66, south of
Spencerville is scheduled
to begin next week. The
National Park Service desig-
nated the Deep Cut Roadside
Park, a Registered National
Historic Landmark in 1966.
Deep Cut, an area 6,600 feet
long and up to 52 feet deep,
is the deepest excavation of
the canal, which originally
extended from Toledo to
Cincinnati.
Seven members of St.
John’s baseball team which
finished second in the
Midwest Athletic Conference
won league honors. Pitcher
Brian Heitz and outfielder
Duane Wieging received all-
conference honors. Named
honorable mention were
Mark Moscinski, Bruce
Odenweller, Scott Noonan,
Randy Mueller, and Scott
Suever.
50 Years Ago – 1963
Jerry Hilvers, son of Mr.
and Mrs. George Hilvers of
Ottoville, was awarded the
degree of State Farmer at the
recent convention of the Ohio
Future Farmers of America,
held in Columbus. Jerry was
one of the two percent of
members in the state that is
selected yearly for this honor.
He is a 1961 graduate of
Ottoville High School and is
now engaged in farming with
his father.
The program at the Rotary
luncheon meeting Wednesday
was presented by Ned Fry,
who is a great student of the
Civil War period. In his pre-
sentation Fry played a number
of records all from the stand-
point of the Confederacy.
Before the meeting President
Paul Harter, Jr. presented a
check of $100 to the Delphos
Chamber of Commerce for
expenses on the Delphos
Clean-up, Fix-up campaign.
Landeck Catholic Ladies
of Columbia met Tuesday
evening in the church meet-
ing room with 47 members
present. Plans were made to
hold a white elephant sale at
the next meeting. The com-
mittee for the June 11 meet-
ing includes Jane Bonifas
and Beatrice Kaverman
as co-chairmen, Gertrude
Knebel, Lucille Illig, Delores
Kill, Viola Clement, Thelma
Hoersten, Dorothy Kill,
Leona Suever and Mildred
Rayman.
75 Years Ago – 1938
Mary Alice Fethers,
Jefferson student, will com-
pete in the alto clarinet com-
petition in the Region Three,
National solo and ensemble
contest, to be held May 19
at Elkhart, Indiana. It is the
second straight year that she
has been selected as Ohio’s
representative to the national
contest in the alto clarinet
division.
One of the most delight-
ful social affairs held at
Jefferson School this year,
was the Rainbow Prom
given Saturday night for the
members of the senior class.
The prom was given by the
members of the junior class.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
mostly sunny. Highs in the upper 70s. Light and variable winds
becoming northwest up to 5 mph in the afternoon.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s. North
winds around 5 mph shifting to the northeast after midnight.
FRIDAY: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
mostly cloudy. A 20 percent chance of showers and thunder-
storms. Highs in the upper 70s. East winds 5 to 10 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance
of showers and thunderstorms. Lows in the upper 50s. East
winds 5 to 10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of
showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the upper 70s.
SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY: Partly cloudy with
a 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Lows in
the lower 60s. Highs around 80.
MONDAY: Partly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of
showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the lower 80s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of showers and thunderstorms. Low in the mid 60s.
TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy with 50 percent chance of
showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the upper 70s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a 40 percent
chance of showers and thunderstorms. Lows around 60.
WEDNESDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 50 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the mid 70s.
OJ Simpson testifies in
bid for new Vegas trial
Associated Press
LINDA DEUTSCH
LAS VEGAS (AP) — His leg shackles rattling as he shuf-
fled to and from the witness stand, O.J. Simpson made his own
case Wednesday for a new trial on armed robbery charges with
testimony that he relied on the advice of his trusted attorney
when he tried to reclaim mementos from his football glory
days.
“It was my stuff. I followed what I thought was the law,”
the 65-year-old former NFL star and actor said. “My lawyer
told me I couldn’t break into a guy’s room. I didn’t break into
anybody’s room. I didn’t try to muscle the guys. The guys had
my stuff, even though they claimed they didn’t steal it.”
Simpson said he took the advice of his longtime former
lawyer, Yale Galanter, and didn’t testify in his Las Vegas trial at
which he was convicted in 2008 of armed robbery, kidnapping
and other charges and sentenced to nine to 33 years in prison.
Harrison, Glover
face off on ‘Idol’
LOS ANGELES (AP)
— Randy Jackson isn’t sure
which budding diva will take
the crown on “American
Idol.”
The veteran judge of
the Fox talent competition
declared Wednesday’s final
performance round at the
Nokia Theatre a dead heat
after finalists Kree Harrison
and Candice Glover each per-
formed three songs.
“Dude, this is so close,”
beamed Jackson, who
announced last week that he’s
leaving the panel after his
12th season. “Everybody go
vote!”
At the beginning of the
night, Jackson declared
Glover, the 23-year-old vocal
powerhouse from St. Helena
Island, S.C., the winner of the
first round.
ROBY, Marilyn A.,
82, funeral services will
begin at 11 a.m. Friday at
Gomer United Church of
Christ, Gomer, Pastor Gary
Ginter officiating. Burial
will be in Cairo Eastside
Cemetery, Cairo. Friends
may call from 2-8 p.m. today
at Hartman Sons Funeral
Home, Columbus Grove.
Preferred memorials are to
the Gomer United Church of
Christ Memorial Fund or the
church’s organ fund.
Corn $6.81
Wheat $6.59
Soybeans $14.91
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
0 9 - 1 0 - 1 3 - 1 5 - 2 6 - 3 4 ,
Kicker: 1-5-6-1-3-2
Estimated jackpot: $35.39
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $190
million
Pick 3 Evening
5-2-7
Pick 3 Midday
2-5-2
Pick 4 Evening
5-0-2-8
Pick 4 Midday
2-8-5-2
Pick 5 Evening
8-5-2-9-7
Pick 5 Midday
5-2-5-0-6
Powerball
0 2 - 1 1 - 2 6 - 3 4 - 4 1 ,
Powerball: 32
Rolling Cash 5
17-18-21-29-31
Estimated jackpot:
$485,000
Answers to Monday’s questions:
A wallaby is pictured on bottles of Yellow Tail wine. A
yellow-footed rock wallaby, to be exact. The wallaby is a
marsupial native to Australia that is smaller than its cous-
in, the kangaroo. Yellow Tail wine is made in Australia.
Tennis great Billie Jean King, in 1972, was the first
woman to be named Sportsperson of the Year by Sports
Illustrated magazine. It was the year after she became the
first woman athlete to earn more than $100,000 in one
season.
Today’s questions:
How many animals were sentenced to death in 1692 at
the infamous Salem witch trials?
What popular appetizer bears a common Mexican
name?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Thursday, May 16, 2013 The Herald – 3
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Just received 2 more loads
of flowers, vegetables and
beautiful handing baskets
Dear EarthTalk: Now that hot weather
is coming, I want to upgrade my home’s
A/C. Which are the most energy-saving
models and should I go central air or win-
dow units?
— Jackie Smith, Cary, NC
According to the American Council for an
Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), energy
consumption for home air conditioning units
accounts for more than eight percent of all the
electricity produced in the U.S., at a cost to
homeowners of $15 billion annually. Besides
the cost, all this cooling leads to annual emis-
sions of about 195 million tons of CO2—or
two tons per year for each American home
with A/C.
Of course, foregoing A/C entirely is the
most energy- and cost-efficient way to go,
but some of us need a little cooling for com-
fort, especially in warmer climates. If A/C
is a must, buying the most efficient model
is the way to save money and pollute less.
Fortunately, a new generation of much more
efficient room and central A/C units means
that upgrading will likely pay for itself in
energy savings within just a few years.
The main factors to consider in choosing a
new model are cooling capacity (measured in
British Thermal Units, or BTUs) and Energy-
Efficiency Ratio, or EER. To determine the
correct BTU rating for a given space, multiply
the square footage by 10 and then add 4,000.
Meanwhile, a given unit’s EER is the ratio of
cooling output divided by power consump-
tion—the higher the EER, the more efficient
the air conditioner.
According to the U.S. Department of
Energy, national appliance standards require
room air conditioners to have an EER of 8.0
to 9.8 or more, depending on type and capac-
ity. Units with an EER rating of 10 or above
typically qualify for the federal government’s
ENERGY STAR label, which appears on
especially energy-efficient appliances. Check
out the ENERGY STAR website for lists of
qualifying A/C models.
The Association of Home Appliance
Manufacturers (AHAM) says that the average
EER of room A/C units rose 47 percent from
1972 to 1991. To wit, replacing an older room
unit with an EER of five with a new model
with an EER of 10) would result in a 50 per-
cent energy cost savings associated with A/C.
As to whether room units or central A/C
makes more sense, it depends. Room units,
which only cost a few hundred dollars each,
will suffice for renters or those who only
need to keep one or two rooms cool at a time.
Meanwhile, central A/C is more efficient
overall at keeping a whole house cool, and
will also do a better job at reducing household
humidity than even several individual room
units—and will save more money faster on
electricity bills. But with a starting price of
around $4,000 for the condenser and initial
set-up (plus any duct work needed to distrib-
ute cool air around a home), central A/C isn’t
for everyone.
ACEEE points out that there are ways
to keep indoor space cooler without A/C:
improving insulation, sealing air gaps, getting
rid of old appliances and light bulbs that give
off lots of heat, running fans, using cooler
colors on exterior roofing and paint, and other
strategies. Those in particularly arid climates
might also consider installing a swamp cooler
(which cools outside air by running it over
cold water) as a cheaper alternative to A/C.
By following these suggestions and upgrading
conscientiously, we can all stay a little more
comfortable in our warming world without
exacerbating the problem too much.
EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered
trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send questions to:
earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.
emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue:
www.emagazine.com/trial.
From an energy-efficiency standpoint, room A/C units are best for keeping one or two
rooms cool at a time, while central air is more efficient overall at keeping a whole house
cool. (Comstock/Hemera Collection photo)
Marion Township Trustees
Information submitted
The Marion Township
Trustees held their regular
meeting on Monday at the
Marion Township Office
with the following members
present: Joseph Youngpeter,
Howard Violet and Jerry
Gilden.
The purpose of the meet-
ing was to pay bills and con-
duct ongoing business. The
minutes of the previous meet-
ing were read and approved
as read. The trustees then
reviewed the bills and gave
approval for 14 checks total-
ing $97,376.70.
Road Foreman Elwer
advised the trustees that a por-
tion of Peltier Road north of
Elida Road should be wedge
and should be able to be done
on the Road Program under
the various monies. The trust-
ees agreed to go ahead and
get it done.
A tile on Peltier Road
south of the railroad in the
Township right away needs
replaced (roughly 154’).
Elwer also recommended
replacing the one catch basin
He estimated the cost would
be around $1,000 for materi-
als. The Trustee told him to
proceed with the project.
Fiscal Officer Kimmet
gave the Trustees the Bank
Reconciliation and Fund
Status reports for April 30 for
their review and signature.
He had paper work the
needed signed for the CD
purchased for the Bellis Fund.
A resolution was made to
appropriate monies to refund
estate tax monies to the
Allen County Auditor which
is in the resolution section
78 and will be part of these
minutes.
A Blank Certificate was
also needed for this refund
and needed signed by the
trustees.
He advised the trustees the
next meeting falls on Memorial
Day. They decided to have the
meeting on May 28. A notice
of the meeting change will be
put in the paper.
Trustee Gilden stated the
he gave Fred Calvelage the
necessary paper he needed
for the Moving Ohio Forward
Grant.
There being no further
business a motion to adjourn
by Trustee Violet was sec-
onded by Trustee Gilden and
passed unanimously.
Cleveland police
recount rescue of
missing women
Associated Press
CLEVELAND (AP) —
About a dozen Cleveland
police officers who responded
to 911 calls leading to three
long-missing women have
been applauded by rank-and-
file members at a union hall
event.
Four officers at the
Wednesday event recount-
ed the emotionally charged
moments of finding the
women at a home and real-
izing one who escaped and
called 911 was Amanda Berry,
who disappeared a decade
earlier.
Officer Michael Tracy said
he was shocked and excited
when he realized it wasn’t a
hoax.
Officer Michael Simon
said the house was dark and
silent as authorities entered
May 6. He wouldn’t discuss
details because he might be
called as a witness at trial.
(Continued from page 1)
Use of helmets has prov-
en to be 37 percent effec-
tive at preventing fatal inju-
ries to the operators and
41 percent effective for
passengers. The National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA)
estimates that 706 of the
motorcyclists who died in
crashes in 2010 would have
lived if they had worn hel-
mets.
National Safety Council
Communications Director
Kathy Lane said that
motorcyclists should follow
the rules of the roadway
and wear protective gear,
including a Department of
Transportation compliant
helmet. Riders should avoid
riding in poor weather con-
ditions, position the motor-
cycle in the lane out of a
motorist’s blind spot and
use turn signals for every
turn or lane change.
Other factors play a sub-
stantial role in crash fatali-
ties. In 2010, 29 percent
of fatally-injured cyclist
had a blood alcohol con-
centration at or above the
legal limit of .08 percent,
35 percent were speeding
and 22 percent did not have
a valid motorcycle license.
The motorcycle license test
prompts many riders to
complete a training course.
Lane said there are some
important tips for motorists
to follow, including allow-
ing a greater following dis-
tance behind a motorcycle
and giving the rider the full
lane width – never try to
share a lane.
“Be extra cautious
in intersections,” Lane
detailed. “Most crashes
occur when a motorist
fails to see a motorcyclist
and turns left in front of a
motorcycle.”
In addition, motorists
can become more cognizant
of motorcyclists by exer-
cising additional preventa-
tive measures. Don’t rely
on perception; estimate that
a motorcycle is closer than
it looks. Remember turn
signals on a motorcycle
are not always automati-
cally self-canceling; drivers
must determine whether a
motorcycle’s turn signal is
for real. Note that a motor-
cyclist will adjust position
within a lane to be seen
more readily, avoid road
debris and deal with pass-
ing vehicles and wind.
Also, operators decrease
speed by downshifting or
rolling off the throttle,
which does not activate a
brake light, so leave plenty
of room and do not tailgate
motorcyclists.
(Continued from page 1)
Superintendent/Elementary Principal Scott Mangas updated
the board on the final days of the year. His students will have
field days on Monday and Tuesday and school will dismissed
for the year for all grades at 1 p.m. on Wednesday.
In other business, the board:
• Accepted the following donations and miscellaneous pay-
ments to Ottoville Local Schools: $1,028.50 General Mills
Box Tops for Education; $464.98 Putnam County Education
Service Center Wellness Stipend; and $993.15 from the Chase
Bank Ultimate Rewards Program;
• Congratulated Warren Bowery, Cory Boecker and the cast
and crew of “Peter Panic” for their excellent performance on
April 19 and 20:
• Moved James Brown to the Masters plus-15 level of edu-
cation. Brown will be placed on this salary scale at the begin-
ning of the 2013- 14 school year;
• Approved Logan Kortokrax, Zach Weber, Jacob Turnwald,
Brandon Kimmet and Brandt Landin as student workers on an
as-needed basis for summer 2013. They will operate mowers
as well as other school equipment and paid the state minimum
wage; and
• Approved the Memorandum of Understanding for Dual
Credit – Post Secondary Enrollment Option Instruction
between James A. Rhodes State College and Ottoville High
School.
The next meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. June 19 in the
board room in the elementary wing.
(Continued from page 1)
The class song is “You’re
Gonna Miss This” by Trace
Adkins; the class colors are
California blue and charcoal
grey; the class flower is the
white rose; and the class motto
is: “We came as strangers, but
we leave as life-long friends.”
The Fort Jennings High
School class of 2013 includes:
Emily Rose Baldauf, Mara
Frances Brown, Lori Sue
Bruskotter, Dylan Andrew
Eldridge, Allen Joseph
Fischbach, Kiersten R. Freund,
Amber Maria Gerdeman,
Gabrielle Lee German,
Reanne F. Higginbotham,
Rachel Ann Horstman,
Brittany Nicole Inkrott, Mark
A. Inkrott, Adam D. Kleman,
Brandon Kent Kohli, Rachel
Lynn Krietemeyer, Alexander
Donald Maag, Elaina Nicole
Maag, Kristen Rose Maag,
Marissa Marie Mesker,
Sara Katherine Miller,
Tyler Julius Neidert, Chad
Anthony Recker, Morgan
Elizabeth Ricker, Catherine
Ann Schnipke, Macy Jade
Schroeder, Colin Sickels,
Andrew Thomas Stechschulte,
Gina Marie Stechschulte,
Kaitlin Marie Stechschulte,
Alex Jay Von Lehmden, Jenna
Nicole Von Sossan, Isabel
Hoejer Wang, Kurt Thomas
Warnecke, Martina Marie
Weems and Jacob Young.
Share
Ottoville
Grads
Thanks for
reading
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869 Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
www.delphosherald.com
Got a news tip?
Want to promote
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405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
Nancy Spencer, editor
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Don Hemple, advertising manager
419-695-0015 ext. 138
dhemple@delphosherald.com
2
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St
Delphos , OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
H.G. Violet Equipment
2103 North Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
AGRIBUSINESS
4 — The Herald Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Delphos FFA Awards Chapter Degrees
At the May FFA meeting, 15 members received their chapter degrees. To receive a chapter degree, members
have to meet the following requirements: must have a Greenhand degree, must have completed at least one
semester of instruction in agricultural education; have in operation an approved supervised agricultural experi-
ence program; be regularly enrolled in an agricultural education class; have satisfactory knowledge of the local
constitution and the local program of activities, have earned $150 by the members own efforts, worked 50 hours
in a Supervised Agricultural Experience other than class time; demonstrated five parliamentary procedure abili-
ties; maintained a satisfactory scholastic record in the agricultural course; submitted a written application; led a
group discussion for 15 minutes; participated in three official functions in the FFA; and also complete 15 hours
of community service. Members who received the degree are pictured above, front from left, Karen Cline, Libby
Spring, Kayleigh O’Connor, Alysaa Hall, Devin Coronado and David Leathers; and back, Shelby Koenig, Justin
Siefker, Devin Rabe, Jake Horstman and Austin Schulte. Absent from meeting and picture but receiving degree
Shayla Rice, Tyler Fisher, Elisabeth Miller and Lahanna Lehman. (Submitted photo)
Marestail control
BY JIM LOPSHIRE
Ag educator
OSU-Extension
Paulding County
Soybean producers have a list of
weeds that cause the most yield loss
from competition for light, nutrients,
and water. This list is a result of a
fall weed survey completed by OSU
Extension personnel in various counties
around the state. The survey determines
the weed species not controlled in an
herbicide/weed management program.
In Paulding County, 90 soybean
fields were surveyed in 2012 prior to
harvest to determine which weed spe-
cies were most often not controlled dur-
ing the regular season. The top soybean
weed problems identified in the survey
were common ragweed, common lambs-
quarters and marestail.
Marestail is quickly establishing
itself as the newest weed problem in
northwest Ohio. In 2012, five northwest
Ohio counties reported 50 percent or
more or their fields surveyed as having
large patches of 8 or more plants scat-
tered in the field.
Marestail has quickly become a prob-
lem weed because seeds only germinate
on or near the soil surface. No-till soy-
beans planted into cornstalks without
any tillage provide an ideal environ-
ment for germination and early growth.
Tillage would bury the seeds and pre-
vent germination and emergence.
Young plants will remain in a low-
growing rosette stage through late April,
followed by stem elongation or bolting
and growth to an upright mature plant.
Plants that emerge the previous fall
will start bolting earlier than spring-
emerging plants. Pictures of marestail
at various growth stages can be found at
the following URL: http://www.ppws.
vt.edu/scott/weed_id/erica.htm.
The control problem occurs because
glyphosate is not effective on mares-
tail plants that have already bolted and
produced elongating stems higher than
six inches. In addition, many marestail
populations have become glyphosate
resistant.
Herbicide programs must consist of a
spring burndown to ensure soybean fields
are free of marestail by planting time
and residual pre-emergent herbicides to
ensure marestail control for another six
to eight weeks. Their spring burndown
should be a mix of glyphosate and anoth-
er herbicide to ensure that the field is
free of marestail at the time of soybean
planting and prevent the development of
herbicide resistant weeds. The herbicide
2,4-D is probably the most effective,
however, farmers are reluctant to use
2,4-D because in order to prevent crop
injury they have to wait at least seven
days before they can plant soybeans.
The extension publication, Control of
Marestail in No-till Soybeans, provides
specific information on herbicide selec-
tion, timing and rates. This fact sheet
may be found at: http://agcrops.osu.edu/
specialists/weeds/marestail/marestail-
fact09_000.pdf.
Spring farm
safety
BY JAMES J. HOORMAN
Assistant Professor
OSU-Extension
Putnam County
National Safety Council
statistic show that 700 farm-
ers die in work-related acci-
dents annually with another
120,000 injuries. Many acci-
dents may be prevented if
proper safety procedures are
followed (Bruynis, 2012).
Jepsen recommends these
farm safety measures:
• “Keep the farm safe for
children. Children should not
be taken for rides on trac-
tors or other farm equip-
ment because they may be
injured. Train your children
about farm hazards (moving
equipment, pinch points, farm
chemicals, electrical hazards,
grain bin safety etc.)
• Provide safety training
for all family members and
employees (including volun-
teers).
• Make sure all safety
shields are in place and work-
ing properly. Use Roll Over
Protection Structures (ROPS)
on all tractors to prevent acci-
dents.
• Shut the engine off before
oiling, cleaning or adjusting
equipment. It easy to get tan-
gled up in equipment and get
injured.
• Make sure the fam-
ily member is mature (old)
enough to handle the task
assigned.
• Follow all safety precau-
tions on farm chemicals such
a re-entry intervals and per-
sonal protective equipment.
• Make sure you have suf-
ficient labor resources to get
the work done. Tired, sleepy
employees or family mem-
bers are at increased risk for
an accident.
• Senior farmers may face
similar hazards as young peo-
ple due to increased chance
of slippage or injury, medica-
tion, unfamiliar electronics or
equipment, slower response
time, and tiring easily”
(Jepsen, 2012). Check up on
senior farmers often.
Harvest Land Cooperative
offers this advice:
• “Remember to always
turn off equipment, lower
hydraulics, and remove the
key before leaving equipment
and vehicles unattended.
• Staying alert during
spring farm work is very
important. Fatigue, drowsi-
ness and illness can lead to
mishaps in the field.
• Drink lots of water,
and remember to eat prop-
erly throughout the day. Take
breaks for your mind and
your body.
• Recognize when you
have had enough, and turn
the operation over to some-
one else.
• It is a good idea to have
someone trained in first aid on
each farm work team. Keep
well stocked first aid kits and
updated fire extinguishers on
hand at each work site. Be
sure workers know how to
use a fire extinguisher. And
keep important phone num-
bers on hand in case of emer-
gencies.
• Electrocution is one
of the greatest hazards on
today’s farms. Before head-
ing back into the fields this
spring, be aware of working
near overhead power lines.
Keep farm equipment at least
10 feet away from all over-
head power lines. The mini-
mum 10 foot distance is a
360-degree rule – below, to
the side and above lines.
Be aware of increased
height when loading and
transporting larger modern
tractors. Before transit, avoid
raising the arms of planters,
cultivators or truck beds near
power lines”
( Har vest Land
Cooperative, April 2013).
Farm Bureau launches enhanced OurOhio.org website
Information submitted
COLUMBUS — Ohioans
looking to learn about food
and farms, excel in the gar-
den, find new recipes or
great events and tours can
turn to the newly redesigned
OurOhio.org website. The
website, originally launched
by Ohio Farm Bureau in
2005, is a resource for hun-
dreds of thousands of visitors
searching for expert informa-
tion on Ohio food, gardening,
cooking and related events,
as well as stories about Ohio
farms and information about
Ohio-produced agricultural
products and businesses.
The new website offers
enhanced functionality and
features including an upgrad-
ed Buying Local Directory,
a new video section, easier
sharing features, and a direct
connection and search func-
tion tying in with the ofbf.
org website.
Users will be able to
search hundreds of markets
and locations throughout
Ohio as part of the upgraded
Buying Local Directory, view
an interactive Google map
and print directions directly
from the page. Each farm
or market listing will have
its own page listing products
for sale, hours and contact
information.
“The Our Ohio website
is just one of the ways Ohio
tries to connect farms and
consumers,” said Ohio Farm
Bureau’s Vice President of
Communications Pat Petzel.
“We are always looking for
ways to tell stories, answer
consumer questions and pro-
vide engagement opportuni-
ties such as events and tours
where farmers can interact
with their customers and fel-
low Farm Bureau members.”
An Ohio Farm Bureau
membership is the best way to
receive ongoing information
about Ohio food, agriculture,
gardening and events. Join by
calling 1-888-GrowWithFB
or visiting GrowWithFB.org.
Our Ohio is an effort
to help further Ohio Farm
Bureau’s mission of forg-
ing a partnership between
farms and consumers and
is supported by Nationwide
Insurance.
See updates at
delphosherald.com
Senate panel approves
massive farm bill
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Agriculture Committee
on Tuesday approved a massive five-year farm bill that would
cut spending while also creating new subsidies for farmers.
The legislation approved 15-5 includes concessions to
Southern rice and peanut farmers, thanks to a new top
Republican on the committee, Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran.
The bill eliminates $5 billion in annual subsidies, called direct
payments, that are important to those Southern farmers but
makes it easier for them to receive alternate subsidies if prices
dip.
The Senate bill calls for a total of roughly $2.4 billion a year
in cuts, while a House version to be considered Wednesday
would save $4 billion out of almost $100 billion annually.
Those cuts include more than $600 million in yearly savings
from across-the-board cuts that took effect earlier this year.
Much of the savings in the House and Senate bills comes
from eliminating the direct payments, which are frequently
criticized because they aren’t tied to production or crop prices.
Part of that savings would go toward deficit reduction, but
the rest of the money would create new programs and raise
subsidies for some crops while business is booming in the
agricultural sector.
Republican Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas, the top Republican
on the committee in the last session of Congress, criticized the
higher subsidies for Southern farmers, which are essentially
a lower threshold for rice and peanut subsidies to kick in.
Roberts said the new policy could guarantee that those farmers
profits are average or above average.
“I simply don’t know how to justify a program that pays
producers more than the cost of production and essentially
becomes nothing more than another income transfer program,
not a risk management tool,” Roberts said.
Under the House bill, authored by Rep. Frank Lucas,
R-Okla., those subsidies for rice and peanut farmers could kick
in even sooner. These “target price” programs allow farmers
to receive subsidies if prices fall below a certain threshold. It
hasn’t been used much in recent years because of record crop
prices, but is intended to be a safety net if prices collapse.
The bill includes generous protections for other crops as
well. Both bills would boost federally subsidized crop insur-
ance and create a new program that covers smaller losses
on planted crops before crop insurance kicks in, favoring
Midwestern corn and soybean farmers who use crop insurance
most often.
Nebraska Sen. Mike Johanns, a Republican on the panel
who served as Agriculture Secretary in the George W. Bush
administration, was critical of the entire bill, arguing that the
bill was more generous than Nebraska farmers had asked for
and that the added help for the Southern farmers could endan-
ger the bill on the Senate floor. The Senate easily passed a farm
bill last year that did not include those higher subsidies.
Johanns also said the bill has fewer cuts than advertised
because the across the board cuts have already taken effect. He
called many of the cuts an “illusion.”
“It’s no way to deal with budget problems,” he said.
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., chairwoman of the Senate
Agriculture Committee, said all of the changes are meant to
make farm programs more efficient.
“Instead of subsidies that pay out every year even in good
times, the bill creates risk management tools that support farm-
ers when they are negatively impacted by weather disaster or
market events beyond their control,” she said.
In order to boost savings, the Senate bill would cut $400
million out of almost $80 billion spent annually on food
stamps, now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program, or SNAP. The legislation would save dollars by tar-
geting states that give people who don’t have heating bills very
small amounts of heating assistance so they can automatically
qualify for higher food stamp benefits.
1
ATTENTION:
Delphos Community
Midwest Rehab has partnered with Heritage Health Care
and New Vision Nursing & Home Care to be your
Home Health Therapy Provider in Delphos
and the surrounding communities
If you want Midwest Rehab, you must ask your doctor to
refer to one of these agencies or call Midwest Rehab directly.
B
e
t
t
e
r
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.
.
S
t
r
o
n
g
e
r
.
.
.
F
a
s
t
e
r
MIDWEST REHAB, INC.
485 MOXIE LANE, DELPHOS
(P) 419-692-3405; (F) 419-692-3401
HERITAGE HEALTH CARE
(P) 419-222-2404; (F) 419-222-2786
NEW VISION NURSING &
HOME CARE
(P) 567-356-5113; (F) 567-356-5106
Jenny Geier, Offce Manager;
Katie Greathouse, OT;
Steve Zuber, PT & Owner;
Mary Vorst, Billing Manager;
Heather Bockrath, DPT
“To honor
and remember”
On Memorial Day our nation pays tribute and
remembers all those from our country who paid
the ultimate sacrifice in defense of freedom for
our nation ... and locally we want to honor those
who are actively serving in our military.
Send us the names of active military
personnel as well as where they are serving,
spouse and/or parents’ name to the Herald
by May 22. Send info by
email to: nspencer@delphosherald.com
mail to: The Delphos Herald,
405 N. Main St., Delphos OH 45833
or drop off at the office.
Publications date Sat., May 25.
Nothing feels beter than a white, bright, healthy
smile. Tat’s why we ofer a full line of
general and cosmetic dental services to
keep your teeth beautiful.
Brighten Every Day
with a Great Smile
Dr. Jacob Mohr
General Dentist
NEW PATIENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME!
419.692.GRIN
(4746)
Open Mon-Wed-Thurs 8-5,
Fri 8-11
Call for appointment
www.mohrsmilesohio.com
Thursday, May 16, 2013 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy
Birthday
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Delphos Postal
Museum
TODAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5:30 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission meets at
the museum, 241 N. Main St.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
7 p.m. — Spencerville
Local Schools Board of
Education meets.
St. John’s Athletic Boosters
meet in the Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. — The Fort
Jennings Board of Education
meets in the library.
Delphos Chapter 26 Order
of the Eastern Star meets at
the Masonic Temple on North
Main Street.
Delphos VFW Auxiliary
meets at the VFW Hall, 213
W. Fourth St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —
Delphos Postal Museum is
open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
May 17
Jerry Landwehr
Erica Bohn
Alaina Kortokrax
Hunter Haehn
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Chili-Lime
Southwest Wraps
½ cup mayonnaise 1
tablespoon lime juice
1 teaspoon chili powder
3 cups shredded cooked
chicken
1 (10-ounce) can diced
tomatoes and green chiles
1 (15.25-ounce) can
black beans, rinsed and
drained
1 (15.25-ounce) can
whole-kernel corn, rinsed
and drained
½ cup chopped cilantro
7 (10-inch) flour tor-
tillas
In a large bowl, com-
bine mayonnaise, lime
juice and chili powder. Stir
in chicken, tomatoes and
green chiles, beans, corn
and cilantro. Spoon mix-
ture into each tortilla. Roll
up tortillas, and cut in half.
Makes 14 servings.
Make the filling a day
ahead and store, covered,
in refrigerator.
Bacon-Wrapped
Asparagus
10 fresh asparagus
spears, trimmed
1/8 teaspoon pepper
5 bacon strips, halved
lengthwise
Place asparagus on
a sheet of waxed paper;
coat with cooking spray.
Sprinkle with pepper; turn
to coat. Wrap a bacon
piece around each spear;
secure ends with tooth-
picks. Grill, uncovered,
over medium heat for 4
to 6 minutes on each side
or until bacon is crisp.
Discard toothpicks. Yield:
2 to 3 servings.
Rhubarb Mallow
Cobbler
4 cups diced fresh or
frozen rhubarb
2 1/2 cups sugar, divid-
ed
1 cup miniature marsh-
mallows
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
extract
1 3/4 cups flour
3 teaspoons baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk
In a large bowl, com-
bine rhubarb and 1-1/2
cups sugar. Transfer to a
greased 11x7-inch baking
dish. Sprinkle with marsh-
mallows.
In a small bowl, cream
the butter, vanilla and
remaining sugar until light
and fluffy. Combine the
flour, baking powder and
salt; add to creamed mix-
ture alternately with milk.
Beat just until moistened;
spoon over rhubarb.
Bake at 350 degrees
for 50-55 minutes or until
topping is golden brown.
Serve warm.
If you enjoyed these
recipes, made changes or
have one to share, email
kitchenpress@yahoo.com
Share the
flavors of spring!
Shauna Turner Smith, executive director of the Delphos
Area Art Guild was the guest speaker at the Delphos
Optimist Club meeting. Optimist member Kevin Wieging
thanked her for coming. Smith’s mission is to promote and
encourage personal appreciation and interaction with art
in the community and surrounding area. The Delphos Area
Art Guild’s goal is to have new and consistent offerings for
the community. (Photo submitted)
Optimists host DAAG director
SENIOR
LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP
WORKERS
MAY 16-18
THURSDAY: Sue
Vasquez, Sue Schwinnen,
Joyce Feathers, Sandy Hahn,
Lyn Rhoads and Gwen
Rohrbacher.
FRIDAY:Mary Jane
Watkins, Joyce Feathers,
Joyce Day and Rosie Wittler.
SATURDAY: Vera Chiles,
Millie Minnig, Valeta Ditto
and Marge Kaverman.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS:
5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon
Saturday.
Anyone who would like
to volunteer should con-
tact Catharine Gerdemann,
419-695-8440; Alice
Heidenescher, 419-692-5362;
Linda Bockey 419-692-7145;
or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-
692-7331.
If help is needed, contact
the Thrift Shop at 419-692-
2942 between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF MAY 20-24
MONDAY: Salisbury steak,
mashed potatoes, cauliflower,
bread, margarine, fruit, coffee
and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: BBQ chick-
en, corn O’brien, cauliflower,
Heavenly Hash tarts, coffee
and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Meatloaf,
mashed potatoes, California-
blend veggies, bread, marga-
rine, peaches, coffee and 2%
milk.
THURSDAY: Baked spa-
ghetti, broccoli, garlic toast,
peaches, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Taco salad, fruit,
coffee and 2% milk.
Blood drive falls short of goal
The American Red Cross
held a blood drive at the
Delphos Eagles on May 9,
2013. The goal for the day
was 37 pints of blood and 36
pints were collected.
Those reaching gallon
levels are: Judy Pohlman (4
gallons), Janet Siefker (8 gal-
lons) and Joel Calvelage (11
gallons).
The next blood drive at the
Delphos Eagles is scheduled
for July 11.
COLUMN
Announce you or your family member’s
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
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In Print & Online for
DELPHOS HERALD
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6 – The Herald Thursday, May 16, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM COX
DHI Correspondent
CONVOY - Ottoville’s Luke Schimmoeller
dominated Wednesday’s Division IV section-
al final on the mound and at the plate.
The junior right-hander blanked
Lincolnview 2-0 on two hits and drove in
both Big Green runs.
Ottoville (9-9) advances to the Coldwater
district where they’ll play the St. Henry/Fort
Recovery winner in Wednesday night’s sec-
ond game (6:30 p.m.). Lincolnview is 9-13.
Schimmoeller was masterful on the mound,
striking out 12 and walking only one. He
overcame four throwing errors by his infield.
“What a game he pitched today!” Ottoville
coach Tony Castronova exclaimed. “We made
those errors and it didn’t bother him. Some
pitchers, you make errors like that, it flusters
the pitcher; it didn’t fluster him. He’s a base-
ball junky. He loves baseball; he loves being
on that mound.”
The Green mounted the game’s first threat
in the bottom of the first, getting 2-out singles
from Schimmoeller and right fielder Brandon
Boecker, but Lancer ace Eli Farmer then got
first baseman Jared Fanning on a fly to center.
Lincolnview threatened in the top of the
second, via two Ottoville throwing errors,
but Schimmoeller snuffed that one on a
groundout to second. The Big Green got
on the board in the bottom of the third
without getting a ball out of the infield.
Second baseman Craig Odenweller grounded
one into the third/short hole; slick-fielding
shortstop Nick Leeth flagged it down but
Odenweller beat the throw. Center fielder
Derek Schimmoeller and left fielder Jacob
Turnwald both laid down perfect bunts for
singles, filling the bags. Luke Schimmoeller
bounced into a force, short to second, plating
Odenweller. Farmer escaped further dam-
age when Boecker ripped a liner to second
baseman Troy Patterson, who threw to first,
doubling Luke Schimmoeller.
Lincolnview got its first hit in the fourth
when first baseman Conner McCleery crushed
a double to the gap in left center to start the
inning. McCleery, however, got no farther.
The Lancers mounted another threat in the
fifth on a 1-out walk to third baseman Austin
Leeth and another Ottoville throwing error
but, again, Schimmoeller was up to the task.
The Big Green added a second run in the
bottom of the fifth. DH Cory Fischer ground-
ed one through the third/short hole for a
leadoff single and was replaced by pinch-run-
ner Wes Markward. Odenweller reached on
another perfect bunt, putting runners at first
and second. Derek Schimmoeller lined one
up the middle that was flagged down by Nick
Leeth but the ball spurted out of his glove,
eliminating any chance for a double play; he
was still able to corral the ball and tag the
bag, forcing Odenweller, putting runners at
the corners. Turnwald bounced to third base-
man Austin Leeth, who nailed Markward in
a run-down. Luke Schimmoeller then drove
in Derek Schimmoeller with a 2-out single
through the third/short hole.
The Lancers’ last threat of the game came
in the top of the seventh when right fielder
Derek Friesner bombed a double into the
gap in left center. Friesner got no farther,
however.
“We knew coming in that they were gonna
throw Schimmoeller and he was gonna pitch
well,” said Lancer coach Kevin Longstreth.
“You’re not gonna win many games with zero
runs. We had guys in scoring position quite a
few times and just couldn’t get that big hit.
That’s kinda been our Achilles’ heel all year.
I knew runs were gonna be at a premium this
game. They (the Lancers) played hard and
just didn’t come out on the right end tonight.”
Farmer was solid on the hill for
Lincolnview, yielding two earned runs on
eight hits, while striking out two and walking
nobody. He threw 76 pitches, of which 49
were strikes.
Schimmoeller stymies Lancers 2-0; Ottoville advances
Panthers knockout Lady Green in tournament
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
RURAL MIDDLE POINT —
Ottoville stayed within reasonable
striking distance of Parkway’s fast-
pitch softball unit.
That is, until the seventh inning
when the Lady Panthers put it away
with six runs to pace a 12-1 Division
IV sectional final triumph on a windy
Wednesday at Lincolnview Field.
The Lady Panthers (17-5) advance
to take on Patrick Henry 5 p.m.
Tuesday at Elida.
“We stayed with them for six
innings; it was only 5-1 entering the
sixth. We told Kenzie (Martin) to just
keep them there because anything can
happen,” Ottoville coach Joe Modica
explained. “They just caught up to
her in the seventh inning and started
to hit ropes all over the place; I vis-
ited the mound and told her she had
to adjust and she did, getting the last
three outs. We played good defense
behind her; we made them earn their
runs and I can live with that. At the
plate, we put the ball in play pretty
well; they had to make plays.”
Parkway mentor Mark Esselstein
was somewhat pleased with his group.
“We started out hitting the ball
well, especially the first inning, then
we went into a lull offensively. We
kept adding to the lead with a run
here or there but got on our front
foot too much and popped it up,” he
added. “We caught up to their pitcher
in the seventh inning. Kylie is our
number two pitcher but she’s a good
pitcher of her own; she only really
had one mistake. I give a lot of credit
to Ottoville because they played good
defense against us.”
With the wind blowing out of the
west toward the right-field line, the
Panthers got three runs in the top
of the first against Ottoville starter
Martin (2-9) on four hits, including
a run-scoring triple by Rachel King
(scoring Kayla Walls — 2-for-3, 2
steals) and a one-out two-run inside
the park home run to right by Sierra
Fent; the ball hit in front of Robyn
Turnwald and then took a wicked hop
toward the corner, allowing the batter
to circle the bases.
The Lady Green answered with
one in the home half against Panther
right-hander Kylie Snyder (6-2) on
a one-out single to left by Megan
Risner, a two-out error on a pickoff
play and a double to left by Martin.
After Snyder got the final out, that
began a run of 16 straight outs (9 by
strikeout).
The Panthers made it 4-1 in the
third on three hits, an error and a
fielder’s-choice groundout by
Lindsey Walls (plating Snyder).
Parkway added a tally to its edge
in the fourth courtesy of a leadoff
triple by number nine hitter Olivia
Smith and a 1-out sacrifice fly by
King.
Ottoville catcher Courtney Von Sossan reaches out for the ball to try
and get Parkway’s Sierra Fent at home in the first inning Wednesday
night at Lincolnview. Fent was safe as she completed a two-run inside-
the-park homer in the Panthers’ 12-1 tourney triumph. (Delphos Herald/
Pat Agler)
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
There has been a major uproar about the umpiring
in Major League Baseball over the last week or so.
Whether it was a misinterpretation of the rules or a
blown call on a video replay or whatever, the arbiters
are under fire more than ever these days.
They are going to make mistakes; that is part of the
game in any sport.
Do they make more mistakes these days than in the
past or do we just notice it more?
After all, they didn’t have replays in the 1940s and
50s, for example, and the use of the technology has
exploded in the recent years.
There are so many different camera angles: you
have slow motion, slow-mo, super slow-mo, super-
duper slow-mo, etc.
You have the “K zone” for balls and strikes and of
course, sometimes I — uh, we — wonder what the
heck is the strike zone that the guy (or gal) is calling!
I don’t know what you can do to improve the
situation, either — every flaw is exposed — except
to drill, drill and drill these umps more. I think they
already work hard.
A thought occurred to me that maybe they could
spread them out more; for example, move the first and
third base umps farther out into the outfield so they
can be closer to the wall. However, then they are far-
ther from the bases and makes that call more difficult.
Which one is better?
Have they ever thought of having six umps, like
they do in the playoffs, all the time?
I realize that the money involved would go up
substantially but when you have billionaire owners
and millionaire players — when will the first billion-
dollar contract be signed? — I think sparing a few
thousand dollars to try and get these things right
might be worth the dime.
Umpires under fire
Ottoville pinch-runner Wes Markward gets cut down at the plate as Lincolnview
catcher Tyler Richey makes a good play to tag him out Wednesday night at Convoy. The
Big Green grabbed a 2-0 tournament victory. (Delphos Herald/Tina Eley)
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
2013 Western Buckeye League
Meet
Bath Stadium
Wednesday’s Results
Girls Team Rankings - 3
Events Scored: Defiance 24,
Celina 21, Wapakoneta 15, Ottawa-
Glandorf 13, St. Marys Memorial
12, Shawnee 4, Elida and Van
Wert 2.
Boys Team Rankings - 4 Events
Scored: Ottawa-Glandorf 39, Elida
26, Wapakoneta 17, Kenton and
Celina 10, Defiance 8, Van Wert 6,
Bath and Shawnee 4.
Finals (10-8-6-4-2-1):
Girls 4x800 Meter Relay:
1. Defiance 9:59.02; 2. Ottawa-
Glandorf 9:59.88; 3. St. Marys
Memorial 10:03.91; 4. Shawnee
10:25.98; 5. Van Wert (Williams,
Barnhart, Gamble, Eikenberry)
10:40.27; 6. Celina 10:50.26.
Boys 4x800 Meter Relay:
1. Ottawa-Glandorf 8:06.20; 2.
Defiance 8:07.61; 3. Van Wert
(Schalois, Butler, Holliday,
Fleming) 8:23.51; 4. Shawnee
8:27.23; 5. Celina 8:33.46; 6.
Wapakoneta 8:47.60.
Girls High Jump: 1. Wenning
(C) 5-4; 2. (tie) Thams (W) and
Hayzlett (W) 4-10; 4. Burkhart (D)
4-10; 5. Aubrey Williams 4-10; 6.
Warnecke (O) 4-10.
Boys Pole Vault: 1. Laubenthal
(O) 12-10; 2. Nick Pauff 12-6; 3.
(tie) Hinders (C) and Ferenbaugh
(W) 12-0; 5. Marling (K) 12-0; 6.
Hinegardner (W) 11-6.
Boys Long Jump: 1. Beckman
(O) 21-0.25; 2. Brandon Stinson (E)
21-0.75; 3. Bertram (W) 20-2.50;
4. Lauck (W) 20-1.75; 5. Hinders
(C) J20-1.50; 6. Laubenthal (O)
20-1.50.
Girls Discus: 1. Burkhart (D)
119-10; 2. Sutter (C) 116-6; 3.
Heffner (SM) 114-8; 4. Bellman
(O) 113-8; 5. Brehm (C) 113-2; 6.
Bourne (W) 107-3.
Boys Shot Put: 1. Quentin Poling
(E) 52-8.75; 2. Abrams (K) 51-0.25;
3. Wells (O) 47-2.75; 4. Jones (B)
45-6; 5. Karhoff (O) 45-1.50; 6.
Martinez (C) 44-9.
Preliminaries (top 7 to Friday’s
Finals)
Girls 100 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Wenning (C) 15.62; 2. Schimmoeler
(O) 16.50; 3. Jackson (C) 16.89; 4.
Marlowe (SH) 16.95q; 5. Kuhlman
(O) 16.97; 6. Khiarea Deshazer (E)
17.01; 7. M. Sperry (V) 17.26.
Boys 110 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Toumazes (O) 16.01; 2. Jackson (C)
16.08; 3. Lemmerman (SM) 16.11;
4. Frieson (SH) 16.19; 5. Kevin
Russell (E) 16.30; 6. Moening (O)
16.36; 7. Cook (K) 16.51.
Girls 100 Meter Dash: 1. Ayers
(B) 12.74; 2. Stechschulte (O)
12.80; 3. A. Clay (V) 12.93; 4.
Maag (O) 13.26; 5. Gottschalk
(SM) 13.30; 6. A. Danylchuk (V)
13.39; 7. Erin Kesler (E) 13.42.
Boys 100 Meter Dash: 1. Nick
Pauff (E) 11.45; 2. Byer (C) 11.55;
3. T. Branson (V) 11.55; 4. Frieson
(SH) 11.65; 5. Christler (W) 11.69;
6. Desmend White (E) 11.84; 7.
Beckman (O) 11.85.
Girls 4x200 Meter Relay: 1.
Kenton 1:47.38; 2. Celina 1:49.33;
3. Ottawa-Glandorf 1:49.55; 4.
Shawnee 1:51.85; 5. Wapakoneta
1:52.53; 6. Defiance 1:54.34; 7. Van
Wert (Dowdy, Danylchuk, Koontz,
Meyers) 1:54.63.
Boys 4x200 Meter Relay: 1.
Van Wert (Pierce, Branson, Krugh,
Kopp) 1:32.76; 2. Celina 1:34.67;
3. Ottawa-Glandorf 1:34.84; 4. Bath
1:35.66; 5. Shawnee 1:35.71; 6.
Elida (Desmend White, Clark Etzler,
Avery Sumpter, Khory Kesler)
1:36.31; 7. Defiance 1:36.99.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay: 1.
Kenton 50.62; 2. Ottawa-Glandorf
51.40; 3. Van Wert (Meyers, Dowdy,
A. Clay, Danylchuk) 52.34; 4. Celina
52.90; 5. St. Marys Memorial 53.34;
6. Wapakoneta 53.75; 7. Elida (Tori
Bown, Megan Tracy, Erin Kesler,
Aubrey Williams) 54.49.
Boys 4x100 Meter Relay: 1.
Elida (Nick Pauff, Khory Kesler,
Avery Sumpter, Brandon Stinson)
44.75; 2. Van Wert (Pierce,
Branson, Lloyd, Krugh) 44.78; 3.
Wapakoneta 45.71; 4. Celina 45.85;
5. Ottawa-Glandorf 46.29; 6. St.
Marys Memorial 46.62; 7. Bath
47.06.
Girls 400 Meter Dash: 1. Roberts
(SH) 59.17; 2. Carr (C) 1:01.37; 3.
Bostelman (K) 1:01.43; 4. Bellman
(O) 1:04.14; 5. Fett (D) 1:04.35;
6. D. Ellerbrock (O) 1:05.05; 7.
Detmer (D) 1:06.13.
Boys 400 Meter Dash: 1. S. Kopp
(V) 52.28; 2. Toumazes (O) 52.29;
3. Brandon Stinson (E) 52.55; 4.
Virdin (SH) 53.24; 5. Q. Salcido (V)
53.47; 6. Marks (C) 54.07; 7. Rex
(B) 54.23.
Girls 300 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Wenning (C) 46.93; 2. Hardy (SH)
48.23; 3. Thams (W) 48.52; 4. W.
Meyers (V) 49.41; 5. Jackson (C)
50.56; 6. Heitkamp (SM) 52.31; 7.
M. Sperry (V) 52.75.
Round Up
See OTTOVILLE, page 7
See GREEN, page 7
See MUSINGS, page 7
See ROUND UP, page 7
Thursday, May 16, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
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Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business May 15, 2013
(Continued from page 6)
“We were kinda worried
about Eli,” added Longstreth.
“He hurt himself at the
Ottoville game (colliding
with the fence in a 7-3 Lancer
win last Friday, suffering a
hip injury). This was his first
time back out. He did what
we expected; he pitched to
contact. The defense for the
most part did what they need-
ed to.”
Luke Schimmoeller (2-for-
3, 2 RBIs) and Odenweller
(2-for-2, 1 run) led the Big
Green offense.
“We had some really
clutch hits today,” added
Castronova. “The wind was
blowing in and we knew
Farmer was a good pitcher.
He keeps the ball down, so
we had to play a lot of small-
ball and it worked out for
us. You can’t say enough for
these guys. They worked hard
and we’re going to district for
the first time in five years or
something like that.”
Lincolnview is slated to
play Kalida 5 p.m. Monday
in regular action.
Lincolnview (ab-r-h-rbi)
Nick Leeth ss 4-0-0-0,
Williams cf 3-0-0-0, Oechsle
dh 3-0-0-0, McCleery 1b
3-0-1-0, Richey c 3-0-0-0,
Youtsey lf 3-0-0-0, Friesner
3-0-1-0, Neate pr 0-0-0-0,
Patterson 2b 3-0-0-0, Austin
Leeth 3b 2-0-0-0, Farmer p
0-0-0-0. Totals 27-0-2-0.
Ottoville (ab-r-h-rbi)
Derek Schimmoeller cf
3-1-1-0, Turnwald lf 3-0-
1-0, Luke Schimmoeller
p 3-0-2-2, Boecker rf 3-0-
1-0, Fanning 1b 3-0-0-
0, Horstman 3b 2-0-0-0,
Hohlbein ss 3-0-0-0, Fischer
dh 3-0-1-0, Markward pr 0-0-
0-0, Odenweller 2b 2-1-2-0,
Van Oss c 0-0-0-0. Totals
25-2-8-2.
Score by Innings:
Lincolnview 000 000 0
- 0 2 1
Ottoville 001 010 x - 2 8 4
WP: Luke Schimmoeller;
LP: Farmer. LOB:
Lincolnview 7, Ottoville
6. Double Play: Patterson
to McCleery (LV). 2B:
McCleery, Friesner.
(Continued from page 6)
In the Panther sixth, they made it 6-1 on a one-out free pass
(Kayla Walls), a steal and a 2-out misplayed fly ball off the bat
of Snyder.
In the Parkway seventh, the Panthers sent 11 to the dish,
including several pinch-hitters, in putting together six hits and
two free passes. The big hit was a two-run single by Snyder
(3-for-5), an RBI double by Tara Walls (3-for-4) and run-
scoring singles by Zoey Pond and Smith (2-for-4). As well,
Kayle Heckler knocked in the last tally with a ground ball.
Ottoville got a leadoff single to left by Alena Horstman and she
advanced on a wild pitch. Martin fouled out down the right-
field line and Horstman went to third but was ruled to have left
early and was doubled up. Ottoville hosts Wayne Trace Friday,
visits Continental Saturday and closes the regular season in a
makeup game versus Kalida, hopefully Tuesday.
Parkway picked up Fairview at home Friday before continu-
ing its tourney trail.
PARKWAY (12)
ab-r-h-rbi
Kayla Walls cf 3-2-2-0, Abby Stephenson ph 1-0-0-0,
Rachel King lf 3-1-1-2, Kayla Stephenson ph 0-1-0-0, Kylie
Snyder p 5-0-3-2, Kayle Heckler cr 0-1-0-0, Sierra Fent 1b
3-1-1-2, Madison Roehm ph 0-0-0-0, Lindsey Walls 2b 4-1-
1-1, Kayle Heckler ph 1-0-0-1, Tara Walls 3b 4-0-3-1, Halle
Beougher pr/ph 1-1-0-0, Selena Burtch 3b 0-0-0-0, Ashlynn
Henderson ss 4-1-2-0, Zoey Pond c 4-0-1-1, Whitney Rollins
cr 0-1-0-0, Olivia Smith rf 4-2-2-1. Totals 37-12-16-11.
OTTOVILLE (1)
ab-r-h-rbi
Paige Lucas 2b 3-0-0-0, Megan Risner cf 3-1-1-0, Alena
Horstman lf 3-0-1-0, Kenzie Martin p 3-0-1-1, Alexa Marlow
cr 0-0-0-0, Nikki Burgei 1b 3-0-0-0, Courtney Von Sossan c
2-0-0-0, Morgan Beining ss 2-0-0-0, Robyn Turnwald rf 2-0-
0-0, Alexa Marlow rf 0-0-0-0, Stephanie Horstman 3b 2-0-0-0.
Totals 23-1-3-1.
Score by Innings:
Parkway 3 0 1 1 0 1 6 - 12
Ottoville 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 1
E: Fent, Von Sossan, Turnwald; DP: Parkway 1; LOB:
Parkway 9, Ottoville 1; 2B: King, T. Walls, Martin; 3B: K.
Walls, T. Walls, Smith; HR: Fent; SB: K. Walls, Snyder 2,
Beougher, Rollins, Smith; SF: King.
IP H R ER BB SO
PARKWAY
Snyder (W, 6-2) 7.0 3 1 1 0 11
OTTOVILLE
Martin (L, 2-9) 7.0 16 12 11 4 4
WP: Snyder.
(Continued from page 6)
In my job here, I have gotten to know
quite a few men — mostly men but a
few women — that are the arbiters for
our local sports — football, basketball,
soccer, etc. — and I have grown to
appreciate the job they do every day.
Let’s face it; for every call they make,
they are half-right and half-wrong, no
matter what.
They are also not making a killing
doing it; they have to have a love of the
game — plus thick skin and small ears!
— to do this thankless job.
I would venture a guess that they
don’t like making mistakes and want to
make the call right every time.
We’ll see where it goes from here.
Speaking of baseball, kudos to the
high school baseball team in Elk Grove,
California, who saved a young girl’s
life.
According to the story by Laken
Litman, it seems as if the Valley High
School team was finishing up its season
when they heard a young girl screaming
in the parking lot next to the baseball
field. A mother was dropping her daugh-
ter off for an after-school program but
accidentally put her car in reverse and
ran over the girl.
Every player on that team tore off to
the parking lot and up to 15 of the guys
helped pick up the car off the girl and a
coach pulled her girl out.
Thankfully, according to police
reports, the girls will be OK.
With that in mind, there were a
quartet of items that popped up recent-
ly for me to potentially write about —
isn’t that nice of them? — though my
comments won’t be long.
One is the Tiger Woods/Sergio
Garcia flap, with Garcia blaming Woods
for causing an errant tee shot during last
weekend’s third round of the Players
Championship, providing us with some
drama.
The second is that announcement
that Donovan McNabb will officially
retire in September as a Philadelphia
Eagle.
The third is that Green Bay Packers’
CEO/President Mark Murphy wants
former quarterback Brett Favre back as
a member of “the family”.
The fourth is that new Cincinnati
Bengal linebacker James Harrison
spends around half a million dollars for
what he terms “body work” — mas-
sages, chiropractic and acupuncture, for
example.
Woods and Garcia have never gotten
along from day one. I really don’t know
who to believe but let’s just write that
this might refuel what everyone had
hoped would be a modern-day rivalry
like Nicklaus/Watson.
McNabb will now be on the clock to
a potential shot in the Hall of Fame in
five years. In all honesty, he has some
good numbers to have a legit chance to
be elected, though at best, it likely won’t
be on the first ballot.
I wouldn’t like to be on the commit-
tee.
Thirdly, if Favre is not a member
of the Pack family, that is his fault; he
turned his departure into a soap opera.
I add that his No. 4 should be retired.
Finally, I am surprised others don’t
spend a goodly amount of moolah to
try and keep their body in tip-top shape
to play football. I believe it was Roger
Craig that had a masseuse that regularly
worked on him years ago during his
playing days.
I think I would do whatever I could
— legally, of course — to give me a
chance to not only have success during
my career but to be able to walk after it.
(Continued from page 6)
Boys 300 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Bader (C) 41.64; 2. Quentin
Poling (E) 42.98; 3. Moening
(O) 43.13; 4. T. Moore (V)
43.17; 5. Brown (SM) 43.52;
6. Jackson (C) 44.08; 7.
Frieson (SH) 44.67.
Girls 200 Meter Dash: 1.
Ayers (B) 26.25; 2. Roberts
(SH) 26.35; 3. Strable (C)
26.58; 4. Stechschulte (O)
26.70; 5. A. Clay (V) 26.74;
6. Fennig (C) 28.17; 7. Erin
Kesler (E) 28.54.
Boys 200 Meter Dash: 1.
N. Krugh (V) 23.45; 2. Byer
(C) 23.52; 3. Martin (W)
23.85; 4. S. Kopp (V) 23.86;
5. Quentin Poling (E) 23.96;
6. Elford (D) 24.35; 7. Snider
(C) 24.49.
Girls 4x400 Meter Relay:
1. Celina 4:09.16; 2. Kenton
4:11.06; 3. Shawnee 4:12.04;
4. Defiance 4:16.83; 5.
Ottawa-Glandorf 4:17.30;
6. Van Wert (Eikenberry, A.
Clay, Danylchuk, Meyers)
4:19.84; 7. Wapakoneta
4:22.00.
Boys 4x400 Meter Relay:
1. Van Wert (Kopp, Salcido,
Krugh, J. Fleming) 3:32.05;
2. Ottawa-Glandorf 3:33.51;
3. Elida (Brandon Stinson,
Clark Etzler, Avery Sumpter,
Nick Pauff) 3:34.98; 4.
Defiance 3:35.95; 5. Shawnee
3:37.62; 6. Celina 3:38.78; 7.
Wapakoneta 3:40.12.
——-
Miller City routs Vikings
COLUMBUS GROVE —
Miller City’s baseball team
rolled up a 15-5, 6-inning vic-
tory in Division IV sectional
baseball action Wednesday at
Columbus Grove.
Kaufman went 3-for-4 (2
runs, walk), as did Balbaugh
(3 runs), while Fuka went
3-for-5 (run).
Devin Mangas went 2-for-
4 for the Vikings.
Miller City advances to
the Elida District to take on
Allen East 2 p.m. Wednesday.
Score by Innings:
Leipsic 0 2 0 1 2 0 - 5
Miller City 0 4 2 4 0
5 - 15
Game ended with 2 outs
in the bottom of the sixth
WP: Lehman; LP:
——-
Ohio Logistics title spon-
sor of 25th annual Brad
Doty Classic
LIMA — Ohio Logistics,
providers of worldwide
logistics services, returns
as the title sponsor of the
Ohio Logistics Brad Doty
Classic presented by Racing
Optics featuring the World of
Outlaws Sprint Car Series at
Limaland Motorsports Park
on July 10.
Ohio Logistics, which
operates nearly 4 million
square feet of warehouse
space in four states, is head-
quartered in Findlay.
Kerry Madsen won the
Brad Doty Classic in 2012,
with Stevie Smith in second.
David Gravel was third fol-
lowed by Greg Wilson in
fourth and Donny Schatz in
fifth.
Twenty different drivers
have won the Classic, dat-
ing back to the inaugural
event in 1989, with Danny
Smith, Steve Kinser and Dale
Blaney being the only 2-time
winners.
The 2013 racing season will
mark the 16th year that The
University of Northwestern
Ohio has owned and operated
Limaland Motorsports Park,
which is in its 78th year of
hosting racing.
This will mark the 12th
visit by the World of Outlaws
Sprint Car Series to what
is one of the most highly-
regarded tracks on the sched-
ule. In the previous 11 events
at the 1/4-mile track, eight
different drivers have visited
the winner’s circle.
Tickets for the Classic are
available by calling the LMP
ticket hotline (419-998-3199)
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-
Thursday or visiting www.
limaland.com for further
information. Tickets are also
available at the track box
office every Friday night.
Round Up
Musings
Green
Ottoville
Thanks for reading
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Nancy Spencer, editor
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Don Hemple, advertising manager
419-695-0015 ext. 138
dhemple@delphosherald.com
News About Your Community
Got a news tip? Want to promote an event or business?
Choo’s 2 homers help Reds beat Marlins
Indians hit 3 HRs, lead Kluber over Phillies, 10-4
Heat rally past Bulls 94-91 to advance
MIAMI (AP) — Shin-Soo Choo hit
two homers and four pitchers combined
on an 11-hit shutout Wednesday night
to help the Cincinnati Reds extend their
winning streak to a season-best five
games by beating Miami 4-0.
Choo hit solo homers in the fourth
and sixth inning, giving him nine this
season. The multihomer game was his
second in eight days and ninth of his
career.
Mike Leake (3-2) went 6 2-3 innings
and pitched around nine hits. The
Marlins had 14 baserunners but stranded
12 and hit into two double plays.
That gave the crowd of 14,866 little
to cheer about, and the biggest roars
came when highlights of the Miami
Heat’s playoff victory over the Chicago
Bulls two miles away were shown on
the video scoreboard.
The Marlins were shut out for the
seventh time, most in the majors.
Cincinnati climbed a season-high eight
games above .500 and improved to 5-1
against Miami, which has lost four in
a row.
The Marlins fell to 0-10 this year
with the retractable roof open in their
stadium. The ball carries better in those
conditions, and Choo twice sent it flying
off Alex Sanabia (2-6).
Choo homered into the nightclub
beyond the left-field fence, then pulled
a homer into the Marlins’ bullpen in
right field. He also led off the game with
a single and scored on a double by NL
RBI leader Brandon Phillips.
Choo’s four hits tied a career high,
and he raised his average to .322. Joey
Votto added two hits and an RBI for the
Reds, who improved to 20-6 when they
score first.
They led 4-0 in the seventh when
Miami mounted a threat. With runners
at second and third, Sean Marshall came
on and struck out Derek Dietrich with a
3-2 curve to end the inning.
Miami put two runners aboard again
in the ninth. Aroldis Chapman then
threw seven fastballs of at least 100 mph
to Dietrich, who finally struck out look-
ing on a changeup.
The Marlins managed three infield
hits among their 10 singles but went 1
for 10 with runners in scoring position.
They rank last in the majors in wins at
home, where they’re 5-13.
Sanabia allowed four runs in six
innings and has lost five consecutive
starts.
PHILADELPHIA (AP)
— Corey Kluber inspired his
teammates with a tough at-
bat his first time up to the
plate in the majors.
Jason Kipnis hit a three-
run homer, Nick Swisher
and Mike Aviles also went
deep to back Kluber, and the
Cleveland Indians beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 10-4
Wednesday.
Kluber (3-2) gave up
three runs and six hits in
six innings. But it was his
first career AB against Cole
Hamels in the second inning
that set the tone. Kluber
fouled off consecutive 1-2
pitches and worked the count
full before flying out to deep
left.
“I guess that’s beginner’s
luck,” he said.
Maybe so, but it made the
hitters adjust their approach.
“Corey woke us up, hav-
ing the best at-bat in the
first couple innings,” Kipnis
said. “We did a nice job not
chasing his pitches. That’s
an approach we try to take
against everyone. We want to
see some pitches, get quality
at-bats.”
Hamels needed 91 pitches
to get through four innings
and reached 100 in the fifth.
“We drove his pitch count
up early,” manager Terry
Francona said. “We made him
earn his outs and we scored
early. It’s great to work the
count and have something to
show for it.”
A day after rookie
Jonathan Pettibone held the
Indians in check, Hamels
got roughed up by one of
the league’s highest-scoring
offenses. Cleveland had been
in a slight funk, scoring just
seven runs in its previous
four games.
Hamels (1-6) allowed
five runs and six hits in five
innings. The three-time All-
Star and 2008 World Series
MVP has a 4.61 ERA, and the
Phillies are 1-8 in his starts.
Hamels had six straight qual-
ity starts before this one, with
a 2.41 ERA in that span.
“You have to go out there
and execute pitches,” Hamels
said. “I wasn’t able to do
that early on. I think any
time you go 3-2 to pretty
much the whole lineup over
and over, you’re not putting
yourself into a good spot.
I was pitching myself into
situations where most like-
ly they’re going to get the
hits, they’re going to get the
walks, they’re going to score
the runs.”
Jimmy Rollins drove in
three runs for Philadelphia,
which ended a three-game
winning streak.
The surprising Indians
have won 12 of 16 and are
22-17 under Francona, in
his first year with Cleveland
after winning two World
Series title in Boston in 2004
and 2007.
By TIM REYNOLDS
The Associated Press
MIAMI — Knowing his team needed
him at his best, Dwyane Wade retreated
to the Miami Heat locker room after the
third quarter for some quick treatment
on his aching right knee.
When he came back, he was good
as new.
And now he can rest until the Eastern
Conference finals.
LeBron James scored 23 points,
Wade added 18 and had a brilliant
45-second sequence that proved cru-
cial and the Heat clawed back from
an 11-point second-half deficit to beat
the Chicago Bulls 94-91 on Wednesday
night and close out their second-round
series in five games. The Heat outscored
Chicago 25-14 in the fourth quarter to
escape and advance.
“I knew the fourth quarter was going
to be tough so I wanted to re-tape my
knee,” said Wade, who has been battling
bone bruises on his knee for several
weeks. “I knew I was going to come
back into a grind. Our trainers did a
great job of getting it taped it enough so
I could come out and play.”
1
8 – The Herald Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
Repairs
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney
Repair
419-204-4563
Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
Tree Service
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
DAY’S PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding
Fitzgerald
Power Washing
& Painting
419-303-3020
Interior, Exterior, Residential,
Commercial, Decks, Fences,
Houses, Log Homes, Stripping,
Cleaning, Sealing, Staining,
Barn Painting, Barn Roofs
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured • References
A+ rating with the Better
Business Bureau
GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
OPEN 7 DAYS
9AM - 5 PM
COMING SOON!
Tennessee Tomatoes &
Florida Sweet Corn
AVAILABLE NOW!
Veggie Plants & Flowers
9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749
504-914-0286
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
Concrete leveling of
floors, sidewalks,
patios, steps, driveways,
pool decks, etc.
Call Dave cell
419-236-1496
419-692-5143
home/office
Mike
419-235-1067
U
N
E
V
E
N
C
O
N
C
R
E
T
E
?
VONDERWELL
CONTRACTING
CONCRETE
LEVELING
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
“You buy, we apply”
Lawn Care
SPEARS
LAWN CARE inc.
Total Lawncare
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
AMISH
CARPENTERS
ALL TYPES OF
CONSTRUCTION
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
B&S Millwright, LLC
Grain Systems Division
Specialists in Sales and
Construction of Brock Grain Systems
•Grain Bins
•Support Structures
•Dump PIT’s
•Conveyors
•Continuous Dryers
•Custom Fabrication
7313 SHELLEY ROAD
MENDON, OH 45862
Office: 419-795-1403
Mobile: 419-305-5888 or 419-305-4732
E-mail: bsmillwright@frontier.com
Articles 07.p65 2/19/2013, 10:48 AM 13
HELP WANTED
Growing commercial printer
Looking for
EXPERIENCED SINGLE
WIDTH PRINTING PRESS
OPERATOR
Second Shift or Third Shift
Wages based on experience
Benefits include
• Health Insurance
• Dental Insurance
• Life Insurance
• 2 weeks vacation after 1 year
• 3 weeks vacation after 5 years
• 401K w/partial employer match
Send resume to:
Dennis Klausing
Eagle Print
111 E. Fourth St., Delphos, OH 45833
HELP WANTED
Growing commercial printer
Looking for
PRESS TRAINEE
Applicant must pass a series of
tests to qualify
Send resume to:
Dennis Klausing
Eagle Print
111 E. Fourth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
125 Lost and Found
FOUND: TOOLS on St.
Rt. 189/190 Ft. Jennings
Call 419-302-1781 to
identify. Please leave a
message.
255 Professional
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
The YWCA is looking for
an energetic, detailed
oriented person that
demonstrates a
commitment to women’s
issues, a true advocate
for the goals and mission
of the YWCA. Bachelor’s
degree required w/min.
5 years of managerial
experience along with
grant writing. Duties:
•Long-range
organizational skills,
financial planning,
•Fundraising
•Personnel
Administration,
Staff Development,
•Working w/volunteers,
•Establishing strong
community
public relations.
Send resumes w/salary
requirements by
May 22 to:
YWCA of Van Wert
County, OH
Attn. Search Committee
408 E. Main St.
Van Wert, OH 45891
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APARTMENT.
Stove and refrigerator,
No smoking or pets.
321 E. Cl evel and.
$400/mo plus deposit.
Call 419-692-6478
305
Apartment For
Rent
DELUXE 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments for rent.
Quiet, secure setting,
appliance and utilities in-
cluded. Starting at $675.
419-233-3430
320 House For Rent
2-STORY 2/3BR House
in Venedocia. No pets.
Washer/Dryer hook-up.
References required.
$500/mo + $500 deposit.
Call 419-296-7267
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own.
2 bedroom, 1 bath mo-
bile home. 419-692-3951
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
10990 DUTCH Rd.
behind Delpha. Thurs-
day-Friday 8:30am-5pm.
Toys, home decor, small
appl i ances, l adi es
scr ubs, pl us si ze
womens, boys clothes
sz10, shoes, purses,
something for everyone.
22420 SR-697,
5/17-5/18
Friday 8am-7pm,
Saturday 8am-2pm.
Multi-family. Boy/Girl
clothes infant-adult, baby
items, entertainment
center, cast/model cars,
desk w/chair, nightstand,
dresser, computer desk
w/hutch, file cabinet.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
304 S. Pierce St.
Wed 5/15 1pm-6pm,
Thurs 5/16 9am-4pm,
Fri. 5/17 9am-5pm. Girls
clothes 24mo-2T and
10/12, boys clothes 4T
and 16, car seats, baby
gym, golf clubs, home
goods, bakeware, pic-
tures, toys and many
misc. items.
615 JENNI NGS St.
(around back in garage)
Womens M-XL, boys
0-5/ 6, t oys, bi kes,
frames, purses, xmas,
crafts, lots of misc!
9am-5pm Thurs & Fri
May 16 & 17
904 S. Erie St.
Thursday, Friday, Satur-
day. Opens at 10am.
Clothing, toys, other vari-
ous items.
COUNTRY GARAGE
Sale. 10231 Bliss Rd.,
Delphos. Lots of kids
Name Brand clothes,
boys 0-4T and girls
0-18m. Toys, bouncer,
stroller/carseat combo.
May 16th & 17th @ 8am.
ESTATE & Multi-Family
Garage Sale. Furniture,
household items, toys,
clothes, pool table and
more. 1033 Park Ave.
Across from the pool.
May 17th -Fri. 9am-7pm,
May 18th -Sat. 9am-3pm
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
FOR SALE: Dining table
w/6 chairs, china cup-
board, 1930’s bedroom
set, refrigerator, garage
items, washer & dryer,
pet cages, eagle figu-
rines, Stetson Cowboy
hat-never worn, diver’s
watch, misc. clothing,
odds&ends from house
and garage. 602 N.
Main, back of house.
Call 419-692-2709 to
see.
FRIDAY 10AM-6PM,
Saturday 10am-2pm.
610 N. Jefferson. Gui-
t ars, ki t chen t abl e
/chairs, end /coffee ta-
bles, curios, nite stand,
TV’s, Christmas, tools.
GARAGE SALE DAYS
PAULDING, May 17th &
18th, 8:30am-4:30pm.
Maps at Marathon and
Valero gas stations.
ONE DAY Moving Sale!
Sat urday May 18.
10am-2pm. 226 N.
Pierce St., Delphos
PORCH SALE. Thurs-
day 5/16 4-8pm, Friday
5/17 8am-6pm, Saturday
5/18 8am-12pm. An-
tiques, bicycles, storage
bench, Longaberger
baskets, queen bedding
sets, cordless weede-
ater, yard blower/vac,
movies, scrapbooking
storage/carrycases, jun-
ior -Misses -Plus size
Men’s/Women’s clothes,
scrubs, crystal bracelet,
nurse figurines, books
and lots more!! 634
North Main Street!!
560
Home
Furnishings
42” ROUND Oak table
and 4 chairs. Sealy
Sleeper Sofa, excellent
c o n d i t i o n . Ca l l
419-692-6102
CLEARANCE-
Discontinued,
Scratch-N-Dent,
One-Of-A-Kind,
Floor Displays
Up To 75% Off
KERNS FIREPLACE
& SPA
4147 Elida Road
Lima
419-224-4656
MAN SIZE Lift Chair,
with heat, like new. $800
Call 419-996-9196
583
Pets and
Supplies
FREE TO a good home:
10 week old kittens. Lit-
ter of 3. 1 orange male,
2 calico females. On
solid food & box trained.
Mother indoor cat with
shots. 419-692-0423 or
419-233-1907.
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
610 Automotive
‘97 DAKOTA 4wd SLT
3.96L-V6. Clean in and
out , no probl ems.
131k-mi l es. $4500.
419-286-2816
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders, Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
080 Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED GRILL
Cook needed. Must ap-
ply in person at Jim’s
Restaurant, 727 East
Fifth St., Delphos
GLM TRANSPORT
hiring for our regional
fleet. Safety perform-
ance and referral bonus
programs. 401(k) and
direct deposit. Home
weekends. Mileage paid
via PC Miler practical
miles. For details, call
(419)238-2155
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR expe-
rience! Our drivers aver-
age 42cents per mile &
higher! Home every
weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annu-
ally. Benefits available.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect! PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
NOW HIRING Hair
Stylists. New Image
Salon, 1114 Elida Ave.
(Old Fiesta). Call Brandy
at 260-602-4077
yordybrandy@yahoo.com
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facil-
ity providing skilled
rehabilitation services,
assisted living, post
acute medical care and
more. We currently
have RN/LPN full time
and part time positions
available for 2nd and
3rd shift. Please stop
by our Delphos loca-
tion and fill out an ap-
plication.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
SEEKING QUALIFIED
individual for carpentry
work including new con-
struction, pole buildings,
and some concrete
work. Send replies to
Box 109 c/o Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
SEEKING: FULL-TIME
Executive Director for
the Delphos Area Cham-
ber of Commerce. Can-
didates must have good
working knowledge of
Word, Excel, Publisher
and Quickbooks; must
be self-motivated, have
excellent communication
and organizational skills;
limited benefits avail-
able. Only serious inquir-
ies, please mail resume
to: Delphos Area Cham-
ber of Commerce, Attn:
Board President, 310
North Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833. Resumes
must be received by May
22, 2013
Classifieds Sell
Adoption ADOPT: The stork
didn’t call. We hope you will.
Loving family of 3 looking to
adopt another little miracle.
Contact Robin and Neil: 866-
303-0668, www.rnladopt.info.

Business Services REACH
2 MILLION NEWSPAPER
READERS with one ad
placement. ONLY $295.00.
Ohio’s best community
newspapers. Call Kathy at
AdOhio Statewide Classifed
Network, 614-486-6677, or
E-MAIL at: kmccutcheon@
adohio.net or check out our
website at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services REACH
OVER 1 MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $995.00.
Ask your local newspaper
about our 2X2 Display
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Network $1860 or Call Kathy
at 614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@adohio.net. or
check out our website: www.
adohio.net
Help Wanted Large concrete
company looking for
experienced poured concrete
wall workers ASAP in Holiday
City, OH for 3-4 months.
Call 414-755-6103, or email
kyles@employs.com
Help Wanted Drivers - Hiring
Experienced/Inexperienced
Tanker Drivers! Earn up
to $.51per mile! New Fleet
Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR
Exp. Req. - Tanker Training
Available. 877-882-6537
www.OakleyTransport.com.
Help Wanted Knight
Refrigerated CDL-A Truck
Drivers Needed. Get Paid
Daily or Weekly, Consistent
Miles, Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of
the Road. EOE
855-876-6079.
Help Wanted Earn $500
A Day: Insurance Agents
Needed; Leads, No Cold
Cal l s; Commi ssi ons
Paid Daily; Complete
Training; Advancement
Opportunities Health &
Dental Insurance;Guidance
in Obtaining License. Call
1-888-713-6020.
Help Wanted Driver: - One
Cent Raise after 6 and 12
months. $0.03 Enhanced
Quarterly Bonus. Daily or
Weekly Pay, Hometime
Options. CDL- A, 3 months
OTR exp. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com.
Help Wanted $2500 Sign-On
Bonus for Company Drivers:
Super Service is hiring solo
and team drivers. CDL-A
required. Great hometime
options. Call 888-471-7081
or apply online at www.
superservicellc.com
Help Wanted Gordon
Trucking CDL-A Drivers
Needed! Up to $3,000 Sign
On Bonus! Home Weekly
Available! Up to .46 cpm w/10
years experience. Benefts,
401K, EOE. No East Coast.
Call 7 days/wk! TeamGTI.
com. 866-954-8836
Help Wanted Averitt Offers
CDL-A Drivers a Strong,
Stable, Proftable Career.
Experienced Drivers and
Recent Grads - Excellent
Benefts, Weekly Hometime.
Paid Training. 888-362-8608
AverittCareers.com E.O.E.
Help Wanted Western Ohio
Driver Wanted! $1,000 Sign
On Bonus! Class A CDL
Drivers, Run Regionally, Be
home weekly. Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annually).
888-409-6033 or online www.
drivejtc.com
Help Wanted Owner
Operator: Experienced
CDL-A Owner Operators
Wanted. $2,000 Solo Sign-
On Incentive & $5,000 Team
Sign-On Incentive. Long
Haul Freight. Competitive
Pay Package. Paid loaded
and empty miles. Also hiring
Company Teams. Call 866-
937-7803 or apply online at
www.drivenctrans.com

Help Wanted Highest Pay
In The Industry, Up to $0.52
Per Mile. No Truck Older
Than 2010. Call Or Apply
Online Today. 800-441-4953.
DRIVEHEARTLAND.COM
Help Wanted $5,000
Summerti me Bonus.
Foremost Transport is hiring
drivers with 3/4-ton and larger
pickups to transport trailers.
No forced dispatch, industry-
leading rates, and excellent
bonuses! Call 1-866-
764-1601 or apply online
ForemostTransport.com

Help Wanted CDL-A Drivers:
Hiring experienced company
drivers and owner operators.
Solo and teams. Competitive
pay package. Sign-on
incentives. Call 888-705-
3217 or apply online at www.
drivenctrans.com
Help Wanted Drivers, O/
Os Needed: FT or PT
Dingledine in Urbana, OH.
Regional operation with lots
of home time, can work when
available. Call 937.652.3454
for info.
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT. Job
Guaranteed after FREE 3
week CDL-A Training. Live
within 100 mile radius of
Wauseon, Ohio 1-800-621-
4878. Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted Drivers - OTR
Positions. Earn 32c-45c
per mile. $1,000 Sign-On
Bonus! Assigned Equipment
Pet Policy. deBoer Trans-
portation 800-825-8511 O/O’s
Welcome www.deboertrans
Help Wanted Drivers:
Regional Runs, Ohio Drivers,
Home Weekly. .40c-.42c/Mile
- All Miles, Class A CDL +
1 yr. OTR Exp., 1-866-879-
6593 www.landair.com
Help Wanted “Partners in
Excellence” OTR Drivers,
APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass. Passenger policy.
2012 & Newer Equipment,
100% No Touch. Butler
Transport 1-800-528-7825.
Misc. VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CANADA.
Fish for walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included. Call Hugh
1-800-426-2550 for free
brochure. website www.
bestfshing.com
Misc. Airlines Are Hiring -
Train for hands on Aviation
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualifed - Job Placement
assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance.
1-877-676-3836.
Miscellaneous For Sale
Homeowners Wanted!!!
Kayak Pools is looking for
demo homesites to display
our maintenance-free Kayak
pools. Save thousands of
$$$ with our pre-season sale!
Call Now! 800-315-2925
kayakpool smi dwest . com.
Discount Code: 897L01.
RV’s For Sale 2006 Gulf
Stream Cavalier Travel
Trailers 8’x32’, Queen bed
+ Bunks, Appliances w/
microwave, Furnace and A/C.
Incredible Buy! ONLY $3,995
1-800-686-1763 www.
williamsburgsquare.com
Schools/Instructions IN A
RUT? WANT A CAREER,
NOT JUST A JOB? Train to
be a professional truck driver
in only 16 DAYS! The avg.
truck driver earns $700+/
wk*! Get CDL Training w/
Roadmaster! Approved for
Veterans Training. Don’t
Delay, Call Today! 1-866-221-
3300. Roadmaster Drivers
School of Ohio, Inc. 4060
Perimeter Dr., Columbus, OH
43228 *DOL/BLS 2012
Wanted To Buy CORVETTES
WANTED - 1953-1972 any
condition, competitive buyer,
1-800-850-3656 or
corvettebuyer.com
OHIO SCAN NETWORK
CLASSIFIEDS
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Norman J. Knippen
and Alice C. Knippen,
.622 acre Jennings
Township to Ann C.
Kaverman TR and
Raymond A. Kaverman
TR.
Good Home
Properties LLC, Lot
152, Columbus Grove,
to Village of Columbus
Grove Ohio.
Michael A. Bidlack,
Eric D. Bidlack, April
Bidlack, Charles R.
Bidlack, and Marie
Bidlack, 2.00 acres
Perry Township, to
Debra Lynn Good.
Sara E. Maag TR,
58.187 acres Pleasant
Township, to Timothy
L. Recker and Anna M.
Recker.
Gordon Excavation
Company, 1.417 acres
Jennings Township and
.583 acres Jennings
Township to Mark D.
Drerup and Lisa C.
Drerup.
Kennwood A. Bartz,
Kathy Lynn Bailey
and Timothy Bailey,
10.439 acres Monterey
Township and 2.0 acres
Monterey Township to
Shirley Leach.
Gerald W. Pester,
48.0 acres Greensburg
Township, 10.69 acres
Greensburg Township,
78.50 acres Palmer
Township and 38.66
acres Greensburg
Township, to Chad E.
Pester and Jason J.
Pester.
Juanita M. Ernest
nka Juanita M. Hadley,
parcels Union Township
to James E. Ernest.
Mary C. Kemper,
Lot 26, Ottoville, to
Janet M. VonLehmden,
Patricia A. Romes, Rita
M. Kreinbrink, Diane
H. Verhoff, Marcia R.
Herring, Henry J. Kemper,
Karen T. Bonifas, David
H. Kemper and Beth A.
Clay.
Howard L. Coleman
Jr., Marilyn Coleman,
Bobby D. Coleman,
Wanda Coleman,
Ronald S. Coleman,
Rochelle Coleman,
Teresa L. Jones,
Larry Jones, Brenda
S. Thedford, William
Thedford, Wanda J.
Winkle and Ronald
Winkle, 3.77 acres
Greensburg Township to
Steven M. Liebrecht and
Andrea M. Liebrecht.
George J. Knippen
Jr. and Jeanette M.
Knippen, 37.952 acres
Monterey Township
to George J. Knippen
Jr. and Jeanette M.
Knippen.
Robert J. Lause and
Marguerite E. Lause,
Lot 1000, Lot 1001
and Lot 40, Ottawa, to
Franklin Mullins and
Mary L. Mullins.
Barbara J. Deken,
parcel Ottawa Township
to Brian L. Moser and
Laura L. Moser.
Jeffrey Joseph
W a n n a m a c h e r
and Cheryl L.
W a n n a m a c h e r ,
.78 acre Monterey
Township to Jeffrey
Joseph Wannamacher
and Cheryl L.
Wannamacher.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening May 16, 2013
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Thursday, May 16, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Pup’s “mom”
upset over
vicious dog
Dear Annie: I have an
8-month-old puppy, and I
take her to a local dog park so
she can run off leash and play
with the other dogs, which
she loves. In the three months
I have been taking her,
“Phoebe” has never been at-
tacked or fought with another
dog. That was until last night,
when Phoebe approached an-
other dog that was
on a leash and that
dog attacked her.
My puppy whim-
pered and howled
while being bitten
on her neck and
back. I tried to get
her away, but the
other dog was so
vicious.
The owner of
the other dog just
stood there mak-
ing no effort to
pull his dog away, nor did
he apologize. I fnally ex-
tracted Phoebe from the other
dog’s mouth. As I was walk-
ing away, the owner said he
doesn’t know why his dog
doesn’t like other dogs. I was
too shaken to reply. Besides, I
felt sorry for the vicious dog,
wondering what could have
happened to make him like
that.
Luckily, Phoebe was not
severely injured. I did my
best to soothe her, but it took
several minutes to calm her
down. Before I left the park,
I warned other owners about
the dog that attacked mine.
Why would someone
bring a dog that hates other
dogs to a dog park? There is
a gentleman who arranged
for the park to exist and is the
“leader.” Should I tell him
what happened? I don’t want
to get the park shut down,
which is why I didn’t call the
police. What do I do? –Phoe-
be’s Human Mom
Dear Mom: If the park
has a “leader,” then he is the
person to notify. This owner
seems ignorant of dog behav-
ior and may have been try-
ing to “socialize” his dog by
bringing the animal to a pet-
friendly park. But it sounds
as if that dog needs training.
It would be a kindness for
someone to point that out to
him and make a referral be-
fore an animal is seriously
hurt.
Dear Annie: As an al-
coholic in recovery, it was
interesting to me to observe
the self-righteousness in my
family about my addiction as
they went through their heart
surgeries stemming from
their addictions to chocolate
cake, bacon and cherry pies.
They are just as addicted to
food as I am to alcohol.
They say it’s “different,”
but how is it more legitimate
to grab a doughnut when un-
der stress than to pour myself
a cocktail? In spite of their
heart surgeries and the strug-
gle of carrying 300 pounds
on a body designed for 150,
they somehow see slamming
down a cherry cobbler as ac-
ceptable, but my having a
beer is a sin.
Moderation in all aspects
of our lives might not be a
bad idea. –No Hypocrite in
Paducah, Ky.
Dear Paducah: Addic-
tions, regardless of
type, involve the
inability to con-
trol one’s appetite,
whether it be for
food, drugs, liquor,
gambling, what-
ever. Unlike most
other addictions,
however, one can-
not give up food
altogether. So while
we agree that there
is hypocrisy, and of
course moderation
is best, there is in fact a dif-
ference between food, which
is necessary for life, and al-
cohol, which is not. Imagine
how much harder it would be
to control your addiction if
you were told that you abso-
lutely must have three shots
a day, but not a fourth. Or a
beer. Or a replacement from
the well-stocked pantry. Not
an excuse, mind you. Just an
observation.
Dear Annie: I agree with
“Retired Teacher” about high
school guidance counselors.
She is right on the money.
Guidance counselors are
not in schools to assist stu-
dents with personal prob-
lems. That isn’t even in their
job description. Their prima-
ry function is to advise stu-
dents about the courses they
need to graduate. After that,
a multitude of assessment re-
sponsibilities fll their time.
While many may wish they
could counsel to the emo-
tional well-being of their stu-
dents, they simply don’t have
the time. –K.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, MAY 17, 2013
Try to start setting aside a little
seed money in the year ahead. There’s
a strong possibility you’ll be offered
a chance to join an exciting new
business opportunity. Be sure it can
deliver before you participate.
TAURUS (April 20 --May 20) --
Your leadership qualities will be quite
evident to your colleagues. Don’t
be surprised if they look to you for
direction.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- This is a good day to nail down a
financial arrangement that you’ve
been working on. It should gratify all
of your expectations.
CANCER (June 21 -- July 22) --
You’ve got the right moves, whether
you’re directing a group endeavor
or independently launching a new
project. Show your stuff.
LEO (July 23 -- Aug. 22) -- Lady
Luck has her eye on you, and she’s
likely to pull some rabbits out of
her hat just when you need them the
most. Use this bit of good fortune to
accomplish something big.
VIRGO (Aug, 23- Sept. 22)
-- If you need to get approval for
something, step up and make your
pitch. Your audience is likely to be
more receptive now than it will be
tomorrow.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Nostalgia will be a tempting refuge,
but don’t fall prey to its siren song.
There are things in your current life
that deserve and demand attention.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Even though an idea that works
exceptionally well happens to be
yours, you’ll let the group as a whole
take the bows. This will make you
more popular than ever.
SAGITARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.21)
-- The best thing you can do right now
is to settle in and do your work as well
as you can. Your quiet achievement
will not go unnoticed.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 -- Jan.
19) -- Good friends could prove to
be of enormous emotional support.
If you’re feeling down in the dumps,
seek out the company of the people
who know and love you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 -- Feb. 19)
-- You’ll be more motivated to do a
good job if you keep in mind that your
labors are not just for you, but mostly
for those you love.
PISCES (Feb. 20 -- March 20)
-- Good news that will considerably
brighten your spirits is forthcoming. It
has to do with a relationship that you
recently initiated.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
An aura of opportunity is embracing
you, so make the most of it. Now is
the time to go after something you’ve
been hoping to accomplish.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
10 – The Herald Thursday, May 16, 2013
JoAn M. Smith, CFP
®
Financial Advisor
with the practice of Paul C. Carbetta II, CRPC
®
, CRPS
®
Comprehensive Wealth Partners
Private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise
Financial Services, Inc.
227 North Main Street
Delphos, OH 45833-1768
Tel: 419.695-7010 joan.m.smith@ampf.com
Harter and Schier
Funeral Home
Ph. 419-692-8055 P.O. Box 306
Fax 419-692-8065 209 W. Third St.
Delphos, Oh.
45833
“Locally Owned & Operated”
Also EMS members - photos not available:
Dale Carder
Donna German
Roy Hoehn
Dave McNeal
Greg Odenweller
Joel Will
Mike Fredrich
We appreciate your efforts in all the work you do.
Thanks from all of us!
DELPHOS FIRE & RESCUE
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE DIVISION
Although three members are scheduled at a
time, the E.M.S. is basically a volunteer staffed
operation. The on-duty firefighters respond directly
from the fire department to initiate victim care with
the volunteers responding with the rescue squad.
An EMT-basic is required to have 130 hours
of training which includes 10 hours of clinical
time. An EMT-intermediate is required to receive
130 additional hours of instruction inclusive of
40 hours of clinical work. An EMT-paramedic is
required to complete a training program of 600
hours including 374 hours of clinical work.
Re-certification requirements for each level of
certification are as follows:
EMT-BASIC - current national registry, 30 hour
refresher class or 40 hours of continuing educa-
tion.
EMT-INTERMEDIATE - 60 hours of continu-
ing education.
EMT-PARAMEDIC - 92 hours of continuing
education.
The recertification for the state of Ohio is a must
every three years.
At the present time there are two members of
the original membership, Tom Hickey and Fred
Hoffman.
The City of Delphos currently has three ambu-
lances, a 2007 - Medic 1; 2004 - Medic 3; 1999 -
Medic 2; with all being equipped for advanced life
support.
Currently the city is making on the average of
73 emergency responses per month.
The non-emergency calls (transports) are han-
dled through private agencies.
Request for assistance can be made by calling
the emergency fire number at 419-695-1616 or
9-1-1. Business phone 419-695-2911.
EMS 35
th
Anniversary
Delphos Fire and Rescue
Years
EMS Members EMT Rating Of Service
Melissa Langhals Basic 1 yr. 9 mo.
Brent Brinkman Basic 9
Dale Carder Basic 22
Donna German Intermediate 31
Tom Hickey Basic 36
Roy Hoehn Intermediate 20
Fred Hoffman Paramedic 36
Tim Klaus Basic 31
Steve Martz Basic 5
Dave McNeal Paramedic 35
Mike Metzner Basic 29
Kerby Miller Paramedic 5
Don Moreo Basic 29
Greg Odenweller Basic 6
Diane Pack Intermediate 4
Cynthia Schaeffer Basic 7
Dana Steinbrenner Basic 11
Kevin Streets Basic 16
John Wade Paramedic 26
Elaine Wiechart Intermediate 32
Joel Will Paramedic 14
Chris Wisher Intermediate 5
Jamey Wisher Basic 12
Kristina Jettinghoff Basic 3
Kelly Maas Intermediate 3
Travis Miller Basic 3
Cory Meyer Paramedic 3
Mike Fredrich Intermediate 8 mo.
234 S. Jefferson St.
Delphos
Ph. 419-692-6010
Special Thanks to Dr. William E. Tucker
Medical Director of St. Rita’s Emergency Dept. for all his help
and involvement in keeping us up to date!
1725 E. 5th, Delphos
419-692-3015
CHEVROLET• BUICK
www.westrichfurniture.com
1105 Elida Ave.
Delphos, Ohio
419-695-6045
We Pay Tribute To The Delphos EMS!
710 Elida Avenue
Delphos, Ohio
Phone 419-695-2931
FAX 419-695-9930
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-2871
VANCREST
419-692-7976
Famous for our pork tenderloins
BEER - WINE - LIQUOR - FINE FOOD
107 E. Second St., Delphos
Community Health
Professionals
• Visiting Nurses & Hospice
•Private Duty Services
Delphos
419-695-1999
www.ComHealthPro.org
www.delphachevy.com
PITSENBARGER
SUPPLY, INC.
Serving breakfast at 7am daily
9:00-5:30 Daily
Open Saturday until 3:00,
Sunday 12-3
130 N. Main, Delphos
(Across from the Post Office) 3 Locations
Phone: 419-692-0861
Lehmann’s
FURNITURE
All Major
Credit Cards
Accepted
A great big THANK YOU to
all the EMS members
for all you do for us.
We appreciate your prompt
service, professionalism and
kindness to our residents.
Schulte
Communications
AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE
•Kenwood • Nextel • Verte-Standard
Two-Way Radio Systems Specialists
•Cell Phone amplifers
14468 Landeck Rd.,
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-1846
Jim Schulte, Duane Schulte
Ph.: 419-692-6618
vancrest.com
Clara L. Hanf, CPA
Financial Advisor
112 E. Third St., Delphos, OH 45833
Local Agents:
Lyons Insurance 419-229-3359
Schmit, Massa, Lloyd 419-692-0951
Rhoades Ins. 419-238-2341
“Neighbor Insuring Neighbor” Since 1863
K
TIRE
4
226 S. Pierce St., Delphos
419-692-2034
www.4ktire.com
24 HOUR ON-SITE SERVICE - Open Mon.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 8-1.
CALL FOR EVENING APPOINTMENTS
Sales • Service • Selection
FOR ALL YOUR TIRE NEEDS: CAR, FARM,
LIGHT TRUCK, REPAIRS, ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
234 N. Canal Street
Delphos
419-692-1010
T 419.692.4133
T 800.999.2701
F 419.692.2260
202 N. Main Street
Delphos, Ohio 45833-0457
clara.hanf@raymondjames.com
www.raymondjames.com/clarahanf
Raymond James Financial Services, Inc.
member FINREA/SIPC
C & J Agri
Service
•Liquid Fertilizer • Parts • Seed
Triple J
Application LLC
Ag Lime • Chicken Litter Application
John Bonifas
419-236-8841
John Bockey
419-296-5123
Joe Wittler
419-233-1432
13491 Converse-Roselm Rd.,
Venedocia, OH 45894
419-692-4332
for your
service!
Eagle
Print
111 E. Fourth St., Delphos, OH 45833
Call 1-800-589-6950 419-695-0015
Fax 419-695-4675
For FREE Quotes Contact:
419-695-0015 ext. 103
Your Hometown Printer...
Brent Brinkman
Travis Miller
Tom Hickey
Kerby Miller
Melissa Langhals
Dana Steinbrenner
Fred Hoffman
Don Moreo
Kelly Maas
Kevin Streets
Kristina Jettinghoff
Diane Pack
Steve Martz
John Wade
Tim Klaus
Cynthia Schaeffer
Mike Metzner
Elaine Wiechart
Cory Meyer
Chris Wisher Jamey Wisher
24486 Rd. U-20
Delphos, OH
419-692-8996
Large Format
Graphics,
Custom Artwork,
Logo Design,
Signs, Banners,
Magnets,
Static Clings
& More!
RELIABLE
PLUMBING & HEATING
205 W. Second St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-2921
24 Hour Emergency Service
www.reliablepandh.com
facebook.com/reliable.delphos
OH LIC 24196

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